Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

3 Jan. - 26 Dec. 1941

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Jan 1941:

Widow of Former Anna Editor Dies Sunday

             Mrs. Martha Hammond died at her home in Anna Sunday morning, December 29, following a heart attack and stroke several days previous.

             Mrs. Hammond was the widow of the late J. L. Hammond editor and owner of the Union County Democrat (now the Gazette Democrat) of Anna until his death on Dec. 30, two years ago.

             She leaves a daughter, Mrs. Mary Hammond Kent; and a son, Joe Hammond; three grandchildren, Betty Hammond, whom she reared, and Barbara and John Gaylon Kent.

             (Jackson L. Hammond, Jr., 28, a bookkeeper from Anna, Union Co., Ill., born in Washington Co., Md., the son of J. L. Hammond and Mary Sumner, married on 11 Sep 1894, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., Martha E. Aden, 21, born in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Simon Aden and Julia Thompson.  According to her death certificate, Martha E. Hammond was born 13 Feb 1870, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Simon Aden, a native of Germany, and Julia Thompson, a native of New York, died 29 Dec 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the widow of J. L. Hammond, and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Jackson L. Hammond Nov. 30, 1865 Dec. 30, 1937 Martha E. Hammond Feb. 19, 1873 Dec. 29, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

James Richard Clayton

             James Richard Clayton, age 89, died at the home of his son, Bert, east of Karnak, Monday morning, December 30, 1940.

             Surviving him are three sons, Robert, James, Jr., and Bert, of Karnak; and four daughters, Mrs. Oma Jones of Chicago, Audrey of Karnak, Mrs. Hattie Brown of Karnak and Mrs. Ruth Trumbo of Rayville, ___.

             Funeral services were held at Salem Church Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock with Rev. Robert Smith officiating.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Joppa with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (James R. Clayton married Nancy V. Briley on 17 Dec 1871, in Massac Co., Ill.  Richard Clayton married Mary J. Crider on 4 Mar 1873, in Massac Co., Ill.  The death certificate of James Clayton, farmer and widower, states he was born 30 Sep 1851, in Tennessee, died 30 Dec 1940, in Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Warren E. Crain Dies Following Short Illness

             Warren E. Crain, life-long resident of Valley Recluse community between Mounds and Villa Ridge, died Saturday, December 28, at six o’clock in the evening, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, following a short illness.

Had Mr. Crain lived until January 5, 1941, he would have reached the age of 72 years, having been born Jan. 5, 1869, on a farm only one mile from the one on which he spent most of his life.  He was a member of a pioneer family.

             On March 25, 1896, he was married to Miss Adelaide Rebeccah Hawkins of the Mounds community.  Five children were born of this union, all of whom are living.

Surviving are his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Lottie Chebnine of Centralia and Mrs. Alice Mahoney of Valley Recluse; three sons, John L. Crain at home, Judge Joe Crain of Mound City and George C. Crain of Pulaski; eight grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. R. B. Goe and Miss Alma Crain of Gulfport, Miss.; two brothers, Dr. L. F. Crain of Deep River, Iowa, and W. R. Crain of Hanford, Calif.; also many other relatives.  His was the first death in his immediate family.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the family residence with Rev. Hubert A. Bahr of Villa Ridge officiating.  Casket bearers were John Barnett, Robert Sullivan, Lee Stenzil, Henry Hendricks, Dewey Mahoney and Roy Stout.  Burial was in Villa Ridge cemetery with J. T. Ryan of this city and Elmer E. Ford of Dongola, funeral directors, conducting.

             (Warren E. Crain, 27, farmer, born in Villa Ridge, Ill., son of W. R. Crain and Mary A. Spence, married on 25 Mar 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Addie R. Hawkins, 22, born in Beechwood, Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Lewis A. Hawkins and Sally E. Walbridge.  William R. Crain married Mary A. Spence on 2 Mar 1862, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Warren E. Crain, farmer, of Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., states that he was born 5 Jan 1869, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of William Richard Crain, a native of Springfield, Ohio, and Mary Ann Spencer, a native of Olmsted, Ill., died 28 Dec 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Addie R. Crain, and was buried at Villa Ridge cemetery.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Warren E. Crain 1869-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Jan 1941:

KARNAK RESIDENT DIES

             James Richard Clayton, age 89, died at the home of his son, Bert, east of Karnak Monday morning.

             Surviving him are three sons, Robert, James Jr., and Bert, of Karnak; and four daughters, Mrs. Ona Jones of Chicago, Audrey of Karnak, Mrs. Hettie Brown of Karnak and Mrs. Ruth Trumbo of Rayville, La.

             Funeral services were held at Salem Church Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock with Rev. Robert Smith officiating.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Joppa.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

FRANK BECK OF KARNAK DIES IN PADUCAH HOSPITAL

             Frank Beck of Karnak passed away at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, Ky., Friday morning.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.

             Burial was made in Anderson Cemetery.  Pallbearers were Paul Jones, Otis Canada, Milford Hitchcock, Woodrow Wilson, Lee Wilson and Joe Kean.

             (A birth certificate for Charles Franklin Beck states he was born 3 Jan 1878, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the son of Charles Beck and Martha Weidner.  His death certificate states that Frank Beck, barber, of Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., died 27 Dec 1940, at I. C. Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., of congestive heart failure, and was buried in Anderson Cemetery at Karnak, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             Word has been received here of the death November 23, of Dr. Alex Von Aichlburg who practiced dentistry in Mound City and Cairo about 40 years ago.

             Dr. Von Aichlburg married Miss Mabel Jocelyn, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Jocelyn, in 1889.  Dr. Jocelyn was a dentist in Cairo for many years.

             Dr. Von Aichlburg was ill nine days with septicemia and pneumonia.  Oxygen and blood transfusions failed to help and he passed away November 23.  He is survived by his wife and three children, Eric, Jocelyn and Mrs. Iris Cook, all of California.

             (His marker in Mountain View Cemetery in San Bernardino, Calif., reads:  Alex Von Aichlburg 1873-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PROMINENT RESIDENT OF PULASKI COUNTY DIES

             Warren E. Crain passed away Saturday, Dec. 28, at 6 p.m. at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo following a brief illness.

             Mr. Crain was born January 5, 1869, on a farm near Villa Ridge, about one mile from the present home where he has spent his entire life.  He was married March 25, 1895, to Miss Adelaide Rebeccah Hawkins of Mounds to which union five children were born, all of whom survive.

             Mr. Crain, a highly respected and well known farmer, was a community man, a member of a pioneer family and a prosperous farmer.

             Surviving Mr. Crain is his widow, Adelaide Crain; two daughters, Mrs. Lottie Cheniae of Centralia, Mrs. Alice Mahoney of Mounds; three sons, John L. Crain of Mounds, Judge Joe Crain of Mound City, and George C. Crain of Pulaski; and eight grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Goe and Miss Alma Crain of Gulfport, Miss.; two brothers, Dr. L. F. Crain of Deep River, Iowa, and W. R. Crain of Hunford, California.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home with Rev. Hubert A. Bahr of Villa Ridge officiating.  John Barnett, Robert Sullivan, Lee Stenzel, Henry Hendricks, Dewey Mahoney, and Roy Stout served as casket bearers.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery with J. T. Ryan of Mounds and Elmer J. Ford of Dongola in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Jan 1941:

Former Resident of County Dies at Home near Joppa

             Mrs. Rose Odle Jones, wife of Edwin Jones, died Monday morning, January 6, at her home near Joppa. She had been in failing health but her death came unexpectedly.

             She leaves besides her husband, a daughter, Mrs. Elmer Kerley of Chicago; a son, Francis Edwin, who is stationed with the Coast Guard at Panama; also a son at home, Everett; four sisters, Mrs. Martha Youngblood of Mound City, Mrs. Esta Atherton and Mrs. Annie Mangold of near Olmsted, Mrs. Howard Nealy of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; also two brothers, James Odle of Ullin and Thomas Odle of Olmsted; and many other relatives and friends.  She was a great-aunt of Mrs. Arthur File of this city.  Most of her life was spent near Olmsted and Grand Chain in this country.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock at the Congregational church in Grand Chain with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was in Grand Chain cemetery.

 

Mother of Sam Green Dies at Age of 82 Years

             Mrs. Emma Ellen Green, mother of Sam Green of this city, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles D. Foster, 2115 Pine St., Cairo, Tuesday morning, Jan. 7, at the age of 82.

             She loves two daughters, Mrs. Porter and Mrs. Clara Rodgers of Alton; and six sons, S. T. Jackson of Indianapolis, Ind., Ernest Jackson of Columbus, Ky., Ozel Jackson of Charleston, Mo., Roy Green of Lebanon, Ky., Sam Green of Mounds, and Elbert Green of Clinton, Ky.; 13 grandchildren; and one sister, Mrs. Mollie Rayburn of Bardwell, Ky.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 at the First Methodist Church in Cairo, of which Mrs. Green was a devoted member.  The Rev. L. E. McKown, pastor, conducted the services.  Burial was made in the family lot in the Clinton, Ky., cemetery.

             (The death certificate of Emma Eliza Green of Cairo, Ill., states that she was born 13 Sep 1858, in Carlisle Co., Ky., the daughter of Joseph Henry Read and Elizabeth Ramsey, a native of Kentucky, died 7 Jan 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of William C. Green, and was buried in Clinton Cemetery in Clinton, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of Homer Martin Dies in Detroit Recently

             Mrs. ___ey Martin, formerly of Goreville, who was living with a daughter in El Paso, Texas, died in Detroit one day last year where she had gone to attend the wedding of her son, Homer Martin of C. L. O. office, who had divorced his first wife and was marrying his secretary.

             Mrs. Martin leaves five sons and a daughter.  The daughter at one time taught school in Mounds.

             Funeral services were held in Goreville Saturday with burial in Busby Cemetery nearby.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Jan 1941:

SON OF FORMER MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIES

             Word has been received here of the death of Don Paul Johnson, year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson of Urbana, who died of pneumonia at the home of his parents Wednesday, January 1st.

             He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson.  Mrs. Johnson was formerly Miss Dorothy Devore of Mound City; and his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Devore of this city; and paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson of Urbana, Ill.; and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Friday at 10 o’clock at Webster Groves Presbyterian Church.

             (The death certificate of Don Johnson states he was born 11 Jan 1940 in Urbana, Ill., the son of Leonard Johnson, a native of Urbana, Ill., and Dorthy DeVore, a native of Mound City, Ill., died 1 Jan 1941, in Urbana, Champaign Co., Ill., and was buried at Urbana.  His marker in East Lawn Cemetery at Urbana reads:  Don Paul Johnson Jan. 11, 1940 Jan. 1, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT SON DIES

             Jerry Ray Winter, five weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Winter of Dongola, died at the home of his parents Monday morning at 2 o’clock.

             He is survived by his parents; one sister, Phefin Jean; one brother, Bobby Joe; his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Gulley and Charles Winter; one great-grandfather, Andy Goodman; and a cousin, Edah Belle McMahan, all of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Hobart Peterson officiating.  Burial was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery with Elmer J. Ford in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Jerry Ray Winter states he was born 27 Nov. 1940, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Robert Winter, a native of Dongola, Ill., and Helen Gulley, a native of Ullin, Ill., died 6 Jan 1941, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Jerry R. Winter Nov. 27, 1940 Jan. 6, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Devore and son, Gale, attended the funeral Friday of Don Paul Johnson, year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson in Urbana.  Mrs. Johnson was formerly Miss Dorothy Devore of Mound City.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Jan 1941:

Well-Known Railroad Man Dies January Ninth

             A. Robert DeCrow, who had been a patient in the Illinois Central Hospital for two or more weeks, died Thursday last at 12:45 p.m.  He had been ill for two months of pernicious anemia.

             Mr. DeCrow, familiarly known as “Al,” was of a jovial disposition and always had a smile for everyone.  He was born in Cairo on January 3, 1881, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert DeCrow.  His death came on January 9, 1941, just one day after his 60th birthday.

             Mr. DeCrow was twice married, first to Miss Myrtle McGill of Marion, the mother of his daughter, Mrs. Mabel Carson of this city.

             On June 21, 1923, he was married to Mrs. Minnie (Bour) Struckmeyer, who also survives as does his stepdaughter, Miss Sara Struckmeyer.  He also leaves one brother, Jock DeCrow, of Shreveport, La.; and an uncle, James V. DeCrow, of Cairo; besides many other relatives.

             Mr. DeCrow had been employed as switchman for the Illinois Central Railroad for many years and had friends all along the division line.

             He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainman.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the First Methodist Church with the pastor, Rev. J. Rue Reid, officiating.  Members of the B. R. T. served as casket bearers.  Friends gathered from far and near to pay their last respects to his memory.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, J. T. Ryan Funeral Service directing.

             (He signed his name as Allen Robert De Crow when he registered for the 1918 draft and was yardmaster for the Illinois Central at Mounds.  A. R. Decrow, 41, of Mounds, Ill., married Minnie Struckmeyer, 38, of Mounds, Ill., in 1923 in Mississippi Co., Mo.  His application for Social Security states he was born in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Robert P. Decrow and Anna M. Rinehart.  The death certificate of Allie R. De Crow, switchman, of Mounds, Ill., states he was born 9 Jan 1881, died 9 Jan 1941, of pernicious anemia at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., where he had been a patient for 20 days, husband of Minnie DeCrow, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Albert R. DeCrow 1881-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Thomas M. Roach

             Thomas M. Roach died at his home in the Scruggs-Chapman addition Saturday night, January 11, at 11:30 o’clock, following a long illness.  His age at death was 40 years.

             Previous to his illness, Mr. Roach had been employed for 18 years as flagman for the Illinois Central Railroad.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.

             He leaves his wife, Myrtle; one daughter, Aileen; his mother, Mrs. Edith Roach; two sisters, Mrs. James T. Ryan and Mrs. Thomas Pyle, all of Mounds; three aunts, Mrs. May Roach of Chicago, Mrs. A. C. Reichert of Grand Chain and Mrs. H. B. Bartleson of Ozark, Ark.; two uncles, T. J. Billingsley of Cairo and Dallas Roach of Maywood.

             Funeral services were held at the Congregational-Christian church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, with Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor, officiating.  Burial was in Grand Chain cemetery with George C. Crain, Walter Gates and Harry Windland conducting.

             (L. M. Roach, 23, of Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., married on 4 Mar 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Edith Billingsley, 18, of Grand Chain, Ill.  According to the death certificate of Thomas Roach, flagman, he was born 18 Feb 1900, in Grand Chain, Ill., son of L. M. Roach, a native of Grand Chain, Ill., and Edith Billingsley, a native of Levings, Ill., died 11 Jan 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain cemetery.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Thomas M. Roach Feb. 18, 1900 Jan. 11, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Jan 1941:

Lindell Miller, Charleston, Mo., truck driver, was released by the grand jury and discharged.  He was driving the truck which struck and killed Hanson St. John on Main Street in Mound City three days before Christmas.

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF THIS CITY DIES IN CHICAGO

             Word has been received that Mrs. Cora Porterfield passed away at her home in Chicago, Saturday, January 4th.  She is survived by her husband, John, who is a retired superintendent of general transportation of the Illinois Central R. R. system and a granddaughter of Chicago; also a brother, Ollie Stuart, of Pulaski.

             Mrs. Porterfield was formerly Miss Cora Stuart of Pulaski.

             (J. F. Porterfield married Cora B. Stewart on 27 Jan 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Cora Belle Porterfield was born 14 May 1871, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Jesse Stewart, died 4 Jan 1941, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the wife of John Franklin Porterfield, and was buried in Oakwoods Cemetery in Chicago.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT SON DIES

             Terry David, one-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Lance, passed away Thursday morning at the home of his parents near Pulaski following a brief illness of pneumonia.  Short funeral services were held at the residence Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Charles A. Day of Metropolis, pastor of the Christian Church at Pulaski, officiated.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.

             (The death certificate states that Terry Lance was born 11 Dec 1940, in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Alvin Lance and Elaine Palmer, natives of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 9 Jan 1941, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A. R. DAVIS DeCROW DIES AT ILLINOIS CENTRAL HOSPITAL

             A. R. DeCrow, 60, of Mounds, died Thursday at 12:45 p.m. at the Illinois Central Hospital at Paducah, following an illness of two months of pernicious anemia.  Mr. DeCrow known to everyone as “Al,” was a popular man with a friendly disposition.

             Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Minnie DeCrow; a daughter, Mrs. Mabel Carson; a stepdaughter, Miss Sarah Struckmeyer, all of Mounds; a brother, Jack DeCrow of Shreveport, La.; an uncle, James V. DeCrow, of Cairo; and other relatives.

             Mr. DeCrow had been employed as switchman for the Illinois Central Railroad in Cairo since 1916.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the First Methodist Church at Mounds, with Rev. J. Rue Reid officiating.  Members of the B. R. T. served as casket bearers.

 

T. M. ROACH DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS SATURDAY

             Thomas M. Roach, age 40, passed away at his home in Mounds Saturday night at 11:30 o’clock following a long illness.

             He is survived by his wife Myrtle; one daughter, Aileen; his mother, Mrs. Edith Roach; two sisters, Mrs. James Ryan and Mrs. Thomas Pyle of Mounds; three aunts, Mrs. May Roach of Chicago, Mrs. A. C. Reichert of Grand Chain and Mrs. H. B. Bartleson of Ozark, Ark., and two uncles, T. J. Billingsley of Cairo and Dallas Roach of Maywood, Ill., besides many other relatives.

             Mr. Roach had been employed by the Illinois Central Railroad Company for 18 years as flagman and was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen.

             Funeral services were held at the Mounds Congregational church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was made in Grand Chain cemetery.

 

DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES

             Nole L. Taylor, age 70, passed away on his farm near Dongola Thursday afternoon.  He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Minnie Taylor and three sisters, Mrs. Rosie Wagner and Miss Nancy Taylor, both of Alton, and Mrs. Dennis Gray of Dorchester.

             Elmer J. Ford of Dongola was in charge of the funeral arrangements.  Funeral services were held in Gillespie at Weiss Funeral Home at 1 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  Burial was made in Morrison Cemetery near Gillespie.

             (His death certificate states that Noel L. Taylor, farmer in Union Co., Ill., was born 13 Sep 1870, in Carlinville, Ill., the son of John Taylor, a native of North Carolina, and Susan Newell, a native of Kentucky, died 9 Jan 1941, in Union Co., Ill., husband of Minnie E. Taylor, and was buried in Morrison Cemetery in Macoupin Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Minnie E. Taylor 1878-1961 Noel L. Taylor 1870-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Jan 1941:

Mrs. Matilda Caldwell

             Mrs. Matilda Caldwell, age 90, passed away at her home near Ullin Friday morning, January 17, at 10 o’clock.

             She is survived by the following children:  John Wilson and William Wilson of Mounds, Mrs. Mary E. Calvin, Marvin and G. E. Wilson of Ullin.  She is also survived by 35 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and eight great-great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at New Concord Church Sunday morning at 11 o’clock with Rev. W. J. Weiss officiating.  Burial was in New Hope Cemetery.  Pallbearers were John A. Wilson, James Wilson, Clinton Wilson, Neval Calvin, Charles Calvin and Clifford Calvin.  Wilson Funeral Service conducted the funeral.

             (Solomon C. Wilson married Matilda Sichling on 21 May 1868, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Charles A. Calvin, 24, farmer, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Andrew Calvin and Miss Sturd, married on 19 Apr 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mary Ellen Wilson, 19, born in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Sam and Mebil Wilson.  According to her death certificate, Matilda Caldwell was born 29 Jan 1850, in Henderson Co., Ky., the daughter of Adam Sichling, a native of Germany, died 17 Jan 1941, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in New Hope Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. James Hancock

             Mrs. Malinda Hancock, age 77, wife of James Hancock, passed away at her home near Pulaski Friday morning, Jan. 17, following a prolonged illness.

             She is survived by her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Theo Sharp of Carbondale, Mrs. Ruth Witzman of Pulaski, and Mrs. Hazel Britt of Olmsted; one son, Earl Myhre of Elgin, Ill.; a sister, Mrs. Bertie Higgins of St. Louis; two grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at New Concord Church with the pastor, Rev. W. J. Weiss, officiating.  Burial was in Concord Cemetery.

             (According to her death certificate, Malinda Hancock was born 15 Feb 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of William Shumaker, a native of Germany, and Mary Ozmant, died 17 Jan 1941, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of James Hancock, and was buried in Concord Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Matilda wife of James Hancock 1863-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Stella Bartleson and daughter, Miss Mildred, who were called here by the death of Mrs. Bartleson’s nephew, Thomas M. Roach, returned the latter part of the week to their home in Ozark, Ark.

 

Joseph Bodkin Dies after Long Illness

             Joseph Bodkin, long-time resident of this place, died Monday morning, Jan. 30, at his home on East First Street.  His age was 73 years.

             He leaves his wife, Sina; one daughter, Mrs. Fred McChesney of Cairo; one son, Lloyd Bodkin of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Thomas Pate of Charleston; and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the J. T. Ryan Funeral Home with Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational-Christian church officiating.  Burial was made in the Bardwell Cemetery at Bardwell, Ky.

             (His death certificate states that Joseph Bodkin, retired laborer, was born 5 Sep 1870, in Bardwell, Ky., the son of Frank and Martha Bodkin, natives of Kentucky, died 20 Jan 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Sina Bodkin, and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery in Carlisle Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Those who attended the burial of Joseph Bodkin at the Bardwell Cemetery were:  Frank Ebbs, W. Harper, J. T. Thompson, L. Schaeffer, R. Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Childers, Rev. C. S. Benninger, Miss Anna Esbey, Mrs. L. Shaeffer and Mrs. H. A. Hamlett.

 

Fred Penrod Loses Brother

             Millie Penrod, farmer and teacher of the Vienna community and brother of Fred Penrod of this city, died last week in the Fisher hospital at Metropolis.  The Vienna Times says of him, “He had taught school for thirty-five years in the various school districts of the county. . . . He lived a busy, energetic life, more in the interest of others than himself.  His memory will be cherished by many.”  What better could be said of a man?

             (When Eugene Millington Penrod registered for the draft in 1918, he stated he was born 9 Mar 1881, and was a farmer at Vienna, Ill.  His death certificate states that Millie Penrod, farmer, of Vienna, Ill., was born 3 Mar 1882, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Barney Penrod, a native of Dongola, Ill., and Lavina Morgan, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 13 Jan 1941, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., husband of Ella Penrod, and was buried in Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Bridges Cemetery reads:  Millie E. Penrod Mar. 9, 1881 Jan. 13, 1941 Ella L. Penrod Feb. 18, 1892 Aug. 16, 1974.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jan 1941:

HANGS SELF IN CAIRO CITY JAIL HOLDOVER

             Wilson A. McCrite of Cairo, a World War veteran, hung himself in the holdover cell of the Cairo city jail early Friday morning.

             McCrite was well known in Pulaski and Alexander counties, having been a salesman for the Woodward Hardware Company for 20 years.  He was born and reared in Alexander County, living there all his life.

             McCrite had been taken to jail after a state car he was driving struck a car driven in Cairo by William E. Brooks of Urbandale.

             McCrite had just talked to his wife before committing suicide, and witnesses said at the inquest that McCrite had accomplished the hanging in three minutes, from the time his wife left the cell, went to the officer’s desk there, and returned to the cell to find her husband hanging.

             (Robert W. McCrite married Mary A. Phillips on 16 Mar 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His 1918 draft registration states that Wilson A. McCrite was born 28 Dec 1890, in Delta Ill., and was deputy county clerk for County Clerk Jacob Heid. The application for a military headstone states Wilson A. McCrite enlisted as a private 26 Jun 1918, in 35th Company 9th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade, and was honorably discharged 3 Jan 1919.  His death certificate states that Wilson A. McCrite, engineer, was born 28 Dec 1896, in Delta, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Robert W. McCrite and Alice Phillips, natives of Alexander Co., Ill., died 17 Jan 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Catherine McCrite, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Catherine A. McCrite 1903-1946 Wilson A. McCrite 1889-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. JAMES HANCOCK DIES AT HER HOME IN PULASKI

Mrs. Malinda Hancock, age 77, wife of James Hancock, passed away at her home near Pulaski Friday morning, following a prolonged illness.

             She is survived by her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Theo Sharp of Carbondale, Mrs. Ruth Witzman of Pulaski and Mrs. Hazel Britt of Olmsted; one son, Earl Myhre of Elgin, Ill.; a sister, Mrs. Bernice Higgins of St. Louis; two grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the New Concord Church with the pastor, Rev. W. J. Weiss, officiating.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery.

 

AGED RESIDENT DIES AT HOME NEAR ULLIN

             Mrs. Matilda Caldwell, age 90, passed away at her home near Ullin Friday morning at 10 o’clock.

             She is survived by the following children:  John Wilson and William Wilson of Mounds, Mrs. Mary E. Calvin, Marvin and G. E. Wilson of Ullin.  She is also survived by 35 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and eight great-great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the New Concord Church Sunday morning at 11 o’clock with Rev. W. J. Weiss officiating.  Burial was in New Hope Cemetery.

 

INFANT SON DIES

             Donald Ray, month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Oval Roper of Mound City passed away Monday morning at 8 o’clock after a brief illness.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by one brother, Stanley; his paternal grandmother, Mrs. Lucy Ralph; and his maternal grandmother, Mrs. Lula Minner, all of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Ralph.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery. G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Donald Roper was born 9 Dec 1940, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Oral Roper, a native of Morehouse, Mo., and Gladys Minner, a native of Mound City, Ill.,  died 20 Jan 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOSEPH BODKIN OF MOUNDS DIES AT HIS HOME MONDAY

             Joseph Bodkin, age 73, passed away at his home in Mounds Monday morning following a lingering illness.

Besides his wife, Sina, he is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Fred McChesney of Cairo; one son, Lloyd of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Thomas Pate of Charleston, Mo.; and several other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the J. T. Ryan Funeral Home in Mounds Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.   

             Burial was made in the Bardwell Cemetery at Bardwell, Ky.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 Jan 1941:

Mrs. W. S. Hale

             Mrs. Susan Elizabeth Hale, age 67, died at her home in Ullin Friday morning, Jan. 24, at 5 o’clock following a long illness.  She had been a resident of Ullin for the past 29 years.

             Surviving are her husband, W. S. Hale; two daughters, Mrs. Mary E. Dale of Dongola and Mrs. Bessie Hill of Wetaug; two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Yokley of Tomkinsville, Ky., and Mrs. Sally Norman of Indianola, Ill.; eight grandchildren and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Ullin Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Interment was made in Ullin Cemetery with W. J. Rhymer Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Susan Hale, of Ullin, Ill.,  was born 17 Jul 1872, in Kentucky, the daughter of Thomas Hood, a native of Kentucky, died 24 Jan 1941, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of W. S. Hale, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  S. Elizabeth Hale July 17, 1872 Jan 24, 1941 1889 William Sherman Hale Oct. 8, 1868 April 26, 1961.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Thomas Griffith, 71, prominent Union County farmer living near Cobden, died Jan. 23.  Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Arrilla Spiller, past president of the Rebekah State Assembly, who has many friends here.  He is also survived by two other daughters and three sons.

             (John Griffith married Lucetta Ferrill on 18 Dec 1864, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Thomas W. Griffith, farmer, was born 1 May 1863 in Union Co., Ill., the son of John Griffith and Lucetta Ferrill, natives of Tennessee, died 23 Jan 1941, in Union Co., Ill., widower of Alice Griffith, and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Alice C. Griffith 1871-1939 Thomas W. Griffith 1869-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DIED IN AUTOMOBILE

             Mrs. G. B. Newcome of Pewaukee, Wis., died suddenly Saturday morning while sitting in a car in front of the Franklin Hotel Carbondale waiting for her husband to mail a postal card in a street mail box.  They had remained over night at the Franklin and were ready to resume their journey to Old Mexico.  After mailing the card, Newcome returned to the car and found his wife slumped in the seat.  She was dead when a doctor arrived.  It was the third time, Newcome said, that he and his wife had started to Mexico and twice they had to give up the trip on account of his wife’s illness, and return to Pewaukee.—Anna Talk

             (Her death certificate states that Sarah Booth Newcome was born 4 Apr 1871, in Milwaukee, Wisc., daughter of George Booth, a native of England, died 18 Jan 1941, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., wife of G. B. Newcome, and was buried in Pewankee Cemetery in Pewankee, Wankesha Co., Wisc.  Her marker in Forest Hill Cemetery in Pewankee, Wis., reads:  Sarah Booth Newcome 1871-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER SLAVE DIES AT CARRIER MILLS

             William Berry, 98, (Colored), who was no doubt the oldest person in the county of his race, and was a slave at 24 years of age, at the end of the Civil War, died Thursday at his home in Carrier Mills.  He would have been 99 years of age had he lived until March 17.  He was born in Hickman, Tenn., in 1842.  His wife, Lucinda, who survives, was born in 1862, and they had been married 57 years.—Marion Post

 

AGED LADY FOUND DEAD IN CHAIR

             Mary Jane Grimes, 73, of Marion Route 1, north of Marion near Spillertown, was found dead in her home Sunday morning.

             She was seated in a chair in the kitchen and a cup partly full of coffee was frozen solid in the cup.

             Mrs. Grimes lived alone and always left her home unlocked.  She told neighbors that they would probably find her dead one day and she wanted to leave the house open so they could get in.

             David Presley, a son-in-law of Mrs. Grimes, found the body and notified the coroner.—Johnston City Progress

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 31 Jan 1941:

MRS. W. S. HALE OF ULLIN DIES AT HER HOME FRIDAY

             Mrs. Susan Elizabeth Hale, age 67, passed away at her home in Ullin Friday morning at 5 o’clock, following a long illness.  She had been a resident of Ullin for the past 29 years.

             Besides her husband, W. S. Hale; she is also survived by two daughters, Mrs. May E. Dale of Dongola and Mrs. Bessie Hill of Wetaug; two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Yokley of Tomkinsville, Ky., and Mrs. Sally Norman of Indianoua, Ill.; eight grandchildren and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Ullin Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Interment was made in Ullin Cemetery.

 

KILLED BY TRAIN

             Glenn “Bugs” Lamer of Anna was killed early Saturday morning when his car stalled on the Illinois Central tracks in Anna in front of a fast freight train headed south.  The train struck the car on the side away from the driver’s seat, completely demolishing the car and knocking Lamer from the car, seriously injured.  He died two hours later in an Anna hospital.  He suffered a punctured lung, broken collar bone, broken leg and internal head and chest injuries.

             He was the Ford dealer in Anna and was well known in Pulaski and Union counties. 

             His wife, formerly Vivian Culp of Mound City, and numerous other relatives survive.  Lamer was a nephew of Judge Hal A. Spann of Anna, circuit judge of this territory.

             (Hewitt Hugh Lamer, 21, farmer from Cobden, Union Co., Ill., born in Success, Ill., son of Willis Lamer and Frances Lovelace, married on 2 Nov 1897, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., Laura May Hardin, 19, born in Cobden, Ill., daughter of Lewis Thomas Harding and Eliz. Ferrill.  The death certificate of Glenn R. Lamer, automobile dealer, states he was born 17 Feb 1913, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the son of H. H. Lamer and Laura Hardin, natives of Cobden,  died 25 Jan 1941, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., husband of Vivian Lamer, and was buried in Cobden Cemetery. His marker there reads:  Glenn R. Lamer (Bugs) 1903-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Feb 1941:

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             J. S. Miller passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lawrence Livesay, in Toledo, Ohio, Thursday night, January 30.  Mr. Miller a former resident of Mound City, served as station agent for the Big Four at Mound City for many years.

             Mr. Miller was making his home in Pittsburgh, but sometime before Christmas had gone to Toledo to visit his daughter, and while there was stricken.

             He is survived by one son, James; four daughters, Misses Edna and Merle of Pittsburgh, Mrs. Helen Hickox of Cairo, and Mrs. Lawrence Livesay of Toledo; nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

             Funeral services were held at the James Funeral Home in Mound City Monday morning at 10:30 o’clock.  Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Mound City, officiated.

             Burial was made in the Mounds cemetery.

 

Among those who attended the funeral of J. S. Miller Monday were Mrs. Clara Wilson of Mt. Carmel, Mrs. Harry Wilson of Harrisburg, James Miller of Houston, Tex., Miss Edna Miller of Pittsburg, Pa., and M. M. Maddox of Beaumont, Tex.

 

Miss Edna Miller of Pittsburg, Pa., who is remaining here for a few days after the death of her father, J. S. Miller, was the guest Monday of Mrs. Agnes Meyer.

 

Draftee in Jail

             Marion Swain, Jr., colored, of Mounds, is in jail over stabbing a youth named George Hodge, also colored, at a dance Sunday night at Memphis Place, the Egyptian Club at Mounds.  The fray is said to have involved a girl.  Hodge is said to be in a serious condition in the hospital at Cairo.

