Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

5 Jan. - 27 Dec. 1940

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Jan 1940:

G. W. Keller

             George William Keller, age 70 years, died Saturday at the home of his son, C. C. Keller, in Mound City following a short illness.

             Mr. Keller was born in Mound City and lived there most of his life.  Since the age of 14, he had worked as a barber in Mound City and St. Louis.  He was a member of one of the oldest and best known families of Mound City.

             He is survived by one son, C. C. Keller, of Mound City; three daughters, Mrs. T. D. Thomasson of Mounds and Mrs. George Hironimous and Mrs. Evelyn Mulcahy of St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Ira Finley of Columbus, Ohio; a brother, Chris Keller of Lakewood, Ohio; several grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.  His wife, who passed away several years ago, was a half-sister to the late W. J. Biggerstaff of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church Mound City Monday afternoon with Rev. S. L. Hagan officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Casket bearers were M. J. Monan, George Gunn, C. F. Bode, James Finley, Sr., L. J. Beisswingert, and Harry Perks.  James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (George W. Keller, 25, barber, born in Mound City, Ill., the son of Christian Keller and Elizabeth Revington, married on 25 Jul 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Ella Ira Cole, 23, born in Mound City, Ill., daughter of Josiah Cole and Elizabeth Rebecca Delaney.  Christian Keller married Lizzie Revington on 28 Oct 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Josiah Cole married Rebecca Biggerstaff on 21 May 1862, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, George William Keller, barber, of Mound City, Ill., was born 23 Mar 1869, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Christian Keller, a native of Germany, and Elizabeth Revington, a native of Illinois, died 30 Dec 1939, in Mound City, Ill., husband of Della Keller, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  George W. Keller Mar. 23, 1869 Dec. 30, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

One Killed—53 Injured in Illinois Central Wreck

             Thomas E. Tallmadge, 63, a prominent architect of Chicago, was killed and 53 other passengers were injured early Monday morning, Jan. 1, when two fast passenger trains of the Illinois Central crashed together at Arcola.

             Both headed north, the Panama Limited ran into the rear of the 14-car Louisiana, which had stopped to take on a Chicago passenger, according to report.

             Almost all the passengers were asleep when the crash came.  Five all steel sleepers of the Louisiana were telescoped.  The diner and the coal tender of the Panama met the same fate.

             The wreck occurred during a fog and while the temperature was 12 degrees above zero.

             The two trains, on their regular schedule, travel two miles apart.

             Two versions of the cause of the wreck were given in metropolitan papers:  One, given out by J. L. Downs, superintendent of the Champaign division, blamed the flagman on the Louisiana, who, it was claimed, failed to set out his warning flare in time.  The second, accredited to R. S. Scott of Champaign, the Panama engineer, was that his automatic control system was out of order and that he had so reported it at Centralia, but was told to proceed.

             Tallmadge, the man killed, was returning from a trip south with his sister, Miss Abby Tallmadge.  Both resided at an Evanston hotel.  Miss Tallmadge escaped with minor injuries.

             The 53 injured were taken to various hospitals along the way between Arcola and Chicago.

             (According to his death certificate, Thomas E. Tallmadge, architect, of Evanston, Cook Co., Ill., was born 24 Apr 1876, in Washington, D.C., the son of Lewis Tass Tallmadge, a native of Springfield, Mass., and Mary Eliza Eddy, a native of Madison, Ind., died 1 Jan 1940, in Arcola, Douglas Co., Ill., and was buried in Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Ill. –Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Luvina Sneed

             Mrs. Luvina Sneed, age 76, passed away at the home of Warren Bartleson, near Grand Chain, Friday morning.

             Surviving are her three children, Mrs. Lucy James of Colorado Springs, Colo., Charles of Grand Chain, and Mrs. Bertha Dillow of Dongola; also one sister, Mrs. Laura Carlock of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Christian church in Grand Chain with Rev. F. C. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (George W. Sneed married Mrs. Lavina Walker on 8 Dec 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Riley Ethridge Walker, 20, born in Tennessee, farmer, of Dongola, Ill., son of Michael Pane Walker and Sallie M. Garver, married on 7 Dec 1879, in Union Co., Ill., Luvina Peeler, 16, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Larence M. Peeler and Melia N. Stafford.  Francis M. Carlock, 24, born near Dongola, laborer, of Dongola, Ill., son of J. C. Carlock and Ellen Littleton, married on 14 Dec 1879, in Union Co., Ill., Laura Ann Peeler, 20, born near Dongola, daughter of M. L. Peeler and P. M. Ball.  Michael L. Peeler married Permelia A. Ball on 10 Mar 1854, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Luvina Sneed was born 15 Feb 1863, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Lawrence Peeler and Mellisa Ball, natives of Dongola, Ill., died 27 Dec 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of George Sneed, and was buried at Grand Chain, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Luvina P. Sneed 1863-19__ George W. Sneed 1857-1934.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. S. T. Walsh

             Mrs. Eliza B. Walsh, age 70, passed away at the home of her son, James Walsh, of Cairo, Saturday morning, Dec. 30. She had been ill for the past six weeks.

             She is survived by her husband, Stephen T. Walsh; three daughters, Mrs. Bessie Baum of St. Louis, Mrs. Mary Toler of Pulaski and Mrs. Elvis Fulcher of Cairo; three sons, J. B. of Greenville, Miss., William and James of Cairo; a brother, Mose Kinslow of Center, Ky.; 15 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Calvary Baptist Church, Cairo, Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Rev. Eddie Lomolino pastor, assisted by Rev. Wilbert V. Snider, pastor of the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church in Pulaski, officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Eliza B. Walsh, of 320 28th St., Cairo, Ill., was born 20 May 1869, in Glasgow, Ky., the daughter of Ambrus Kinslow and Miss Gillick, natives of Kentucky, died 30 Dec 1939,  in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Stephen T. Walsh, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Eliza B. Walsh May 20, 1869 Dec. 30, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Sadler Dies While on a Holiday Visit Here

             John Sadler, age 24, died at 7 o’clock Tuesday morning, Jan. 2, at the home of his mother, Mrs. Ida Sadler, after a brief illness.  In company with his wife he had come here from his home in Osawatomie, Kansas, to spend the holidays.  He had been out with his mother and wife for a short while Thursday night of last week and upon returning home had complained of feeling ill and scarlet fever developed.

             John was born and reared here, the son of Mrs. Ida Sadler and the late John Sadler.  He was educated in the Mounds public schools and Mounds Township High School, graduating in the class of 1934.  He later attended Rankin Trade School in St. Louis and completed a seven-year course in three years, making a record for the school.

             On August 31, 1936, he was married to Miss Helen Mohry of St. Louis, who survives him.  Surviving him, besides his wife and mother, are one sister, Miss Birdie Sadler; three half-sisters, Mrs. Lester Keller of Cairo, Mrs. Olga Rice and Mrs. Geneva Ballard of Mounds; three half-brothers, Shirley Sadler of St. Louis, William and Kenneth Sadler of Bush, Ill.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church at two o’clock, the Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, John P. Sadler, apprentice machinist, of Osawatomie, Kan., was born 31 Jul 1915, in Mounds, Ill., the son of John Sadler, a native of Grand Tower, Ill., and Ida Burd, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 2 Jan 1940, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Helen Sadler, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  John P. Sadler July 31, 1915 Jan. 2, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Jan 1940:

Death Claims G. W. Keller

             George William Keller, 70 years of age, passed away Saturday evening at 6 o’clock at the home of his son, C. C. Keller, in this city.

             Mr. Keller, a member of one of the oldest and best known families of Mound City, was born here and lived here most of his life.  Since the age of 14 he had worked as a barber in Mound City and St. Louis.

             He is survived by one son, C. C. Keller, of this city; three daughters, Mrs. T. B. Thomasson of Mounds and Mrs. George Hironimus and Mrs. Evelyn Mulcahy of St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Ira Finley of Columbus, Ohio; a brother, Chris Keller, of Lakewood, Ohio; several grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.

             The body remained at the James Funeral Home.  Funeral services were held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church Monday afternoon with Rev. B. L. Hagan officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Casketbearers were J. M. Monan, George Gunn, C. F. Bode, James Finley, Sr., L. J. Beisswingert, and Harry Perks.  James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Mrs. Ira Finley returned to her home in Columbus, Ohio, New Year’s Day after being called here by the death of her brother, George Keller.

 

Mrs. Sam Roberson has returned to her home in Portageville, Mo., after attending the funeral Monday, January 1, of George Keller.

 

Mrs. George Hironimus and Mrs. Evelyn Mulcahy have returned to their home in St. Louis after being called here by the death of their father, George Keller.

 

REV. J. M. CLAYTON KILLED WHEN AUTO IS HIT BY TRAIN

(Vienna Times)

             Rev. James M. Clayton, former pastor of the Vienna Methodist Church, was fatally injured Saturday afternoon when the automobile he was driving was struck by a B. and O. passenger train at Fairfield, Ill.  His wife, Georgia, and daughter, Miss Louise, 13, who were riding in the car with him, received minor injuries.  Mrs. Clayton is still in the hospital at Olney, where all three were taken after the accident, but Louise was able to return to the home of her brother, Bovard, at Eldorado Sunday afternoon.  Rev. Clayton had retired from the ministry and was making his home at Eldorado.  While he was pastor of the Vienna Church, he also managed a pickling plant near the Big Four depot here.

He is survived by five daughters, Mrs. Christine Kline, Chicago; Mrs. Gladys Wicklien, Evansville, Ill., Miss Illma Clayton, Champaign, Miss Elizabeth Clayton, Fairfield, Ill., and Miss Louise Clayton, Eldorado, Ill.; and two sons, James Clayton, Jr., Fairfield, Ill., and Bovard Clayton, Eldorado.

(J. Madison Clayton married Georgia Blessing on 9 May 1907, in Lawrence Co., Tenn.  His death certificate states that James Madison Clayton, retired minister, of Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., was born 7 Dec 1877, in Wayne Co., Tenn., the son of Stephen H. Clayton and Sarah Davis, natives of Tennessee, died 24 Dec 1939, in Olney, Richland Co., Ill., husband of Georgia Clayton.  He is buried in Maple Hill Cemetery in Fairfield, Wayne Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

REV. M. H. LOAR DIES

             Rev. M. H. Loar, of Carbondale, passed away at the Barnes Hospital in St. Louis week before last.  Funeral services were held at Carbondale Friday.  Rev. Loar was formerly district superintendent and was well known throughout Southern Illinois.

             (Melvin H. Loar married Ollie Riley in Effingham Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN T. SADLER DIES

             John T. Sadler, age 24, passed away at his home of his mother, Mrs. Ida Sadler in Mounds, Tuesday morning at 7 o’clock after an illness of a few days.

             He is survived by his widow, Helen; his mother; one sister, Byrdie of Cairo; three half-sisters, Mrs. Lester Keller of Cairo, Mrs. Olga Rice and Mrs. Genevieve Ballard of Mounds; three half-brothers, Shirley Sadler of St. Louis and William and Kenneth Sadler of Bush, Ill.

             Mr. Sadler was a graduate of Mounds High School in the class of ’34 and Rankin Trade School in St. Louis in October 1937.  For the past two years he has been employed by the Missouri-Pacific Railroad Co., in Osawatomie, Kan.

             He and his wife were spending the holidays with his mother when he was stricken with an attack of scarlet fever.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. J. Ruie Read officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

            

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Jan 1940:

Wife of Cypress Doctor Victim of Auto Crash

             Mrs. Violet Rose, 55, bride of about three months of Dr. W. P. Rose of Cypress, was killed Sunday night at 7:30 o’clock when the Ford V8 in which she was accompanying her husband on a professional call was hit by a truck about one and a quarter miles west of the intersection of Routes 146 and 37 at West Vienna.  Her neck was broken by the impact of the car and truck and she died within fifteen minutes after the crash.

             Dr. Rose suffered a broken rib and severe bruises about the shoulder.  He had sought to enter the state highway, according to reports, at the point of the accident, but lost control of his car.  The driver of the truck, which was a coal truck headed east from Cape Girardeau, Mo., to the Illinois coal fields, left the slab and swerved to the right as far as he possibly could, but the spinning Ford could not be righted and the crash came.