             Swain is a draftee and was taken by Sheriff Hudson to Mounds for medical examination.  The stabbing fray, even if Hodge lives, might cause the government to reject him.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Feb 1941:

ELDORADO BOY, 11, KILLED BY BLOW

             Charles E. Boutwell, 11, Eldorado school boy, was killed last Thursday by a blow from a club in the hands of Harold Eugene Hafford, 10 years old.  It was said the two boys were fighting in a vacant lot when Harold swung a stout maple club against the neck of his playmate.  He then fled.  A bystander picked up Boutwell and found that the child’s neck had been broken by the blow.

             A coroners’ jury returned an open verdict in the death.  The jury made no recommendations.  There is no indication that the state’s attorney will take any action.

             (According to the death certificate, Charles Elbert Boutwell, of Eldorado, Ill., was born 25 Dec 1928, in Eldorado, Ill., the son of Elbert Boutwell, a native of Gallatin Co., Ill., and Gladys Woods, a native of Texas City, Ill., died 30 Jan 1941, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in North Fork Township, Gallatin Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Charles E. son of Elbert & Gladys Boutwell 1928-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Feb 1941:

WETAUG MAN HELD FOR SHOOTING ULLIN NEGRO

             Ray “Shorty” Nix, about 19 years old, of Wetaug, was brought to the Pulaski County jail Sunday night charged with an attempted holdup at “Porky” Johnson’s Place in Ullin.  He is charged also with the shooting of Robert Bell, Negro of Ullin, after they quarreled over 15 cents.

             Bell is in St. Mary’s Annex in a serious condition.  He was shot in the chest, the bullet ranging downward, lodging in his stomach.

             After he had shot Bell, Nix went to Johnson’s tavern, brandishing his gun.  He ordered Johnson to turn over his money, at the same time telling some customers in the place to get their money out and turn it over to him.

             While Nix was occupied with Johnson, Al Peeler, of Wetaug, a deputy sheriff who was present, turned his gun toward Nix, ordering him to put his hands up.  When Nix did as ordered he was disarmed.  While Peeler was preparing to put handcuffs on Nix, the youth made a lunge for Peeler’s gun, which was then laying on the bar.  Jack Westfall and Peeler prevented Nix’s reaching the gun.

             When Nix entered the tavern, he boasted of having killed two men on the other side of town, witnesses reported.  After Nix was taken away to jail, Westfall decided to investigate his boast, finding Bell wounded but did not see anyone else.  Westfall rushed Bell to the hospital.

             Nix is said to have been drunk at the time of his alleged crimes.  He has been a resident of Pulaski County for several months, living on the Priest farm near Wetaug.

 

RESIDENT OF PULASKI DIED AT HIS HOME FRIDAY

             George Roods, age 79, passed away Friday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Thomas, at Pulaski.

             He is survived by two sons, John of Pulaski and William of East Prairie; two daughters, Mrs. Sara Thomas and Mrs. Myrtle Smith of Pulaski.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church in Pulaski with Rev. George Leathers officiating.  Burial was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.

             (The death certificate states that George Rhoods, farmer, was born 10 Oct 1861, in Procterville, Ohio, son of Henry Rhoods and Sarah Day, died 8 Feb 1941, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Pulaski, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Feb 1941:

ERNEST VAN DYKE

             Ernest Van Dyke, colored youth of about 20 years of age and son of R. L. Van Dyke of this city, died in a Chicago hospital and was brought here for burial, the funeral services having been held Tuesday with the Donaldson Funeral Service in charge.  Young Van Dyke formerly drove the grocery truck for the Gunn Grocery.

             (His death certificate states that Ernest Van Dyke died 9 Feb 1941, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the son of R. H. Van Dyke.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Frank Hickman of Ullin Dies Thursday Morning

             Frank Hickman of Ullin, age 68, died at his home at 10:20 o’clock Thursday morning, Feb. 20.

             Surviving are his wife and three daughters, Mrs. Sam McGee of Dongola, Mrs. James Curry of Pulaski and Miss Frances Hickman of Ullin; also three grandchildren.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Ullin Methodist Church with Rev. R. J. Weiss, assisted by Rev. Wilbert Snider, officiating.  Burial will be in Ullin Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Frank Hickman, railroad employee, of Ullin, Ill., was born 16 Mar 1872, in Boonville, Ark., the son of Richard Hickman and Elenora Tingle, died 20 Feb 1941, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Maggie Hickman, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Frank Hickman 1872-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Rev. Charles F. Kiest

             Rev. Charles F. Kiest, age 84, died at his home in Dongola Saturday night, Feb. 15, at 10 o’clock after a short illness.  Except for two years residence in Anna, Rev. Kiest had spent his entire life in Dongola.

             The Rev. Mr. Kiest was ordained in 1886 and served 10 churches as pastor during his 45 years of active ministry.  At the age of 13 he joined the Evangelical Church, but in 1926 joined the Dongola Lutheran Church, of which he was a member at the time of his death.  He was instrumental in promoting the construction of five different churches and was a member of the Village Board of Dongola for a number of years.

             He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. C. R. Laiser of Anna and Mrs. E. A. Maze of Fon due Lac, Wis.; one son, Clarence of near Dongola; one brother, Alfred, of Oak Park; nine grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Dongola Lutheran Church Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock with Dr. H. L. McGill, assisted by Rev. William E. Bridges and Rev. H. G. Petterson officiating.  Burial was made in Anna Cemetery.

             (Charles F. Kiest, 22, born in Northfield, Cook Co., Ill., married on 20 Nov 1879, in North Northfield, Cook Co., Ill., Carrie Fritch, 23, born in Deerfield, Lake Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Charles Franklin Kiest, retired minister, was born 8 Feb 1857, in Shermerville, Illinois, the son of Frederick Kiest and Ann Mulkey, natives of Germany, died 15 Feb 1941, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Rev. C. F. Kiest 1857-1941 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GOREVILLE MAN HELD IN DEATH OF NEWTON

             Everett Adams of Goreville was ordered held to await the action of a Johnson County grand jury by a Williamson County coroner’s jury Monday in the death of Gorge Marion Newton, 27, who died Monday morning in a Herrin hospital.

             Dr. C. F. Murrah at an inquest stated that Newton died of a knife wound in the head.  Other evidence at the inquest disclosed that Newton was wounded that night of February 4, while in an automobile with a party of friends from Goreville.  He received treatment at his home in Goreville, but when his condition failed to improve, he was taken to the Herrin hospital last Friday.  Dr. Murrah said an X-ray examination revealed a knife blade imbedded in his head, but an operation failed to locate the blade.  He underwent two blood transfusions at the hospital before death, the surgeon said.

 

AGE 101

             Johnson County has a resident who is 101 years old.  His name is George Herman and he lives near New Columbia in the southeast part of the county, according to the Vienna Times.  His mind is alert, his memory of past events remarkable and his conversation both interesting and intelligent.  He lives alone, keeps house, does his own cooking and is independent of any of his neighbors.  He has been married four times and is the father of 13 children.  His present wife, age 32, is in a hospital suffering from a broken back due to a fall.  He is a native of Edwards County where he spent most of his life.

             In an interview with the Vienna Times editor, Mr. Herman said:

             “I would like to go back to Edwards County and visit among my old friends and relatives.  It is quite a distance, but I could make it in two or three days.  My horse needs a good work out.  It’s getting fat and if I drove it, it would be good for the horse.”  Albion is about 100 miles north of Vienna.

 

GEORGE GORE, JR., RELEASED FROM PRISON

             George Gore, Jr., son of Dr. George Gore, Sr., a Benton surgeon now serving an Illinois prison term for killing Carl Choisser, a Benton attorney, was released from the Missouri State Penitentiary Thursday.

             Gore, 32, was convicted of grand larceny in Cape Girardeau County in January 1940, and sentenced to two years.  Prior to trial on the larceny charge in Missouri, Gore had been tried and acquitted on charges of killing his stepmother, Mrs. Nancy Gore.—Johnston City Progress

 

Jake Eddleman

             Jake Eddleman, age 54, died at his home on a farm near Dongola Sunday night, February 16, at 7:30 o’clock.  Mr. Eddleman was injured a month ago when a tree fell on him and broke an arm and leg.  It was thought that he was recovering, but _____ set in and his passing was expected.  He was a highly ____ farmer and had lived his ____ in the Dongola community.

             Surviving are his wife, ___ daughters, Mrs. Van Lingle, Miss Mae Eddleman; one ___mother, Mrs. Jake ____; and a brother, Archie, ____.  Two sisters, Mrs. Eva ____ ___sonville, and Mrs. Ann__ ___ Perks, also survive him,

             Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion Church near Dongola ___day afternoon at 2 o’clock ___ Roy Shelton, assisted by ____ Bernhart, officiating.  Burial was in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Feb 1941:

JAKE EDDLEMAN

             Jake Eddleman, age 54, died at his home on a farm near Dongola Sunday night at 7:30 o’clock.  Mr. Eddleman was injured a month ago when a tree fell on him and broke an arm and leg.  He was well known, highly respected and prosperous farmer and had lived his entire life in the Dongola community.  He served as a member of the local school board for several years.

             He is survived by his wife, Norma; two daughters, Mrs. Van Lingle and Miss Mae Eddleman; one son, Van; his mother, Mrs. Jake Eddleman, Sr.; and a brother, Archie, all of Dongola.  Two sisters, Mrs. Eva Keller of Jacksonville, Ill., and Mrs. Anna Casper of near Perks also survive him,

             Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion Church near Dongola Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Roy Shelton, assisted by Rev. J. A. Bernhart, officiating.  Burial was in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

             (Jacob M. Eddleman, 25, a farmer from Dongola, born in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the son of Jacob Eddleman and Susan Sowers, married 2nd on 26 Mar 1885, in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Amanda Dillow, 27, from Anna, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Peter Dillow and Miss Treese.  According to his death certificate, Jacob Eli Eddleman, farmer, was born 5 May 1886, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the son of Jacob Eddleman and Amanda Dillow, natives of Illinois, died 16 Feb 1941, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Norma Eddleman, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads: Jacob E. Eddleman 1887-1941 Norma Eddleman 1893-1972.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. CORNELIA TROUTMAN PASSED AWAY LAST FRIDAY

             Mrs. Cornelia Troutman, age 86, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Anita Miles, near Dongola Friday evening. 

             She is survived by seven children, Mrs. Margaret Corzine of Cypress, Rev. A. M. Troutman of Cypress, Fernando of Bradley, Ill., Mrs. Lulu Martin of Renshaw, Ill., Mrs. Anita Miles of Dongola, Eddie of Dongola and Mrs. Zetta Jones of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Friendship Church with Rev. H. W. Karraker officiating.  Burial was made in the Friendship Cemetery.  The following grandchildren served as casket bearers:  Dallas Miles, Leroy Troutman, Elvis Corzine, Festus Martin, Dorvey Troutman and Doyle Troutman.

             (Jacob Troutman married on 2 Mar 1873, in Union Co., Ill., Nelly Karraker. Her death certificate states that Cornelia Troutman, widow, was born 15 Oct 1854, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Dennis Karraker and Nancy Hinkle, died 14 Feb 1941, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Friendship Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Cornelia Troutman 1854-1941 Jacob A. Troutman 1850-1915.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Feb 1941:

Former Mounds Resident Dies at Home in Arkansas

             Mrs. J. W. Morris, daughter of J. Logan Taylor, died at her home in Weiner, Ark., Sunday morning following a long illness.

             Mrs. Morris is the former Stella Taylor and served as an operator in the local office of the Illinois Bell Telephone Company for a number of years.

             Surviving are her husband, J. W. Morris; one son, Carl, who is in the United States Navy; one daughter, Ladonn of Weiner; her father, Logan Taylor; and two sisters, Mrs. Frank (Nellie) Ebbs and Mrs. Theo (Madge) Endicott, all of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held at Weiner Tuesday afternoon.

             Those attending the funeral from here were J. Logan Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ebbs, Mrs. Theo Endicott, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Melton.

             (Her marker in Oaklawn Cemetery in Jonesboro, Craighead Co., Ark., reads:  Stella Morris 1896-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of Ullin Resident Dies Last Week in Albion

             Mrs. Elizabeth Reeves of Albion, age 75, mother of Mrs. Philip Echols of Ullin, died at her home in Albion Tuesday evening, Feb. 18.  She had been bedfast the past year.  She is survived by one son, Luther Reeves of Grayville; three daughters, Mrs. Bessie Halam of Fairfield, Mrs. A. L. Cox of Carbondale, and Mrs. Echols.  Funeral services were held at the Albion Baptist Church Thursday afternoon with interment in Graceland Cemetery.  Mrs. Echols had been with her mother more than a week before her passing.  Mr. Echols and daughter Adra attended the funeral.

             (Alexander Hughes married Eliza Jane Stanley on 21 Oct 1841, in White Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Elizabeth Cordelia Reeves was born 27 Jul 1875, in Edwards Co., Ill., the daughter of Alexander Hughes and Miss Stanley, natives of Illinois, died 18 Feb 1941, in Albion, Edwards Co., Ill., widow of Milton Reeves, and was buried in Albion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. B. A. Hoar of Anna Celebrates 90th Birthday

             Mrs. B. A. Hoar, widow of the Rev. B. A. Hoar, a former pastor of the Mounds Methodist Church, celebrated her 90th birthday February 22, having been born in the year 1851 on the natal day of the “Father of our country.”  She and her daughter, Katherine, make their home in Anna where her husband settled upon his retirement from the ministry.

             Mrs. Hoar’s maiden name was Lydia Ann Sapp and she was born near St. Elmo, Ill., on a farm her father had purchased from the Government for $2.00 per acre.  Many years ago she sold her part of this farm for $50.00.  It is now one of those rich oil farms in the Louden pool and there are at least 17 oil wells on the original farm which belonged to her father.

             She was the sixth child in a family of seven and so delicate that her parents despaired of her life.  The others are long since gone.  Two of her brothers were ministers in the United Brethren Church.

             She and her husband were schoolmates and were married Sept. 1, 1872.  They had been married ten years before entering the life of minister and minister’s wife.  Her disposition has always been gentle and her voice soft and low; she was never in the limelight, but, as one of her children has said:  “She was the power behind the throne.”  One of her treasures is a valentine given her by the lover of her youth 70 years ago—two years before their marriage.

             This couple reared four sons and four daughters, one daughter, Sadie, dying at the age of 20 in the Anna parsonage.  Two of the sons are ministers.  There are 14 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

             The Rev. Mr. Hoar, after a life filled with kindliness, good deeds and devotion to his ministerial work, died Nov. 30, 1928.

             Many people called on Mrs. Hoar and she received numerous gifts, among them a beautiful birthday cake.  WEBQ at Harrisburg dedicated a song to her and greetings poured in from friends of the present and of the long ago and even from strangers, and are continuing to pour in as the days come and go.

(A picture of Mrs. Hoar accompanies the article.  Benjamin A. Hoar married Lydia A. Sapp on 1 Sep 1872, in Fayette Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Feb 1941:

KILLED IN AUTO WRECK

             W. R. Eberhardt, Jr., of New York and Cleveland, was killed Saturday night when his car plunged off Route 3 just on the other side of the Cairo Junction.  Eberhardt is said to have been driving fast en route to Cairo when he lost control of the car.  Residents living near the scene of the accident testified at the inquest they heard the squealing of the tires as Eberhardt attempted to stop the car or either when the car slid sideways along the road.  He died soon after being taken to the hospital.  The young man was traveling to Milan, Tenn., where he was to have taken charge of a shell-loading plant.

             (The death certificate of Walter R. Eberhardt, civil engineer, of 317 W. 83rd St., New York City, N.Y., states he was born 30 Dec 1916, in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Walter R. Eberhardt, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, and Catherine A. Sellman, a native of Brookins Lake, Mich., died 22 Feb 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Hillcrest Cemetery, Geneva, Ashtabula Co., Ohio.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. JAMES L. PALMER PASSED AWAY WEDNESDAY

             Mrs. James L. Palmer, age 66, passed away at her home in Karnak Wednesday morning following an illness of six months.

             Besides her husband, she is survived by one son, Eugene, of Karnak; a sister, Mrs. Anna Durham, of Tamms; five brothers, Ben Bass of Cape Girardeau, Harrison of Peoria, Logan of Chicago, and Sam and Isadore of Elco.

             Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Friday) at one o’clock with Rev. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Burial will be made in Delta Cemetery. Wilson Funeral Service will be in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Ida Palmer was born 31 Mar 1874, in Delta, Ill., the daughter of Henry Bess, a native of Missouri, and Mary Bass, a native of Arkansas,  died 25 Feb 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of James L. Palmer, and was buried in Delta Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIED SUNDAY

             Mrs. J. W. Morris passed away at her home in Weiner, Ark., Sunday morning at 3:30 o’clock following a lingering illness.

             Besides her husband, she is survived by a son, Carl, who is in the United States Navy; a daughter, Ladonn of Weiner; two sisters, Mrs. Frank Ebbs and Mrs. Theo Endicott; and a brother, Ed Taylor, all of Mounds.  Her father, Logan Taylor, of Mounds, also survives her.

             Mrs. Morris will be remembered as Miss Stella Taylor.  She served as operator for the Bell Telephone Company in Mounds for a number of years.

             Funeral services were held in Weiner, Ark., Tuesday afternoon.

 

AGED RESIDENT OF ULLIN DIED AT HIS HOME THURSDAY

             Frank Hickman, 68 year old pioneer citizen of Ullin, passed away at his home in Ullin Thursday morning, February 20, at 10:30 o’clock after an illness of two weeks.

             Besides his wife, Maggie; he is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Sam McGee of Dongola, Mrs. James Curry of Pulaski and Miss Francis Hickman of Ullin; and three grandchildren.

 

DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES AT HOME SATURDAY

             Mrs. Ruth Viola Dillow, age 48, passed away at her home on a farm near Dongola Saturday morning at 12:30 o’clock following an illness of five months.

             Mrs. Dillow is survived by her husband, Ralph; three sons, Wayne, Ellis and Leroy; and one daughter, June, all at home; and two brothers, George and Ernest of Jonesboro.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. John’s Lutheran Church with Rev. William E. Bridges, pastor, officiating.  Burial was made in St. John’s Cemetery.

             (According to her death certificate, Ruth Viola Dillow was born 14 Feb 1893, near Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of J. H. Ury and Delia Poole, natives of Illinois, died 22 Feb 1941, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., wife of Ralph Dillow, and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ralph H. Dillow 1892-1965 Ruth V. Dillow 1893-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Mar 1941:

MRS. ANGA CURD

             Mrs. Anga Curd, colored, age 60 years, died Saturday morning, March 1, at her home in North Mounds.  She had been sick for some time.

             Surviving are her husband, Henry Curd; five children and several grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon.

             (A marriage license for Henry Curd and Angeline Barnhill was issued on 14 Jan 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Angeline Curd was born 17 Nov 1875, in Huntington, Tenn., the daughter of Ned Bornhill and Mingie Broyhill, natives of Huntington, Tenn., died 1 Mar 1941, in Road District, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Henry Curd, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Kate Vaughn Passes On

             Mrs. Kate Vaughn, age 71 years, a highly respected colored resident of this place who resided across from the Douglass High School building on Highway 51, was fatally injured in a bus wreck which occurred Sunday, February 23, and died Wednesday, Feb. 26, at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Belleville.

             The bus, driven by Earl Love of Pulaski, colored, collided with an automobile on the old St. Louis road near Belleville, according to reports.

             The body was brought to Mounds Saturday and funeral services were held Sunday with burial here.  Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Lula Webb and Mrs. Priscilla Mailon.

             “Kate” was a faithful servant and friend.  May she rest in peace.

(Katie Vaughn is in the 1920 census of Berlee St., Clarksdale, Coahoma C., Miss.  Her death certificate states that Katie Vaughn, widow, of Belleville, Ill.,  was born 17 Mar 1870, in Alabama, died 26 Feb 1941, in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill. –Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Mar 1941:

WILLIAM BLASDEL DIED AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

             William Blasdel, age 69, of Grand Chain, passed away at the Fischer Hospital in Metropolis Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock.  He is survived by his wife, Clara; three daughters, Mrs. Mabel Metcalf of West Frankfort, Mrs. Blanch Evers of Rector, Ark., and Mrs. Carmen Rhodes of Vienna; two sons, Guy and Clarence, both of Grand Chain; and one brother, Henry Blasdel of Grand Chain.

             Funeral services were held at the Ohio Chapel Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Burial was made in Ohio Chapel Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that William Blasdel, farmer, of Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 22 Jan 1871, in Champaign Co., Ill., the son of John Blasdel and Eliza A. Thompson, natives of Indiana, died 1 Mar 1941, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., husband of Clara Blasdel, and was buried in Road District 12, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ohio Chapel Cemetery reads:  Clara Blasdel 1889-1956 William Blasdel 1871-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOUNDS NEGRO WOMAN DIES IN BUS WRECK

             Mrs. Katie Vaughn, 65-year-old Mounds Negro, died Wednesday at a hospital in Belleville, Ill., as a result of injuries received February 23 in a bus wreck near Belleville.  The bus, owned and driven by Earl Love, Negro of Pulaski, was en route to St. Louis when it collided with an automobile.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Mar 1941:

Dave Brown

             Dave Brown, age 69 years, died Friday, March 7, at his home in Mound City, after a several weeks’ illness.  He had been a resident of Mound City over 60 years.

             Surviving is one brother, Ell Brown of Mound City; and one half-brother, James Modglin of Unity.

             Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10 o’clock at the Pentecostal church in Mound City, the Rev. Earl Harp officiating.

             Burial was made in Redden Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Dave Brown was born 8 Feb 1872, in Illinois, son of Bill Brown, died 7 Mar 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Two Negroes Dead after Fight in Grand Chain

             Alvin Thompson of Cypress and Johnnie Washum of Joppa, both colored, are dead as result of a fight which occurred Sunday afternoon at Grand Chain.  Thompson died at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo Sunday evening shortly after he had been taken there.  Washum died Monday night in the same hospital.

             Thompson was shot in the side and Washum in the abdomen.  Washum, who was conscious Monday, is said to have admitted that both he and Thompson were shot with his gun and that it was in his hands when the bullet that struck him was fired, that this happened in a close struggle and that he fired twice at Thompson after having been wounded himself.

             The cause of the fight seems to be an undetermined factor.

             (The death certificate of John Wardell Washum, restaurant worker, of Joppa, Massac Co., Ill., states that he was born 31 Aug 1907, in Mound City, Ill., son of Dick Washum, a native of Paris, Tenn., and Jennie Curtis, a native of Columbus, Ky., died 10 Mar 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Catherina Washum, and was buried in Grand Chain cemetery.  The death certificate of Alvin Thomas, laborer, of Vienna, Ill., states that he was born 31 Jul 1911, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Calvin Thomas and Maggie Chavis, natives of Illinois, died 9 Mar 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sister of R. W. Wiedemann Dies in Fort Meyers, Fla.

             R. W. Widemann received word Thursday morning of the death of his sister, Mrs. Rue Truberger, of Fort Meyers, Florida.  She had been seriously ill for several weeks.

             Mr. and Mrs. Wiedemann had spent a part of the winter of 1939-40 at the Truberger home in Fort Meyers.

             Surviving are her husband and son, her mother, Mrs. Rosalie Wiedemann; three sisters, Mrs. Oliver Kuebler of Golconda, Mrs. Fred Jost of East St. Louis, with whom the mother is residing at present, and Mrs. B. Kuebler of Shiloh, Fla.; one brother, R. W. Wiedemann of this city.  Mrs. Truberger was the youngest member of the family.

             As this article is being written, no news of the time or place of the funeral is available.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Mar 1941:

ACCIDENTALLY SHOT, DIES

             Miss Margaret Josephine McKinney, age 26, of Cairo, accidentally shot herself when she knocked a gun from the top of a steel cabinet in her home Sunday night.  She died several hours later in the hospital.  Miss McKinney was a popular young lady, well known in this county.  She was employed in Sheriff John E. Miller’s office.  A coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death.  Evidence presented at the inquest brought out that the young woman had been reaching for a hat box when the gun was knocked from the shelf, the gun being discharged in an unknown manner.

             (Her death certificate states that Margaret Josephine McKinney, deputy clerk, of Cairo, Ill., was born 1 Mar 1914, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of Charlie O. McKinney and Margaret O’Donnell, natives of Cairo, Ill., died 9 Mar 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker reads:  Daughter Margaret J. McKinney Mar. 1, 1914 Mar. 9, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. S. TRAMMELL DIES AT HIS HOME IN THIS CITY

             James S. Trammell, age 55, passed away at his home in Mound City Tuesday morning at 4 o’clock following a few weeks’ illness.  Mr. Trammell had made his home in Mound City for the past 15 years.

             Besides his wife, he is survived by seven daughters, Mrs. Bessie Charles of McClure, Mrs. Nellie Womack of Jonesboro and Mrs. Obnie Wyatt, Mrs. Pauline Kowen, Mrs. June Magill, Mrs. Shirley Bremen and Miss Billie Trammell of Mound City; four sons, Clifford of Caruthersville, Mo., and Donald, Kenneth and Patrick of Mound City.  A sister, Mrs. Lula Rendleman of Pomona, Ill., also survives him.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock with Rev. H. E. Lockard, pastor, officiating.  Burial was made in Lindsay Cemetery at McClure.

             (According to his death certificate, James Sherman Trammell, of Mound City, Ill., was born 28 Oct 1874, in Illinois, the son of John Trammell and Ellen Lawson, natives of Illinois,  died 11 Mar 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Bessie Trammell,  and was buried at McClure, Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DAVE BROWN DIES

             Dave Brown, age 89, passed away at his home in Mound City Friday morning at 7:20 o’clock after an illness of several weeks.

             Mr. Brown had been a resident of Mound City for the past 60 years.

             He is survived by one brother, Ell Brown, of Mound City; and a half brother, James Modglin, of Unity.

             Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10 o’clock at the Pentecostal church in Mound City.  Rev. Earl Harp officiated.  Burial was made in Redden Cemetery.

 

BOY BURNED IN PLAY

             A report yesterday and not checked was that a Negro boy, 16 years of age, was so badly burned that he died Wednesday night at Rago, between Karnak and Whitehill and at the boundary of the county.  He and other boys, some white, were playing in a brush arbor or tepee, when it was fired.  He was unable to get out without being so badly burned that he died.

 

TWO YEARS AND FINE GIVEN TO RAY NIX

             Ray Nix, 20 years of age, of Florence, Alabama, fell into a bad way on the night of February 9, when he got drunk, shot at and wounded Robert Bell, a Negro, and tried to hold up Porky Johnson’s place at Ullin.  Yesterday in county court he pleaded guilty to assault with a deadly weapon and got one year and $1,000 fine, and to carrying concealed weapons and got one year and a $300 fine.

             He will be at Vandalia for some time before being at liberty.  The fines will delay him some time.

             Nix did not know what he had done, so drunk was he or under the influence of a drug.

             He came into the county last fall and was working on a farm chopping wood.  In town one night, he went on the spree that brought him to plenty of trouble and very easily could have caused someone to lose a life.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Mar 1941:

HARVEY WILLIAMS

             Harvey Williams, of Cairo, age 50, nephew of Homer Williams of this city, died Sunday at St. Mary’s Annex following a stroke.  Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon in Cairo with burial in Spencer Heights.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, he lived at 313 33rd St., Cairo, Ill., and was a laborer for Pioneer Poles Co., in the Drainage District, Cairo, Ill.  His wife was LeDora Williams.  His death certificate states that Harvey Williams, common laborer, of Alexander Co., Ill., was born 24 Apr 1884, in Lexington, Tenn., the son of Berry Williams and Patsy Jones, natives of Lexington, Tenn., died 16 Mar 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Dora Williams, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOTHER BURNED TO DEATH AFTER SAVING CHILDREN

             After saving four children, Mrs. Bernie Sweet was burned to death Saturday when she ran back into her blazing home at Herrin.

             Witnesses at the coroner’s inquest testified that the blaze originated from an explosion of an oil stove Mrs. Sweet was using to cook supper for her little family.  When the flash occurred, the first thing she thought about was to save the four small children, the oldest of which is eight years old.  She put the children out a north window, witnesses said, with the oldest boy helping to lift the baby out the window.  When she came out, witnesses said she acted as if she had suddenly thought of something important and rushed back in the building again.  A second after she went into the house a second explosion occurred and flames spread throughout the building.—Johnston City Progress

             (Her death certificate states that Eva Sweet was born about 1909 in Carterville, Ill., the daughter of William Elden and Annie Watkins, natives of Illinois, died 8 Mar 1941, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., wife of Bernie Sweet, and was buried at Herrin, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TWO KILLED, ONE INJURED ON DEATH CURVE

             Two men were killed and a third injured at 2 a.m. Tuesday when an automobile in which they were riding left the highway at “death curve” between this city and Herrin.

             The dead are John Sinks and Blake Wright.  Elsworth Gordon is in the Herrin hospital suffering a fractured left collar bone, a scalp wound and numerous cuts and bruises.  The car a 1937 Ford V-8, belonged to Sinks, who was driving.

             All three men are from West Frankfort where they were employed by the Sunrise Bakery.

             Gordon, the only survivor, says the three men went to Herrin and were returning home after spending the evening there.  All three were riding in the front seat.  They were driving at high rate of speed, Gordon said, and when they reached the curve, Sinks lost control of the car and the Ford left the road completely.  It turned over many times.

             (Thomas A. Henson married Dora Etta Henson on 7 Jun 1904, in Franklin Co., Ill.  The death certificate of John Henson Sinks, bakery salesman, of West Frankfort, Ill., states that he was born 1 Jan 1917, in Frankfort Heights, Ill., the son of Thomas A. Sinks and Etta Henson, natives of Illinois, died 11 Mar 1941, in Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Dorothy McCloud Sinks, and was buried at West Frankfort, Franklin Co., Ill.  His marker in Tower Heights Cemetery reads:  In Loving Memory John H. Sinks Jan. 1, 1917 Mar. 11, 1941 Erected by Wife and Daughter Dorotha M. and Joan Sinks.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Mar 1941:

CARL SICHLING DIED WEDNESDAY AT BELLEVILLE

             Carl Sichling, formerly of Ullin, died at Belleville Wednesday following an operation, according to word received here.  The funeral will probably be today, but details were not learned.

             Sichling was an insurance agent at Ullin, later going to Carbondale and still later to Belleville or East St. Louis.

             He was an ex-service man and known to Legion members of the county.

             (Carl Sichling, of 522 Market Ave., East St. Louis, Ill., registered for the draft in 1918 and worked for the railroad in East St. Louis, Ill.  His nearest relative was his mother, Seddie Sichling of Ullin, Ill.  The application for a military headstone states that Carl Thomas Sichling enlisted 28 Aug 1918, as a private in Co. B, 330th Infantry, and was honorably discharged 10 Feb 1919.  His death certificate states that Carl Sichling, insurance company manager, of Belleville, St,. Clair Co., Ill., was born 22 May 1897, in Ullin, Ill., the son of Joseph M. Sichling, a native of Union Co., Ill., and Siddie Stubblefield, a native of Tennessee, died 19 Mar 1941, in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill., husband of Maude Sichling, and was buried at Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DETAILS OF FIRE IN WHICH NEGRO YOUTH DIED

             Clifford Tuice, 16 years of age, colored, was burned to death at Rago on Wednesday of last week when a shack in which he and two others were playing caught fire and burned.  Tuice was pulled from the wreckage, his clothes nearly burned off him and his flesh badly cooked in places.  He died about 10 o’clock that night.

             A rural school at Rago has 20 or 30 students, both white and colored.  It was taught by Cletus Girley.  On the playground was a shack, built pig pen style of small logs and poles, the largest said to be about six inches in diameter.  It was probably not over 8 to 10 feet square and was about four feet high.  Across the top were laid poles and on them was hay and straw.  Cracks were chinked with sacks.

             Entrance was a hole near the ground and across it was a sack to keep the wind from blowing into the cabin.

             A stove made of a lard can and with a pipe out the roof furnished heat.

             At noon that day, the cabin caught fire, presumably when the sack over the entrance blew over the stove.  The fire must have not been noticed at first, possibly because there was already smoke in the place, and it had spread before it was seen.

             The two white boys dived through the hole and escaped, one being slightly singed and one having to make two attempts.  The colored boy never did attempt to come out and cried for help only for a brief moment.

             At the inquest, it was an opinion, though not verified, that he must have turned sick or had a heart attack.

             The whole cabin was burning when a teacher, Mr. Girley, arrived and in pulling out Tuice, was burned about the hands and face.  The burned boy begged for water to be poured on him to cool him.  His condition was most pitiful.

             The playhouse had turned into a funeral pyre.