             Mrs. Rose is survived by her husband; one son, Bruce Morgan, school teacher at Karnak; four sisters, Mrs. Cassie Callis of Bedford, Ky., Mrs. Minnie Johnson of Colfax, Ill., Mrs. Retta Rowlett of Bedford, Ky., and Mrs. Melissa Abbott of Pleasantville, Ky.; and three brothers, Dee Jefferies of Columbus, Ohio, and Newton and Homer Jefferies of Smithfield, Ky.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon at the Methodist church in Karnak, Rev. S. C. Wright, the pastor officiating.  The casket bearers were T. E. Kelly, Ambrose Kiestler, F. M. Mitchell, C. E. Carvegh, Doyle Lentz, and W. O. Househouser.  Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak was in charge.  Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery at Cypress.

             Mrs. Rose was a member of the Order of Eastern Star at Grand Chain and the White Shrine at Mound City.

             (Pleasant W. Rose, 61, married Violet P. Morgan, 53, on 1 Oct 1938, in Charleston, Mississippi Co., Mo.  Her death certificate states that Violet Morgan Rose, of Cypress, Ill., was born 11 Mar 1885, in Bedford, Ky., the daughter of John Wesley Jeffries, a native of Milton, Ky., and Dorcas Fallis, a native of Virginia, died 7 Jan 1940, in Elvira Township, Johnson Co., Ill., wife of P. W. Rose, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Billie Leon Miller

             Billie Leon, seven-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Miller of Ullin, died at the home of his parents Saturday evening, Jan. 6, following a brief illness of pneumonia.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by a sister, Betty Lou; his paternal grandmother, Mrs. Cora Miller; grandfather, Walter Miller; and great-grandfather, Mrs. Sarah Miller of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held at the residence in Ullin Monday morning at 11 o’clock with Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Burial was made in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, George C. Crain Funeral Service conducting.

             (His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  Billie L. Miller June 3, 1939 Jan. 6, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to express our sincere thanks to our friends and neighbors for the kindness and sympathy shown us during the illness and following the death of our dear husband, son and brother, John P. Sadler.  Especially do we wish to thank the Rev. J. Rue Reid for his consoling words, those who sent flowers and who offered the use of their cars and James T. Ryan for his thoughtful service.  All these kindnesses will ever be remembered.

Mrs. Helen Sadler

Mrs. Ida Sadler and Family

 

Shirley Sadler of St. Louis, who was called here by the death of his half-brother, John Sadler, has returned to his home.

 

August Reichert

             August Reichert, age 84, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ida Briggs, in Grand Chain, Friday night, January 5, at 8:30 o’clock.  He had been in ill health for a year or more.

             Mr. Reichert, a prominent and successful farmer in the Grand Chain community for the past 50 years, had also served as trustee of the Olmsted schools.

             He is survived by eleven children, six daughters:  Mrs. Ida Briggs and Mrs. Lena Merchant of Grand Chain, Mrs. Kathyrn Kraatz of Olmsted, Mrs. Clara McGregor of Mt. Carmel, Mrs. Permelia Bartleson, of Los Angeles, and Mrs. ___ England of Paducah; five sons ___, Adam, August, and Robert of Grand Chain and Fritz of Wyatt, Mo.; two sisters, Mrs. Rose Rep___ of St. Louis, and Mrs. Freda He___ of San Diego; a brother, John of Centralia, Wash.; twenty ___ grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church at Grand Chain Monday morning at 10:__ o’clock with Rev. Peco officiating.  Interment was made in Grand Chain Catholic cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, August Reichert, farmer, was born 22 Jun 1855, in Freeburg, Ill., the son of Jacob Reichert, a native of Illinois, and Fredpa Miller, a native of Germany, died 5 Jan 1940, in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Katherine Reichert.  His marker in Saint Catherine Cemetery in Grand Chain, Ill., reads:  August Reichert 1855-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Jan 1940:

AUGUST REICHERT DIES

             August Reichert, age 84, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ida Briggs, in Grand Chain, Friday night, at 8:30 o’clock.  He had been in ill health for the past year.

             Mr. Reichert had been a prominent and successful farmer in the Grand Chain community for the past 50 years and had served as trustee of the Olmsted schools for a number of years.

             He is survived by six daughters:  Mrs. Lena Merchant of Grand Chain, Mrs. Kathyrn Kraatz of Olmsted, Mrs. Clara McGregory of Mt. Carmel, Mrs. Permelia Bartleson, of Los Angeles, and Mrs. Helen England of Paducah; five sons John, Adam, August, and Robert of Grand Chain and Fritz of Wyatt, Mo.; two sisters, Mrs. Rose Repman of St. Louis, and Mrs. Freda Henseleit of San Diego; a brother, John of Centralia, Wash.; twenty grandchildren and four great-grandchildren also survive him.

             Funeral services were held in St. Catherine’s Catholic Church in Grand Chain Monday morning at 10:30 o’clock with Rev. Peco officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain Catholic cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Jan 1940:

Betty Lou McClellan

             Betty Lou, two-day-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ollie McClellan, passed away Friday morning, Jan. 12, at the home of her parents near Pulaski.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by the following brothers and sisters:  Burton and Pauline of Naperville; George, Lyle, Ruth, Mabbis, Roy, Richard, Carolis, Robert and Alline, all of Pulaski.

             Interment was made in Rosehill Cemetery with brief services at the grave.  George C. Crain Funeral Service was in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Betty Lou McClellan was born 10 Jan 1940, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Ollie McClellan, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., and Pansy Ellenwood, a native of Grand Chain, Ill., died 12 Jan 1940, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Jan 1940:

MRS. W. P. ROSE KILLED INSTANTLY IN AUTO WRECK

             Mrs. Violet Morgan Rose, wife of Dr. P. W. Rose of Vienna and Cypress, was killed Sunday evening about 7:15, when the automobile in which she and her husband, Dr. Rose were riding collided with a large coal truck six miles west of Vienna on Route 146 near the Lige Ragsdale home.

             From evidence presented at the inquest, Dr. Rose and his wife had been to see a patient.  He drove on the pavement from the side road south of the pavement.  After he ran onto the road, apparently his car slipped on icy pavement and turned almost around.  The truck driver, coming from the west, in attempting to check the speed of his truck, swerved across the pavement on the ice and left rear wheel struck the right side of the doctor’s car crushing it.—Vienna Times.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Jan 1940:

DROWNS UNDER ICE

             The following dispatch from Tolu, Ky., appeared in Saturday’s Paducah Sun-Democrat:

             “Charles Tinsley, about 55, of Tolu, lost his life near here late yesterday afternoon when he fell from a barge in the Ohio River and was dragged beneath the ice.

             “The river was covered with a three-inch layer of ice.  Efforts to discover the body were fruitless.

             Tinsley was among a group of 18 livestock owners who were attempting to transport cattle that had been taken to an island in the river for the winter, back to the shore.  A channel was chopped in the ice for the barge, but on the return trip it was found that the ice had narrowed the channel.  Tinsley, leaning over the side of the barge to chop a wider channel, fell into the river and disappeared beneath the ice.

             “He is survived by a widow and six children.”

             (Charles A. Tinsley married Maggie Victoria Hooten on 3 Nov 1911, in Hardin Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Charles Arthur Tinsley, farmer, of Tolu, Crittenden Co., Ky., was born 17 Sep 1889, in Kentucky, the son of William T. Tinsley and Sallie Dial, natives of Kentucky, drowned 11 Jan 1940, in Crittenden Co., Ky., in an unavoidable accident on the Ohio River, husband of Maggie Tinsley and was buried in Whites Chapel Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. J. and Billy Travers returned the first of the week to Champaign to resume their work in the U. of I., having been called home by the death of their great uncle, J. C. Ryan, which occurred Thursday of last week.

             (According to his death certificate, James C. Ryan, retired mill worker, was born 4 Dec 1864, in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, the son of Timothy Ryan and Bridget Scanlon, natives of Ireland, died 18 Jan 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Bismarck King, 60, general manager of the Polar Service of Decatur, and former president of the Tri-State Ice Manufactures’ Association and the Illinois Association of Ice Industries, died Tuesday in Decatur.  Mr. King at one time was the local superintendent for the C. I. P. S. Co. and he and his family made many friends while here.

             (Bismarck King of 5400 Augusta St., arrived in the U.S. about 10 Nov 1901, at Chicago, Ill., and was naturalized 14 Jan 1911. When he registered for the draft in 1918, Bismarck King lived in Mounds, Ill., was a mechanical engineer and district superintendent for Central Illinois Public Service Co., and was a naturalized citizen.  His nearest relative was listed as Donald L. King of Mounds.   According to his death certificate, Bismarck King, general manager of the ice plant, was born 11 Jan 1880, in Chesley, Ontario, Canada, the son of Adam King, a native of Ireland, and Jane Hamal, a native of Canada, died 23 Jan 1940, in South Wheatland Township, Macon Co., Ill., wife of Mary F. King, and was buried in Fairlawn Cemetery in Decatur, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Five Year Old Boy Dies of Diphtheria

             Everette Eugene, five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Tanksley of Mound City, passed away at the home of his parents, Thursday morning, Jan. 18, following an illness of diphtheria.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by one brother, Donald Ray; a sister, Wilma Louise; a half-brother, Paul Vernon Williams; and a half-sister, Rose Mavis Williams.  His paternal and maternal grandfathers also survive him.

             Private services were held at the grave Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Burial was made in Grand Chain Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Everett Eugene Tanksley was born 23 Nov 1934, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Freeman Tanksley, a native of Elco, Ill., and Anna Gray, a native of Joppa, Ill., died 18 Jan 1940, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried at Grand Chain, Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Everett E. Tanksley Nov. 23, 1934 Jan. 18, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Damage Suit Filed in Death of Gordon Edwards

             A complaint has been filed in Pulaski County Court by Virgil Edwards against Robert Nathan, driver of the car that struck Mr. Edward’s son Gordon on the highway at the intersection of First Street, December 25, the accident causing the death of the boy.

             The complaint asks judgment of $10,000 against the driver, alleging the speed of the moving car was 60 miles an hour and that he failed to sound a warning of his approach.

 

Dies Suddenly at Home of His Brother

             James C. Ryan, age 76, passed away at the home of his brother, W. H. Ryan, in Mounds Thursday morning, January 18, at 6:55 o’clock after an illness of one week of asthma and heart trouble.

             Mr. Ryan was affectionately known as “Uncle Jimmie.”  He came to Mounds from Frederictown, New Brunswick, Canada, in June 1934 to make his home with his brother.

             Besides his brother, he is survived by two nieces, two nephews, five grandnieces and seven grand nephews.

             The body was taken to the Ryan Funeral Home, where it remained until time for services, which were held at St. Raphael’s Church Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery with Harry E. Windland in charge of the arrangements.

 

GUS PARKER

             Gus Parker, colored, age 47 years, died Monday, January 15, at the home of his aunt, Mrs. William Blue.  He had been a helpless cripple for many years and had been cared for by Mrs. Blue for 15 years.

             (The application for a military headstone states that Guss Parker, mechanic, enlisted 22 Feb 1918, in 816th Transportation Corp, and was honorably discharged 1 Aug 1918.  He was buried in Lincoln Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker was shipped to Kate Blue in Mounds, Ill.  In the 1930 census his name was listed as Augustus Parker and he was living in the household of William H. and Katherine Parker in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  William H. and Kate Blue are in the 1920 census of Mounds and living in their household was the mother of Kate, Harriet Parker, age 110, a native of Kentucky.  His death certificate states that Guss Parker, common laborer, World War I veteran, was born 9 Feb 1894, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Malissia Pettigrew, a native of Cairo, Ill., and died 15 Jan 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to express our sincere thanks to all neighbors and friends who so kindly assisted during the illness and following the death of our nephew, Gus Parker.  Especially do we wish to thank the Rev. T. Tabourn for his constant sympathy and help, little Annie Belle Shelby, Mrs. Sarah McKenzie, those who sent flowers and those who offered the use of their cars.  Your kindness will ever be remembered,.