             (The death certificate states that Clifford Tyuse, high school student, of Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., was born 5 Aug 1924, in Olmsted, Ill., the son of Robert Tyuse, a native of Lima, Ohio, and Mary Johnson Jones, a native of Columbus, Ky., died 12 Mar 1941, in Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried at Olmsted, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Mar 1941:

Funeral Services Held for Carl Sichling Saturday

             Funeral services were held in Carbondale Saturday afternoon for Carl Sichling of Belleville, formerly of Ullin, who died Wednesday evening, March 19, in a Belleville hospital, where he had been a patient for about two weeks.  Burial was made in Oakland Cemetery, Carbondale, the local Elks lodge having charge of the service.

             Mr. Sichling was the younger son of Mrs. Sid Sichling of Ullin.  He left Ullin about ten years ago for Carbondale to enter the employ of the Great West Life Assurance Company.  Later he was transferred to Belleville.

             Surviving are his wife, the former Mable Williams; one daughter, Iva Lou; his mother and a brother, Ralph of Ullin; also other relatives.

             Mr. Sichling was a member of the American Legion and had served as commander of the post at Carbondale.

 

Wife of Former Methodist Pastor Dies Last Thursday

             Mrs. H. B. Shoaff, wife of Rev. H. B. Shoaff of Vienna, died Thursday night of last week in Holden Hospital, Carbondale, where she had been a patient at intervals for some time.

             The Rev. Mr. Shoaff and family formerly resided in the Methodist parsonage here in Mounds during his pastorate of the First Methodist Church and news of the passing of Mrs. Shoaff will be heard with regret.

             Surviving are the husband, four sons, Ray Shoaff of Cincinnati, Ohio, Norman of Chicago, George and Carl of Carbondale; also an adopted daughter, Martha.  Mr. and Mrs. Shoaff recently had purchased a home in Carbondale to which they had intended to move upon Mr. Shoaff’s retirement from the ministry.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the First Methodist Church of Carbondale with the Rev. Mr. Harvey, pastor, officiating.  Burial was in a Carbondale cemetery.

             (Herman B. Shoaff married Fannie Zimmerman on 31 May 1899, in Wabash Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Fannie Maybelle Zimmerman Shoaff, of Vienna, Ill., states that she was born 8 Aug 1879, in Loogootee, Ind., the daughter of George W. Zimmerman and Antle Fannie, natives of Kentucky, died 20 Mar 1941, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., wife of H. B. Shoaff, and was buried at Carbondale, Ill.  Her marker in Oakland Cemetery reads:  Fannie M. Shoaff 1879-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Andrew Poe

             Andrew Poe, resident of Mounds for many years, died Friday afternoon, March 21, at 12:35 o’clock at his home, following a long illness.  His age was 50 years.

             Surviving are his widow, Myrtle; four children by a former marriage, Raymond, Andrew Jr., and Mrs. Thelma Miller of Benton Harbor, Mich., and Mildred Poe at home; also one granddaughter; a brother, Fred Poe of Denver, Colo.; four stepchildren; and other relatives.

             For many years Mr. Poe was a distributor of Raleigh products in this community, but for the past year he and his wife have operated a confectionery on Front Street.

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home on First Street Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, the Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the Methodist church, officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with the J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1917, Andrew Poe resided in Woodward, Iowa, and was a section laborer for the Interurban in Dallas Co., Iowa. According to the death certificate of Andrew Allen Poe, confectionary owner, he was born 16 Feb 1891, in Brookport, Ill., died 21 Mar 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Myrtle Poe, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill., reads:  Andrew Poe Feb. 16, 1891 Mar. 21, 1941.  His Social Security claim states that he was the son of Dennis Poe and Rachel Hall.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FIND BODY OF WHITE INFANT BENEATH BRIDGE

             The body of a prematurely born white female infant was found in a bottle of preserving fluid beneath the Big Muddy River Bridge over Route 13 at Murphysboro on Sunday.

             The bottle was discovered by two boys:  Dave Wilson and Ed Crisp, and reported to police.  Coroner Roy Ruffman was notified and immediately began an investigation.

             The infant was judged to have been a seven-month baby, but how long it had been in the bottle was not determined.  Police stated that there was no mark of violence on the small body.—Carbondale Herald

 

Mother of Rep. Paul Powell Dies in Vienna

             Mrs. Vinna D. Powell, 68, widow of the late Thomas B. Powell, died about 8:00 Saturday evening, March 15, of a paralytic stroke.  She was the mother of Rep. Paul T. Powell.  Death came rather swiftly after suffering a stroke in the afternoon.  She had been in declining health for many years.

             Mrs. Powell, her son and wife, made their home together.  The deceased was a patient sufferer and her loved ones were ever mindful and did everything possible for her comfort.  They shared their joys and sorrows with each other and now that the mother has departed from this life, the home will not be the same.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the First Christian Church in Vienna, Rev. Charles A. McGinnis of Pontiac, Ill., assisted by Rev. Robert Furgeson, pastor of the church here, officiating.  The Fulkerson quartet sang and Mrs. Joe Throgmorton sang a solo.  A large crowd attended the service and the beautiful and profuse floral offering showed the esteem in which Mrs. Powell was held.  Interment was made in the Vienna Fraternal Cemetery.—Vienna Times

             Mrs. Paul Powell is the former Daisy Butler of Mounds.

             (Thomas B. Powell married Vinna Duncan on 23 Sep 1896, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Vinna Duncan Powell was born 20 Jul 1872, in Marion, Ill., the daughter of Hartwell Duncan, a native of Marion, Ill., and Rebecca Simmons, a native of Tunnel Hill, Ill., died 15 Mar 1941, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the widow of Thomas B. Powell, and was buried in District 5, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

            

Union County Veteran Dies in 105th Year

             Tillman Manus, Civil War veteran of Anna, died Thursday night, March 20, after an illness of two weeks.  Mr. Manus would have celebrated his 105th birthday had he lived until April 9 of this year.  Only a month or so ago a relative of his was telling the writer how much Mr. Manus enjoyed life.

             Born in Tennessee, he was disowned by his family when he joined the Union Army, it is said.  He moved to the Anna community at the age of 21 years

             Surviving are six children, five sons and a daughter ranging in age from 70 to 82 years.

             Funeral services were held at Anna Sunday afternoon.

             (Tilman Manus married Nancy A. Morgan on 10 Apr 1857, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Tilman Manus, farmer, of Anna, Union Co., Ill., was born 9 Apr 1835, in Woodbury, Tenn., the son of John Manus, a native of Tennessee, and Lavina Middleton, a native of England,  died 20 Mar 1941, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., widower of Nancy Manus, and was buried in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Trinity Cemetery reads:  Tilman Manus Apr. 9, 1835 Mar. 20, 1941 Nancy E. His Wife Jan. 18, 1840 June 14, 1911.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Campfire Claims Life of Transient

             Night creatures in the remote bluff section north of Makanda were spectators to a weird sight sometime Monday night as an unknown transient fought a furious but futile fight to extinguish the flames of his heavy clothing that apparently had become ignited by sparks as he slept in the popular Hanging Rock bluff shelter near the Illinois Central Railroad.

             There were no witnesses to the tragedy, but indications were that the man had rolled and tumbled for more than a hundred feet in his struggles from the campfire to where the body, charred beyond recognition, lay when found by workmen early Tuesday morning.

             He appeared to have been about 45 years old, 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight about 140 pounds with light brown hair turning gray. The body was removed to the Huffman Funeral Home in Carbondale to be buried in Oakland Cemetery there.—Wayman Presley

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Mar 1941:

CARL SICHLING DIES

             Carl Sichling, youngest son of Mrs. Sid Sichling of Ullin, died in a hospital at Belleville, Ill., Wednesday evening, March 19, at 7 o’clock following an operation Tuesday. He had been ill for several weeks.

             Mr. Sichling was born and reared in Ullin, leaving there about eight years ago for Carbondale.  From Carbondale he was sent to Belleville with the Great West Life Insurance Company.

             He is survived by his wife, Maude; and one daughter, Iva Lou, both of Belleville; his mother, Mrs. Sid Sichling; and a brother, Ralph of Ullin; two nieces, Mary Jo Sichling and Anna Lou Sichling of Ullin; and a number of other relatives.

             The body was taken to Carbondale Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Burial was made at Carbondale.  He was a member of the American Legion.

 

HEARING TOMORROW ON CUSTODY OF CHILDREN

             There will be a hearing tomorrow before Judge Crain concerning the custody of two children, Vivian and Ruby Parker, daughters of a deceased veteran and whose mother is also deceased.  An aunt, Mrs. Letha Echols, has charge of them.

             The Legion is bringing complaint through one of its members charging neglect and seeking to have the children sent to the Home at Bloomington, where children of veterans are well maintained and given full high school education and two years of college work.

 

INFANT SON DIES

             Clay Evans, 15 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Evans, of Urbandale, passed away at the home of his parents, Tuesday evening, March 17, at 8 o’clock.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by one brother, Alflee Evans; three half-sisters, Mrs. Ruth Long of Evansville, Ind., Miss Mary Evans of Mound City and Miss Mary Helen Johnson of Urbandale; and five half-brothers, Homer Lee Johnson and Bobby Johnson of Urbandale, James Evans, Fred Evans, Jr., of U. S. Army and Leon Evans of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Fred Harp of Mound City officiating.  Burial was made in Mounds cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Clay Evans was born 13 Dec 1939, in Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Fred Evans, a native of Tennessee, and Bessie M. Liskey, a native of Morehouse, Mo., and died 18 Mar 1941, in Road District 2, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH CLAIMS J. E. CHARLES

             Word has been received by friends here from Mrs. W. A. Dougherty, formerly of this city now of Metropolis, of the death of her brother-in-law, J. E. Charles, who passed away at his home in Columbus, Ohio, Wednesday after a long illness.

             He is survived by his widow, the former Miss Eva Simpkins of Cairo.  Funeral services were held at Columbus Friday.

             (The Ohio Death Index states that Edwin J. Charles died in Columbus, Ohio, 19 Mar 1941.  J. Edwin Charles was buried in Union Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ANDREW POE DIES AT HIS HOME IN MOUNDS

             Andrew Poe, age 50, passed away at his home in Mounds Friday afternoon, March 21, at 12:35 o’clock after an illness of two months.

             Besides his widow, Myrtle, he is survived by four children, Raymond, Andrew Jr., and Mrs. Thelma Miller of Benton Harbor, Mich., and Mildred Poe of Mounds; one granddaughter; a brother, Fred Poe of Denver, Colo.; four stepchildren; and other relatives.

             Mr. Poe was employed for many years as distributor of Raleigh products, but for the past year had been operating a confectionery at Mounds.

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home in Mounds Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, with Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the First Methodist Church, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

 

MRS. G. E. RITTER DIES

             Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. G. E. Ritter, who passed away at her home in Richmond Hill, N.Y., Friday night at 9 o’clock following an illness of several weeks.

             Mrs. Ritter was the mother of Mrs. Carolyn Perks, formerly of Mound City and had made a number of friends in this city during her frequent visits with her daughter.

             Burial was made in Richmond Hill.

             (This may be the same person as Carolina A. Ritter, who was born about 1869 and died 21 Mar 1941, in Queens, New York.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF PULASKI COUNTY DIES

             Word has been received of the death of George W. Kelley, age 72, who passed away at his home in St. Louis Saturday.

             Mr. Kelley was born and raised in Pulaski County and was a half-brother of the late James D. Kelley who resided in Ullin.

             Burial was made at Liberty Cemetery near Pulaski Tuesday afternoon.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Apr 1941:

Mrs. C. O. Kean

             Mrs. Hattie Kean, age 60, passed away Friday evening, March 28, at 8:15 o’clock at her home in Karnak after an illness of two months.

             Besides her husband, C. O. Kean, she is survived by four sons, Owen, Joe and John Kean of Karnak and Vance Wilson of Karnak; four daughters, Mrs. Martha Clark of Grand Chain, Mrs. Louise Eastwood of Karnak, and Misses Alice and Kathleen Kean of Karnak; three sisters, Mrs. May Prater of Manchester, Tenn., Mrs. Bertha Patterson of Summitville, Tenn., and Mrs. Kate Keys of Marion, Ill.; two brothers, Bill Lowe and Cecil Lowe of Manchester.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.  Pallbearers were Charles, Kenneth, Junior and Wayne Kean; and James and Kenneth Keys.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificates states that Hattie E. Kean was born 12 Mar 1881, in Middle Tennessee, the daughter of John Lowe, a native of Pennsylvania, died 28 Mar 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of G. O. Kean, and was buried at Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Belknap Masonic Cemetery reads:  Mother Hattie E. Kean 1881-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Lillian Douglas

             Lillian Douglas, age 17, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Douglas, in Karnak Monday evening, March 31, at 6 o’clock.

             Besides her parents she is survived by one sister, Delphia, of Karnak; and four brothers, Clyde, Clark and Wayne of Karnak and Raymond of Aurora.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.  Interment was made in Salem Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Lillian Viola Douglas states she was born 4 Sep 1923, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Claude Douglas and Bertis Bunch, natives of Massac Co., Ill., died 31 Mar 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 4, Massac Co., Ill.  Her marker in Lower Salem Baptist Church Cemetery reads:  Lillian V. Douglas 1923-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. R. W. England Dies Wednesday at Home Here

             Mrs. Sophia England, age 57 years, passed away Wednesday morning, April 2, at her home on North McKinley Avenue, after an illness of two weeks.  Mrs. England was the wife of R. W. England, county commissioner of Pulaski County for the past 27 years.

             She is survived by her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Gladys McGee of Mounds and Mrs. Violet Stokes of St. Louis; two sons, Lois England of Springfield and Wardell England, a student at the Southern Illinois Normal University, Carbondale.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 1 o’clock at the Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, this city, with the Donaldson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Rome Wellington England (col.) married on 11 Jan 1903, by W. B. Jones, Baptist minister, in Henry Co., Tenn., Sophie Brown (col.).  P. A. England was bondsman.  According to her death certificate, Sophie Elizabeth England was born 2 Mar 1884, in Corinth, Tenn., the daughter of Alfred Brown and Asglee Jones, a native of Curla, Tenn., died 2 Apr 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Rome England, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Apr 1941:

MRS. E. W. ENGLAND DIES AT HER HOME IN MOUNDS

             Mrs. Sophia England, age 57, passed away Wednesday morning at her home in Mounds after an illness of two weeks.

             Mrs. England was the wife of E. W. England, county commissioner of Pulaski County for the past twenty-seven years.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 1:00 p.m. at the Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church in Mounds.  Donaldson Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements.

 

LILLIAN DOUGLAS DIES AT HOME IN KARNAK

             Lillian Douglas, age 17, passed away at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Douglas, in Karnak Monday evening at 6 o’clock.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by one sister, Delphia of Karnak; and four brothers, Clyde, Clark and Wayne of Karnak and Raymond of Aurora.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak, Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.  Interment was made in Salem Cemetery.

 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. LULA PARKER

             Mrs. Lula Benson Parker, age 79, who has been making her home in this city with her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Anna Kreager, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital at 10:55 Tuesday night following an illness of only a week.

             She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. John M. Marshall of Cairo and Mrs. L. B. Elliott of Baton Rouge, La.; two sons, D. C. Parker of Vicksburg, Miss., and Neill Parker of St. Louis, Mo.; eight grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

             Mrs. Parker was a devoted member of the First Christian Church and a fine Christian character.  Her husband preceded her in death last June.

             Funeral services were held at the Berbling Funeral Home at 2 p.m. Thursday, with Rev. O. L. Angel of Metropolis, former pastor of the First Christian Church of Cairo, officiating.  Burial was made in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Lula Benson Parker, retired, of Graves Co., Ky., was born 7 Dec 1861, in Graves Co., Ky., daughter of Martin C. Benson and Mary Jane Williams, natives of Robinson Co., Ky., died 1 Apr 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Dyas Parker, and was buried at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Lula B. Parker Dec. 7, 1861 Apr. 1, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES

             Charles F. Schluder, lifetime resident of the Dongola community, passed away at his farm home near Dongola at 2:30 o’clock Friday morning, March 28, following a critical illness of several days, although he had been in failing health for several years.  Mr. Schluder was a prominent and highly respected farmer, born and reared in Union County, where he had spent all his life on the farm on which he passed away.  He was 74 years old.

             Mr. Schluder is survived by his wife, Birdie; three sons, Ira of Oxford, Ohio, and Clyde and Harold of Dongola; two sisters, Mrs. Alice Casper of Dongola and Mrs. Emma Kegwin of Walnut, Illinois.  He also leaves nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Lutheran church in Dongola, with the Rev. William E. Bridges, pastor of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Charles Frank Schluter, farmer, was born 9 Jun 1866, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the son of Frederick Schluter and Mary Louise Tate, natives of Germany, died 28 Mar 1941, in Union Co., Ill., husband of Birdie Schluter, and was buried in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in the American Legion Cemetery in Dongola reads:  Birdie J. Schluter 1874-1956 Charles F. Schluter 1866-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Dexter, Mrs. Cora Miller, Mr. and Mrs. John George attended the funeral of Charles Schluter, Sr., in Dongola Sunday afternoon.  (Beech Grove)

 

MRS. HATTIE KEAN DIES AT HER HOME IN KARNAK

             Mrs. Hattie Kean, age 60, passed away Friday evening, March 28, at 3:15 o’clock at her home in Karnak after an illness of two months.

             Besides her husband, C. O. Kean; she is survived by four sons, Owen, Joe and John Kean of Karnak and Vance Wilson of Karnak; four daughters, Mrs. Martha Clark of Grand Chain, Mrs. Louise Eastwood of Karnak and Misses Alice and Kathleen Kean of Karnak; three sisters, Mrs. May Prater of Manchester, Tenn., Mrs. Bertha Patterson of Summitville, Tenn., and Mrs. Kate Keys of Marion, Ill.; two brothers, Bill Lowe and Cecil Lowe of Manchester.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.

 

TILMAN MANUS DIES AT HIS HOME IN ANNA

             Tilman Manus, who would have observed his 106th birthday anniversary April 9, died at his home in Anna last Thursday night after an illness of two weeks.  He was Union County’s last surviving Civil War veteran, having served throughout the war in the Union Army.  Born in Tennessee, he was disowned by his family when he joined the army.

             Manus came to Union County when he was 21 years old and spent the rest of his life in this area.  He witnessed the debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas at Jonesboro, shortly before the former was elected President.—Cobden Review

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Apr 1941:

Mound City Negro Found Dead in Baseball Park

             Willie McMurry (Billy Moon), colored, World War veteran, was found dead in the baseball park, South Mounds, early Sunday morning.  He had been stabbed in the base of the neck, the knife having severed the jugular vein.

             County officials stated that their investigation led them to believe that Sally Williams alias Sally Young, also colored, of Mound City, knew something about the murder, as certain ones reported having seen the two together late Saturday night.

             Within a few hours the girl went to Mound City from the home of an uncle in Cairo and gave herself up to Sheriff I. J. Hudson, pleading self-defense as the cause.  The coroner’s jury held the girl for action by the grand jury.

             (The death certificate states that Willie Van McCurry, railroad worker, was born in November 1894, in Tennessee, the son of Will McCurry and Addie Hooker, natives of Tennessee, died 5 Apr 1941, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Inez McCurry, and was buried in the National Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His interment record states that Will McCurry enlisted on 1 Aug 1918, and was honorably discharged 20 Jan 1919 as a corporal in Co. A, Developmental Battalion No. 2, 161st Depot Brigade at Camp Grant, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Apr 1941:

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Beaupre and daughter, Virginia, and son, Everett, returned Tuesday to their home in Detroit after being called here by the death of Mr. Beaupre’s mother, Mrs. Lillie Beaupre.

 

MRS. LILLIE BEAUPRE DIES

             Mrs. Lillie V. Beaupre, 75 years old, died at 2 o’clock Saturday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Rutledge, on Poplar Street in this city.  She had been a resident of Mound City for the past 55 years.  Her husband died 11 years ago.  She is survived by her daughter and one son, Arthur Beaupre, of Detroit; four grandchildren and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the James Funeral Home Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. S. L. Hagen, pastor of the Church of the Redeemer of Cairo, officiating.  Burial was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (According to her death certificate, Lillie V. Beaupre, of Mound City, Ill., was born 22 Feb 1866, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Isaac Yost and Rebecca Mullen, natives of Ohio, died 5 Apr 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Henry Beaupre, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Lillie V. Beaupre 1866-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Apr 1941:

Joe Rollins

             Joe Rollins, age 75, passed away at the Keys’ home at Belknap Thursday morning, April 10, at 6 o’clock.  Mr. Rollins had been ill for only a few days but had been in failing health for the past year.  He had made his home in Belknap for the past 60 years.  There are no close surviving relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Belknap Methodist Church Saturday morning at 10 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

 

Mrs. Sudie Mercer

             Mrs. Sudie Mercer, age 93, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gus Stern, this city, Tuesday morning, April 15, at 5 o’clock.  Mrs. Mercer was born in Graves County, Kentucky, March 4, 1848.

             Besides Mrs. Stern she is survived by two other daughters, Mrs. John Stern of Pulaski and Mrs. Eva Marble of Granite City; two sons, Jim Reeves of Mounds and Otis Reeves of Selma, Tenn.; 11 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Assembly of God church Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock with Rev. Roberts officiating.  Interment was made in East Prairie, Mo., with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge.

            

Anita Sue Parker

             Anita Sue Parker, seven-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Parker, passed away at the home of her parents in Mound City Saturday evening at 6:30 o’clock after an illness of several weeks.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by five sisters, Mrs. Norma Alley, Mrs. Virginia Clardie, Mrs. Florence Harp, Mrs. Rosemary VanMeter and Miss Martha Parker, all of Mound City; two half-sisters, Mrs. Helen Carrolton of Baton Rouge, La., Miss Gladys Parker of Woodriver, Ill.; four brothers, William Sisk, John, Louis and Russell Parker; two half-brothers, Carlos and Albert of Mound City; and her maternal grandfather, William Buckle, of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Pentecostal church with Rev. Fred Harp officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Anida Sue Parker, according to her death certificate, was born 27 May 1933, in Mound City, Ill., the son of George Parker and Nora Buckles, natives of Illinois, died 12 Apr 1941, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Half-Sister of Mrs. E. G. Wildy Dies in Cairo Monday Morning

             Mrs. Virginia Ann Walter, age 72, wife of John Walter, passed away at her home 217 Ninth Street, Cairo, Monday, at 4 o’clock a.m.  Mrs. Walter had been in failing health for several years.

             She was a member of the First Methodist Church of Cairo and had resided at the home of Ninth Street for the past 40 years.

             Besides her husband, she is survived by two children, William G. Walter of Detroit and Mrs. Ada Osgood of Cairo; two half-brothers, Priest Thomas of America and J. H. Thomas of Cairo; one half-sister, Mrs. E. G. Wildy of Mounds; two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Cairo First Methodist Church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with Rev. L. S. McKown, pastor, officiating.  Burial was in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Virginia Ann Walter was born 8 Sep 1868, in Camden, Tenn., died 14 Apr 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of John Walter, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery reads:  —Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. August Crosson received a message Thursday afternoon telling them of the death of Mrs. Tom Guthrie of Blythe, Calif.  Mr. and Mrs. Guthrie resided here a number of years ago and will be remembered by many.  Mr. Guthrie survives his wife.  They had no children.

             (Mary Lucille Guthrie was born 19 Sep 1893, in Ohio, the daughter of Miss Fogarty, and died 17 Apr 1941, in Riverside Co., Calif.  She is in the 1940 census of South Broadway St., Palo Verde, Riverside Co., Calif., with her husband, Thomas F. Guthrie, the owner of a billiard hall.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Apr 1941:

ANITA SUE PARKER DIES

             Anita Sue Parker, seven-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Parker, passed away at the home of her parents in Mound City, Saturday evening at 6:30 o’clock after an illness of several weeks.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by five sisters, Mrs. Norma Alley, Mrs. Virginia Clardie, Mrs. Florence Harp, Mrs. Rosemary Van Meter and Miss Martha Parker, all of Mound City; two half-sisters, Mrs. Helen Carollton of Baton Rouge, La., Miss Gladys Parker of Woodriver, Ill.; four brothers, William Sisk, John, Louis and Russell Parker; two half-brothers, Carlos and Albert of Mound City; and her maternal grandfather, William Buckle, of this city.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Pentecostal church with Rev. Fred Harp officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. SUDIE MERCER

             Mrs. Sudie Mercer, age 93, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gus Stern, in Mounds Tuesday morning at 5 o’clock.  Mrs. Mercer was born in Graves County, Ky., March 4, 1843.

             Besides Mrs. Stern, she is survived by two other daughters, Mrs. John Stern of Pulaski and Mrs. Eva Marble of Granite City; two sons, Jim Reeves of Mounds and Otis Reeves of Selma, Tenn.; 11 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild.

             Funeral services were held at the Assembly of God church in Mounds Wednesday afternoon at one o’clock with Rev. Roberts officiating.  Interment was made in East Prairie, Mo.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Apr 1941:

Miles Hoffner

             Miles Hoffner, 83-year-old resident of Perks, died at his home Saturday morning, April 19.  He was a retired section foreman on the C. & E. I. R. R.

             He is survived by his wife, Mary; and seven children:  Mrs. Margaret Oliver of Toledo, Ohio, Mrs. Ollie Wright of Centralia, Mrs. Mary O’Neal of Marion, Mrs. Daisy Langston of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. Della Churchill of Dongola, John of Fornfelt, Mo., and Mrs. Fannie Howell of Alberta, Canada.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church in Perks Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Monroe Osborne of Cairo officiating.  Burial was in the Bridges Cemetery near Perks with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (H. D. M. Hoffner married Mrs. Mary A. Sutliff on 6 Apr 1884, in Johnson Co., Ill.  James H. Sutliff married Mary A. Turner on 22 Oct 1875, in Johnson Co., Ill.  The Social Security claim names the parents of Henry Daniel Miles Hoffner as Simeon J. Hoffner and Margaret C. Lyerly.  The death certificate states that Henry Daniel Miles Hoffner, retired railroad man, was born 26 Dec 1859, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Simeon Hoffner, a native of North Carolina, and Margaret Hoffner, died 19 Apr 1941, in Perks, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mary Hoffner, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

F. E. Beggs

             Frank E. Beggs, age 60, passed away suddenly Friday morning, April 18, at his home in Belknap.

             He is survived by his wife, Olive; five children, Ula Burnham of Belknap, Alma Neal of Harrisburg, Eunice Ledbetter of Harrisburg, and Wayne Beggs of Terre Haute, Ind.; also one sister, Louise Miller of Belknap.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Belknap Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (George W. Beggs married Ollie Dewase on 28 Aug 1870, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Frank E. Beggs, barber, of Belknap, Cache Township, Johnson Co., Ill., was born 5 Apr 1881, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of George E. Beggs, a native of Johnson Co., Ill., and Olive Deweese, a native of Illinois, died 18 Apr 1941, in Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill., widower of Nellie Adkins Beggs, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Belknap, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Frank E. Beggs May 4, 1881 Apr. 18, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sister of Mrs. Charles Guy Dies Saturday in Ullin

             Mrs. Ida Belle Sichling died at her home in Ullin Saturday morning, April 19, at 7:15 o’clock.

             She leaves her husband, Joseph Sichling; four sons, Harry, Edward, Lawrence and Ellis; two daughters, Mrs. Mary Hoffmeier and Miss Edna Sichling, both of Ullin; two sisters, Mrs. Nora Stull of Ullin and Mrs. Julia Guy of this city; one brother, Wesley Leadbetter of Ullin; also four grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Methodist church of Ullin with burial in New Hope Cemetery.

             (Joseph Sichling, 26, married Ida Ledbetter, 19, on 25 Dec 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William P. Leadbetter married Aurelda Diller on 18 Jan 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Ida Bell Sichling, housewife, of Ullin, Ill., was born 3 Nov 1874, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Perry Ledbetter and Armilda Dillon, a native of Texas, died 19 Apr 1941, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Joseph Sichling, and was buried in New Hope Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.–Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Charles E. Koonce

             Mrs. Linnie Hooppaw Koonce, widow of the late Charles E. Koonce died at her home west of town Friday evening, April 18, following an illness of long duration.  Her age at death was 81 years and for the last 34 years she had lived in and near Mounds.  Her husband preceded her in death six years ago.

             While still active, this couple conducted Koonce Hotel on First Street for a number of years and drew many people to Mounds because of their excellent meals and service.

Mrs. Koonce leaves three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Sheets of Route One, Mounds; Mrs. Nettie Braswell of Carterville and Mrs. Hazel Utley of Omaha and McClure; one son, Edgar Koonce, Mounds; two brothers, George Hooppaw of Mound City and William Hooppaw of Pulaski; 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.  She had the untiring devotion of her family during her illness.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the First Methodist Church with Rev. J. Rue Reid in the pulpit.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

Out-of-town persons, other than the immediate relatives, who attended the services were:  Mrs. Elizabeth Utley, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Utley and niece, Mrs. Amos Edwards, Miss Murie Armstrong, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Meyer, all of Omaha; Mrs. Ben Davis of Eldorado, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Koonce and Mrs. Ralph Koonce of Greenville, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dowell, Mr. and Mrs. James Bennett, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Talley, Mrs. J. W. Hayton, Mrs. Jennie Phemister and Mrs. Bess Harris, all of Carterville.

             (The death certificate of Malinda Koonce states that she was born 6 Aug 1859, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Thomas Hooppaw and Nillie Jones, natives of Illinois, died 18 Apr 1941, in Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Charles E. Koonce, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Aged Colored Resident Dies Monday Morning

             E. Henry (Son) Gay, mail messenger for the Mounds Post Office for many years, died at his home here at 12:10 a.m. Monday.  He had worked as usual the previous Wednesday, but had been in failing health for some time.  Gay,” as he was called, was a familiar character on the streets, especially between the Post Office and Illinois Central station.

             He is survived by a niece, Mrs. Mamie New of Fulton, Ky., who reached his bedside before his death.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the A. M. E. church with the Rev. Mr. Taborn officiating.

             (His death certificate state that Henry Gay, common laborer, was born about 1870 in Gibson Co., Tenn., the son of Tom Gay, a native of Livingston Co., Tenn., and Mary Ann James, a native of Gibson Co., Tenn., died 21 Apr 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to all neighbors and friends for their kindness during the illness and following the death of our beloved mother, Mrs. Linnie Koonce.  The cards of sympathy, the beautiful flowers, the offer of cars, the kindly words and ministrations of all, especially the minister and those who sang, will always be gratefully remembered.

The Family

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Apr 1941:

MRS. LINNIE KOONCE DIES

             Mrs. Linnie Koonce, age 81, passed away at her home west of Mounds Friday evening at 6:40 o’clock after an illness of many months.  She had resided in and near Mounds for the past 34 years.  She was the wife of the late Charles K. Koonce, who preceded her in death six years ago.

             Surviving her are three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Sheets of Mounds, Mrs. Nettie Braswell of Carterville and Mrs. Hazel Utley of Omaha, Ill.; one son, Edgar Koonce, of Mounds; two brothers, George Hooppaw of Mound City and William Hooppaw of Pulaski; 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Mounds Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with Rev. J. Rue Reid officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

MRS. IDA BELLE SICHLING

             Mrs. Ida Belle Sichling passed away at her home in Ullin Saturday morning at 7:15 o’clock.  She is survived by her husband, Joseph Sichling; four sons, Harry, Edward, Lawrence, and Ellis; two daughters, Mrs. Mary Hoffmier and Miss Edna Sichling all of Ullin; two sisters, Mrs. Nora Stull of Ullin and Mrs. Julia Guy of Mounds; one brother, Wesley Ledbetter of Ullin; and four grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Ullin Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Interment was made in New Hope Cemetery.

 

MRS. AMANDA J. LENTZ

             Mrs. Amanda J. Lentz, age 73, passed away at her home on a farm near Dongola Wednesday, April 16, after an illness of five weeks.

             She is survived by four children, Cal and Albert and Mrs. Birdie Dillow and Mrs. Effie Halterman; two brothers, Levi and Sherman Sivie; one sister, Mrs. Sam Burns; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, all of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held at Christian Chapel at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. F. Mathis officiating.  Burial was made in Christian Chapel Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Amanda Jane Lentz, of Township 13 south, range 1 east, was born 16 Oct 1867, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of John Sivia and Susan Verble, natives of Illinois, died 16 Apr 1941, in Union Co., Ill., the widow of Sandy Lentz, and was buried in Christian Chapel Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Amanda Lentz Oct. 16, 1878 Apr. 16, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MILES HOFFNER DIES

             Miles Hoffner, 83 year old resident of Perks, passed away at his home Saturday morning.

             He is survived by his wife, Mary; and seven children, Mrs. Margaret Oliver of Toledo, Ohio, Mrs. Ollie Wright of Centralia, Mrs. Mary O’Neal of Marion, Mrs. Daisy Langston of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. Della Churchill of Dongola, John of Fornfelt, Mo., and Mrs. Fannie Howell of Alberta, Canada.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church in Perks Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Monroe Osborne of Cairo officiating.  Burial was made in the Bridges Cemetery near Perks.  Wilson Funeral service was in charge of arrangements.