Kate and William Blue

 

SENATOR BORAH DIES

             Senator William Edgar Borah, age 74, died Friday evening, Jan. 19.  His death was caused by a cerebral hemorrhage suffered Tuesday morning.  He was born near Fairfield and lived in Southern Illinois until he was 20.  At the age of 30 he married Miss Mary McConnell, daughter of a former Governor of Idaho, in which state Borah had settled for the practice of law.  He was an independent Republican and had served in the United States Senate for 33 years longer than any living senator.

             Since his death, he has been constantly eulogized over the radio and in the newspapers.  His funeral was held Monday in the senate chamber.  His body was taken to Idaho for burial.

             The Berlin newspapers paid tributes to Senator William E. Borah, calling him an upright American who opposed all European entanglements.

             All papers featured accounts of his descent from the family of Katharina Von Born, the wife of Martin Luther, German leader of the Reformation.

 

HISTORIAN DIES

             John Nicholas (J. Nick) Perrin of Belleville, founder of the Illinois Historical Society and author of a “History of Illinois,” which has been a standard authority for years, died Sunday in a Belleville hospital at the advanced age of 85 years.  His body was cremated Tuesday and the ashes are to be buried at Perrin’s Lodge, overlooking the Illinois River, in Calhoun County, where Perrin for many years had entertained other Illinois historians during the summer months.  Surviving is one son, Leon N. Perrin, Jr., city attorney of Belleville.

             After organizing the State Historical Society in 1892, he served for four years as its secretary, without pay.  He was, politically, an ardent Democrat and was a candidate for his party for Congress in 1904 and again in 1918.  During the World War years he was secretary of the Belleville draft board.

             Small in stature, he had a halo of silver hair and a mobile countenance.  Ready of wit, eloquent in speech, he was known as the “silver tongued” orator of Southwestern Illinois.

             Mr. Perrin had erected his own monument at the place in 1936.  It is a carved statue in wood, painted in natural colors of Old Nakomis, the Indian girl, who, according to legend, is the fabled daughter of the moon.

             A romantic Indian legend first drew Mr. Perrin to the spot and it was later that he determined it was the landing place of Marquette and Joliet.  The legend was about an Indian girl who jumped off the bluff into the river and was followed by her distracted lover.

             Born in what is now French Village of a French father and a Swiss mother, Mr. Perrin attended McKendree College and the University of Michigan law school and set up a law office in Belleville in 1876.  But he practiced law only in a casual way.

             He was elected to the legislature in 1881 and introduced the first bill to regulate the coal mine owners and the bill which established the State’s first dental code.  A lifelong Democrat in a Republican community, he twice ran for Congress, in 1904 and 1918, but was defeated, although he led his ticket by a wide margin.

             He was a delegate to the Democratic convention which nominated Bryan in 1896 and again to the convention in 1924.  On this occasion he voted for Al Smith on 99 ballots, then declared he was through with the “vaudeville.”  He said he was throwing his support to Will Rogers, caught a boat for Europe, and was on the sea when John W. Davis was finally nominated.

Wrote History of Illinois

             His history of the State was published in 1906.  It was considered a model of brevity.  He also wrote a romantic Indian novel, “The Jewel of Cahokia,” and some poetry.

             As a lecturer in the days when chautauquas were the vogue, Mr. Perrin was billed as the “silver-tongued orator of Illinois” and he commanded as much as $500 a speech, a high price in those days.  He had a strong, high-pitched voice and he lectured in English, French and German.

             As a member of the Belleville draft board in the World War, he declined remuneration in a letter to President Wilson in which he said he was “too proud to take $5 a day to send men more physically able to war, men who had no choice but to take $1 a day until they might be shot.”

             Born a Catholic, Mr. Perrin concluded that religion was a personal matter which should “be part of one’s life,” and he quit the church.  The only speaker at his funeral was Circuit Judge Maurice V. Joyce.

             He was married in 1882 to Miss Lola McCoy, who died 10 years later.

             (John N. Perrin married Lola A. McCoy on 31 Jan 1882, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John Nicholas Perrin, attorney at law, was born 23 Jun 1855, in French Village, Ill., the son of Nicholas Perrin, a native of France, and Marie Pfiffner, a native of Switzerland, died 21 Jan 1940, in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill., widower of Lola McCoy, and was buried at St. Louis, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Jan 1940:

EVERETTE E. TANKSLEY DIES

             Everette Eugene Tanskley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Tanksley of this city, passed away at the home of his parents Thursday morning of last week, following an illness of diphtheria.

             Besides his parents he is survived by one brother, Donald Ray; a sister, Wilma Louise; a half-brother, Rose Mavis Williams.  His paternal and maternal grandfathers also survive him.

             Private services were held at the grave Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Burial was made in Grand Chain cemetery.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Feb 1940:

Mrs. E. W. Martin

             Mrs. Minnie Elizabeth Martin, age 65, of Grand Chain, died January 28, at St. Anthony’s Hospital in St. Louis, following an illness of several weeks.

             Mrs. Martin was a member of the Christian Church of Grand Chain and an active worker in the church.

             She is survived by her husband, E. W. Martin; two sons, Gallie of Olive Branch and Fred of Memphis; three daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Eliott of Karnak, Mrs. Elva Merchant of Grand Chain and Mrs. Bertha Waite of St. Louis; one brother, Hamilton Lewis of Blaten, Ohio.

             Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Grand Chain Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.  Wilson Funeral Services was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Minnie E. Martin 1874-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Holhubner

             John Holhubner, age 82, died Sunday morning, Jan. 28, at 6:20 o’clock at the home of his son, John E. Holhubner near Olmsted with whom he had made his home since the death of his wife on 1935.

             Mr. Holhubner was born in Austria, coming to the United States in 1884.  He first located at Elgin, Ill., then at Jonesboro and finally in Olmsted, where he has lived for the past 45 years.

             He is survived by his son, John; two daughters, Mrs. Johanna Holzleitner of Russellville, Mo., and Mrs. Josie Schnaare of Olmsted; ten grandchildren; and one sister still living in Austria.

             Funeral services were held at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Olmsted Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Galen officiating.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge.

             (According to the death certificate, John Holhubner, retired farmer, was born 24 Jun 1857, in Austria, the son of John Holhubner, a native of Austria, died 28 Jan 1940, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Anna Holhubner, and was buried in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  John Holhubner 1857-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Egner

             Mrs. Elizabeth Egner, age 81, passed away at her home near Dam 53 Friday morning, Jan. 26, after an illness of one month.

             Mrs. Egner had lived in the Olmsted community for the past 50 years and was well known and loved by all.

             She is survived by one son, Gust Egner of Chicago; one daughter, Mrs. Minnie Harmon of Ullin; one brother, John Hoffman of Quincy, Ill.; three grandchildren and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Olmsted Methodist church with Rev. Beatty officiating.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery.

             (August Egner married Lizzie Hoffman on 31 Oct 1882, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Elizabeth Egner was born 21 Jan 1859, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Mr. Hoffman and Margaret Anna Hoffman, natives of Germany, died 26 Jan 1940, in Road District 4, Levings, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of August Egner, and was buried in Olmsted, Ill.  Her marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  August M. Egner 1862-1928 Elizabeth Egner his wife 1861-19.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Wilson

             Mrs. Elizabeth Frances Wilson died Sunday morning, Jan. 28, at 11:20 o’clock at her home in Mound City following an illness of several months.

             Mrs. Wilson was born in Indianapolis, Ind., moving to Mound City with her family at the age of one year and had been a resident there since that time.  She was a member of one of the pioneer families of Mound City and was a devout member of the First Methodist Church.

             Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Ben Dawson of Michigan; one son, Harry Wilson of Mound City; two granddaughters and one great-grandson.

             Funeral services were held at the James Funeral Home Mound City Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor of the First Methodist Church, officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service conducting.

             (According to her death certificate, Elizabeth Frances Wilson was born 12 Mar 1856, in Indianapolis, Ind., the daughter of John Dishinger, a native of Germany, died 28 Jan 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of William R. Wilson, and was buried in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

E. C. Coombes Dies after Long Battle with Illness

             Eugene C. Coombes died Thursday, January 25, at his home in Villa Ridge after valiantly battling with illness over a long period of time.  He was born Sept. 9, 1893, and his age at the time of death was 46 years, four months and 16 days.

             At the age of 18 years Mr. Coombes secured a position with the Illinois Central Railroad in Mounds and had risen to the position of yardmaster when he was compelled to retire from railroad work because of illness, after 21 years of service.

             He and his family moved to Villa Ridge and had lived there the last seven years.  For the past 18 months Mr. Coombes had been employed as telephone operator there.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Alice Harper Coombes; one daughter, Cloedeen; and one son Darrell, all of Villa Ridge; his stepmother, Mrs. Varhees Coombes McHenry of Robinson, Ill.; three brothers, Glenn, Kenneth and Russell; and one sister, Blanche.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, at the Methodist church in Mounds, the Rev. James Tucker of Thebes officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.

             The services were attended by a large concourse of relatives and friends.

             (When Eugene registered for the draft in 1917, he was a switchman for the Illinois Central at Mounds, Ill.  His registration for Social Security states he was born in Paris, Edgar Co., Ill., the son of Daniel V. Coombes and Helen N. Longnecker.  The death certificate of Eugene Crowley Coombes, railroad switchman, states he was born 9 Sep 1893, in Paris, Ill., the son of Vorhees Coombes and Nellie Longnecker, died 25 Jan 1940, in Road District 1, Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Julia Alice Coombes, and was buried at Mounds, Ill. His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Eugene C. Coombes 1893-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Agnes Gunn received a telegram Saturday morning telling of the death of Mrs. Willie Lewis Graham of Moline, a former resident of Villa Ridge.

             (Ira E. Lewis married Jessie Pollock on 10 Jul 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Willie Margaret Graham states she was born 6 Jan 1890, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the daughter of Jessie Pollock, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 27 Jan 1940, in Moline, Rock Island, Ill., wife of Fred R. Graham, and was buried in South Moline Township.  Her marker in Moline Memorial Park in Moline, Rock Island Co., Ill., reads:  Willie M. Graham 1890-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. John Ed Williams of Jackson, Tenn., Mrs. Edward Morris of Memphis and Carl Harper of Chicago were called here the latter part of the week by the death of their brother-in-law, Eugene C. Coombes.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to extend our sincere thanks to our neighbors and friends who so kindly assisted us during the illness and following the death of our brother and uncle, James C. Ryan.  Especially do we desire to thank the Rev. Father Gilmartin, those who sent flowers and those who offered the use of their cars.  Each deed of kindness will long be remembered.

The Ryan, Travers and McAdoo Families

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Feb 1940:

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. ELIZABETH F. WILSON

             Mrs. Elizabeth Frances Wilson passed away Sunday morning at 1:20 o’clock at her home on ___Fourth Street.

             Mrs. Wilson was born in 1856 in ____polis, Ind., and moved to Mound City in 1857 and has been a resident of this city since that time.  ___ one of the oldest residents of this city and could recall much of the city’s history.  She saw soldiers training here for Civil War ___.  Mr. Wilson preceded his wife in death ten years ago.  Mrs. Wilson was a devout member of the Methodist church.

             She is survived by one daughter, ____ Dawson of Michigan; one  ___ry of this city; two granddaughters, Mrs. John Jackson of ___ and Mrs. Roy Bewlfi of ____; and one great-grandson, ___ Jackson also of this city.

             Funeral services were held at the ___ Funeral Home Wednesday ____ at 2 o’clock with Rev. Charles Montgomery, pastor of the Methodist Church, officiating.  Burial was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.

 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. E. W. MARTIN

             Mrs. Minnie Elizabeth Martin, of Grand Chain, passed away Sunday morning in St. Andrew’s Hospital in St. Louis following an illness of several weeks.  Mrs. Martin was a member of the ____n Church and was active ­­­­­­ in the church.  She had many friends in the community and was loved by all.

             She is survived by her husband, ___ Martin; two sons, Gallie of Olive Branch and Fred of Memphis; three daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth ___lott of Karnak, Mrs. Elva ___t of Grand Chain and Mrs. ____ Waite of St. Louis; one ____, Hamilton Lewis of Blaten, ____.