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

             Mr. and Mrs. August Crosson of Mounds have received a message telling them of the death of Mrs. Tom Guthrie of Blythe, Calif.  Mr. and Mrs. Guthrie resided in Mounds a number of years ago and will be remembered by many.

 

Mrs. Joe Sichling of Ullin was buried Sunday afternoon. (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 May 1941:

One Killed, Six Injured When Cairo Building Falls

             A woman was killed and six others were seriously hurt in Cairo at noon Saturday when an old two-story brick building at 515 Commercial Avenue, Cairo, collapsed without warning.  Mrs. Olar Reed, who, with her husband had only recently moved to Cairo from Goreville, lived upstairs in the building and was found dead in the debris after the collapse.

             The injured, taken from the wreck to the hospital, were Mr. Reed, Mr. and Mrs. Grimm, who were visiting the Reeds, Mrs. O. S. Braden, Joan Braden, her seven-year-old daughter and Mrs. L. Ramage, who was operating a laundry in the downstairs portion of the building, having recently purchased it from Mrs. Braden.

             Other occupants were either out of the building or had what seemed miraculous escapes.

             The building was built before the Civil War and during the war was used as the post office.  This was during the time that General U. S. Grant and many Union troops were located in Cairo.

             (The death certificate of Ola Reed, of Cairo, Ill., states that she was born 18 Jul 1903, in Goreville, Ill., daughter of Monroe Kato, a native of Goreville, Ill., and Minnie Harris, a native of Pleasant Ridge, Ill., died 26 Apr 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of George E. Reed, and was buried in Goreville, Ill.  Her marker in Cana Cemetery in Goreville, Johnson Co., Ill., has a photo of Ola and reads:  Ola Cato Reed July 18, 1903 Apr. 26, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 May 1941:

CYPRESS GIRL DIES WHEN RUN OVER BY TRAIN

             Mound City residents might have wondered about the car which sped through the town on Route 37 about 5 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  It was an automobile in which Louida Mouler, age 8, of Cypress, was being taken to the Cairo hospital after being run over by a train as she attempted to cross in front of the moving locomotive.  She and three young companions had been to the store and were returning to their homes, having to cross the tracks.  Louida’s friends made it across the tracks.  The engine’s bell was rung and the whistle sounded, but Louida ran in front of the train.  Both of her legs were cut off.  Verdict of accidental death was returned.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Moulder of Cypress.

             (Her death certificate states that Louida Elaine Moulder, school girl, of Cypress, Ill., was born 1 Oct 1932, in Scotland, Ark., the daughter of Curtis Moulder and Ora Lee Montgomery, natives of Scotland, Ark., died 27 Apr 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried at Cypress, Ill.  Her marker in Garden of Memories Cemetery in Sikeston, Scott Co., Mo., reads:  Louida Elaine Moulder Oct. 1, 1932 Apr. 27, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ONE DIES; 6 RECOVERING AFTER BUILDING CRASH

             Mrs. George Reed, age 37, died as a result of injuries received when an old two-story building at 515 Commercial Ave., in Cairo collapsed and crashed to the ground about noon Saturday, and six persons injured in the crash are recovering.

             Mrs. Harold Ramage, operator of a laundry in the building, is in the Cairo hospital seriously injured.  Mr. and Mrs. Grimm were hurt by falling debris and Mrs. Grimm remains at the hospital for treatment.  Mr. Grimm was released after receiving treatment, as was George Reed, husband of the woman who died.  Mrs. O. S. Braden, formerly operator of the laundry known as Braden’s Laundry, and her daughter, Joan, are also recovering.

             Witnesses to the collapse state there were no explosions before the building buckled and that it fell in at the sides and out toward the front.

             All but Mrs. Ramage were on the second floor of the building, eating lunch when the structure fell.  Mrs. Ramage was on the ground floor.

             Fire started near Mrs. Braden and her daughter, but firemen were able to push a hose through a small opening so Mrs. Braden could direct a stream of water on the fire.  Mrs. Braden, who was also near Mrs. Reed, said she talked in agony a few minutes, then prayed and became silent.  She died on the way to the hospital.

             Age has been advanced as cause for the building collapse. The building was one of the oldest in Cairo, having been used for a post office during the Civil War.  Construction materials of that day were decidedly inferior to those of today, it was pointed out in advancing reasons for the accident, and soft brick and loose mortar in the walls weakened.

             A Caterpillar tractor was used to pull sections of the flooring from the pile of debris so volunteer workers could search for the injured.  Large crowds gathered while the men were working, police and highway patrolmen being kept busy pushing the crowd back.

             Rumors of the shifting sands, underground rivers, etc., were spreading Saturday.  City officials could find no basis for the truth of these rumors, age being generally accepted as the real reason for the building’s collapse.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 May 1941:

Mrs. James Meehan

             Mrs. Mollie Meehan, widow of the late James Meehan, passed away suddenly Friday night, May 2, at the Loretta Hospital in Chicago.

             Mrs. Meehan was born in Villa Ridge and had spent most of her life in Cairo until moving to Chicago with her family in 1916.

             She is survived by three sons, Clarence of Cleveland, Ohio, John and Robert of Chicago; one daughter, Miss Inez Meehan of Chicago; a sister, Mrs. G. P. Crabtree of Cairo; and five grandchildren.  Two nieces, Misses Ruth and Marine Crabtree of Cairo; and a nephew, Dr. Joe Crabtree of Villa Park, also survive her.

             Burial was made in Chicago.

             (Her death certificate states that Mollie Meehan, of Chicago, Ill., was born 23 May 1869, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the daughter of Timothy Coyle and Miss Kelly, died 2 May 1941, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., widow of James Meehan, and was buried in Mt. Carmel Cemetery in Proviso, Cook Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Thomas Stalcup

             Word was received by friends in Mounds Saturday morning of the death of Tom Stalcup at his home in Grantsburg, Friday.

             Mr. Stalcup, a former resident of Mounds and brother of B. A. Stalcup of Centralia, had been ill for some time.

             Funeral services were held at Grantsburg Sunday afternoon.

             (Thomas A. Stalcup married Mary F. Keith on 29 Dec 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His 1918 draft registration states Thomas William Stalcup was a farmer at Grantsburg and his nearest relative was Mable Stalcup.  His death certificate states that Thomas William Stalcup, farmer, was born 26 Feb 1898, in Wynona Co., Miss., the son of Thomas A. Stalcup and Mary I. Keith, natives of Johnson Co., Ill.,  died 2 May 1941, in Grantsburg, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in Wartrace Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Thomas W. Stalcup 1898-1941 Mabel S. Stalcup 1896-1974.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. J. B. Huckleberry

             Mrs. Jessie Hunley Huckleberry, age 71, passed away Saturday morning at 2:50 o’clock at her home in Mound City following a protracted illness.  Mrs. Huckleberry was born in Mound City in the home in which she died and had spent her entire life there.

             She was the youngest daughter of Captain William Hamilton, who built and operated the Marine Ways in Mound City during the Civil War.

             Besides her husband, Ira B. Huckleberry, she is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Mary Batson and Mrs. Geraldine Batson of Tamaroa; one son, J. B. Huckleberry of Mound City; a brother, Alfred S. Hamilton of Caruthersville, Mo.; one niece, Miss Josephine L. Barry of Memphis; and seven grandchildren.

             Services were held at the First Methodist Church in Mound City of which she was a member, Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock.  Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor, officiated.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Ira Huckelberry, 30, of Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., married Jessie Hambleton, 24, of Mound City, Ill., on 30 Dec 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Jessie Hunley Huckleberry was born 31 Mar 1870, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of William Hambleton, a native of Maryland, and Sarah E. Kain, a native of Ohio, died 3 May 1941, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Pioneer Resident Dies Suddenly Monday Morning

             Alex Deeslie, one of the first residents of what is now known as Mounds, died very suddenly Monday morning, May 5, at 7 o’clock while working in the back yard of his home place on South Reader Avenue, with his son-in-law, Homer McKenzie.  His age was 73 years.

             Born in Harrison County, Ohio, near Dennison, Mr. Deeslie, when 13 years old, began working for a railroad company in Ohio.  On December 22, 1887, he was married to his childhood sweetheart, Miss Lorena Auld of Dennison, Ohio.

             On June 25, 1891, he arrived here to serve as boiler maker for the Illinois Central Railroad, continuing in the employment of this same company until his retirement from service.  Mrs. Deeslie joined him a month or more later and they built one of the first temporary houses in the place, located back of the roundhouse.  Through all these years this couple lived in this community.  On Dec. 22, 1937, Mr. and Mrs. Deeslie celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.  Mrs. Deeslie passed away August 27, 1940, following a fall down the steps at her home.  Since that time their daughter, Mrs. May Sweaney, has made her home with her father, who at his retirement and for many years previous was an I. C. engineer.

             Surviving are five daughters, Mrs. May Sweaney, Mrs. Edna McKenzie and Mrs. Wilda McKenzie of Michigan City, Miss., Mrs. Florence Doughty of Webster Groves, Mo., and Mrs. Helen Hunt of Mound City; also ten grandchildren and other relatives.

             All five of his daughters were here to attend his funeral.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational church, Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.

             Masonic rites were conducted at the graveside in Spencer Heights Cemetery by Trinity Lodge No. 562, A. F. & A. M., of which he was a member.  Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His Social Security application states Alexander Deeslie was born in Pittsburg, Alleghany Co., Pa.  His death certificate states that Alexander Samuel Deeslie, retired Illinois Central locomotive engineer, was born 19 Oct 1867, in Alleghany Co., Pa., the son of Samuel Deeslie, a native of Bhern, Switzerland, and Barbra Baker, a native of Pennsylvania, died 5 May 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Memorial Cemetery in Mounds reads:  Father Alex Deeslie 1867-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Sweaney of St. Louis attended the funeral services for Alex Deeslie Wednesday at the Congregational church.

 

Rev. and Mrs. J. Rue Reid, Mrs. William Earle, Mrs. Ray Scott and Mrs. Frank Bour were in Grantsburg Sunday afternoon in attendance at the funeral of Tom Stalcup.

 

Mrs. Jack Hofer, Miss Florence Irene Calvert and James Howard McKenzie of St. Louis, were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of their grandfather, Alex Deeslie.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 May 1941:

DETAILS IN DEATH OF GIRL NEAR KARNAK

             Miss Agnes Daly, employee of the Massac County Relief Administration, was fatally injured in an automobile accident at the crest of a hill between Boaz and Hillerman in Massac County, just east of Karnak, last Wednesday, April 30.

             Just as Miss Daly drove over the rise, she met another car driven by Wayne Doudy, 24, of Goreville, driver and piano player for the Wilson Funeral Home.  A head-on collision resulted.  Two other occupants of Miss Daly’s car, Mrs. O. E. Davis and granddaughter, Frances Dianne Hogue, were slightly injured.

             Doudy was alone.  He was taken to a hospital where he received treatment for minor injuries.  The other injured persons were taken to Metropolis for treatment.

             (The original Social Security application gives her name as Agnes Estella Daly, born 31 Jan 1892, in Metropolis, Ill.  Her death certificate states that Agnes E. Daly, divorced, social welfare relief investigator, was born 30 Jan 1891, in Metropolis, Ill., the daughter of Sam W. Daly, a native of Hamilton Co., Ind., and Mary Ellen Kennedy, a native of Massac Co., Ill., died 30 Apr 1941, in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Among those from out-of-town who attended the funeral of Mrs. Jessie Huckleberry Sunday, May 4, were Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Eaton and daughter of Carbondale, Ill.; Miss Mildred Batson and Mr. and Mrs. Dave Church all of Anna; Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Farril of Mounds; Mr. and Mrs. Theo Endicott and family, also of Mounds; Mrs. Dora Armstrong and Miss Laverne Armstrong of Carterville, Mrs. Birdie Dougherty of Metropolis; Mrs. Ida McCartney of Metropolis, Mrs. Josephine Barry of Memphis, Mrs. J. R. Battson of Pinckneyville, Miss Nora Marie Hall of Carterville, Mrs. George Cowles, Sr., and Mrs. Charles Cowells of Mounds.

                                                         

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             Mrs. Jessie Hunley Huckleberry, age 71, passed away Saturday morning at 2:50 o’clock at her home in this city following an illness of several months.  Mrs. Huckleberry was born in Mound City in the home in which she died and had spent her entire life in this city.

             She was the youngest daughter of Captain William Hamilton, who built and operated the Marine Ways in Mound City during the Civil War.

             Besides her husband, Ira B. Huckleberry; she is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Mary Batson and Mrs. Geraldine Batson of Tamaroa; one son, J. B. Huckleberry of Mound City; a brother, Alfred S. Hamilton of Caruthersville, Mo.; one niece, Miss Josephine L. Barry of Memphis; and seven grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church in Mound City Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock.  Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor, officiated.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

ALEX DEESLIE DIED MONDAY

             Alex Deeslie, age 73, passed away very suddenly Monday morning at 7 o’clock while working in the tool shed in his back yard with his son-in-law, Homer McKenzie.

             Mr. Deeslie, a retired Illinois Central engineer, had made his home in Mounds since 1891.  He was well known and had many friends in this vicinity.  His wife preceded him in death nine months ago following a fall on their back porch.

             He is survived by five daughters, Mrs. May Sweaney, who made her home with her father, Mrs. Homer McKenzie and J. B. McKenzie of Michigan City, Miss., Mrs. H. W. Doughty of Webster Groves, Mo., and Mrs. M. C. Hunt of Mound City.  Ten grandchildren and many other relatives also survive him.

             He was a member of Trinity Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the First Congregational Church at Mounds Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.

             Masonic rites were conducted at the grave in Spencer Heights Cemetery by Trinity Lodge A. F. & A. M.

 

DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES

             John W. Walker, age 81, passed away at his home in Dongola Sunday afternoon.  Mr. Walker was one of Dongola’s oldest business men, having been in the stove repair business for 50 years.  He had been in failing health for the past several months.

             He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Elmer J. Ford and Mrs. Leo Eddleman of Dongola; two sons, Daniel T. and Russell T. of Chicago; one sister, Margaret Ballowe of Thopton, Calif.; 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. H. G. Peterson officiating.  Burial was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that John Wesley Walker, tinner, of Dongola, Ill., was born 19 Mar 1860, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of James C. Walker, a native of Goreville, Ill., and Mary E. Simpson, a native of Illinois, died 4 May 1941, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the wife of Frances Walker, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  John W. Walker Mar. 19, 1860 May 4, 1941 Margaret E. Walker Sep. 1, 1878 May 3, 1934.—Darrel Dexter)

 

NEGRO KILLED IN ACCIDENT NEAR WETAUG

             Charles Edward Madison, St. Louis Negro, was fatally injured early Monday morning when the car he was driving plunged off the road near Wetaug.  He was taken to the Cairo hospital where he died.  Several companions of Madison’s were injured in the accident, cause of which was believed to be Madison’s falling asleep.  A coroner’s jury returned a verdict to that effect.

             Four other occupants of the car received only slight injuries.  Madison was unconscious when found several feet from the car.

             (According to his death certificate, Charles Edward Eugene Madison, common laborer, was born 14 Feb 1918, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Mitchel Madison, a native of Mounds, Ill., and Julia Buren, died 5 May 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Bell Madison, and was buried in Washington Cemetery in St. Louis, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 May 1941:

Mrs. James Mahoney Dies Following Six Weeks Illness

             Mrs. Cicely Sexton Mahoney died Thursday afternoon, May 8, at 4:30 o’clock at her home in Valley Recluse following an illness of six weeks during which time her family had tenderly nursed her with the hope that she might rally.

             Cicely Secton was born May 23, 1863, in Valley Recluse community only one mile from the home in which she died.  Had she lived until May 23 of this year, her age would have been 78.  In 1890 she was married to James Mahoney, member of a pioneer family, his father, T. C. Mahoney having come by flatboat down the Ohio from Cincinnati with a group of artisans brought by the Emporium Company to Mound City in 1857.  Her husband passed away September 6, 1938.

             Surviving are three sons, Ray and Dewey of this city and William, who with his wife, lived on the old home place in Valley Recluse with his mother.  She also leaves three grandchildren, Marianne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Mahoney; Daisy Ray and James Wilson, children of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Mahoney.

             (James Mahoney married Cicely Sexton on 10 Jul 1890, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Patrick Sexton married Mary Ann Alleman on 28 Nov 1862, Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Cecily Mahoney states she was born 23 May 1863, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Pat Sexton, a native of Ireland, and Mary Allen, a native of Switzerland,  died 8 May 1941, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of James Mahoney, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Patrick

             John Patrick died at the home of his brother, Moses, in Grand Chain Sunday evening, May 11, at 5 o’clock at the age of 78.

             He is survived by his brother, also several nephews and nieces.

             Funeral services were held at Cache Chapel Church near Ullin Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Hal Corzine officiating.  Interment was made in Cache Chapel Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (According to the death certificate of John Patrick, farmer, of New Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., he was born 22 Jan 1863, in Grundy Co., Tenn., the son of B. L. Patrick, a native of Grundy Co., Tenn., and Rebecca Croft, died 11 May 1941, in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Homer McKenzie and family and Mrs. J. R. McKenzie and family of Michigan City, Miss., Mrs. H. W. Doughty and daughter Joan of Webster Groves, Mo., have returned to their homes having been called here by the sudden death of their father, Alex Deeslie.

 

Robert Fisher

             Robert Fisher, age 64, died at his home in Karnak, Monday morning, May 12, at 6 o’clock.  Mr. Fisher had been in failing health for the past year.

             He is survived by his wife, Retta; three sons, Omer and Buell of Karnak and Herschell of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at Belknap Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with Rev. W. L. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Burial was in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap, with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (According to the death certificate, Robert A. Fisher, farmer, of Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 28 Feb 1877, in Belknap, Ill., the son of Thomas Fisher, a native of Illinois, died 12 May 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Retta Fisher, and was buried in Belknap Masonic Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Retta Fisher 1877-1965 Robert Fisher 1877-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the acts of kindness, messages of sympathy and the beautiful floral offerings received from our many friends during our recent sad bereavement in the loss of our beloved father, Alex Deeslie.

The Family

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the acts of kindness, messages of sympathy and beautiful floral offerings received from our many friends during our recent bereavement in the loss of our beloved mother, Cicely Mahoney.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Mahoney

Mr. and Mrs. William Mahoney

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Mahoney

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 May 1941:

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the acts of kindness, messages of sympathy and beautiful floral offerings received from our many friends during our recent sad bereavement in the loss of our beloved father, Alex Deesle.

The Family

 

PROMINENT RESIDENT OF PULASKI COUNTY DIES

             Miss Cicely Mahoney, widow of the late James Mahoney, a prominent resident of Pulaski County, died at her home in Valley Recluse Thursday afternoon, May 8, at 4:30 o’clock, following an illness of six weeks.

             She is survived by three sons, Ray, William and Dewey Mahoney, all of Mounds; three grandchildren, Marianne, Daisey Ray and James Wilson Mahoney; and three nieces.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

GRAND CHAIN RESIDENT DIES

             John Patrick, known to many as “Uncle John,” died at the home of his brother, Moses, in Grand Chain Sunday evening at 5 o’clock at the age of 78.

             Besides his brother, he is survived by several nephews and nieces.

             Funeral services were held at the Cache Chapel Church near Ullin Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Hal Corzine officiated.  Burial was made in Cache Chapel Cemetery.

 

DEATH CLAIMS ROBERT FISHER

             Robert Fisher, age 64, died at his home in Karnak Monday morning at 6 o’clock.  Mr. Fisher had been in failing health for the past year.

             He is survived by his wife, Retta; three sons, Omer and Buell and Karnak and Herschell of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at Belknap Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins of Karnak officiating. Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             Mrs. Maude Wimpey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Littlejohn, was born at America, Ill., Sept. 2, 1904, and died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Centralia, Ill., May 3, 1941, at the age of 36 years and 6 months.

             At the age of ten, with her mother, they moved to Mound City, Ill., where she completed her school work, graduating from high school in 1923.

             On December 28, 1925, she was united in marriage to Leo Watkins of Chicago, Ill.  To this union one daughter, Vivian Elaine, was born.  In 1930 she was married to Mr. Edward Wimpey; two daughters, Mavis Jean and Shirley Nan were born.

             In 1933 they moved to Centralia, Ill., from Bluford, Ill., making their home with her mother.  In 1938 Mrs. Wimpey united with the First Methodist Church of Centralia.  Mr. Wimpey preceded her in death.  Besides the above named, she leaves one sister, Mrs. Nan Durning of Detroit, Mich.; one brother, Edwin Littlejohn, of St. Louis; one aunt, Mrs. A. C. Beens of East St. Louis; two uncles, Edwin S. Snyder of Centralia, Ill., and Sam Littlejohn of Jonesboro, Ill.

             (The death certificate of Maude Elaine Wimpey states she was born 3 Sep 1904, in America, Ill., the daughter of Frank Littlejohn, a native of Ullin, Ill., and Flossie Snyder, a native of America, Ill. died 2 May 1941, in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill., and was buried at Centralia, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 May 1941:

Cairo’s Oldest Native Citizen Dies Saturday

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon for Charles Filmore Arter, 86, of Cairo, who died suddenly Saturday afternoon at 2:20 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William J. Dean, 213 Third Street, with who he had lived for the past 13 years.

             Although he had been in failing health due to the infirmities of age and had been blind for 11 years, he had been up and about the house Saturday morning and his death was unexpected.  He did not let his blindness handicap him and had shaved himself Friday.  He was preparing to shave again Saturday, but complained that he did not feel very well and retired only a short time before he died.

             No one disputed Mr. Arter’s claim that he was the oldest native Cairoite.  He was born in a house owned by his parents just below the old St. Charles Hotel, now the Halliday, on November 11, 1854.  His father was Charles Daniel Arter and his mother was the former Eliza M. Harrell, who came to Cairo in 1844 at the age of 10.  He was married 63 years ago to Miss Nellie Powers, who died in 1919.  They were the parents of 12 children, only four of who now survive.

             In his younger days, Mr. Arter spent a number of years as clown with the big circuses.  He was always devising ways to entertain children and liked to have them gather around to listen to his stories.  He had a remarkable memory for names and facts and knew everyone and everything about the Cairo of a half century or more ago.  In his later years, he recognized the friends who came to call upon him by their footsteps.

             Surviving Mr. Arter are his four children, B. H. Arter and Everette Arter of Chicago, Mrs. Dose Kenton of Trenton, Tenn., and Mrs. Abbie Dean, with whom he made his home.

             (The death certificate states that Charles Fillmore Arter, retired nurse, of 213 3rd St., Cairo, Ill., was born 11 Nov 1854, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Charles D. Arter and Eliza Harrell, a native of Cleves, Ohio, died 17 May 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widower of Nellie Arter, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Representative Dies Last Week

             Wallace Albert Bandy died at his home in Marion, May 14, from a lingering illness. He had recently been in Barnes Hospital in St. Louis and was operated on for colitis.

             Mr. Bandy was born July 19, 1880, in Sandy Hook, Ky., to William and Sarah Hunter Bandy.  He was a Spanish-American War veteran and a member of the U. F. & W.  Mr. Bandy had followed the occupation of miner, real estate broker, salesman, and was at one time a member of the Illinois General Assembly.  He was a member of the Methodist Church.

             (W. A. Bandy, born about 1880 in Elliott, Ky., married on 11 Sep 1904, in Barboursville, Cabell Co., W. Va., Dora B. Johnson, born about 1883 in Kentucky.  The 1918 draft registration of Wallace Albert Bandy states he resided at 105 N. Lear, Marion, Ill., and was a traveling salesman for American Mine Door Co., in Canton, Ohio.  His wife was Dora Belle Bandy.  The application for a military headstone states that Wallace A. Bandy enlisted on 21 Jul 1898, as a private in Co. H, 4th Kentucky Infantry, and was honorably discharged on 12 Feb 1899.  According to his death certificate, Wallace Albert Bandy, real estate dealer, was born 19 Jul 1880, in Sandy Hook, Ky., the son of William Bandy and Sarah Hunter, a native of Ohio, died 14 May 1941, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Dora Bandy, and was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in West Marion Township, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 May 1941:

FORMER LEVEE FOREMAN HERE KILLED AT BROOKPORT JOB

             Cecil Cusic of Harrisburg, foreman on one phase of the Mounds-Mound City levee job, was killed Monday night while working on the Brookport levee.

             Cusic was driving a tractor towing one of the huge trailers loaded with dirt when the tractor overturned on the steep grade, pinning the driver beneath it.  Cusic died in the Metropolis hospital an hour later.

             The machine which Cusic was driving is similar to those being used on the job south of Mound City,  They rarely overturn because of their tremendous low-slung weight, but Cusic had driven the machine about middle way up the steep incline and had started driving along the levee at an angle.

             (Edward M. Cusic married Anna Storey on 24 Dec 1893, in White Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Cecil William Cusic, Euclid Construction operator, of Harrisburg, Ill., was born 6 Jun 1905, in Illinois, the son of Edward Cusic and Anna Story, natives of Illinois, died 19 May 1941, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Hamilton Co., Ill.  His marker in Concord Cemetery in McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., reads:  Cecil Wm. Cusic June 6, 1905 May 19, 1941 Ruth H. Cusic Dec. 12, 1905 Oct. 7, 1987.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Lair of Metropolis attended the funeral Sunday of Mrs. Adelia Hayden.

 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. ADELIA HAYDEN

             Mrs. Adella B. Hayden, age 76, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mable Logan, in Mound City Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock following an illness of several weeks.  Mrs. Hayden had been a resident of Mound City for the past 16 years.

             She is survived by three daughters, Miss Elizabeth Hayden of Beverly Hills, Calif., Miss Dorothy Hayden of St. Louis, and Mrs. Logan of Mound City; three sons, Ernest of Visida, Calif., Fred of Hamburg, Ark., and Barney of Dewitt, Ark.; one brother, Sam Brown of Greenville, Miss.; one sister, Tissue Lovejoy of San Antonio, Texas; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church in Mound City Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Mrs. E. L. Mavis officiating.  Burial was in Mounds cemetery.

             (According to the death certificate of Adella B. Hayden, widow, of Mound City, Ill., she was born 8 May 1865, in Brookport, Ill., died 16 May 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF PULASKI COUNTY DIES

             Word has been received by Mrs. Lavina Crippen of Ullin of the death of her mother, Mrs. Annie Cooper, a former resident of Pulaski County.

             Mrs. Cooper, who celebrated her 90th birthday on the second of his month, had been bedfast for a number of months and passed away May 14, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Martha Spooner in Alton, Ill.

             Mrs. Cooper was reared in Pulaski County where she spent her entire life until 16 years ago when she went to Alton to make her home with her daughter, Mrs. Spooner.

             She leaves three other daughters besides Mrs. Spooner, being Mrs. Lavina Crippen of Ullin, Mrs. Birdie Miller of Wetaug and Mrs. Essie Ragsdale of Effingham; and a nephew, Sam Thompson, of Ullin.

             Funeral services were held in Wetaug Friday with Rev. Crim of Effingham officiating.  Burial was made in the Wetaug cemetery.

             (James M. Cooper married Mrs. Annie L. Daniels on 11 Jul 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John R. Daniels married Anna E. Chapman on 16 May 1869, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  She lived at 538 Lawton St., Alton, Ill., on 1 May 1927, when she applied for a military headstone for her husband, James Monroe Cooper, who was a corporal in Co. I, 81st Illinois Infantry during the Civil War and died 26 Sep 1924.  The death certificate of Annie E. Cooper states he was born 2 May 1851, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of George W. Chapman and Lethie Little, natives of Portland, Maine, died 14 May 1941, in Alton, Madison Co., Ill., and was buried in Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Sowers Cemetery at Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  Annie Eliza Cooper May 2, 1851 May 14, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 May 1941:

George E. Park Dies Suddenly Tuesday Night

             Funeral services were held here Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the Methodist church for George E. Park, age 28, of Chicago, who died suddenly of heart trouble Tuesday night in a hospital in that city.  He was a son of Mrs. Millie Park and the late E. W. Park, who made their home in Spencer Heights for many years.  Following the death of Mr. Park seven years ago, the family moved to Chicago.

             Surviving are the mother, one sister, Mrs. Mildred Park Vaughn of Fall River, Mass.; three brothers, William, Edward and Jack and many other relatives less near.  Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor, officiated at the funeral.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of George Park, dry goods salesman, of Chicago, Ill., states he was born about 1911 in Flora, Ill., the son of Edward Park, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Mildred Chanse, a native of Bedford, Ireland, died 27 May 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Ethel Park, and was buried in a local cemetery near Mound City, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Memorial Cemetery at Mounds reads:  George E. Park 1910-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Member of Pioneer Family Dies at Villa Ridge Home

             Mrs. Emma Louise Welson died Friday morning, May 23, at her home in Villa Ridge at the age of 83 years.  She had been an invalid for almost six years from the effects of a fall.  She was the last member of one of the oldest pioneer families of Villa Ridge community.

             The closest surviving relatives are cousins.  Her brother, John Welson and wife and her sister, Miss Flo Welson, all of whom lived in the Welson home, preceded her in death.  All were prominent in the life of the community.

             Miss Welson was born May 3, 1853, in Mound City, the daughter of Robert and Margaret Bogel Welson, who emigrated from Germany.  “Miss Emma,” as she was familiarly called, was librarian of the first library in Villa Ridge more than a half century ago.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the James Funeral Home in this city, with the Rev. Mr. Tucker of Thebes, former pastor of the Villa Ridge community church, officiating, assisted by Rev. H. A. Bahr, present pastor.  Burial was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.  Casket bearers were Harry Green, G. W. Aldrich, Louis Graves, Fred Whelan, E. L. Crain and W. E. Rife.

             (The death certificate of Emma Louise Welson states she was born 3 May 1858, in Mound City, Ill.,  the daughter of George Welson and Margaret Vogel, natives of Germany, died 23 May 1941, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Villa Ridge.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Emma Welson 1850-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Rep. Dies

             Former Representative Claude V. Parsons of Golconda, District 24, was found dead Saturday morning, May 24, in his hotel room in Washington, D.C.  His age was 45 years.  He was a bachelor and a Democrat.

             Parsons served from 1930 to 1940, but after his defeat last year, he was appointed first assistant administrator to the U. S. Housing Authority.  In his earlier days he was superintendent of schools in Pope County and also published a weekly newspaper.  Burial was held in Golconda.

             (The 1917 draft registration of Claude Van Cleve Parsons, student, states that he was born 7 Oct 1895, in McCormick, Pope Co., Ill., and claimed physical exemption from service because of a bursted bladder and a pelvis bone out of socket.  He was buried in New Zion Cemetery in McCormick, Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 May 1941:

MISS EMMA WELSON DIES AT HER HOME IN VILLA RIDGE

             Miss Emma Louise Welson, age 83, passed away at her home in Villa Ridge Friday morning at 4:15 o’clock after a prolonged illness.  Miss Welson was the last of the oldest pioneer family of the Villa Ridge community.

             The closest surviving relatives are cousins.  A sister, Miss Flo, and a brother, John F., preceded her in death several years ago.

             “Miss Emma,” as she was familiarly known, had been an invalid for about six years.  More than half a century ago she was librarian of the first library in Villa Ridge.  Her brother, John, and sister, Flo, who preceded her in death, were both active in the social and business life of the vicinity.

             Miss Welson was born May 3, 1853, in Mound City to Robert and Margaret Vogel Welson, who were emigrants from Germany.  Mr. and Mrs. Welson came to Pulaski County in the early days.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Jun 1941:

Miss Effie Lansden

             Funeral services for Miss Effie A. Lansden, librarian of Safford Memorial Library, Cairo, who passed from this life Thursday, May 30, at St. Mary’s Hospital, were held Saturday afternoon at the Cairo Presbyterian church of which she was a devoted member.  The Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor, and the Venerable S. L. Hagan of the Church of the Redeemer officiated.

             Burial was in the family lot in Villa Ridge cemetery, where her father, the late Judge John M. Lansden, and her mother, Effie W. Lansden rest.

             Surviving are three sisters, Mrs. Robert Peck Bates of Chicago, Misses Emma L. and Margaret Lansden of Cairo; two brothers, John M. Lansden of New York City and Attorney David S. Lansden of Cairo.

             Miss Lansden was born August 22, 1872, in the family home at 315 Fifth Street, where she and her sisters, Emma and Margaret, have lived all their lives.

             Educated in the public schools of Cairo, she took special courses in library work at the Universities of Illinois and Wisconsin.  In 1903 she entered the Cairo Public Library as assistant to Mrs. L. L. Powell and held this position until the death of Mrs. Powell in 1922—19 years.  In June 1922, she was made librarian and held this position until her death—19 years.  Thus, she had served the public in Cairo 38 years and had become “Miss Effie” to all with whom she came in contact.  Highly gifted, always cheerful, ever ready with an answer no matter what the question, endowed with a sense of humor and an unusual gift of repartee, there were no dull moments in her presence.