             Funeral services were held at the ___c church in Grand Chain _____ afternoon at 2 o’clock with ___nninger officiating.  Burial was made in the Masonic cemetery at Grand Chain.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

JAMES W. EDWARDS DIES

             James W. Edwards, 49-year-old World War veteran, passed away at the Veterans Hospital at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., Monday morning.

             He is survived by his wife, Lela; two sons, Lloyd and Clarence, all of Pulaski; three brothers, Ray of Olmsted, Ernest of Olmsted and Owen of Villa Ridge; five sisters, Mrs. Wilma Richards of Olmsted, Mrs. Cletus Modglin of Ullin, Mrs. Ruby Caudle of Olmsted and Mrs. Jennie Thurston of Pulaski.

             Funeral services were held at Center Church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock and interment was made in Liberty Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (The application for a military headstone states he enlisted 3 Oct 1917 and was honorably discharged 21 May 1919, as a private of Co. B, 107th, 32nd Division, Military Police.  He died 29 Jan 1940, and the marker was shipped to Lela Edwards at Pulaski, Ill.  His marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  James W. Edwards Pvt. Ill. Co. I 107 Mil.—Darrel Dexter)

 

E. C. COOMBES DIES

             Eugene C. Coombes, age 46, passed away at his home in Villa Ridge, Ill., Thursday afternoon at 12:30 o’clock.

             Mr. Coombes was born September 9, 1893.  At the age of 18 he secured a position with the Illinois Central Railroad in Mounds and had been promoted to yardmaster when he was forced to retire because of ill health after 21 years of service.  He had been a resident of Villa Ridge for the past seven years and was employed as telephone operator there for the past 18 months.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Alice Harper Coombes; one daughter, Cleodeen; and one son, Darrell, all of Villa Ridge; his stepmother, Mrs. Varhees Coombes McHenry of Robinson, Ill.; three brothers, Glenn, Kenneth and Russell; and one sister, Blanche.       

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Mounds Methodist Church.  Rev. Tucker, pastor of the Union Church at Villa Ridge, officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service were in charge of arrangements.

 

Those from out of town who attended the funeral of E. C. Coombes Sunday were Carl Harper of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Williams of Jackson, Tenn., and Mrs. W. E. Marrs of Memphis.

 

VIENNA COLORED MAN FOUND ALMOST FROZEN TO DEATH

             Charlie Greenway, colored errand man for over half of the business and professional men of Vienna, was found at his home in the west side of town Friday afternoon of last week, almost frozen to death.

             Charlie, whose home is some distance from any other colored resident of that section of the city has been complaining of recent weeks of not feeling well.  Friday afternoon Charlie Norman passed his home and noticed that there were no tracks in the snow ___ the house.  He went f__ _____ he found Charlie Greenway half frozen and unable _____.  He built a fire in the r____ summoned a physician.  _____ revived after some time __ that time the Normans ____ have been caring for ___ was plenty of cover on ___ when found, Charlie ___ cover over him.  He was ______.

             Charlie has no relatives ___ Vienna, but he has a host of friends who went to his assistance.  By the first ___ he was much improved ___ friends prevailed upon ____ Anna for treatment.  ___ and on Tuesday he went ___ situation as a volunteer.

             Charlie will be missed on the streets of Vienna, going about his daily chores.  It is hoped he will respond readily ___ for his physical ailments ___ back in Vienna where ____ spring days return.—Vienna Times

             (He survived, as he registered for the draft in 1942 and stated he was born 2 May 1893, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His Social Security registration states he was born 2 May 1889, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of John and Jennie Greenway.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Feb 1940:

Former Governor Deneen Dies at Age of 76 Years

             Charles S. Deneen, former Republican Governor of Illinois, died in Chicago, Monday, Feb. 5, of heart disease.   He was twice elected Governor, first in 1904 and again in 1906, and was sent to the Senate in 1924.

             Deneen will probably be remembered for his fight against corruption in the Republican Party, made in the primary of 1928.  He opposed the faction headed by Gov. Len Small, Mayor William Hale Thompson and State’s Attorney Robert N. Crowe.  Deneen’s home was bombed and two of his followers were slain, but in the end Deneen and his forces triumphed.

             He was born in Edwardsville, Ill., May 4, 1863.  He attended McKendree College, Lebanon, and the Union College of Law at Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in 1888.  Three years later he married Miss Bina Day Mahoney of Mt. Carroll, Ill., who, with one son and three daughters, survives.

             (Charles Samuel Deneen married Bina Day Maloney on 10 May 1891, in Bureau Co., Ill.  His 1909 application for the sons of the American Revolution states that he was born 4 May 1863, in Edwardsville, Madison Co., Ill., the son of Samuel Hedding Deneen and Mary Frances Ashley, the grandson of William Lyon Deneen and Verlinda Beall Moore, the great-grandson of Risdon Moore and his second wife, Anna Dent (who was born in 1767, died in 1845 in St. Clair Co., Ill., the daughter of Col. William Dent and whom he married in 1790 in North Carolina), the great-great-grandson of Charles Moore and Mary Cooper, the great-great-great-grandson of Shildes Moore and Blandana Risdon.  Charles Moore and three of his sons, Thomas, who was killed; William, who was captured and died in a prison ship; and Risdon, enlisted in the U. S. Navy and served on a privateer.  Risdon Moore was born 20 Nov 1760, in Sussex Co., Dela., died in 1828 in St. Clair Co., Ill., and served as a sailor on a privateer from 1776 until the close of the war.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Stinnett attended the funeral services Sunday afternoon of Fidelo Stinnett, uncle of Mr. Stinnett, held in Pleasant Hill Methodist Church near Slater, Ky.

             (His death certificate states that Fidello N. Stinnett was born 11 Jun 1857, in Kentucky, the son of Noyd Stinnett and Matilda Windoff, natives of Kentucky, died 2 Feb 1940, in Slater, Ballard Co., Ky., of mitral regurgitation, widower of Emma Stinnett, and was buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Smith were called to Christopher by the death of his son, Lester Smith, who was killed at the mines.  He was caught between two coal cars.  Surviving are his wife and seven children; two brothers, Everet and Carl Smith; two sisters, Freda Taylor of Desoto and Ruby of DuQuoin and his father, Tom Smith, of Perks.