             Many honors came to her.  They have been chronicled in the Cairo Evening Citizen, her home town paper.  We wish to add our tribute to her as a dear friend whom we shall miss and who, we know, will be missed by countless others as the days come and go.

             (Her death certificate states that Effie Allan Lansden, librarian, of Cairo, Ill., was born 22 Aug 1872, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of John M. Lansden, a native of Sangamon Co., Ill., and Effie W. Smith, a native of Jacksonville, Ill., died 29 May 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Effie A. Lansden 1872-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ex-Kaiser Wilhelm II Dies Monday at Eighty-Two

             Ex-Kaiser, Wilhelm II, of Imperial Germany, died in exile Wednesday, June 4, in Doorn, the Dutch village that had been his dwelling place since 1918.  His age was 82.

             He will be buried at Doorn Monday with military rites and the attendance limited to the family, representatives of Hitler’s regime and of the old imperial army and navy group.  His temporary resting place will be a small chapel on the estate of which he lived.

 

Mrs. Oliver Wallace

             Adena Felemna Wallace, age 73, passed away at her home on mile east of Pulaski Thursday evening, May 29, at 5 o’clock.  She was the widow of the late Oliver Wallace.  Surviving are two daughters, Carrie and Louise of Pulaski; three sons, Joe and Antone of Pulaski and William of Cairo; four grandsons; one brother, Frank Bour of Mounds; and two cousins, Joe Lutz and Mrs. William Bestgen of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the First Christian Church in Pulaski with Rev. Charles A. Day officiating.  Mrs. Wallace was a member of this church.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery this city with the G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.  Casket bearers were Ernest Palmer, Frank Reeves, Arthur Reeves, George Gillispie, Arthur Palmer and Hess Smoot.

             (According to her death certificate, Adena Felemena Wallace was born 4 Jul 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Allouice Bour and Caroline Moses, natives of Germany, died 29 May 1941, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Adena F. Wallace 1867-1941 William Oliver Wallace 1862-1938.—Darrel Dexter)           

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to thank all our friends for the kindness and sympathy shown us in our recent bereavement.

The Park Family

 

Mrs. Millie Park, Mrs. Harry Vaughn and daughter, Suzanna, who were called here from Trenton, Mich., by the sudden death of their son and brother, George Park, who passed away in a Chicago hospital Tuesday, May 27, left Tuesday of this week for Chicago, home of Mrs. Park. Mrs. Vaughn and daughter will return to Michigan and proceed from there to their new home in Fall River, Mass.

 

Out-of-town relatives who attended the funeral of George Park held at the Methodist church Thursday last were his mother, Mrs. Millie Park, his brothers, William Park and Edward Park and wife and Jack Park, all of Chicago; his sister, Mrs. Mildred Park Vaughn and daughter Suzanne, who are at this time moving from Trenton, a suburb of Detroit, Mich., to Fall River, Mass.; Charles Mann, Mrs. Robert Mann and daughter of Flora; Mrs. Roy Fox of Carmi, Mrs. Dwight York of Decatur and Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Richardson and children of Centralia.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Jun 1941:

RESIDENT OF OLMSTED DIES

             Charles G. Schnaare, age 87, passed away at the home of his son, Warren, at Olmsted, Saturday morning at 3 o’clock following a stroke suffered earlier in the week.

             Besides his wife, Mr. Schnaare is survived by the following children, Rudolph of America, Warren, Edward and Emil of Olmsted, Herbert of Grand Chain and Mrs. Laura Eddleman of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Lutheran church in Olmsted with Rev. A. W. Galen officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Charles G. Schnaare, farmer, was born 5 Feb 1857, in Illinois, died 31 May 1941, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Charles Schnaare Mar. 4, 1855 May 31, 1942.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DAUGHTER DIES

             Hoppie Nannie Fitzgerald, the one-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fitzgerald of Mound City, died at the home of her parents in this city at 9:00 o’clock Monday morning.  She is survived by her parents, three sisters, Helen Louise, Agnes and Joan; four brothers, Charles Richard, William, Henry and Kenneth.  Funeral services were held at 9 o’clock Tuesday at the James Funeral Home with Father Lawrence Gilmartin officiating.  Burial was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Hoppe Nannie Fitzgerald was born 14 May 1940, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Richard Fitzgerald, a native of Mound City, Ill., and Hoppie Oliver, a native of Kentucky, and died 2 Jun 1941, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Hoppie N. Fitzgerald May 14, 1940 June 2, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Youth Drowns as Row Boat Overturns

             Melvin Wright, 15-year-old son of Mrs. John Bates of Mound City, was drowned late Tuesday night when a row boat in which he and another youth, Carl Clanahan of Mound City, were returning from Kentucky, overturned.

             The boat was loaded with scrap iron which they hoped to sell in Cairo.  The water was rough because of high winds and the boys were unable to right the boat in the waves.

             Carl was thrown from the boat and was able to strike out for the Illinois shore.  Melvin, who his mother reported as not being able to swim at all, was swept down the river and soon became lost from Carl.  The boat was about midway of the river when it capsized.

             An extensive search was made Wednesday for the boy’s body, but efforts had proved unsuccessful.  A professional diver searched for him late Wednesday afternoon. The current where the boy is said to have drowned is very swift.

            

CAIRO LIBRARIAN DIES AFTER YEARS OF SERVICE

             Mrs. Effie Lansden, librarian of the Cairo Library for many years, died at the Cairo hospital Thursday morning following an illness of several weeks.  Mrs. Lansden was one of the best loved and respected citizens of Cairo.

             Her interest in her work, her willingness to help others, and her community interest were unsurpassed.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, burial being made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church and the Venerable S. L. Hagan, pastor of the Church of the Redeemer, officiated.

 

OBITUARY

Adena Bour Wallace

             Adena Bour Wallace, daughter of Allouise and Caroline Bour, was born at Valley Recluse July 4th, 1867.  She was married to W. O. Wallace Oct. 2, 1889.  To this union were born 4 sons and 2 daughters, namely:  Joe, Charlie, Antone, William, Louise and Carrie.  Charlie passed away July 15th, 1924.  Her husband preceded her in death, having died March 10, 1938.

             Mrs. Wallace and her husband located on a farm one and one-half miles northeast of Pulaski during their early married life, where she lived until her death.

             Death came to her peacefully about 5 p.m. of May 29, 1941, in the eventide of her life, as she had passed the 73rd birthday.  Her health failed about three years ago, but she did not give her activities up until about 2 ½ years later.  She suffered very much, but bore it without murmuring.  She united with the Pulaski Christian Church on Mother’s Day, May 13, 1924.

             Her presence will be greatly missed in the community.  She has been an angel of mercy in the sick room and among the dying.

             Mrs. Wallace leaves besides her 3 sons and 2 daughters, one brother, Frank Bour of Mounds; two cousins, Joe Lutz and Mrs. William Bestgen of Mound City.  Mrs. Bestgen was by her bedside when death came as were 4 of the children.  She is also survived by 4 grandsons, Billie Joe, Carroll LaVon, Billie and Charles Oliver Wallace; 2 nieces and 4 nephews and other relatives and friends.

             Funeral services were conducted at the Pulaski Christian Church in Pulaski, Sunday, June 1, 1941, at 2:30 p.m. by her pastor, Rev. Charles A. Day of Metropolis.  Her casket bearers were Ernest Parker, Frank Reeves, Arthur Reeves, George Gillespie, Arthur Palmer, and Hess Smoot.

 

This community (Beech Grove) was sorry to learn of the passing of their old friend, Mrs. Winstead, the widow of Dr. M. L. Winstead, who preceded her in death in 1919.

             (Marcus Winstead, 22, from Cobden, Union Co., Ill., married on 22 Mar 1877, in Union Co., Ill., Zilpha Tweedy, 15, from Cobden, Ill., daughter of Isaac Tweedy.  The death certificate of Zilpha Winstead states she was born 7 Jul 1862, in Alto Pass, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Willis Tweedy, a native of Illinois, died 27 May 1941, in Road District 10, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.      Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  Zilpha Winstead 1862-1941 Dr. M. L. Winstead 1854-1919.—Darrel Dexter)                   

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Jun 1941:

Boy of Drowned Boy Found Near East Cairo

             The body of Melvin Wright, age 16, son of John Bates of Mound City, who drowned in the Ohio River Tuesday afternoon, June 3, was found Saturday afternoon, June 7, at East Cairo.

             The boy was drowned when a row boat loaded with scrap iron capsized near the Kentucky shore as he and Joe Cunningham, also of Mound City were rowing toward the Illinois side of the river.

            

Former Principal Dies at Advanced Age

             Mrs. Rose E. Cutting, for 52 years a teacher and principal at Metropolis Community High School, died June 7, following a two-year illness.

             Mrs. Cutting, the widow of Captain Thomas Cutting, retired from teaching in 1928 and in 1937 the high school’s $150,000 gymnasium was dedicated to her.

             She never revealed her age and it is not included in school records.

             (The death certificate of Rose E. Cutting, high school teacher, states she was born 6 Nov 1862, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Jason Skinner, a native of England, and Elizabeth Rudolph, a native of St. Louis, Mo., died 7 Jun 1941, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., died 9 Jun 1941, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., widow of Thomas Cutting, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill.  She was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Metropolis.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Daughter of Former Resident Meets Death in Accident

             Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Tobin received a message Sunday morning telling them of the death of Miss Marian Carver, 18, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Carver of San Antonio, Texas, who was killed early that morning in an auto accident.

             Mr. (Tom) Carver is a former Mounds man.  He and his family visited Mr. and Mrs. Tobin here in June of 1940.  Marian was a graduate of a San Antonio high school, having finished the course just two weeks before her untimely death.

             Surviving are her parents and one brother, Thomas William, known as Billy.  Burial was in San Antonio.

             (Her death certificate states that Marion Glore Carver, student, of 942 W. Mistletoe, San Antonio, Bexar Co., Texas, was born 30 Sep 1923, in San Antonio, Texas, the daughter of Thomas W. Carver, a native of Missouri, and Agnes M. Houston, a native of San Antonio, Texas, died 7 Jun 1941, of a broken neck, in an auto accident at State Highway 81 near Bandera, Texas, and was buried in Mission Burial Park in Texas.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Frank Hardesty Dies Wednesday Morning

             Mrs. Lola Hardesty, wife of Rank Hardesty, died at one o’clock Wednesday morning, June 11, at her home on Delaware Avenue.  She had been ill for several weeks and had only recently been brought home from St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.  Her age at death was 42 years.

             Mrs. Hardesty was born and reared in Pulaski County and had lived in this county all her life.

             Surviving are her husband; one son, Harold; her mother, Mrs. Lucy Beaver, all of Mounds; a half-brother, George Beaver of Mound City; also several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First Methodist Church with Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor, officiating.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery with the G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (George R. Hood, 24, farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of Samuel Hood and Caroline Jones, married on 16 Oct 1898, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., Lucy E. Woodward, 19, from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of John P. Woodward and Mary Cummins.  Her death certificate states that Lora Hardesty was born 23 Feb 1899, in Olmsted, Ill., the daughter of George Hood, a native of Johnson Co., Ill., and Lucy Woodward, a native of Dongola, Ill., died 11 Jun 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Frank Hardesty, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Lora Hardesty Feb. 23, 1899 Jun 11, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We sincerely thank our many friends for their kindness and helpfulness during the illness and after the death of Rev. W. J. Ward.  We greatly appreciate the expressions of love and sympathy in our sorrow.

The Family

 

Rev. W. J. Ward

             William James Ward was born November 10, 1871, and passed away June 7, 1941, at the age of 69 years, 6 months and 27 days.

             He was the eldest child of James L. and Adeline Ward.  He was born near Charleston, Missouri, where he spent the early part of his life.  At twenty-one years of age he was converted and united with the old Concord Baptist Church near Charleston.  Sometime later Concord Church went down and he united with the nearly organized New Bethel Church, also near Charleston.  When he was twenty-eight years old this church ordained him to preach the gospel and he always loved and cherished her as his mother church.

             The first half of his ministry was spent in Missouri.  His first active work was to serve as district missionary of Charleston Association.  He was then called to New Bethel where he served ten years until he felt the Lord’s call to larger fields.  Other pastorates he held in Missouri were East Prairie, Oak Ridge, Chaffee, Fredericktown and Portageville, in addition to several rural churches.  He helped organize the Gravel Ridge Church.

             Twenty years ago Brother Ward followed God’s call to Illinois where he became pastor of the First Baptist Church in Mound City.  Two years later he became missionary of Clear Creek Association.  Finding that this work was becoming too strenuous, he gave it up for the pastorates of Dongola and Shiloh.  Other churches he pastored were Immanuel of Cairo, Tamms, Pleasant Grove, New Hope, Effingham and Mount Olive.  His last pastorate was Shiloh near Villa Ridge.  This was the second time he pastored this church and he remained faithful and active until his last illness forced him to give up his active ministry for his Master.

             Brother Ward was united in marriage with Stella Leet of Charleston, Mo., May 25, 1904, and they were happy together until she preceded him in death some ten months ago.  To this union were born four children:  Joseph Moody and Frances Ellen who died in infancy, and Russell and James, who survive.

             Other relatives who survive are:  three sisters, Mrs. Ben Patrick of Bertrand, Mo., Mrs. Charles Jackson of Diehlstadt, Mo., Mrs. Joe Tate of Sikeston, Mo.; two brothers, Charles W. of Charleston, Mo., and John T. of St. Louis, Mo.; one grandchild, Jean Ward of Mounds.

             Brother Ward was a true friend and father and was loved by all who knew him.  His radiant and inspiring personality will be sadly missed by all.

             Funeral services were held in the First Baptist Church in Dongola Monday afternoon, June 9.  They were conducted by Rev. E. W. Reader, State Secretary of Missions, Carbondale, assisted by Rev. Hobart Peterson, pastor of Dongola, and Rev. H. W. Karraker of Dongola.

             The music was handled beautifully by the Dongola quartet composed of Mr. Charley Dale, Mr. Robert Corzine, Mr. Lester Dale, and Mr. Don Corzine, accompanied by Cleta Sowers; and Mrs. Dell Boyd accompanied by Mrs. Preller Douglas.  Mrs. Boyd sang one of Brother Ward’s favorite songs, a beautiful solo, “Sunrise Tomorrow.”  She had sung this song at his request at Mrs. Ward’s funeral.

             The pallbearers were:  Troy Beggs, Harold Benson, Tommy Reeves, Lowell Eddleman, Hobart Peterson, and Melvin Karraker, all of Dongola.

             The Elmer J. Ford Funeral Service of Dongola handled the funeral arrangements very efficiently.

             Brother Ward’s fellow ministers in the cause of Christ paid their last tribute of love and respect by attending the funeral and sitting in a body.  There were over twenty preachers present.  These included:  Rev. W. T. Waring, pastor of Anna; Rev. Glenn Verble, Dongola; Rev. H. B. Atherton, Dongola; Rev. C. W. Penrod, Dongola; Rev. S. F. Reeves, Dongola; Rev. Fred Propst, pastor at Jonesboro; Rev. Roy Lockerby, Carbondale; Rev. H. E. Lockard, pastor at Mound City; Rev. Earl Taylor, Mounds; Rev. Charles Green, St. Louis, Mo.; Rev. Robert Grant; Rev. Clarence Bridges, Elco; Rev. Lester Kossler, Dongola; Rev. B. B. Murphy, Paducah, Ky.; Rev. Kenneth Hall, pastor at Mounds; and Rev. A. M. Troutman of Cypress.

             In addition to these ministers, all brothers and sisters and immediate relatives were present, and there were many other people from out of town.  They came from Southeast Missouri and from all over Southern Illinois to join the local people in paying the last tribute to Brother Ward whom they all knew and loved.  The profusion of beautiful flowers banked on each side of the casket was a testimony of love from his friends.

             Brother Ward will be sadly missed by a heartbroken family, by many relatives, by hundreds of friends, but his influence will live.  “He fought a good fight; he finished the course; he kept the faith.”  In the words of his friends, “He lived what he preached.”  A Saint of God has gone to his eternal home to rest from his cares, pains, burdens and sorrows.  We seem to hear God’s benediction, “Well done.”—Contributed

             (William J. Ward married Stella Edith Leet on 25 May 1904, in Mississippi Co., Mo.  According to his death certificate, William James Ward, Baptist minister, of Dongola, was born 10 Nov 1871, in Charleston, Mo., the son of James L. Ward and Adeline Frye, natives of North Carolina, died 7 Jun 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Stella Ward, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Stella E. Ward Oct. 2, 1879 Aug. 2, 1940 William J. Ward Nov. 10, 1871 Jun 7, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)                

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Jun 1941:

DROWNED YOUTH’S BODY RECOVERED SATURDAY

             The body of Melvin Wright, 16-year-old stepson of Walter Wright of Mound City, was recovered near East Cairo about 4:00 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  Wright drowned last Tuesday night when returning with another youth in a rowboat, loaded with scrap iron from Kentucky.

             A man and his wife were fishing a short distance south of East Cairo when they noticed what seemed to be a body floating near the shore.  They notified authorities in Cairo who contacted Pulaski County officials and early Saturday evening the body was identified.  Identity was difficult because of decomposition.

             The youth was buried at 9 o’clock Sunday morning in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, G. A. James Funeral service in charge of arrangements.  Short services were held at the burial place by Rev. Earl Harp of the Mound City Pentecostal Church.

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF THIS COMMUNITY DIES

             William Broedelle, age 78, a former resident of this community, died at his home in Mt. Carmel last Friday.

             While living in this end of the state, Mr. Broedelle was a member of the Cairo Woodmen of the World.

             Roy D. Short Funeral Service of Mt. Carmel, assisted by G. A. James of Mound City was in charge of arrangements.  Burial was made by the side of the late Mrs. Louis Broedelle, his wife, in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.           

             (William Broedel married Louisa Breivgel on 16 Jul 1882, in Wabash Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that William Broedel, retired railway employee, of 330 W. 1st St., Mt. Carmel, Ill., was born 17 Apr 1863, in Wabash Co., Ill., the son of Michael Broedel and Catherine Schrodt, natives of Germany, died 7 Jun 1941, in Mt. Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill., widower of Louisa Bruvogel, and was buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  William Broedelle 1863-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

REV. J. W. WARD

William James Ward was born November 10, 1871, and passed away June 7, 1941, at the age of 69 years, 6 months and 27 days.

             He was the eldest child of James L. and Adeline Ward.  He was born near Charleston, Missouri, where he spent the early part of his life.  At twenty-one years of age he was converted and united with the old Concord Baptist Church near Charleston.  Sometime later Concord Church went down and he united with the nearly organized New Bethel Church, also near Charleston.  When he was twenty-eight years old this church ordained him to preach the gospel and he always loved and cherished her as his mother church.

             The first half of his ministry was spent in Missouri.  His first active work was to serve as district missionary of Charleston Association.  He was then called to New Bethel where he served ten years until he felt the Lord’s call to larger fields.  Other pastorates he held in Missouri were East Prairie, Oak Ridge, Chaffee, Fredericktown and Portageville, in addition to several rural churches.  He helped organize the Gravel Ridge Church.

             Twenty years ago Brother Ward followed God’s call to Illinois where he became pastor of the First Baptist Church in Mound City.  Two years later he became missionary of Clear Creek Association.  Finding that this work was becoming too strenuous, he gave it up for the pastorates of Dongola and Shiloh.  Other churches he pastored were Immanuel of Cairo, Tamms, Pleasant Grove, New Hope, Effingham and Mount Olive.  His last pastorate was Shiloh near Villa Ridge.  This was the second time he pastored this church and he remained faithful and active until his last illness forced him to give up his active ministry for his Master.

             Brother Ward was united in marriage with Stella Leet of Charleston, Mo., May 25, 1904, and they were happy together until she preceded him in death some 10 months ago.  To this union were born four children:  Joseph Moody and Frances Ellen who died in infancy, and Russell and James, who survive.

             Other relatives who survive are:  Three sisters, Mrs. Ben Patrick of Bertrand, Mo., Mrs. Charles Jackson of Diehlstadt, Mo., Mrs. Joe Tate of Sikeston, Mo.; two brothers, Charles W. of Charleston, Mo., and John T. of St. Louis, Mo.; one grandchild, Jean Ward of Mounds.

             Brother Ward was a true friend and father and was loved by all who knew him.  His radiant and inspiring personality will be sadly missed by all.

             Funeral services were held in the First Baptist Church in Dongola Monday afternoon, June 9.  They were conducted by Rev. E. W. Reader, State Secretary of Missions, Carbondale, assisted by Rev. Hobart Peterson, pastor of Dongola, and Rev. H. W. Karraker of Dongola.

             The music was handled beautifully by the Dongola quartet composed of Mr. Charley Dale, Mr. Robert Corzine, Mr. Lester Dale, and Mr. Don Corzine, accompanied by Cleta Sowers; and Mrs. Dell Boyd accompanied by Mrs. Preller Douglas.  Mrs. Boyd sang one of Brother Ward’s favorite songs, a beautiful solo, “Sunrise Tomorrow.”  She had sung this song at his request at Mrs. Ward’s funeral.

             The pallbearers were:  Troy Beggs, Harold Benson, Tommy Reeves, Lowell Eddleman, Hobart Peterson, and Melvin Karraker, all of Dongola.

             Brother Ward’s fellow ministers in the cause of Christ paid their last tribute of love and respect by attending the funeral and sitting in a body.  There were over twenty preachers present.  These included:  Rev. W. T. Waring, pastor of Anna; Rev. Glenn Verble, Dongola; Rev. H. B. Atherton, Dongola; Rev. C. W. Penrod, Dongola; Rev. S. F. Reeves, Dongola; Rev. Fred Propst, pastor at Jonesboro; Rev. Roy Lockerby, Carbondale; Rev. H. E. Lockard, pastor at Mound City; Rev. Earl Taylor, Mounds; Rev. Charles Green, St. Louis, Mo.; Rev. Robert Grant; Rev. Clarence Bridges, Elco; Rev. Lester Kossler, Dongola; Rev. B. B. Murphy, Paducah, Ky.; Rev. Kenneth Hall, pastor at Mounds; and Rev. A. M. Troutman of Cypress.

             Elmer J. Ford Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             In addition to these ministers, all brothers and sisters and immediate relatives were present, and there were many other people from out of town.  They came from Southeast Missouri and from all over Southern Illinois to join the local people in paying the last tribute to Brother Ward whom they all knew and loved.  The profusion of beautiful flowers banked on each side of the casket was a testimony of love from his friends.

             Brother Ward will be sadly missed by a heartbroken family, by many relatives, by hundreds of friends, but his influence will live.  “He fought a good fight; he finished the course; he kept the faith.”  In the words of his friends, “He lived what he preached.”  A Saint of God has gone to his eternal home to rest from his cares, pains, burdens and sorrows.  We seem to hear God’s benediction, “Well done.”

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUNDS KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT

             A message was received by Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Tobin of Mounds Sunday morning notifying them of the death of Miss Marian Carber, 18-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Carver of San Antonio, Texas, who was killed in an auto accident early Sunday morning.

             Mr. Carver, who is familiarly known as Tom, formerly resided in Mounds and in June of last year the family visited Mr. and Mrs. Tobin at their home in Mounds.  Marian was graduated from the San Antonio High School just two weeks ago.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by one brother, Thomas William.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning.

 

MOUNDS RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Lola Hardesty, age 42, passed away at her home in Mounds Wednesday morning at 1 o’clock following an illness of several weeks.  Mrs. Hardesty, the wife of Frank Hardesty, was born and reared in Pulaski County and had spent her entire life there.

             Besides her husband, she is survived by one son, Harold; her mother, Mrs. Lucy Beaver, both of Mounds; a half-brother, George Beaver of Mound City; several nieces and nephews and other relatives.

             Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o’clock at the First Methodist Church in Mounds with the pastor, Rev. J. Rue Reid, officiating.  Burial will be in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral service is in charge of arrangements.

            

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Jun 1941:

R. M. Jerrell

             Robert M. Jerrell, age 80 years, died Saturday, June 21, at 12:15 p.m. at the home of his daughter, Mrs. C. L. Nicholson on North Blanche Ave., where he and his wife have made their home for several years.  He was seriously ill only a short time.

             Surviving are his wife, three daughters, Mrs. W. E. Brockman of Bandana, Ky., Mrs. Ralph Henry of Highland and Mrs. Nicholson; three sons, M. P. Jerrell of Jackson, Mich., L. G. Jerrell of Pulaski and Roy Jerrell of Cairo; five sisters, Mrs. Otie Randall and Mrs. Bernie Yancy of Oscar, Ky., Mrs. Lena Hall, Indiana; Mrs. Maud Perkins and Mrs. Mae Newton of Kevil, Ky.; one brother, Jess Jerrell of Kevil, Ky., and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock in the Baptist church at Oscar, Ky., of which Mr. Jerrell was a charter member.  The Rev. Mr. Hogue of Oscar, assisted by Rev. K. G. Hall of the Mounds Baptist Church, officiated.

             Burial was made in the cemetery in the churchyard with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service directing.

             Those form out of town who attended the funeral services were Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Jerrell of Jackson, Mich., Mr. and Mrs. Landon Roberson and Mr. and Mrs. Eduard Pugh of Fulton, Ky., Mr. and Mrs. N. Roberson and two children of Hurst, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Henry and son of Highland, Mr. and Mrs. E. Crice Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Brockman and Mrs. Mae Newton of Kevil, Ky., Mrs. Kate Smith of Alton and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Jerrell of Cairo.

             (According to his death certificate, Robert M. Jerrell, retired farmer, was born 19 May 1861, in Ballard Co., Ky., the son of R. Y. Jerrell and Tamasia Peyton, natives of Virginia, died 21 Jun 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Oscar Cemetery in Oscar, Ballard Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Dies at 90

             Mrs. John Hartman of Mill Creek, Alexander County, died Monday morning, June 23, at the age of 90 years.  She and her husband, who survives, had been married 70 years on January 8 of this year.

             Besides her husband, six children survive, Mrs. Minnie Fink, Mrs. Mary Boggs, Mrs. Mina Davis of Mill Creek, Carl Craig Hartman of Jonesboro, Garl of Mill Creek and Mrs. Armanda Dexter of Ullin.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at Elco Baptist Church with the Rev. F. F. Reeves of Dongola officiating.  Burial was in St. John’s Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service having charge of arrangements.

             (John C. Hartman married Martha C. Phillips on 8 Jan 1871, in Alexander Co., Ill.  David C. Fink married Minnie V. Hartman on 24 Dec 1899, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Martha C. Hartman, of near Elco, Alexander Co., Ill., was born 21 Apr 1851, in Delta, Ill., daughter of Amos Phillips, a native of Missouri, and Mary Porterfield, a native of Nashville, Tenn., died 22 Jun 1941, in Road District 6, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of John C. Hartman, and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  John C. Hartman Apr. 28, 1846 Aug. 25, 1945 Mother Martha C. Hartman Apr. 21, 1851 June 22, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Emma Marlman

             Mrs. Emma Marlman, age 71, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Erma Wood, near Karnak Sunday morning, June 22.

Her husband preceded her in death several years ago.  She is survived by four children, Mrs. Wood, Mrs. Elsie Mescher, of Belknap, Archie Marlman of Villa Grove, and Walter of Granite City; three brothers, Gus Lippert of Karnak, Sam and Andrew of Karnak.

Funeral services were held at the Anderson Church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. L. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Mrs. Marlman has been a member of the Methodist Church for many years.  Burial was in Anderson Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (According to her death certificate, Emma Marlman, widow, of Road District 4, Massac Co., Ill., was born 18 Dec 1869, in Round Knob, Ill., the daughter of Henry Lippert and Wilhelmina Winstring, natives of Germany, died 22 Jun 1941, in Road District 4, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Anderson Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Mother Emma Marlman 1869-1941 Father John Marlman 1868-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Louis J. Stout

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church for Louis J. “Sid” Stout, son of A. L. Stout of this city, who died at Hines Hospital in Maywood, Ill., Friday morning, June 20, at 6:30 o’clock.  Father Laurence Gilmartin officiated.  Burial was in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge with the J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Surviving Mr. Stout are one son, Albert of Gearheart, Oregon; his father, A. L. Stout; and a brother, E. R. Stout of Mounds; another brother, Morris of San Antonio, Texas; one sister, Mrs. Jack Rae of Chicago; two aunts, Mrs. Kate Dunn and Mrs. M. S. Egan of Cairo; and two uncles, C. M. and Tom Stout, also of Cairo.

             This is the second son of A. L. Stout to be buried “under the U. S. flag.”

             (Louis Stout married Mary Daily on 22 May 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Records from the Home for Disabled Volunteer Veterans at Danville, Ill., states that Louis J. Stout enlisted on 3 Jul 1917, as a private and was honorably discharged on 13 Apr 1919.  He enlisted on 15 Jan 1921, in Springfield, Ill., and was honorably discharged on 14 Jun 1921, at Scott Field, Ill.  He suffered from chronic conjunctivitis and chronic bronchitis.  He resided at the home from 16 May 1929, to 4 Jun 1929.  His application for Social Security gives his name as Louis John Stout.  The application for a military headstone states he served as a private 1st class in Co. K, 130th Infantry, 33rd Division.  His death certificate states that Louis J. Stout, clerk, of Cairo, Ill., World War veteran, was born 4 Oct 1896, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Aaron L. Stout, a native of Illinois, and Mary Daily, a native of Ireland, died 20 Jun 1941, in Proviso Township, Cook Co., Ill., divorced husband of Clara Stout, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Louis J. Stout Illinois Pvt. 1 cl. 130 Inf. 33 Div. June 20, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

G. W. Childers

             George W. Childers, 72, died at his home here Tuesday morning, June 24, following an illness of several months.  He and his family had lived here only a few months, having formerly been residents of Grand Chain.  Surviving, besides his wife, are three daughters, Mrs. James Bartleson of Elgin, Mrs. Avery Clantet of Seattle, Washington, and Mrs. Virgil Lawrence, of Norfolk, Va.; two sons, Woodrow of this city and George of Seattle; a sister, Mrs. Nellie Wood of Seattle; a brother, J. A. Childers of this city and two half-brothers, F. and M. Grey of Seattle.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at the Congregational church in Grand Chain with the Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was in Ohio Chapel Cemetery.  Casket bearers were Henry Wiesenborn, Adam Reichert, Guy Harris, John McIntire, Cab Wilmouth, and A. S. Reichert.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge.

             (John A. Childers married Mary Jane Elder on 7 Sep 1865, in Franklin Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, George W. Childers, retired farmer, was born 23 Sep 1868, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., son of John A. Childers, a native of Herrin, Ill., and Mary Elder, a native of Nashville, Ill., and died 24 Jun 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Flora Childers, and was buried in Ohio Chapel Cemetery in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  George W. Childers 1868-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Pioneer Resident of Mounds Dies Suddenly Friday Morn

             Mrs. Annie Heitz Blanckertz died suddenly at her home on North Blanche Avenue at 12:25 a.m. Friday, June 20.  She had been in failing health for several years, but had been able to be about the house most of the time.

             Mrs. Blanckertz was born in Jefferson County, Mo., March 8, 1863, and her age at death was 78 years, three months and 12 days.  She was married in St. Louis in 1885 to John William Blanckertz and the family moved here in 1889.  Her husband died October 27, 1895, when their youngest child was only three months old, thus she was left to rear her family.

             Surviving are two daughters, Miss Laura Blanckertz and Mrs. Nellie Ross; two sons, William and Harry, all of Mounds; two granddaughters, Mrs. H. E. (Elizabeth Ross) Atherton, of Memphis, Tenn., and Miss Frances Blanckertz of Mounds; also one half-sister, Mrs. August Nollman of High Ridge, Mo., and several nieces and nephews.  One daughter, Flora, died June 15, 1905.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock at the Congregational church with the Rev. S.C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service directing.  Casket bearers were Fletcher Harris, Laurence Schneider, Lester Grandstaff, Jr., L. B. Armstrong, Fred Carson and H. C. Fellenstein.

             Among those from out of town who attended the funeral services were:  Mrs. August Nollman, son Edwin Nollman and wife and Miss Lillian Nollman of High Ridge, Mo.; Dr. and Mrs. H.E. Atherton of Memphis, who were visiting the Blanckertz home at the time; Mrs. Edward Zimmer and Mrs. George Riemann of St. Louis, nieces of Mrs. Blanckertz, and Mrs. J. L. Marley of Chicago.

             (Her death certificate states that Annie Blanckertz was born 8 Mar 1863, in Jefferson Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry Heitz, and M. Delbruegge, natives of Germany, died 20 Jun 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of John William Blanckertz, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mother Annie Heitz Blanckertz Mar. 8, 1863 June 20, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Kate Inman was called to Cairo Tuesday evening by the death of her niece’s husband, Joseph Steger, which occurred suddenly Monday and was attributed to the excessive heat.

             (According to his death certificate, Joseph Steger, laborer for the City of Cairo, Ill., of 1600 Locust St., Cairo, Ill., was born 28 Jun 1879, in Cairo, Ill., the son of John Steger, a native of Germany, and Mary Deere, a native of St. Louis, Mo., husband of Mary Alice Steger, died 23 Jun 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Joseph Steger 1877-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to express our sincere thanks to our neighbors and friends for their thoughtfulness during the illness and following the death of our dear mother, Mrs. Annie Blanckertz.  We wish also to thank the donors of the beautiful flowers, those who offered their cars and the minister for his words of consolation. Your kindness will ever be remembered.

The Blanckertz Family

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Jul 1941:

KILLED BY TRAIN

             Mathis Woodson, age about 50, a colored man living in North Mounds, was found dead on the Illinois Central tracks early Monday morning.  The accident in which Woodson, also known as Mathis Crook, was horribly mangled, is thought to have occurred about midnight Sunday night.  William Simpson reported the accident to Coroner O. T. Hudson.  Woodson was a World War veteran and was a single man.

 

J. J. Kuykendall

             James Jackson Kuykendall, age 63, of 8014 Washington Avenue, Cairo, died Sunday afternoon at 12:30 following an illness of five years.  He had lived in Cairo for 50 years and had been employed by the Illinois Central and the New York Central for 30 years, having been yard conductor for the New York Central when taken ill.  He was a Mason, an Elk and a member of the Methodist Church.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mayme Dickerson Kuykendall; two children, Dewitt of Springfield and Jo Katherine Marchildon of Cairo; five grandchildren, C. A., Peggy and Patsy Marchildon of Cairo; Ann and Dewitt Kuykendall of Springfield; two aunts, Mrs. J. C. Dewitt and Mrs. John Shadrick of Anna.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church, Cairo, at 5 o’clock Tuesday afternoon with burial in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.  The Rev. L. S. McKown, pastor conducted the service.  Masonic rites were conducted at the grave.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, James Jackson Kuykendall lived at 3300 Sycamore, Cairo, Ill., and was a switchman for the Big 4 Railway in Cairo, Ill.  According to his death certificate, James Jackson Kuykendall, railroad yard conductor, of Cairo, Ill., was born 31 Aug 1878, in Belknap, Ill., the son of Joseph J. Kuykendall, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Cordelia Shadrick, a native of Mt. Pisgah, Ill., died 29 Jun 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Mayme Kuykendall, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mamie D. Kuykendall Nov. 10, 1884 Dec. 10, 1973 James J. Kuykendall Aug. 31, 1878 June 29, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Helen Mason Steers Dies Suddenly in Indiana Hospital

             Miss Helen Mason Steers, daughter of Mrs. Mary Mason Steers of Villa Ridge neighborhood, died at midnight Friday night, June 27, at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Lafayette, Ind.

             Miss Steers, Home Bureau supervisor in Jerseyville for the past five years, was attending a convention in Lafayette when she was taken ill.  She underwent an emergency operation for appendicitis and died before her mother could reach her bedside.  Before going to Jerseyville, Miss Steers had taught in the Metropolis schools for 11 years.  She was a member of the Eastern Star Lodge of Metropolis.

             She was the only remaining child of Mrs. Steers, another daughter having died years ago.

             Funeral services were held at the family residence on the Villa Ridge America Road Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock with Rev. Charles Day conducting the services.  Casket bearers were cousins, namely:  Ben Mason, Charles Mason, Herbert Hayden, Henry Steers, Arthur and William Full.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.

            

Larry Charles Endicott Died Tuesday Morning

             Leroy Charles Endicott, 14-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore C. Endicott, died Tuesday morning, July 1, at 7:25 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, following an attack of measles resulting in complications.

             Surviving are his grief-stricken parents; one sister, Winifred Nadine; his paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Endicott of Villa Ridge; his maternal grandfather, J. Logan Taylor of Mounds; two aunts, Mrs. Nellie Ebbs of Mounds and Mrs. Ruth Brauer of Carbondale; two uncles, Harold Endicott of Villa Ridge and Eddie Taylor of Mounds; also other relatives.

             Leroy graduated last spring from Thistlewood Grade School.  He was a member of the Press Club, the Library Council and the shop class.  He attended the Congregational Sunday School and was a member of Mrs. Laurence Schneider’s class.

             Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Thursday afternoon at two o’clock, the pastor, Rev. S. C. Benninger, officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with the Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Honorary casket bearers were the following schoolmates:  Victor Bucher, George Travers, David Titus, Louis Murphy, Ralph Boren, Robert Lasley, Henry Lasley, James Toler, Bill Ewing, Bobby Stout, Gene Meshew, and John Bruce.

             Flower girls were Audrey Egner, Rosalie Wilkerson, Barbara Thomasson, Betty Catherine Williamson, Aileen Roach, Betty Sullivan, Glenda Jean Sitton, Patricia Rose and Mary Joyce Nicolaides.

             (His death certificate states that Leroy C. Endicott, school student, was born 14 Sep 1926, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Theodore Endicott, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Madge Taylor, a native of Creal Springs, Ill., died 1 Jul 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Leroy C. Endicott Sept. 14, 1926 July 1, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Paderewiski Is Dead

             Ignace Jan Paderewski died Sunday night, June 29, in the apartment in New York where he grieved away his final months for his failing musical genius and his war-crushed Poland.  He was the first president of the Polish Republic.

             He died in the presence of his sister, Mme. Antonia Wilkonska; his aide-de-camp, Sylvian Strackacz, and his secretary, I. Kollopallo, after a brief struggle against pneumonia.

             His death was believed hastened by his patriotic fervor which since childhood had taken much time and vital energy from his music.  He had made a tiring trip in the heat to Oak Ridge, N. J., recently to attend a meeting of the association of Polish War Veterans and had been ill ever since.

             Paderwski was 80.  He had not played the piano publicly for two years—since Germany’s attack on Poland precipitated the war, but there was considerable doubt that the war was the reason for his musical retirement.  At his last major appearance, in New York, Feb. 26, 1939, in a program broadcast to a worldwide radio audience estimated at 50,000,000 it was all too apparent his palsied hands had lost the musical genius.  He will be best remembered by his Minuet which it is said he composed in twenty minutes.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Jul 1941:

HELEN MASON STEERS DIES

             Miss Helen Mason Steers, daughter of Mrs. Mary Steers of near Villa Ridge, died at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Lafayette, Ind., at midnight Friday, June 27.

             It was reported that Miss Steers was stricken with an acute attack of appendicitis while attending a convention in Lafayette Friday and was removed to the hospital where she died following an emergency operation.  Her mother was called to her bedside.

             Miss Steers was employed as home supervisor in Jerseyville, Ill., for the past five years and previously had taught school in Metropolis for 11 years.

             Miss Mason is survived by her mother, Mrs. Mary M. Steers, and a number of other relatives.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James in charge of arrangements.

 

LEROY ENDICOTT OF MOUNDS DIES

             LeRoy Endicott, age 14, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Tuesday morning at 7:25 o’clock, following a week’s illness.

             He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Endicott; one sister, Nadine of Mounds; his paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Endicott of Villa Ridge; and his maternal grandfather, Logan Taylor of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at the First Congregational Church in Mounds with Rev. Benninger officiating.  Burial was made at Spencer Heights.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Jul 1941:

Mother of Mrs. Eddie Taylor Dies in Carbondale July 2

             Mrs. Mary Sanders, widow of the late Ben Sanders, died in Carbondale Wednesday, July 2, at the home of her son, Lindsey Sanders.

             Surviving are six children:  Mrs. Minnie Larrison of Belknap, Mrs. Nettie Yow of Carbondale, Mrs. Shirley Morford of Vienna, Mrs. Gladys Taylor of Mounds, Roscoe Sanders of Cypress and Lindsey Sanders of Carbondale.

             Mr. and Mrs. Taylor and family and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Melton attended the funeral services which were held Friday afternoon at two o’clock at the Berea Church with Rev. Wiley Mathis officiating.  Burial was in Berea Cemetery.

             (L. L. Sanders married Mary M. Mathis on 9 Aug 1883, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary M. Sanders was born 20 Jul 1864, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of David Mathis and Ellen Shropshire, died 2 Jul 1941, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., widow of Lindsey Lincoln Sanders, and was buried in Berea Cemetery in Road District 6, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Mary Sanders 1864-1941 Lincoln Sanders 1861-1930.—Darrel Dexter)

 

George French Dewey

George French Dewey, city engineer of Cairo from 1907 until 1936, died Saturday night, July 5, in his apartment at the Halliday Hotel, the result of a stroke earlier that day.

             Mr. Dewey not only did much general surveying in the southern end of Illinois and in Southeast Missouri, but made maps of Alexander and Pulaski counties and also of Mississippi County in Missouri.  These maps are still used as the official guides for engineering work in these counties, it is said.

             He was born in Irvington, Ill., Nov. 19, 1870, and moved with his parents to Cairo in 1872.

             Surviving are his wife, who is a patient in St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo at present; one son, Edmund Dee Dewey, also an engineer and connected with the Illinois Division of Waterways; two brothers, Judge W. S. Dewey and Circuit Clerk John M. Dewey of Cairo; one sister, Miss Jennie Dewey, also of Cairo.

             (According to his death certificate, George French Dewey, of 2nd Ohio St., Cairo, Ill., was born 19 Nov 1870, in Irvington, Ill., the son of Edmund S. Dewey, a native of Lennox, Mass., and M. Jennie French, a native of Goffstown, N. H., died 5 Jul 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Margaret Dewey, and was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Charleston, Mississippi Co., Mo.  His marker there reads:  George F. Dewey 1870-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Freddie Richard Johnson

             Freddie Richard Johnson, eight-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Johnson of this city, died at St. Mary’s Hospital Tuesday morning, July 8, following a brief illness,

             Besides his parents, he is survived by his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Turner of Villa Ridge, and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the grave in Beech Grove Cemetery, with the Rev. Mr. Roberts officiating.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Freddie Richard Johnson was born 9 Nov 1940, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Sam Johnson, a native of Anna, Union Co., Ill., and Creton Della Turner, a native of Villa Ridge, died 8 Jul 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. W. N. Madden

             Loretta Madden, age 73, wife of W. N. Madden, passed away at her home in Karnak Monday afternoon, July 7.

             Besides her husband she is survived by six children:  Mrs. Martha McKinney of Karnak, Mrs. Alice Rushing of Vienna, Mrs. Nellie Weaver of Metropolis, Mrs. Nora Ford of South Haven, Mich., Irvin East of Karnak, and Wilbur East of Anna and one sister, Mrs. Ida Weaver of Paducah.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the Methodist church in Karnak with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.  Burial was in Chapel Hill Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Loretta East Madden states that she was born 5 Feb 1868, in Gallatin Co., Ill., the daughter of John F. Brentley and Nancy E. McKee, natives of Crittenden Co., Ky., died 7 Jul 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of W. M. Madden, and was buried in Temple Hill Cemetery in Temple Hill, Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DONALD MASON DISHINGER

             Donald Mason Dishinger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Mason Dishinger of this city, died at birth at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Wednesday afternoon, July 2, at two o’clock.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Donald Mason Dishinger was stillborn 2 Jul 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Harry M. Dishinger, a native of Mound City, and Brenda Corbitt, a native of Tennessee, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Rich Moreland and children and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur File attended the funeral of L. N. Jones at Pleasant Ridge Church between Dongola and Vienna Saturday afternoon.

             (Lewis N. Jones, 21, farmer from Moscow, Ill., born in Cypress Creek, Ill., son of E. A. Jones and Mary E. Jones, married on 15 Jul 1894, at E. A. Jones in Union Co., Ill., Louella Humes, 15, who lived at E. A. Jones’ in Union Co., Ill., born in Moscow, Ill., daughter of Olive Humes.  Elmer E. Adams, guardian of the bride, gave his consent.  Erasmus A. Jones married Mary E. Arnett on 17 May 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Lewis N. Jones, farmer, states he was born 27 Aug 1872, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Erasmus Jones and Mary Richardson, died 3 Jul 1941, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Road District 3, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Lewis N. Jones 1872-1941 Fannie L. Jones 1878-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Those from out of town who attended the funeral of Leroy Endicott were:  Mrs. W. L. Blancett, Memphis, Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. V. J. Batson, Tamaroa; Mr. and Mrs. Everet Taylor and family, West Point, N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs. Pete Brauer, Mrs. C. W. Eddleman and Mrs. L. H. Brown, Carbondale; Carson Brown, Vienna; Mr. and Mrs. James Gamble, Washington, D.C.; Mrs. Curtis Mathis, Houston, Texas; and Mrs. Leona Sharp, Elmhurst.

 

            

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Jul 1941:

CLAIMS INDICATE THAT ESTATE HAS EVAPORATED

             The most noted estate in this county, that of Perks & Higgins, possibly worth a half million 15 or 20 years ago, has almost disappeared.  The estate of Mrs. Nannie Higgins, widow of one of the partners, indicates that not all claims will be paid.

             The estate of Mrs. Nettie B. Perks still in litigation, is much better, but when taxes are paid and claims it will be dwindled down to a small sum.

             Yesterday in county court, claims were being filed, some of them small bills of several years standing, and one of them for a check that did not clear.  The Disaster Loan came in for about $3,000 claim the largest of all save taxes, perhaps.

             The administrator, Loren Boyd, told creditors that some of the claims would be “desperate.”  That term means that they would probably not be paid, for the estate would not show that much value.

             The estate consisted of real estate and notes, for the greater part.  Literally thousands of dollars in notes were never paid and became outlawed.  The fall of real estate prices and diverse other things, brought this estate in two decades to small figures.  A claim of a colored woman for housework running years back, a carpenter for work done some time ago and for other such things marked the winding up of affairs.

             The cycle of wealth had turned.

 

HUSBAND OF FORMER RESIDENT KILLS SELF

             Cecil Knight, husband of the former Gertrude Jones of Mound City, committed suicide because of worry over the thought of his having to serve in the army, Mrs. Knight said.

             Knight was employed in Mound City last summer and was known to many here.  He was employed at Charleston, Ind., on the construction of a powder plant.

             Mrs. Knight told how Knight had been worried for several months about the draft and how it would affect him and had on another occasion disarmed him when he threatened to take his life by firing a bullet into his head.  About two o’clock Saturday morning at the intersection of Route 3 and the Upper Cut Road, Mrs. Knight related, when she was driving and had made a stop at the intersection, Knight jumped from the car and fired a bullet into his brain.  He died instantly.

             Knight had two children by a former marriage.  The couple had visited at Jonesboro with Knight’s parents and children and were to visit in Mound City before they returned to Charleston, Sunday.

             (Cecil Knight, 28, of Jonesboro, Ill., married on 6 Nov 1940, in Obion Co., Tenn., Gertrude Jones, 33, of Mound City, Ill.  The death certificate states that Isaac Cecil Knight, road construction worker, of Road District 10, Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., was born 15 Feb 1912, in Jonesboro, Ill., the son of Ike Knight and Alice Whitely, natives of Jonesboro, Ill., died 5 Jul 1941, in Road District 2, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Gertrude Knight, and was buried in Casper Cemetery in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Husband Isaac Cecil Knight 1912-1941 A Devoted Husband and Father.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT SON DIES

             Freddie Richard Johnson, eight-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Johnson of Mounds, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Tuesday morning at four o’clock following a brief illness.

             Besides his parents he is survived by his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Turner, of Villa Ridge; and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon.  Brief services were conducted at the grave in the Beech Grove Cemetery by Rev. Roberts.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge.

 

DONALD M. DISHINGER DIES

             Donald Mason Dishinger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Mason Dishinger of Mounds, died at birth at St. Mary’s Hospital Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

MRS. LORETTA MADDEN DIES

             Loretta Madden, age 73, wife of W. N. Madden, passed away at her home in Karnak Monday afternoon.

             Besides her husband, she is survived by the following children:  Mrs. Martha McKinney of Karnak, Mrs. Alice Rushing of Vienna, Mrs. Nellie Weaver of Metropolis, Mrs. Nora Ford of South Haven, Mich., Irvin East of Karnak and Wilber East of Anna; one sister, Mrs. Ida Weaver of Paducah.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at one o’clock at the Methodist church in Karnak with Rev. W. L. Cummins officiating.  Interment was made in Chapel Hill Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

GEORGE DEWEY DIES AT HIS HOME IN CAIRO

             George Dewey died Saturday night at his home in the Halliday Hotel following a stroke.  Mr. Dewey was city engineer of Cairo for 30 years and since receiving his education has been engaged in engineering work of some kind.  He was 71 years old.

             He was well known to many Pulaski County residents for his work in this county.  He had mapped out Pulaski County, as well as others and his work has been used extensively along with that of later county engineers here.

             In addition to his wife, he is survived by a son, Edmund D. Dewey, of Carbondale; a sister, Miss Jennie Dewey, of Cairo; two brothers, Judge W. S. Dewey and Circuit Clerk John M. Dewey, of Cairo; and numerous other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the First Presbyterian Church in Cairo.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Jul 1941:

John Goodman

             John Goodman, age 92, a farmer of Dongola, died Thursday night July 10, about 10 o’clock as the result of a fall about a week ago in which he broke his hip.

             Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at three o’clock at the Christian Chapel Church near Dongola, conducted by Rev. W. O. Corzine and burial was in the Mt. Zion Cemetery.

             He leaves two children, Mrs. Virgil McIntosh and John W. Goodman of Dongola.
             (According to his death certificate, John W. Goodman, farmer, of Dongola, Union Co., Ill., was born 4 Oct 1848, in Salisbury, N.C., the son of Caleb Goodman and Salina Hoffman, natives of North Carolina, died 10 Jul 1941, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., widower of Mariah Unity Penrod, and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Coleman and daughter, Sandra Lea, left Sunday night for Bridgeport, Conn., having been called there by the death of Mrs. Coleman’s brother, W. S. Murphy,  Mr. Murphy and family visited her last week and had returned home on Friday.  His death occurred Sunday morning at 9 o’clock, but no particulars are known. Funeral services were held Wednesday.  He is survived by his wife; three sons, Vernon, Earl and Lee; and one daughter, Evelyn; his mother, whose home is at Gorham; and his sister, Mrs. Coleman.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Jul 1941:

RESIDENT OF DONGOLA DIES

             John Goodman, age 92, a farmer, of Dongola, died last Thursday night, about 10 o’clock as the result of a fall about a week ago in which he broke his hip.

             Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at three o’clock at the Christian Chapel Church near Dongola, conducted by Rev. W. O. Corzine and burial was in the Mt. Zion Cemetery.

             He leaves two children, Mrs. Virgil McIntosh and John W. Goodman, of Dongola.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Jul 1941:

Mrs. Carlos Merideth

             Mrs. Odessa Merideth of Louisville, Ky., formerly of Mound City, age 27, died Thursday afternoon, July 17, from injuries received in an auto accident early in the morning of May 11, when the car in which she and her husband and infant son were traveling from Louisville to Mound City plunged off the highway in Ballard Co., Ky.  Mr. Merideth evidently dozed at the wheel at the time.  The five months old baby boy was not injured, but the parents suffered serious injuries and were taken to the Cairo hospital.  Both seemed to recover, but later Mrs. Merideth grew worse and was returned to the hospital July 10.

             Surviving, beside her husband and son, are her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Smith; four sisters, Mrs. Lena Harrell, Mrs. Estelle Harrell, Misses Thelma and Barbara Smith, all of Mound City; two brothers, Jamie of Mound City and Gordon of Paducah, Ky.

             Funeral services were held Saturday with burial in Thistlewood Cemetery, conducted by G. A. James Funeral Service.

             (Her death certificate states that Odessa Merideth was born 19 Apr 1914, in Salem, Ky., the daughter of John Smith, a native of Marion, Ky., and Lula Dickson, died 17 Jul 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Carlos Merideth, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Odessa Mae Meridith Apr. 14, 1914 Jul. 6, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Adam Corzine

             Adam Corzine, age 48, passed away suddenly Friday morning, July 18, at his home in Karnak.

             Besides his wife, Hattie, he is survived by three children, Ray, James and Paul; two sisters, Mrs. May Collins and Mrs. Fonzie Crain and a brother, Garvin Corzine, all of Karnak.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. William Henry officiating.  Burial was in West Eden Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Adam D. Corzine made his mark to the 1917 draft registration card, which stated he was born 3 Dec 1892, in Belknap, was a farmer for Main Brothers in Karnak, Ill., and had a wife and child.  His Social Security death claim gives his name as Adam Douglas Corzine, born 28 Dec 1892, in Cypress, Ill.  According to his death certificate, Adam Corzine, box factory laborer, of Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 28 Dec 1892, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of A. J. Corzine and Anna Hogan, natives of Illinois, died 15 Jul 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Hattie Corzine, and was buried in West Eden Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Father Adam D. Corzine 1891-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOSES BROTHER

             Mrs. S. C. Benninger, wife of the pastor of the Mounds and Grand Chain Congregational churches, has returned from Denver, Colo., where he was called by the illness and death of a brother.

 

T. L. Pulley Dies at Home in California

             T. L. Pulley, a former resident of Cairo and well known in Mounds, died at his home in Maywood, Calif., Friday morning, July 18, following a lingering illness.  His sister, Mrs. Lydia Jenkins of this city, was with him, having made two trips to California within the last few months.  Mr. Pulley and his wife, the former Ella Ferguson of Cairo, moved from Cairo to Maywood in 1912.  He was a painter and decorator and was an active member of the Cairo Methodist Church, serving as superintendent of the Sunday school at the time of his departure.

             Surviving are two brothers, R. T. Pulley, of Anna, Carol L. Pulley of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Jenkins and Mrs. A. Minton of this city; also several nieces and nephews.  His wife has been dead for several years.  It was his practice to visit Southern Illinois about once each year.  He was a native of Union County.

             Burial was in Maywood Cemetery Saturday at the side of Mrs. Pulley.

             (The California Death Index states that Tobe Lorenzo Pulley was born 25 Sep 1863, in Illinois, died 18 Jul 1941, in Los Angeles Co., Calif.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Robert Jenkins left Saturday night for Maywood, Calif., for an indefinite stay.  His mother, Mrs. Lydia Jenkins and his sister, Mrs. Henry Wilkerson and family are already there, called by the illness and death of Mrs. Jenkins’ brother, T. L. Pulley.

 

James Carson

             James Carson, age 72, passed away Thursday, July 17, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mary Sisson, at Tamms.

             Mr. Carson is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Sisson, Mrs. Nellie Kolleck of Dongola, Mrs. Margaret Lynn of Ullin and Mrs. Mamie Smith of Hurst; three brothers, William of Armory, Miss., Ed of Memphis, and Perry of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the Ullin Baptist church Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Earl Throgmorton of Cypress officiating.  Burial was in Ullin with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (James I. Carson, 29, farmer, born in Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Frank Carson and Susan Smith, married on 3 Feb 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Clara Moore, 34, of Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., born in Scott Co., Mo., daughter of Matt Harman and Mary Bollinger.  According to the death certificate, James Carson, farmer, was born 21 Oct 1868, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of Frank Carson, a native of Illinois, died 17 Jul 1941, in Road District 7, Alexander Co., Ill., widower of Clara Carson, and was buried at Ullin, Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  James Irvin Carson 1869-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Infant Dies

             Laneer Jarret Schaefer, 24-day-old son of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Schaefer, died at the home of his parents Tuesday evening after a week’s illness.

             Surviving are his parents, four brothers, Elmer, Earl, Floyd and Lee; and one sister, Marva June.

             Funeral services were conducted at the grave in Spencer Heights Cemetery Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the First Methodist Church, officiating.  Ryan Funeral service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Laneer Jarrot Schaefer was born 28 Jun 1941, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of L. J. Schaefer, a native of Ashmore, Illinois, and Cathaleen Smith, a native of Riverton, Ill., died 22 Jul 1941, in Mounds, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Jul 1941:

FORMER RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Myrtle Ann Cook, age 71, passed away at her home in Olmsted Wednesday at 7:00 o’clock.

             Mrs. Cook was born in Mound City and lived here for thirty-seven years when she moved from here to Kentucky and then to Olmsted where she has resided for the past thirty years.

             She is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Mary Holcomb, Mrs. Della Bellamy, Miss Alice Cheek, Mrs. Merle Huddleston; and one step-daughter, Mrs. Madge Kraatz, all of Olmsted; and eight grandchildren.

             Funeral services will be held at the Methodist church in Olmsted Friday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock.  Rev. Beatty, pastor, will officiate.  Interment will be made at Spencer Heights.  G. A. James Funeral Service will be in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Myrtle Ann Cook, of Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 14 Jan 1870, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Hugh Scott and Josephine Amanda Clemens, died 23 Jul 1941, in Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widow of John W. Cook. and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. CARLOS MERIDETH DIES

             Mrs. Carlos Merideth, 27, died at St. Mary’s Hospital early Thursday afternoon, July 17, of injuries received when their automobile, driven by her husband, and in which early on the morning of May 11 they were returning to Mound City from Louisville, Ky., to visit relatives in Mound City, where they had formerly lived, plunged off the highway and overturned in Ballard County, Ky., when he dozed at the wheel.

             Both Mr. and Mrs. Merideth were seriously injured and were brought to St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo.  The husband suffered a broken jaw and other painful injuries.  The wife suffered a broken arm and was hurt about the side and chest.  Their five months old boy, Wayne, escaped injury.

             Mrs. Merideth is survived by her husband, Carlos; an infant son, Carlos Wayne; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Smith; and four sisters, Mrs. Lena Harrell, Mrs. Estelle Harrell, Miss Thelma Smith and Miss Barbara Smith, all of this city.  Two brothers, Jimmie of Mound City and Gordan of Paducah, also survive her.

             Funeral services were held at the Gospel Tabernacle in Cairo, Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock, with Rev. D. M. Osborne, pastor, officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral service in charge of arrangements.

 

Mack Peyton, uncle of Peyton Berbling of Cairo, and cousin of Mrs. Elizabeth Wickliffe of this city, died at Bridges, Mo.  The funeral was yesterday and from Cairo the Berblings attended and from this city Miss Fannie Farley.

 

KARNAK RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Luzina Bond, age 73, passed away at the home of her son, Andy Bond, in Karnak Sunday evening after an illness of several weeks.

             Besides her son, she is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Mary Wheeler, of McLeansboro, Ill.

             Funeral services were held at McLeansboro Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. William Henry of Cypress officiating.  Interment was made in New Hope Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Louvina Bond states she was born 25 Feb 1863, in McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., the daughter of Jacob Megess and Myra Patrick, natives of Illinois, died 20 Jul 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of William Bond, and was buried in New Hope Cemetery in Hamilton Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  We Will Meet Again William D. Bond Feb. 7, 1873 Oct. 8, 1940 Louvina Bond Feb. 25, 1864 July 20, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Aug 1941:

One of Mounds’ Best Known Citizens Passes to Beyond

             A feeling of sadness pervaded the community when it was learned that J. C. Mench had passed from this earth Friday (July 26) at 1:42 p.m. at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Percy Hunt, where he had been seriously ill for the past four weeks.

             For 23 busy years, from 1910 to 1933, Jacob Christian Mench had faithfully served as secretary of the Railroad Y. M. C. A. at Mounds.  His life had probably touched and influenced the lives of more men in this section than any other life in Southern Illinois.  And life as he lived it was an uplifting influence wherever it was felt.

             Mr. Mench was born Aug. 25, 1865, in Bridgeton, New Jersey, to which place his parents had come from Germany.  As schools are classified he had a fifth grade education, but in self-education he ranked with college graduates.  He was a broad and constant reader.  At the age of 10 he was earning his own living in a glass factory as a water boy.  He became a professional glass blower at the age of 18.  At 21 he transferred to Baltimore and from there to Alton where he met and married Miss Mary Janet Logan, a teacher.  They were married in Alton July 5, 1899.

             While not reared by Christian parents, he was converted at the age of 17 and lived to see both his father and mother accept the Christian faith.  To this young man, that faith meant everything, as his life proved.  Soon after his conversion he became a member of a “Praying Band,” who would meet and pray and then go out to visit the sick and relieve the distressed.  Doubtless his whole life was influenced by this band.

             Mr. and Mrs. Mench and children moved to Mounds October 3, 1910, at the time he accepted the secretaryship of the Railroad Y. M. C. A.  The membership of the “Y” increased until at one time it numbered over 1,200, the largest of any one railroad Y. M. C. A. in the United States.

             Records have it that in one year 137,020 men used the large building, which has since been torn down, as a temporary home.  With the assistance of Mrs. Mench, a musician, gospel meetings were held regularly and a large library was built up.  Mrs. Mench also assisted with the office work and the two made this their life work.  He often attended the National Y. M. C. A. conventions and was asked to fill pulpits of prominent churches in cities as Boston and Springfield, Mass.  He established the Hi-Y in Mounds and also in Cairo and sponsored the trips of members to the district and state conventions.  He accompanied the sick to hospitals and made arrangements for their families.  He organized a “Flying Squadron” of men who went about holding religious services.  He frequently filled the pulpits of the various local churches and, although his membership was in the Congregational Church, he was at home in all.

             During the World War, all Illinois Central troop trains stopped at Mounds and Mr. Mench gave all aid possible to the soldier boys, often accompanying them to the next terminal.  It can truthfully be said of him that he lived for others in a sense that few men do.

             The removal of the Illinois Central yards resulted in the closing of the “Y” on January 1, 1933.  For a while Mr. and Mrs. Mench lived in Texas near their son, Charles, but upon the death of Mrs. Mench, July 3, 1937, Mr. Mench returned to Mounds and lived with his daughter, visiting frequently with his sons.  He returned from a visit with his son, Charles, in Butte, Montana, the last day of June.

             Surviving are three children, Mrs. Edith Virginia Huet of this city, James Logan Mench of Cairo and Charles Russell Mench of Butte, Montana; three grandchildren, Frederick Mench of Washington, D. C., Helen Clair Hunt of Mounds, and Susan Lee Mench of Butte; two sisters, Mrs. R. F. Emerson of Saley City, Calif., and Mrs. E. B. Hider of Woodbine, N. J.  R. B. Logan of Alton and Mrs. E. G. Gooding of Shoshone, Idaho, nephew and niece of Mrs. Mench, also were as near as blood relatives to him.

             Beautiful memorial services honoring his life were held in both the Methodist and Baptist churches of Mounds Sunday morning.  Sunday afternoon at 5:30 o’clock funeral services were held in the Congregational church with the pastor, Rev. S. C. Benninger delivering a most fitting sermon and the Rev. J. Rue Reid leading in prayer.  Three favorite hymns were sung by a quartet, H. S. Adams, R. N. Meredith and Clint Mackfield of Centralia and Hugh Atherton of this place, and a solo, “My Task,” by Ray Lentz.  Ray Phelps Scott accompanied the singers.  Active casket bearers were members of Trinity Lodge A. F. & A. M. of which he was a member.  Honorary casket bearers were members of the Board of the Y. M. C. A. at the time of its closing:  G. E. Chance, Luther Hodge, E. G. Britton, Sam Shifley, J. A. Childers, Charles Austin, Sr., and Fayette Blancett, the last named now of Memphis, Tenn.

             Among the out-of-town friends attending the services were Mr. and Mrs. William Gallion, daughter Mary Ruth, and Mr. Meeker of Champaign; Misses Norma and Eula Clanton, also of Champaign, and J. W. Sawyer, retired railroad conductor of Jackson, Tenn.

             Following the services the body was removed to the J. T. Ryan Funeral Home where it remained until 5 o’clock Monday morning when the funeral cortege left for Alton where burial was made by the side of Mrs. Mench in the Alton Cemetery.  Masonic rites were conducted at the grave by the Alton lodge.

             (Jacob C. Mench married Mary Jeannette Logan on 5 Jul 1899, in Madison Co., Ill.  According to the death certificate, Jacob Christian Mench, retired Y. M. C. A. secretary, of Mounds, Ill., was born 5 Aug 1865, in Bridgeton, N. J., the son of Frederick Mench and Mary Siebert, natives of Germany, died 25 Jul 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Mary Mench, and was buried in Upper Alton Cemetery in Alton, Madison Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Noah Kiestler

             Mrs. Alameda Kiestler, age 77, passed away Saturday, July 26, at noon at her home in Cypress, following an illness of several weeks.  She had been a resident of Cypress for more than 30 years.

             Surviving her are her husband, Noah; and one sister, Mrs. Alice Heflin of Nashville, Tenn.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Baptist church with Rev. A. L. Cox officiating.  Interment was made in Luther’s Chapel Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.

             (The death certificate of Alameda Kiestler, of Cypress, Ill., states that she was born 1 Dec 1863, in Tennessee, the daughter of Jacob Thomas, a native of Virginia, and Mary McDaniel, a native of Tennessee, died 26 Jul 1941, in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., wife of Noah Kiestler, and was buried in Luther’s Chapel Cemetery near Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Aug 1941:

PROMINENT RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

             Jacob Christian Mench passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Percy Hunt in Mounds Friday, July 25.

             Mr. Mench and his wife and children moved to Mounds from Alton.  He had accepted the secretaryship of the railroad Y. M. C. A.  Under the leadership of Mr. Mench the “Y” gained in membership to over 1,200, the highest Y. M. C. A. membership in the United States.  He visited the sick and persons in trouble and was considered one of the greatest humanitarians in Southern Illinois.

             When the I. C. yards closed in Mounds, the “Y” closed January 1, 1933.  Mr. and Mrs. Mench left Mounds for Texas to reside.  Mrs. Mench died in 1937.  Since then Mr. Mench has made his home with his three children.

             He is survived  by three children, Edith Virginia Hunt of Mounds, James Logan Mench of Cairo, and Charles Russell Mench of Butte, Mont.; three grandchildren, Helen Clair Hunt of Mounds, Frederick Mench of Washington, D.C., and Susan Lee Mench of Butte.

             Rev. S. C. Benninger, assisted by Rev. J. Rue Reid, officiated at the funeral services.  The Centralia Railroad Conductors Quartet was in charge of the music.  A tribute was paid Mr. Mench when all the churches of Mounds held memorial services in his honor at their regular worship hour.  Burial was made in the Alton Cemetery, Alton, Ill.          

 

BROTHER OF HENRY HALL DIES MONDAY AFTERNOON

             James Hardy Hall, age 61, of Hickman, Ky., passed away at the home of his brother, Henry Hall, in Mound City Monday afternoon at 12:10 o’clock.

             Mr. Hall is survived by two brothers, Henry of Mounds City and Raymond of Hickman; one sister, Mrs. Nora Talley of Mound City.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Charles Montgomery at the James Funeral Home in this city Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock.  Burial was made in Hickman, Ky.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, James Hardy Hall, farmer, was born 1 Jan 1880, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of John R. Hall, a native of Tennessee, and Margaret Carter, a native of Georgia, died 28 Jul 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Hickman Cemetery in Hickman, Hickman Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Aug 1941:

Friends of Mrs. Fred Adler of Centralia, formerly of this city, will regret to hear that death claimed her mother, Mrs. Bundy, of Centralia, July 11.  Had Mrs. Bundy lived until Aug. 14, she would have been 82 years of age.

             (John E. Baldridge married Moriah Richey on 29 May 1839, in Marion Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Martha A. Bundy states she was born 14 Aug 1859, in Jefferson Co., Ill., the daughter of John Baldridge, a native of North Carolina, and Maria Ritchie, a native of New York City, N. Y., died 11 Jul 1941, in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill., widow of Alex Bundy, and was buried in Gilead Cemetery in Grand Prairie, Jefferson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Aug 1941:

INFANT DAUGHTER DIES

             Carolyn Mae Davis, two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ilijah Davis of Dongola, passed away at the farm home of her parents Sunday morning at 1 o’clock.

             She is survived by her parents, her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Harris Davis and Mrs. Laura Slusher, all of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Mill Creek Monday morning at 11 o’clock with Rev. H. G. Peterson officiating.  Burial was made in St. John’s Cemetery.

             (Elijah Andrew Davis married Lola May Hartline on 24 Dec 1940.  The death certificate of Carolyn Mae Davis states that she was born 7 Jun 1941, near Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Elijah Davis, a native of Mill Creek, Ill., and Lola May Hartline, a native of Dongola, Ill., died 3 Aug 1941, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ULLIN RESIDENT DIES

             Herman Lloyd Sowers, age 14, passed away at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clen Sowers, on a farm near Ullin Sunday afternoon at 4:45 o’clock.

             Herman is survived by his parents; one sister, Helen; and his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Marris Sowers of Ullin and Mrs. Etta Sheffer of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Ullin Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. J. R. Weiss.  Burial was in Chapel Cemetery near Dongola.

             (His death certificate states that Herman Lloyd Sowers, student, was born 7 Jan 1927, in Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Clen Sowers and Effie Sheffer, natives of Illinois, died 3 Aug 1941, in Road District 10, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Chapel Cemetery in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Herman L. Sowers Jan. 7, 1927 Aug. 3, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Aug 1941:

Sister of Frank Ebbs Dies Monday in Carbondale

             Miss Mary Ebbs, sister of Frank Ebbs, died Monday afternoon, August 11, at 3:15 o’clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. B. Wright of Carbondale, following a long illness.  She had made her home with Mrs. Wright for several years.

             Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Laura Watson and Mrs. Emma Wright, both of Carbondale; three brothers, Harry and Charlie Ebbs of Carbondale and Frank Ebbs of this city.

             Funeral services were held at the Van Natta Funeral Home in Carbondale Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock, the pastor of the Christian Church officiating.  Burial was made in Oakland Cemetery, Carbondale.

             Those from Mounds who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ebbs, Mrs. Theo Endicott and daughter, Naydine.

             (Henry Ebbs married Lucy Hopper on 2 Jul 1865, in Jackson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary Margaret Ebbs, of Carbondale Township, Jackson Co., Ill., was born 28 Feb 1879, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry Ebbs and Miss Hopper, natives of Marion, Ill., died 12 Aug 1941, in Carbondale Township, Jackson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale, Ill., reads:  Mary M. Ebbs 1879-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Aug 1941:

DIES FROM INJURIES RECEIVED IN WRECK

             Charles Burrows of Equality, who had been operating a tractor on the Mounds-Mound City levee project, died Friday from injuries received in an automobile wreck on Route 37 over the Spur Inn.  He leaves his wife and two children.

            

Benjamin F. Harget

             Benjamin F. Harget of Cairo age 63, died at St. Mary’s Hospital Monday evening, August 18, at 9 o’clock.  Mr. Harget was taken suddenly ill at his home at Twenty-eighth and the Mississippi during the electrical storm.

             He is survived by his wife; four daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Day of Ola, N.C., Mrs. Louise Murphy, Mrs. Stella Abney and Miss Mary Harget, all of Cairo; five sons, Ben Jr., of Company K, Dan of Lincoln, Ill., and Charles, Jimmie and Harold of Cairo.  One grandchild and many other relatives also survive him.

             Funeral services were held at the Karcher Funeral Home Thursday morning at 10 o’clock with Capt. John Potter of the Salvation Army officiating.

             Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             (The 1918 draft registration card of Benjamin Harget states that he was born 8 Aug 1877, was a U. S. guard at Cairo, Ill. The death certificate of Benjamin F. Harget, W. P. A. laborer, of Cairo, Ill., states that he was born 8 Aug 1878, in Festus, Mo., the son of Dan Harget, died 18 Aug 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Mamie Harget, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His original Social Security application states he was born 8 Aug 1879, in Crystal City, Mo., the son of Dan Harget and Anna Quinton.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Aug 1941:

INFANT SON DIES

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Winters, who was born Monday at their home in this city, died late Tuesday evening.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states the infant was born 18 Aug 1941, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Harry Winters, a native of Kentucky, and Rose Fitzgerald, a native of Mound City, Ill., and died 19 Aug 1941, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DROWNS IN OHIO RIVER AFTER FALL FROM DREDGE

             D. R. Waller was drowned Monday morning when he fell from a dredge boat stationed on the Ohio River near Grand Chain.

             The boat on which Waller was working was dredging a channel in the river about a mile from Grand Chain and while Waller was signaling with a flashlight early in the morning, he fell overboard.

             His body was found a short time after he fell.  Attempts at artificial respiration failed.  A coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

             Waller is survived by his wife.

 

FORMER WORKER HERE DIES OF INJURIES FROM FALL

             Charles Burrows, a Caterpilar tractor operator for the Mound City-Mounds flood control project for the last few months, died as the result of injuries he received last Thursday afternoon when he fell out of the open door of his automobile as he was driving on Route 37 near the Spur Inn.

             Burrows’ back was broken. He lived about 24 hours.

             The car left the highway following Burrows’ fall, turned over, slightly injuring his wife and another occupant.  His wife and two children survive.

             The cause of Burrows’ fall was not learned except that the door next to the driver’s seat was open.

             He never regained consciousness after being taken to the Metropolis hospital.  His home was in Equality.

             One or two of the workers here on the levee were with him, one of them being “Pop” Barnett, but were not hurt.

 

LIFE LONG RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             Mrs. Bell Crandall Cumby, age 65, passed away Tuesday afternoon at 3:15 o’clock at her home in Mound City.

             Mrs. Cumby was born and reared in Mound City and spent her entire life here.  According to the history of Alexander and Pulaski counties, Mrs. Cumby was a daughter of James B. Crandall, attorney at law, who came to Mound City in 1863.  Mr. Crandall held the office of county treasurer of Pulaski County from 1865 to 1868 and for several years was a member of the city council.  He was also city attorney for Mound City.

             Mrs. Cumby is survived by her husband, John, of Mound City.

             Burial was made Wednesday evening at 5 o’clock in the family lot at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Short services were conducted at the grave by Rev. Walter Van Meter.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Isabel Crandel Cumby was born 26 Feb 1876, in Mound City, Ill., died 12 Aug 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of J. C. Cumby, and was buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Among those who attended the funeral of Charles Burrows in Equality were Mr. and Mrs. Claude Burnett, Mr. and Mrs. Carrol Sisk, Mr. and Mrs. Whitey George, Mr. Berry and Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie Stern.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Aug 1941:

Everett Jones

             Everett Jones, age 54, passed away Saturday night, August 23, at 10:20 o’clock at his home in Mound City.  Mr. Jones had been a resident of Mound City for 13 years.

             He is survived by his widow, Anna; four daughters, Mrs. Esther Ford of Blytheville, Ark., and Mrs. Agnes Wadlington, Mrs. Beulah Tapley and Mrs. Virginia Cook of Mound City; his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson of Mt. Carmel; two sisters, Mrs. Minnie Williams of Mt. Carmel and Mrs. Maxine Bruce of Springfield, Ill.; and three brothers, Manuel and Alva of Evansville, Ind., and Earl of Mt. Carmel.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church in Mound City Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor, officiated.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, Everett Jones, laborer, of Mound City, Ill., was born 2 Mar 1887, in Grayville, Ill., the son of Steward Jones and Elizabeth Lewis, natives of Illinois, died 23 Aug 1941, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Anna Jones, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Otto H. Betts Dies at His Home in Mound City

             Otto H. Betts, a prominent resident of Mound City, died at his home here Saturday night, August 23, at 11:45 o’clock, following a long illness.  His age was 69 years.

             Mr. Betts was born in Hickman, Ky., but moved to Mound City 52 years ago.  He was married to Miss Rose Monahan in 1897.  He was an accomplished musician and could play most any instrument.  He will specially be remembered here in Mounds as having been the manager of the Gold Sand Store at one time located just east of the First State Bank.

             Surviving are his wife; one sister, Mrs. Charles Conyers of East Prairie, Mo.; one brother, George Betts of Mound City; also nieces and nephews and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Congregational church of Mound City, of which he was an active member, with Rev. H. S. Bahr, pastor, officiating, assisted by Rev. Ed Lockard.

             Burial was in the family lot in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Casket bearers were Clyde Richey, Frank Sergman, William Bestgen, A. J. Ridings, Robert DeZonia and Rohan Lutz.

             (The original Social Security application of Otto Betts gives his parents as John T. Betts and Maria J. Kinman.  His death certificate states that Otto Hickman Betts was born 25 Apr 1872, in Hickman, Fulton Co., Ill., the son of John Thomas Betts, a native of Kentucky, died 23 Aug 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Rose Betts, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sidney L. Luckey

             Sidney L. Luckey, prominent colored farmer of Bethel community west of town, died Monday morning, August 25, at the age of 82 years.

             Born of slave parents in 1859 in the state of Alabama, he farmed for his parents for 17 years then moved with them to Illinois in 1877, to a farm east of Villa Ridge, now known as the Delaney farm.  He left the farm to accept a job on the river working at that for 18 years then went to work for the Illinois Central Railroad Co., holding that place for 16 years.  From the railroad he returned to the farm, purchasing 117 acres four miles west of this city and remained there until his death.

             He became known as one of Pulaski County’s best farmers and was comfortably situated.  His knowledge of farming and farming conditions and the various crops and fruits made him a valuable asset to the farmers in the community and county.

             He reared two children, Isaac Luckey and Birdie Luckey Jones, both of whom reside near their father’s home.

             (According to the death certificate, Sidney Luckey, farmer, of Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born about 1860 in Alabama, the son of John and Sarah Luckey, died 25 Aug 1941, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former M. T. H. S. Teacher Died in Indiana July 28

             Miss Mary Gayle Graham, age 41, died in a hospital at Lebanon, Ind., July 28, after having undergone an operation July 22, according to word received a few days ago by Miss Mary Scruggs from Mrs. Mabel Lane of Lebanon, a sister of Miss Graham.

             Miss Graham taught mathematics in Mounds Township High School the year of 1921-1922, going from here to the Flora High School where she had taught continuously since that time.  While here she made her home with the George M. Scruggs family on Oak Street and was planning to visit here this month.

             She was a graduate of Franklin College and a member of Delta Zeta Sorority.  She leaves three brothers and three sisters, all living in Indiana.

             (Her marker in Old Union Church Cemetery in Jamestown, Boone Co., Ind., reads:  Daughter Mary G. Graham 1900-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Aug 1941:

DEATH CLAIMS EVERETT JONES

             Everett Jones, age 54, passed away Saturday night at 10:20 o’clock at his home in Mound City.  Mr. Jones had been a resident of Mound City for 13 years.

             He is survived by his widow, Anna; four daughters, Mrs. Ester Ford of Blytheville, Ark, and Mrs. Agnes Wadlington, Mrs. Beulah Tapley and Mrs. Virginia Cook of Mound City; two sons, Leon of Cairo and Harold of Mound City; his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson of Mt. Carmel; two sisters, Mrs. Minnie Williams of Mt. Carmel and Mrs. Maxine Bruce of Springfield, Ill.; and three brothers, Manuel and Alva of Evansville, Ind., and Earl of Mt. Carmel.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church in Mound City Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor, officiated.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  The following friends served as casket bearers, Mark Capoot, Roy Tyler, Arthur Henning, R. Hust, Herman Dunn and Gilbert Sheerer.

 

OTTO BETTS DIES AT HIS HOME SATURDAY

             Otto H. Betts, age 69, passed away at his home in this city at 11:45 o’clock Saturday night, following an illness of several years.

             Surviving him are his wife, Rose; one sister, Mrs. Charles Conyers of East Prairie, Mo.; one brother, George Betts of Mound City; besides several nieces and nephews and other relatives.

             Mr. Betts was born in Hickman, Ky., and moved to Mound City 52 years ago.  He was married to Miss Rose Monahan in 1897.  He was an active member of the Congregational Church of Mound City.  Mr. Betts was an accomplished musician and could play most any musical instrument.  He had many friends throughout Pulaski County.

             Funeral services were held at the family residence at 3 p.m. Tuesday with Rev. H. A. Bahr, pastor of the Congregational church of Mound City assisted by Rev. H. E. Lockard of the Baptist church officiating.

             Burial was made in the family lot in Beech Grove Cemetery.  The following friends served as casket bearers:  Clyde Richey, A. J. Ridings, Frank Bergman, William Bestgen, Robert De Zonia and Rohan Lutz.

 

Mrs. Agnes Wadlington returned Sunday from a western trip having been called by the death of her father, Everett Jones.

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral Monday of Everett Jones were Mr. and Mrs. John Peterson of Mt. Carmel, and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Williams of Mt. Carmel, Mr. and Mrs. M. Jones and Mr. and Mrs. Alva Jones, all of Evansville, Ind.

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral Tuesday of Otto Betts were Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Conyers of East Prairie, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Nunnulee of Blodgett, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. John Nunnulee and son Roddy and Jean and Joe Nunnulee, all of Charleston, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Art Conyers and Mrs. Bryan Harris of St. Louis, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Dannaker of Webster Groves, Mo.; Mrs. Lillian Hanley of St. Louis, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Ray Olmsted of East St. Louis, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. George Muscovalley and son, Milton, and daughter, Mrs. Micholis and Mrs. George Thomas Muscovalley, Jr., all of St. Louis, Mo.; and Mrs. C. S. Miller and Mrs. Paul Hickman, both of Cairo.

 

Harris Sowers passed away Tuesday at 2 p.m. after a week’s illness.  (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Sep 1941:

Louis Edward Fiessinger

Louis Edward Fiessinger, age 64, passed away at his home in Mound City Saturday morning, August 30.  He had been a resident of Mound City for the past seven years.

             Surviving are his wife; three daughters, Mrs. Glena Wilburn, Mrs. Bertha Mae Coonrod and Miss Anna Neal Fiessinger of Mound City; and two sons, Aubrey and Everett.

             Three brothers, John of Kevil and Lloyd and Frank of Lovelaceville, Ky.; four sisters, Mrs. Della Rudolph of Kevil, Mrs. Ella Stigall of Blandville, Mrs. Lizzie Overby and Miss Vida Fiessinger of Lovelaceville; and ten grandchildren also survive him.

             Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10:30 o’clock at the residence in Mound City with Rev. Charles A. Montgomery, pastor of First Methodist Church, officiating.  Following the services, the funeral party left for Lovelaceville, Ky., where burial was made.  G. A. James  Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, Louis Edward Fiessinger, laborer, of Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 19 Aug 1877, in Grayville, Ill., the son of Louis Fiessinger, a native of Germany, and Lucy Shears, died 30 Aug 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Fruzzie Fiessinger, and was buried in Lovelaceville Cemetery in Ballard Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Sep 1941:

PULASKI NEGRO KILLED AS HE RUNS INTO MOVING AUTO

A coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death upon investigating evidence from the accident in which Unie Ford, Pulaski Negro, was instantly killed.

             Ford, the evidence brought out, had stepped out of a truck, went around the machine and made a dash across the road, running more or less into the side of an automobile driven by Miss Grace Behme of Vienna.  The accident happened near Ullin last Thursday afternoon.

             (A death certificate for Urie Ford, W. P. A. worker, of Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., states that he was born 6 Aug 1898, in Mississippi, the son of Dave Ford and Mary Thompson, natives of Mississippi, died 28 Aug 1941, in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Francis Ford, and was buried in Union Grove Cemetery in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ONE TO 14 YEARS ON MANSLAUGHTER

             Sallie Young Williams, colored, who has been in the county jail for several months awaiting trial for killing one Willie “Moon” McCurry, entered a plea of manslaughter in circuit court this week before Judge Bradley and drew from one to 14 years.

             The indictment called for murder, but due to no witnesses to the crime, a plea of manslaughter was accepted and she was sentenced to Dwight.

             The man killed, and self-defense would have been the plea, had been with her in a tavern at Mounds and an argument developed.  Something was said about settling it outside and no one thought much about it.  Next morning, someone found “Moon” quite dead in the ball park—a knife slash on the side of his neck had gone too deep.

 

DEATH CLAIMS LOUIS FIESSINGER

Louis Edward Fiessinger, age 64, passed away at his home in this city at 1 o’clock Saturday morning. He had been a resident of Mound City for the past seven years.

             Surviving are his wife, Fruzzie; three daughters, Mrs. Glena Wilburn, Mrs. Bertha Mae Coonrod and Miss Anna Neal Fiessinger of Mound City, and two sons, Aubrey and Everett.

             Three brothers, John of Kevil and Lloyd and Frank of Lovelaceville, Ky.; four sisters, Mrs. Dela Rudolph of Kevil, Mrs. Ella Stigal of Blandville, Mrs. Lizzie Overby and Miss Vida Fiessinger of Lovelaceville; and ten grandchildren also survive him.

             Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10:30 o’clock at the residence in Mound City with Rev. Charles F. Montgomery, pastor of First Methodist Church, officiating.  Following the services, the funeral party left for Lovelaceville, where burial was made.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

New Teacher at Karnak Dies of Heart Attack

             Miss Phyllis McLaughlin of Decatur, age 22, died shortly after retiring at her boarding place in Karnak Friday night.  She had been employed as a teacher in the Karnak High School for the present year and had held classes just four days.

             The verdict at the coroner’s inquest was to the effect that her death was caused by a heart attack.

             The body was taken to Decatur for burial.

             (Her death certificate states that Phyllis McLaughlin, teacher, of Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 19 Mar 1919, in Cerro Gordo, Ill., the daughter of Francis R. McLaughlin, a native of Piatt Co., Ill., and Hallie Selby, a native of Illinois, died 5 Sep 1941, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Cerro Gordo, Piatt Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mound Independent, Friday, 12 Sep 1941:

Brother of E. E. Goddard Dies in California Home

             E. E. Goddard, superintendent of the St. Louis Division of the Illinois Central Signal System and at one time a partner in business with W. L. Toler here, is mourning the loss of his only brother, Glenn Goddard, principal of the Jordan Junior High School of Palo Alto, Calif., whose death occurred Sunday, August 31, at his home.  He leaves his wife, the former Pauline Peterson of Carbondale; and two small sons—Billy, 6, and Bobby, 3—; his brother, Earl E. Goddard of Carbondale; and a sister, Miss Grace Goddard, also of Carbondale.  Both brother and sister were on their way to Palo Alto, but arrived only in time to attend the funeral services, which were held in the Memorial Chapel of Leland Stanford University.

             (William H. Goddard, 21, farmer, born in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the son of Timothy H. Goddard and Susan Sumners, married on 20 May 1883, in Union Co., Ill., Alice L. Anderson, 21, born in Anna, Ill., daughter of James H. Anderson and Rosa Worley.  His 1917 draft registration states that Glenn Goddard, student, of Carbondale, Ill., was born 8 May 1896, in Anna, Union Co., Ill.  The California Death Index states that Glenn W. Goddard was born 8 May 1896, in Illinois, the son of Mr. Goddard and Miss Anderson, died 31 Aug 1941, in Santa Clara Co., Calif.  His marker in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., reads:  Glenn W. Goddard 1891-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

President’s Mother Dies Suddenly in Her 87th Year

             Mrs. Sara Delano Roosevelt, mother of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, died at her Hyde Park home on the Hudson River Sunday, September 7, at 11:15 a.m.  Had she lived until Sept. 21, she would have been 87.

             President and Mrs. Roosevelt were at her bedside when the end came, having watched there throughout the night.

             Stricken Friday night, Mrs. Roosevelt’s condition did not become alarming until almost 24 hours later.  Death was attributed to an acute circulatory collapse.

             Mrs. Roosevelt was born Sept. 21, 1854, at Algonac, north of Newburgh-on-the-Hudson, N.Y.  Her mother was the former Katherine Robbins Lyman of Northampton, Mass.  Her father, Warren Delano, one of a long line of merchants in the far east trade, was engaged in banking and commerce.  She was educated by governesses in her own home and later studied four years in France and Germany.

             She was married to James Roosevelt on Oct. 7, 1880.  He was a lawyer by profession, but was kept busy by his financial and railroad interests and did not practice law.  His death occurred Dec. 8, 1900.  Mrs. Roosevelt lived to see what no other American mother has ever seen—her son elected president for the third term.

             Burial services were held privately in the library of the Hyde Park home and burial was made in the family lot in the churchyard of St. James Episcopal Church, Hyde Park, by the side of her husband.

 

FATHER OF MRS. J. F. CONNELL DIES SATURDAY, SEPT. 7

             Mrs. James F. Connell was called to Peoria Saturday by the illness of her father, L. C. Schuley, who passed away before she reached his bedside.  Mayor Connell and children, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. W. I. Connell left Sunday for Peoria where funeral services for Mr. Schuley were held Tuesday.

 

Mrs. B. A. Braddy attended the funeral of her brother-in-law, Swinton Ballard in Buncombe Friday morning.

             (Swinton W. Ballard, 23, farmer from Johnson Co., Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of Ben F. Ballard and Elizabeth Gurley, married on 8 Oct 1889, at Robert M. Pryor’s in Union Co., Ill., Nora M. Cunningham, 17, from Johnson Co., Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Hugh D. Cunningham and Susan Pool.  Franklin Ballard, son of William Ballard, married on 29 Dec 1853, in Union Co., Ill., Elizabeth Gurley.  The death certificate of Swinton W. Ballard, farmer, of Buncombe, Elvira Township, Johnson Co., Ill., states that he was born 15 Jan 1863, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Franklin Ballard, a native of Pennsylvania, and Elizabeth Gurley, a native of North Carolina, died 10 Sep 1941, in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Nora Ballard, and was buried in Road District 2, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Mount Zion Cemetery in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Swinton W. Ballard 1863-1941 Nora M. Ballard 1872-1951.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KARNAK SCHOOL TEACHER DIES OF HEART DISEASE

             Miss Phyllis McLaughlin of Decatur, Ill., who was hired this year to teach in the Karnak High School was found dead last Saturday morning of heart disease.  Miss McLaughlin taught social sciences.

             She was called early Saturday morning and when no answer came the lady with whom she was living entered her room and found her dead in bed.  She was 22 years of age.

             Her body was prepared for burial by the Wilson Funeral Service and sent to her home in Decatur.

 

 

The Mound Independent, Friday, 19 Sep 1941:

Eli Mowery

             Eli Mowery, age 92, died in Detroit, Mich., Sunday.  His body arrived at Dongola by train Monday afternoon at 5 o’clock and was taken to the Ford Funeral Home, where it remained until the hour of the funeral, which was held at St. John’s Church Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock.  Burial was made beside his wife in St. John’s Cemetery.

             Mr. Mowery lived in Dongola and vicinity for years, but since the death of his wife in 1934, he moved to Detroit where he made his home with his only daughter, Mrs. Clara Lentz.

 

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Ridgeway have returned from Tulsa, Okla., where they were called Friday by the illness of Mr. Ridgeway’s brother, Roy Ridgeway, who passed away before they reached his bedside.  Funeral services were held Monday in Tulsa.

             (A marker in Memorial Park Cemetery in Tulsa, Okla., reads:  Dear Daddy David Roy Ridgeway Apr. 7, 1886-Sept. 12, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mound Independent, Friday, 26 Sep 1941:

Miss Margaret Lansden Dies Saturday at Her Home in Cairo

             Miss Margaret Lansden, youngest daughter of the late John M. and Mrs. Effie W. Smith Lansden of Cairo, died Saturday evening, September 20, at the family home, 315 Fifth Street, where she had been ill for several months.

             She leaves two sisters, Miss Emma Lansden of Cairo and Mrs. Robert Peck Bates of Chicago; two brothers, David S. Lansden of Cairo and John M. Lansden of New York City; also three nephews, David V. and Robert L. of Cairo and John A., of Madera, California.  Another sister, Miss Effie Lansden, passed to the beyond on May 29 of this year.

             Miss Lansden was an active worker in the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo and in the primary department of its Sunday school.  She was also a member of the Cairo Woman’s Club.  Until it was closed, she was chairman of the Board of Managers of the Cairo Children’s Home, which was an outstanding private charitable institution with its success due largely to her efforts.

             Services were held at the family residence Tuesday morning at 10:30 o’clock conducted by the Venerable Samuel L. Hagan of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.  Burial was in the family lot at Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Margaret Lansden, of Cairo, Ill., was born 9 Aug 1879, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of John M. Lansden, a native of Sangamon Co., Ill., and Effie W. Smith, a native of Jacksonville, Ill., died 20 Sep 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Margaret Lansden 1879-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Two Young Men Killed in Early Sunday Morning Wreck

             Dallas Jones of Grand Chain, age 21, and Herschel Maze, Jr., of Goreville, age 20, were killed and Riley Pritchett, also of Goreville, is reported in a critical condition in the Herrin Hospital as the result of a collision which occurred early Sunday morning on the highway south of Goreville when the car, said to have been driven by Jones, struck a loaded coal truck and was demolished.  A fourth young man, William Dunn, also of Goreville, who was at first thought to have sustained only slight injuries was later reported to be suffering from numerous bruises and cuts and possibly internal injuries.

             The young men were returning to Goreville from the midnight show at Vienna.

             Dallas Jones is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Jones of Grand Chain, formerly of Goreville; two sisters, Bertha of Marion and Helen of Grand Chain; five brothers, John Elmer of Grand Chain, Claude of Ullin, Omar of Karnak, Clarence of Chicago and Leon of Louisiana.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning at 11 o’clock at the Mt. Hebron Church at Goreville with Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Burial was made in Mt. Hebron Cemetery.

             Maze is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herschel Maze and a brother Victor, all of Goreville.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Methodist church in Goreville with Rev. Bluford Dawson officiating.  Interment was made in Busby Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of both funerals.

             Later:  Riley Pritchett died from his injuries on Monday following.

                           (The death certificate of Dallas Jones, truck driver, of Grand Chain, Ill., states that he was born 2 Jan 1916, in Chaffee, Mo., the son of John Jones and Lula Foster, natives of Illinois, died 20 Sep 1941, in Road District 1, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in 22 Sep 1941, in Road District 1, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Union Co., Ill., reads:  Dallas son of John & Lula Jones Jan. 2, 1916 Sept. 20, 1941.  The death certificate of Herschel Landon Maze, Jr., of Goreville, Ill., states that he was born 19 Aug 1921, in Goreville, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Herschel Maze and Dessie Threet, natives of Goreville, Ill., died 20 Sep 1941, in Road District 1, Johnson Co., Ill.  He was buried in Busby Cemetery in Goreville, Ill.  The death certificate of Rollie Pritchett, service station attendant, of Goreville, Ill., states that he was born 17 May 1920, in Goreville, Ill., the son of James Pritchett and Bertha Glenn, natives of Goreville, Ill., died 22 Sep 1941, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 1, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker reads:  Rollie Pritchett May 17, 1920 Sept. 22, 1941 Brothers Arbie Pritchett July 12, 1908 July 23, 1930 Sons of James and Bertha Pritchett.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Sep 1941:

USES AX ON HUSBAND

W. C. Jones, Negro, of near Grand Chain, is in the Cairo hospital after being cut on the head with an ax.  It was reported that Jones’ wife, whom he had put out of the house, had re-entered the room where her husband was sleeping and struck him across the forehead with an ax, inflicting a serious wound.

             An operation was performed on Jones at the hospital with part of his brain being removed.  However, Jones is reported to be getting along all right.  He had thrown all of the clothing owned by his wife out the door when he made her leave, it was reported.

 

THREE YOUTHS KILLED WHEN THEIR CAR HITS TRUCK

             Fatally injured when their car sideswiped and tore under a loaded 12-ton Diamond T coal truck on Route 37 south of Goreville early Sunday morning.  Dallas Jones, 21, of Grand Chain and Herschel Maze, Jr., age 20, of Goreville, were buried Monday, and a third victim, Rollie Pritchett of Goreville, age 21, died Monday night.

             With two other Goreville youths, the two young men had attended a midnight show in Vienna and were returning to Goreville where Jones formerly lived.  The cab of the car in which they were riding about a 1930 model Chevrolet, was crushed back, instantly killing Jones and Maze who were in the front seat.

             Surviving Jones are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Jones of Grand Chain; two sisters, Bertha of Marion and Helen of Grand Chain; five brothers, John Lemer of Grand Chain, Claude of Ullin, Omar of Karnak, Clarence of Chicago and Leon of Louisiana.

             Funeral services for the Grand Chain youth were held Monday morning at 11 o’clock at the Mt. Hebron Church at Goreville.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiated with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Oct 1941:

Sister of Louis Stout Dies

             Mrs. F. H. Harmon, sister of Louis Stout, died September 25 in a hospital at Quincy.  The former Maud Stout, she was born in Cairo, but had lived in St. Louis for many years before going to Quincy early in this year to make her home with a daughter.  She is survived by her husband, two daughters, three grandsons and three brothers, Louis of this city, Thomas and Claude of Cairo.

             (Henry Stout married Mary E. Connery on 21 Aug 1864, in Gallatin Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Maud Harman was born 2 Oct 1869, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry Stout, a native of Shawneetown, Ill., and Mary Connery, a native of Wisconsin, died 25 Sep 1941, in Quincy, Adams Co., Ill., wife of Seymour Harman, and was buried in St. Louis Cemetery in St. Louis, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Cairo Youth Killed in Flight Crash in China

             Max C. Hammer, Jr., of Cairo, an instructor in the Chinese Air Corps, met death in a training flight crash Sept. 22, according to word received by his father in the form of a telegram from Secretary of State Cordell Hull.  The news had been relayed to him from the American Consulate in Rangoon, Burma.

             The youth, who was only 25, had been in China less than a month.  He completed his U. S. Army Air Corps training at Kelly Field, Texas, this summer, resigned in July and at once enlisted for service in China.  The last letter his father received was written Aug. 31, aboard ship en route to Singapore.

             (The Report of the Death of American Citizens Abroad states that Maax Curtis Hammer, Jr., died 22 Sep 1941 at 1:30 p.m. near Toungoo, Burma, in an accident during an airplane training flight.  He was buried in Plot D-15 British Cantonment Cemetery in Toungoo, Burma.  His father, Maax C. Hammer, of 219 Fourth St., Cairo, Ill., was notified by telegraph 23 Sep 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Robert Lee Henderson

             Robert Lee Henderson, age 55, died early Sunday morning, Sept. 28, at the home of his sister, Mrs. H. G. Gevedin, in Anna following a short illness.  For many years Mr. Henderson was a resident of this place.

             Besides his sister, he is survived by one son, James, who is in the U. S. Army; one daughter, Mrs. Mildred Wadley; two brothers, Bailey of Jackson, Tenn., and Vester of Tucson, Ariz.

             Funeral services were conducted at the grave at Bardwell Cemetery in Kentucky Monday afternoon.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, Robert Lee Henderson, farm laborer, was born 15 Jan 1886, in Arlington, Ky., the son of J. L. Henderson, a native of Ogden Landing, Ky., and Martha Sullinger, a native of Kentucky, died 28 Sep 1941, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the widower of Virgie Henderson, and was buried at Bardwell, Carlisle Co., Ky.  His June 1937 Social Security application listed his father as John L. Henderson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Miller

             John Miller, age 91, died at his home on a farm near Wetaug Sunday after an illness of 9 months.

             His funeral was held at the Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church near Wetaug Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by the pastor, Rev. William E. Bridges, and burial was made in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

             He leaves three children, Albert G. Miller of Cairo, Hugh Miller of Bruce, Miss., and Walter Miller of Bruce, Miss., and Walter Miller of Ullin; two stepchildren, Mrs. Ethel Betts of New Cangton and Ed Crippen of Ullin; 11 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.

             (His death certificate states that John Miller, farmer, was born 17 Oct 1849, in Mill Creek, Ill., the son of John Miller and Sarah Harky, natives of North Carolina, died 28 Sep 1941, in Road District 10, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Anna S. Miller, and was buried in Road District 10, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery reads:  John Miller 1849-1941 Anna S. Miller 1862-1930.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Oct 1941:

CAIRO AVIATOR KILLED IN CHINA PLANE CRASH

             Max Hammer, Jr., well known Cairo aviator, was killed in a plane crash in China, September 22, his father learned last week.  Hammer, who was a lieutenant in the U. S. Army Air Corps before volunteering for service with the Chinese Army, was flying a training plane.  He was an instructor.

             Lieut. Hammer completed his basic flight training at Randolph Field in Texas.  He was then transferred to Kelly Field from which he was graduated early last spring.  He was one of 60 resigning from the U. S. Air Corps to go to China to aid that army in its fight against Japan.

 

Freeman Sowers of Chicago was called to the funeral of his aunt.  (Perks)

 

RESIDENT OF WETAUG DIES

             John Miller, age 91, died at his home on a farm near Wetaug Sunday noon after an illness of about nine months.

             His funeral was held from the Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church near Wetaug Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by the pastor, Rev. William E. Bridges, and burial was in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

             He leaves three children, Albert G. Miller of Cairo, Hugh Miller of Bruce, Miss., and Walter Miller of Ullin; two stepchildren, Mrs. Ethel Betts of New Canton, Illinois, and Ed Crippen of Ullin; 11 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Oct 1941:

Griffin Mayberry

             Griffin Mayberry, colored, age 49, who suffered a brain hemorrhage and ___e Monday while at work on the levee project and was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, died Wednesday night.  He came to Mounds in 1914 from Jackson, Tenn., but his original home was in Mississippi.  He was a deacon of St. John’s Baptist Church, having served in that capacity since ___.

             Surviving are his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Jennie Mae Brown; and two grandchildren.

             (His death certificate states that Griffin Mayberry, common laborer, of 128 Elm St., Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 16 Aug 1892, in Cannon, Miss., the son of Henry Mayberry, a native of Cannon, Miss., died 8 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill.,  husband of Raida Mayberry, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His Social Security application in 1938 states he was born 16 Aug 1888, in Canton, Miss., the son of Henry Mayberry and Jennie Smith.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Garland Williams Killed When Car Overturned on R. 37

             Garland Williams, well known colored business man of this city, was instantly killed at 3 o’clock Friday morning when the car he was driving overturned on Route 37, on a curve just north of Clancy’s Place.  With Williams were John Scurlock, janitor at the Douglass Grade School, who was seriously injured and was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo; Henry Nixon, an employee of R. W. England, injured but not seriously; Lewis Shelby and Jack Buggs, who were only slightly injured.

             The coroner’s verdict was to the effect that Williams died of a broken neck and other injuries as the result of an accident in which he lost control of the car he was driving and it overturned.

             Williams conducted a second-hand furniture, repair and upholstery establishment on North Front Street.

             Surviving are his wife Agnes Holt Williams, a teacher in the Douglass High School; two brothers, Richard of Detroit and Leonard of Mounds; his stepmother, Mrs. Cecelia Williams, Mounds; a grandmother; and two uncles in Paris, Tenn.  He was the son of the late J. T. Williams.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the A. M. E. church, the Rev. E. Taborn officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, Garland Radford Williams, of Mounds, Ill., stated he was born 7 Jan 1899, and was a waiter for DuPont Co., of Carney’s Pt., N.J.  According to his death certificate Garland Williams, cabinet maker, of Road District 4, Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 7 Jan 1898, in Paris, Tenn.,  son of John T. Williams and Emily Porter, natives of Paris, Tenn., died 3 Oct 1941, near Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Agnes Williams, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Joseph A. Lutz

       Joseph Anton Lutz, age 71, passed away at his home in Mound City, Wednesday morning at 9:45 o’clock after a long illness.  Mr. Lutz was born in Mound City and had spent his entire life there.  At the death of his father, he succeeded him in the meat business, which he continued for a number of years.  At one time he served as councilman of Mound City.

             Surviving him are his wife Lena; three daughters, Miss Louise and Mrs. Helen Mitcham of Mound City and Miss Margaret of Chicago; four sons, Albert of Springfield, Mo., Rohan of Mound City and Edward and William of Chicago; two grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. William Bestgen of Mound City.

 

Infant Dies

             Vivian Kay, the six-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Brashiers, passed away at the home of her parents in Karnak Monday morning at 3:30 o’clock.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Karnak Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. William Henry of Cypress officiating.  Burial was made in Salem Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

 

L. D. Harper

             L. D. Harper, age 78, died in Cairo Sunday morning, Oct. 5, at 6 o’clock.  He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Joe Lane, of Miami Beach, Fla.; two sons, James of Chicago and Vernon of Detroit; a brother, J. W.; a sister, Mrs. Myrtle Mattson of this city; and a grandson.

             Funeral services were held at the J. T. Ryan Funeral Home Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, Rev. L. B. Walkington, pastor of the Methodist Church, officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery with the Ryan Funeral Service in charge.

 

Former Mounds Merchant Dies at His Home in Cairo

             Julius F. Ericson, age 59, died Sunday night at his home, 814 Walnut Street, Cairo, after a three weeks’ illness.

             For many years Mr. Ericson conducted men’s clothing store on First Street in this city and his Mounds friends will regret to hear of his passing.

             Surviving are his wife, the former Anise May Thistlewood; a foster son, Harry K. Moore, of Cairo; one sister, Mrs. Ben Wilson of Chicago; one brother, Victor of Cairo.

             From Mounds Mr. Ericson went to St. Louis, where he was connected with the American Sugar Refining Company as manager; later he was associated with the St. Louis National Bank.  From St. Louis he went to Palm Beach, Fla., and was in the real estate business for several years.   For the past seven years he has resided in Cairo.  He was a member of the Christian Church and of the Masonic Lodge.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Ernest D. Fritts, pastor of the Christian Church, officiating.  Burial was made in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Oct 1941:

NEGRO KILLED IN WRECK ON ROUTE 37

             Fatally injured when the car he was driving overturned on Route 37 on a curve south of Grand Chain, Garland Williams, well known Mounds Negro, died a few minutes after being pulled from the wrecked car.  His neck was broken and he suffered other injuries.

             Three companions were injured in the accident, when Williams lost control, John Spurlock is in a serious condition at the Cairo hospital.  Henry Nixon, Lewis Shelby and Jack Bugs were taken to the hospital but released after treatments for minor cuts and bruises.

             Williams was considered a furniture repair expert and was widely known throughout the county.

             A coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death,

 

Joseph A. Lutz

             Joseph Anton Lutz, age 71, passed away at his home in Mound City, Wednesday morning at 9:45 o’clock after a prolonged illness. 

Mr. Lutz was born in this city and spent his entire life here.  At the death of his father he succeeded him in the meat business, which he continued for a number of years.  At one time he served as councilman of Mound City.

             Surviving him are his widow Lena; three daughters, Miss Louise of this city, Mrs. Helen Mitcham of Perryville, Mo., and Miss Margaret of Chicago; four sons, Albert of Springfield, Mo., Rohan of Mound City and Edward and William of Chicago; two grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. William Bestgen of Mound City.  The only other surviving relatives are five cousins, children of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Wallace of Pulaski.

             Funeral services will be held at St. Mary’s Church in this city Saturday morning at 9:00 o’clock with Rev. Lawrence Gilmartin  conducting the service.  Interment will be made in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Mounds.  G. A. James Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements.

 

RESIDENT OF VILLA RIDGE DIES

             Mrs. Betty Cochran, age 72, passed away Wednesday, October 1, at 11:30 p.m. at the home of her son, Herman Cochran on the Villa Ridge Road after an illness of two years.

             Her husband, Lee Cochran, preceded her in death December 10, 1940.  Surviving her are five sons, Tom of Paducah, Silas of Mounds, Herman of Mounds, Jack of Detroit and Lee of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Jennie Brown of Cairo; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the funeral home Friday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock with Rev. Lannton of Perks officiating.  Interment was in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Oct 1941:

Death of William H. Wise Saddens His Many Friends

             The community was saddened Friday morning last to here that W. H. Wise, a resident here for the past __ years, had died Thursday night, October 9, at his home.  Mr. Wise had not been well for several years, yet the news of his passing was a shock to many.

             Mr. Wise was born November 5, 1875, at Knoxville, Tenn.  When six years of age, he came with his parents to Illinois and has since resided in this vicinity.  He had lived in Mounds since his marriage to Miss Effie Laws at Villa Ridge, April __, 1899.

             He had been an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad for 41 years, retiring in February 1930 because of his health.  He was promoted from fireman to engineer in 1914.  He was a member of the First Baptist Church in Mounds.

             Surviving are his wife; five sons, William, Adolphus and Robert of Chicago, Leslie of Detroit, Mich., and Woodrow of Denver, Colo.; two daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Rose of Mounds and Miss Susie Wise of Chicago.  He is also survived by four grandchildren; three brothers, Oscar of Charleston, Mo., Walter and Bertie of Commerce, Mo.; and one sister, Mrs. Ed Axley of Steele, Mo.

             Funeral services were held at the ___ Funeral Home Sunday afternoon, October 12, at 2 o’clock with the Rev. Kenneth G. Hall, pastor of the First Baptist Church, officiating,.  The pallbearers were the five sons of a brother-in-law, A. H. Laws.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (Willie H. Wise, 23, of Beechwood, Pulaski Co., Ill., married on 12 Apr 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Effa Laws, 19, of Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  William Henry Wise, retired locomotive engineer, was born 5 Nov 1875, in Knoxville, Tenn., the son of Benjamin Wise and Laura Beegle, natives of Tennessee, died 9 Oct 1941, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Effie Wise, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds. His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  William H. Wise Nov. 5, 1876 Oct. 9, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Four Negroes Killed in Auto Crash in Cairo

             Four negroes were killed at 3:30 a.m. Sunday when a car in which eight were riding crushed against an electric power line pole on the east side of Sycamore Street, Cairo, in front of the Swift & Company plant just south of the subway as you go into the city.

             The dead are John D. Parker of Mound City, who owned and was driving the car; John Muse and his wife Carrie Muse of South Mounds, McGowan Tidwell of Mound City.

             Lucille Larry of Cairo was seriously injured and was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital where he remained in a serious condition; John Allen Carr of South Mounds was also injured, but not seriously, Mrs. Parker and Henry Vaughn, also of Mound City, escaped with slight injuries.

             The large pole was broken off and remaining stump bent halfway to the ground.  The car was on its side with the top mashed.

             (According to the death certificate, John Parker, laborer, of Mound City, Ill., was born 6 Nov 1911, in Olmsted, Ill., son of Lora Parker, a native of Illinois, died 12 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Ruth Parker, and was buried in Olmsted cemetery.  The death certificate of John D. Muse, laborer, of Mounds, Ill., states he was born 12 Aug 1908, in Woodland Mill, Tenn., son of John Muse and Bertha Johnson, natives of Tennessee, died 12 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., divorced husband of Carrie Muse, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  The death certificate of Carrie Muse, of Cairo, Ill., states that she was born 29 Nov 1913, in Charleston, Mo., the daughter of Hallie Gordon, a native of Charleston, Mo., died 12 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  According to the death certificate, McGowan Tidwell, common laborer, of Mound City, Ill., was born 6 Feb 1899, in Abbeville, Miss., the son of Sam Tidwell and Anna Porter, natives of Abbeville, Miss., died 12 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Dobford Chapel Cemetery, Holly Springs, Marshall Co., Miss.  When he registered for the draft in 1918, McGowan Tidwell of Holly Springs, Miss., stated he was born 6 Feb 1898, and was farming for Sam Tidwell, and his nearest relative was his mother, Anna Tidwell, of Holly Springs.  He did not sign his name, but made his mark.—Darrel Dexter)

 

State Rep M. F. Browner Dies after Long Illness

             State Representative M. F. Browner of Mound City, age 79 years, died at his home Tuesday night, October 14, following a long illness.

             Representative Browner was born in Mound City and had resided there all his life.  He was a member of the Republican County Central Committee for 32 years and its chairman for 20 years.  He had held the office of city treasurer, city clerk and served as mayor of Mound City for 30 years.  He was a charter member of the Mound City Building and Loan Association and served as its president for 25 years.  He was in the mercantile business for 36 years, retiring in 1918.  On the retirement of the late Judge W. A. Wall, his brother-in-law from the presidency of the First State Bank of Mound City Mr. Browner was elected to the place and continued as president until his death.  At death he was serving his fifth two-year term as a member of the General Assembly, having been a member of the 58th, 59th, 60th, 61st and 62nd General Assemblies.

             He was married July 25, 1913, to Miss Rose Ella Kennedy of Cairo.  Three children who died in infancy, were born of this marriage.  Mrs. Brower died in childbirth on February 21, 1918.  He never remarried.

             He was a life-long member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church of Mound City.

             In manner Mr. Browner was quiet and unassuming.  He was liked by all who knew him.  In his campaigns for election to the General Assembly, members of all parties and all faiths cast their votes for him.

             Surviving are two sisters, Miss Mary Browner and Mrs. W. A. Wall, both of Mound City.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) morning at nine o’clock at St. Mary’s Church.  A group of fellow members of the state legislature are expected to attend the services.

             (His death certificate states that Michael Francis Browner, retired banker, of Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 19 May 1863, in New Jersey, the son of Thomas Browner and Mary McCarthy, natives of Ireland, died 14 Oct 1941, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Michael F. Browner 1862-1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Adolphus and Robert Wise, who were called here by the death of their father, W. H. Wise, returned to Chicago Tuesday.  William and Miss Susie remained for a few days longer.

 

A. B. Walters

             A. B. Walters, age 79 years, died Sunday morning, October 12, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. James Martin on Spencer Heights.  He had been ill for some time.

             Surviving are one son, Andrew, of Metropolis; and one daughter, Mrs. Martin; also five grandchildren.

             Short services were held at the home of his son in Metropolis Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock.  Immediately afterward, the funeral cortege left for Mt. Zion Church, where funeral services were conducted by the Rev. Mr. Simmons.  Burial was in Mt. Zion Cemetery.

             (Albert B. Walters married Nancy P. Baker on 30 Sep 1883, in Pope Co., Ill.  Thomas Walters married Polly Grissom on 19 Jun 1834, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Albert Burton Walters, retired blacksmith, was born 29 Aug 1862, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of Polly Grissen Walters, died 12 Oct 1941, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Ellen Walters, and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)  

 

Norris and Robert Taylor of Truman, Arkansas, were called here by the illness and death of their mother, Mrs. I. N. Taylor.

 

Card of Thanks

             To the public as a whole:  We wish to thank you for the consoling cards, the beautiful flowers and also thank the ones who donated their cars, the Rev. J. T. Dodson, for his words of consolation; also the Donelson Funeral Service who had charge of the death of Griffin Mayberry.

The Mayberry Family

Mounds, Illinois

 

Brother of Mrs. Hallerberg Dies Suddenly October 12

             Mrs. F. W. Hallerberg and her sister, Miss Lucy Simon of Oconee, received word Sunday afternoon of the sudden death of their brother, William Simen of Oconee, with whom Miss Lucy made her home.  She had been visiting here the past two weeks and left at once for her home, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Reichert.  Mrs. Reichert is the former Christamae Hallerberg.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church in Oconee with burial in a cemetery in that place.  Mrs. Hallerberg was unable to attend on account of the illness of Mr. Hallerberg.

             (The death certificate of William C. Simen, harness maker, was born 30 Dec 1881, in Oconee, Ill., the son of Bernard Simen and Martha Dutler, natives of Switzerland, died 12 Oct 1941, in Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Ill., and was buried in Oconee Mound Cemetery in Shelby Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Oct 1941:

M. F. BROWNER PASSED AWAY TUESDAY AT HOME

Mound City’s First Citizen Comes to End of Useful Life at 79

             M. F. Browner, known to nearly all as “Mike,” died at his home about 7:15 p.m. Tuesday of an illness that began early in the year when the fatigue of the campaign of last fall and the attempt to keep abreast of public duties, overtaxed his strength.  He literally began to wear down and wear out and with 79 years of active life lived, the end approached gradually and peacefully.  It was not unexpected.

             Browner was Mound City’s first citizen, a place he earned, deserved and held.  A man of sterling character, a man of high ideals, tolerant and charitable, he held the confidence and esteem of all.  He earned his place while in business and while a city official, called back time and time again to serve, and he kept it when he entered the political field as a member of the State Legislature.

             He was 30 years mayor of Mound City.  Not continuously, but in count of years, for he left the office many times and did not desire to serve.  But the town called him back, and his conservative, sensible, straightforward ways were standard patterns.

             Mr. Browner was the son of the late Thomas Browner and was born in the east.  He attended Mound City schools and grew up in the town.  He worked for a time in the ship yards and entered the grocery business with his father in the eighties and continued in that business until he retired after the World War.

             He was city treasurer and then clerk.  Then he became mayor.  Some of the critical floods which the city fought off, and they were floods in those days, too, were while he was mayor.  Much of the levee building came in his day.

             He was interested in the banks and was a director in both.  When the First National Bank closed here, Browner never withdrew a penny when it was going under, but took his losses with the depositors.

             In 1932 he became president of the First State Bank after the death of the late Judge Wall.  He was president of the Building and Loan for years.

             About ten years ago he decided to enter state politics and ran for the legislature.  Since then he has been a member continuously save for one term.  In November 1936, he fell while inspecting a corn crib and fractured his hip.  It was several days before the extent of his injuries were known and he was removed to a hospital where he was when the flood swept over Mound City in January 1937.

The suffering from the broken hip and his determined fight to get well cost him much.  But he recovered and was much the same, save that some of his vigor was gone and exertion soon tired him.

             The campaign of last fall, the determination to stay in the legislative halls, the onrush of job seekers and then a deep cold, cut him down to where he was in bed much of the time.  A trip to Springfield to vote or a measure when his vote was needed did not help his health and from then on, his vitality seemed to diminish.  In bed for nearly two months, he gained no strength until gradually he slipped out to join many of his own people and friends who have gone on.

             Browner was married in 1913 to Miss Rose Etta Kennedy.  The children born to this union did not live long and Mrs. Browner died soon after the birth of the third child in 1932.  Since that time, he and his sister, Miss Mary Browner, have lived in the home.

             He was a lifelong member of the Catholic Church and a member of the Knights of Columbus.

             Aside from his two sisters, Miss Mary and Mrs. Margaret Wall, he has no immediate relatives.  A sister-in-law, Miss Kennedy of Cairo and cousins in St. Louis survive.  The friends who knew him in five counties are many and some of them were close and liked Browner for his sterling qualities.

             The body was taken from the James Funeral Home Thursday morning and removed to the home where it lay in state until this morning at 9:00 o’clock, when the funeral was held at St. Mary’s Church.

             From many points upstate and over the district, messages of condolence were received and expressions of sympathy.  The services found large numbers from out of town attending.  After all, it was the final gesture not only in respect for the town’s first citizen, but also a gesture for one of the finest men this area has ever placed in political office.

             Business houses closed this (Friday) morning from 8:30 to 10:00 to pay respect to a man who gave so many years of his life to public service.

             The twelve pallbearers will be L. J. Mulroney, Dan O’Sullivan, Jr., Von Lawler, Rohan Lutz, Frank Ledbetter, Joe Westerman, Str., C. F. Bode, John Trampert, C. E. Richey, George A. Tharp, George W. Gunn, and F. J. Kuny.

 

FIVE NEGROES DIE AS RESULT OF AUTO CRASH

             After their car struck a power line pole near the Swift and Co. mill in Cairo, causing two large transformers to fall through the roof of the car, five Negroes were dead, four of them being killed instantly.

             The accident happened early Sunday morning as the car, containing eight persons, got out of control of the driver, John D. Parker, rolled sideways into the pole, stearing it off near the ground and loosing the heavy transformers.

             It was not known whether the persons were killed in the car wreck or if the transformers caused the fatalities.

             Those dead are John D. Parker of Mound City, who owned the car and who was driving.  His wife was not injured.  John Muse of Mounds and his wife Carrie.  McGowan Tidwell of Mound City.  All of these were killed instantly.  Lucille Larry of Cairo died at St. Mary’s Hospital later in the morning.

             A survivor, Henry Vaughn of Mound City, said he had driven the car from Mounds to the Artesian Well when Parker took over.  He said they were traveling “pretty fast.”  He was riding in the front seat with Parker and his wife.  The transformers fell through the roof of the car, just behind the driver, crushing the skulls of three persons.  Parker’s neck was broken, possibly in the crash against the pole.

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral Saturday of Joe Lutz were Mr. and Mrs. K. J. Stuart and family of Cairo, Miss Hazel Flaws of Chicago, Mrs. Margaret Rohan and family of St. Louis and Mr. and Mrs. George Muscovalley of St. Louis.

 

GRAND CHAIN RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Aubrey E. Haynes, wife of Captain Aubrey E. Haynes of Grand Chain, passed away at De Paul Hospital in St. Louis Tuesday morning, where she has been a patient for the past three weeks.

             Besides her husband, she is survived by two children, Aubrey, Jr., and Ruby; her father, P. J. Loomis of Cairo; four sisters, Mrs. James Gray of Elberton, Ga., Mrs. P. Zarofonetis of Augusta, Fa., Mrs. Wilson Brackey of New Orleans and Miss Jeanette Loomis of Cairo.

             Funeral services were held at the Karcher Funeral Home Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with Venerable S L. Hagan, rector of the Church of the Redeemer, officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights.

             (The death certificate of Christine Haynes, of rural Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., states that she was born 12 Feb 1906, in Decatur, Ill., daughter of Peter Loomis and Nellie Hattoon, died 13 Oct 1941, in DePaul Hospital, St. Louis, Mo., wife of A. H. Haynes.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Christina Loomis Haynes Feb. 12, 1906 Oct. 13, 1941.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A. B. WALTERS DIES SUNDAY

             A. B. Walters, age 79, died Sunday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. James Martin, in Spencer Heights, following an illness of several weeks.

             Mrs. Walters is survived by one son, Andrew of Metropolis; a daughter, Mrs. Martin; and five grandchildren.

             Short services were held at the home of his son in Metropolis Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Immediately following the group left for Mt. Zion Church, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. Simmons.  Burial was made in the Mt. Zion Cemetery.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Oct 1941:

Funeral Services Held for U. S. A. Gadbois Saturday

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon for U. S. A. Gadbois whose death, at the age of 81, occurred Thursday, October 16, at 2 a.m. at his home near Villa Ridge.

             The survives were held at the residence with the Rev. S. C. Benninger, Congregational pastor, officiating.  Burial was made in Villa Ridge cemetery with the G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Mr. Gadbois was a retired farmer and fruit grower of the Villa Ridge community, where he had lived for the past 25 years.  For 18 years previous to his residence near Villa Ridge he lived in Cairo, where he was a carpenter and contractor.

             He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Ethel Piper of Oak Ark, Mrs. Mabel Herbert and Mrs. Zena Clancy of Villa Ridge; two sons, Roy of Natchez, Miss., and Everett of Chicago; two granddaughters, Mrs. Wallace McKinney of Oak Park and Mrs. Jean Mirus of Springfield; also two great-grandchildren.

             (U. S. A. Gadbois married M. Alice Spencer on 25 Nov 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Urgeus Samuel Alphonse Gadbois, retired farmer, of Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 14 Sep 1860, in Jackson Co., Ill., the son of Pierre Gadbois and Leocadia Paye, natives of Quebec, died 16 Oct 1941, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Urgeus S. A. Gadbois 1869-1941 Mary Alice Gadbois 1860-1935.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Oct 1941:

ACCIDENTAL DEATH IN WRECK KILLING FOUR

             A coroner’s jury in Cairo returned a verdict of accidental death at an inquest into the death of four Negroes early Sunday morning, October 11.

             Those killed were John Parker of Mound City, John Muse of Cairo and his wife, Carrie and McGowan Tidwell.  The accident occurred when the car, driven by Parker, crashed into a light company pole near Swift and Company’s cotton seed mill just inside Cairo city limits, causing two large transformers to fall through the roof of the car, killing all four instantly.

             Another, who was injured in the wreck, Lucile Larry of Cairo, remains in a serious condition at St. Mary’s Hospital.  It was brought out at the inquest that the car had swerved just after crossing the railroad tracks near the subway and continued swerving until it hit the pole.  Those in the car who were able to testify said Parker was not driving fast.

 

VILLA RIDGE RESIDENT DIES

             U. S. A. Gadbois, age 81, passed away at his home east of Villa Ridge, October 16, at 2 o’clock after a short illness.  Mr. Gadbois was a retired farmer and fruit grower of Villa Ridge, where he has lived for the past 25 years.  Prior to moving to Villa Ridge he was located in Cairo or 18 years as contractor and carpenter.

             Surviving him are three daughters, Mrs. Ethel Piper of Oak Park, Mrs. Mabel Herbert and Mrs. Zena Clancy of Villa Ridge; two sons, Roy of Natchez, Miss., and Everett of Chicago; two granddaughters, Mrs. Wallace McKinney of Oak Park and Mrs. Jean Mirus of Springfield; and two great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.

             Burial was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to take this means of thanking our many friends who expressed their sympathy to us and who paid tribute to our dear brother, M. F. Browner.

             We wish especially to thank the Rev. Father Gilmartin, Father Taylor and Father Jantzen for their assistance, political and business associates, Knights of Columbus and others who by their presence and floral offerings noted his passing.  We shall ever remember your kindness.

Mrs. Margaret Wall and

Miss Mary Browner 

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 Oct 1941:

Cairo Negro Kills Wife Early Sunday Morning

             James Brown shot and fatally wounded his wife, Anita, at their restaurant in Cairo about 1 o’clock Sunday morning.  She died a few hours later at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.  Her age was 32.

             Brown fled and hid in the woods along the Mississippi River Sunday, then later decided to give himself up to the authorities.

             After being taken into custody, Brown said he had married Anita several months ago, but during their investigation the police found a letter addressed to James Brown and signed by Lula Mae Brown, which indicated she was to arrive in Cairo to institute divorce proceedings against him.  The letter was from Hayti, Mo.

             An inquest was held and Brown was held for the grand jury.

             (A death certificate for Georgia Anita Brown, cook, of Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., states she was born 12 Jun 1905, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of William M. Donaldson, a native of Lexington, Miss., and Lena R. Seavers, a native of Grand Chain, Ill., died 26 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Ill., wife of James Brown, and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Johnnie Wayne Grace

             Death claimed Johnnie Wayne Grace, two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Grace of Unity Wednesday morning, October 29, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.

             Surviving are his parents, a brother Michael, age six months; his paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Grace of Unity; his maternal grandparents, Mt. and Mrs. G. P. Grace of Cairo and maternal great-grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Amos W. Jones of Olive Branch.

             The body was brought Wednesday afternoon to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Penrod, where funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with the Rev. W. P. Pearce of the Cairo Baptist Church officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (The death certificate of Johnnie Wayne Grace, of Unity, Alexander Co., Ill., states he was born 21 Oct 1939, in Mounds, Ill., the son of John Grace, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Virginia Penrod, a native of Olive Branch, Ill., died 29 Oct 1941, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Nov 1941:

Mrs. Millie Waters

             Mrs. Millie Walters, age 67, died at the home of her son, Ulis Linder, in Valley Recluse Monday, Nov. 3, after an illness of two months.

             Mrs. Walters is survived by her son and two daughters, Mrs. Eva Phimister of Valley Recluse and Mrs. Ivie Bever of Anna; a brother, James Dwyer of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Belle Hammons of Mound City; and two grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon with Rev. Ernest Pruett officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

C. L. McMackin

             C. L. McMackin, age 81, prominent resident of Salem and father of Miss Helen McMackin known throughout the state, died Saturday in a Chicago Heights hospital, where he had been taken following an auto accident in which he was fatally injured.  C. S. Barnett of West Frankfort, his companion en route to a furniture dealers’ meeting died Friday night.

             He is survived by his wife; one son, Mayor Omar McMackin of Salem; one daughter, Miss Helen McMackin; two grandsons, a granddaughter, and one great-granddaughter.

             Miss Helen McMackin is a former president of the Illinois Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs and former state regent of the Illinois Society of Daughters of the American Revolution.

             (The Social Security application of Charles Lincoln McMackin states that he was born 21 May 1860, in Salem, Ill., the son of Warren E. McMackin and Delilah Crews.  The 1942 application of Oscar J. McMackin states that he was born 18 Mar 1888, in Salem, Ill., the son of Charles L. McMackin born 20 May 1860, died 1 Nov 1941, the husband of Eugenia A. Drake, born 16 May 1866—married 10 May 1886; grandson of Louis W. Drake, born 19 Sep 1835, died 1915, and Helen Merryfield, born 2 Apr 1838, died 1 Oct 1890—married 21 May 1859; great-grandson of John Merryfield, born 5 Jul 1811, died 16 Nov 1880, and Cassandra Rawson, born 26 Mar 1816, died 4 Apr 1871—married 1 Mar 1835; great-great-grandson of James Rawson, born 12 Jun 1790, died 12 Jun 1866, and Mary Polly Franklin born 27 Dec 1795, died 27 Nov 1876—married in New York; and great-great-great-grandson of Samuel Rawson born 16 Jun 1760, died 1814, and Lydia Thurston born 22 Feb 1753, died 13 May 1812—married 20 May 1781; and great-great-great-great-grandson of Elijah Rawson born 5 Feb 1717 died 1798, and Mary Paddock.  Elijah Rawson was a private in the Worchester County Militia in Massachusetts, 6th Regiment during the Revolutionary War.  The death certificate of Charles L. McMackin, furniture dealer, of Salem, Marion Co., Ill., states that he was born 15 May 1860, in Salem, Ill., the son of Warren McMackin, a native of Tennessee, and Delilah Cruse, a native of Wayne Co., Ill., died 31 Oct 1941, in Chicago Heights, Ill., husband of Eugenia McMackin, and was buried in East Lawn Cemetery in Salem, Marion Co., Ill.  His marker reads:  Charles Lincoln McMackin 1860-1941 21st Mayor of Salem.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. John Moore of Pulaski Dies Suddenly Sunday Morning

             Mrs. Ethel Moore, age 61 years, wife of John Moore of Pulaski, died suddenly Sunday morning, November 2, following an attack of apoplexy.

             She is survived by her husband, one daughter, Mrs. Carrell Davis of Pulaski; three sons, Royal of Pulaski, Henry of Los Angeles, Calif., and Charles of Prairie City, Ill.; three grandsons, Carroll Davis and Ray Moore of Pulaski and John David Moore of Los Angeles.  Several nieces and a nephew also survive.

             Mrs. Moore had spent her entire life in the Pulaski community and had many friends.  She was a member of the Christian Church, where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. Charles A. Day officiating.  Burial was in Rosehill Cemetery with George C. Crain directing arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Ethel May Moore states that she was born 20 Dec 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of J. H. Johnson, a native of Tennessee, and Permelia J. King, a native of Texas, died 2 Nov 1941, in Pulaski, Ill., wife of John Moore, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ethel Moore Dec. 20, 1880 Nov. 2, 1941 John Moore May 14, 1877 Oct. 5, 1950.—Darrel Dexter)

 

F. E. Buder

             Florence E. (Floss) Buder of Cairo, well known business man, died suddenly of a heart attack Tuesday evening while at the Presbyterian manse, where he was supervising some repair.  With him was George Vines, a carpenter.

             Following the death of their parents, he and his sister, Miss Minnie Buder had made their home together for many years.