             (Thomas C. Smith married Myrtle M. Hardy on 3 May 1902, in Franklin Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Lester Olen Smith, coal miner, was born 13 Feb 1902, in Buckner, Ill., the son of Tom Smith, a native of Union Co., Ill., and Myrtle Hardie, a native of Buckner, Ill., died 31 Jan 1940, in Zeigler, Franklin Co., Ill., husband of Dora Smith, and was buried in Mulkeytown Cemetery in Franklin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARRIES OUT SUICIDE THREAT

             A dispatch from Elizabethtown, dated Sunday follows:

             “Fearful that her 18-year-old husband would carry out a suicide threat, Mrs. Goldia Palmer, also 18, removed the shell from his shotgun Friday night.  The husband, James Joe Palmer, a WPA worker, arose yesterday morning, apparently no longer in a despondent mood, and his young wife did not object when he took the shell from her pocket and put it back in the gun.

             “A few minutes later, she told Sheriff Otis Brittain, Palmer went into the living room, put the muzzle of the gun against his head and pulled the trigger, killing himself.  The Palmers had been married seven months.”

             (His marker in Peters Creek Cemetery in Hardin Co., Ill., reads:  James Palmer Aug. 1, 1921 Jan. 28, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FIRST WOMAN TO COMMAND MISSISSIPPI BOAT DIES

             New Orleans—Mrs. Blanche Douglas Leathers, 79 years old, the first woman master of a Mississippi River packet, died last Thursday night.

             She was the daughter-in-law of Capt. T. P. Leathers, commander of the Natchez in its famous race up the Mississippi River with the Robert E. Lee.

             She made her first trip in command of the second Natchez, pride of the Mississippi, in 1894.  She took over command of the boat whenever her husband, Bowling S. Leathers, also a captain, had to be ashore.

             She left the river soon after the turn of the century, but never allowed her pilot’s license to lapse.—Golconda Herald Enterprise

             (Her marker in Lot 10, Square 8 on Dudley Walk in the Masonic Cemetery 1 in New Orleans, La., reads: Capt. B. S. Leathers Born Oct. 4, 1855 Died Apr. 27, 1919 His wife Capt. Blanche D. Leathers 1860-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DIES AT 92

Johnston City—Death claimed Mrs. Eliza Turner Saturday afternoon, a few hours after she had passed her 92nd birthday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ethel Nix, of this city.  She had made her home here with her daughter for the past year and had been ill for some time.  She is survived by 55 descendants, representing four generations.

(Math J. Turner married Eliza A. Davis on 17 Sep 1868, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Wesley Travelstead married Mary Ann Parks on 9 Jul 1846, in Williamson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Eliza Yan Turner was born 26 Jan 1848, in Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of Wesley Travelstead, a native of Illinois, and Ann Parks, a native of Williamson Co., Ill.,  died 27 Jan 1940, in Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill., widow of Mathew J. Turner, and was buried in Williamson Co., Ill.  She was buried in Coal Bank Springs Cemetery in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Feb 1940:

SHOOTING AT CYPRESS

             Audie “Smiley” Turnery of Cypress shot and fatally wounded Lynn Capron, 32 years of age, Tuesday evening in the main part of Cypress.  Turner claimed Capron attacked him with a knife.  Capron lived until 10 o’clock that night when he died in the hospital at Cairo.

             (The death certificate of Lynn Capron, WPA laborer, states he was born 31 Jan 1908, in Birdsville, Ky., the son of John E. Capron, a native of Christian Co., Ky., and Sarah Thorning, a native of Salem, Ky., died 6 Feb 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. GEORGE TUCKER

             Mrs. Artie Tucker, age 43, passed away at her home in this city at 1:30 Monday morning after a short illness.

             She is survived by her husband, George Tucker; two sons, Jack and Charles; one daughter, Mrs. Arthur DeVore, all of Mound City; two brothers, John George of Ullin and Wallace George of St. Louis; two sisters, Mrs. Della Farmer of St. Louis and Mrs. Antha Ralls of McClure.

             Funeral services were held at the funeral home Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. C. E. Cox of Paragould, Ark., officiating.

             Berbling Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Artie Ellen Tucker was born 7 Jan 1898, in Kentucky, the daughter of William George and Martha Laudermilk, natives of Kentucky, died 5 Feb 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of George Tucker, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Artie E. Tucker 1898-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SHOOTING AT CAIRO

             William Hayes, about 30 years of age, was shot and killed Wednesday night about 8:20 at the Frazille’s Tavern in Cairo by H. P. Guertermous of Marion, a coal trucker.  The details and reasons for the shooting are not clear.  It seems that Quertermous says he did not even know Hayes and that Hayes came up and struck at him and then appeared to  make threatening gestures, whereupon he drew a pistol and killed him.  The inquest was scheduled for yesterday afternoon.   Quertermous did not leave the scene.

             (The Kentucky Birth Index states that William W. Hays was born 25 Jan 1915, in Carlisle Co., Ky., the son of Nina Brown Hays.  According to his death certificate, William Wilson Hays, steamboater, of Wickliffe, Ky., was born 25 Jan 1915, in Bardwell, Ky., the son of Thomas A. Hays, a native of Bardwell, Ky., and Nancy V. Johnson, a native of Henderson Co., Ky., died 7 Feb 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery in Carlyle Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GLENA MERIDETH DIES

             Glena Maxine, 14 months old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Merideth of this city, passed away at the home of her parents Tuesday morning at 12:10 o’clock following an illness of four days.

             Besides her parents she is survived by four sisters, Helen, Ima Jean, Kathelene and Martha Rose; two brothers, William Jr. and Donald Edward.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Fred Harpe officiating.  Burial was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Glenda Maxine Merideth was born 16 Nov 1938, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of W. C. Merideth, a native of Marmaduke, Ark., and Mildred Utley, a native of Illinois, died 6 Feb 1940, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Feb 1940:

J. E. Fitzpatrick

             _____Charles Griffith of Mounds received word Tuesday morning of the death of her brother-in-law, J. E. Fitzpatrick, who passed away at  _____ in Detroit Monday.

             J. E. Fitzpatrick, a former resident of Mound City, was the son of ____ Fitzpatrick, who was killed ____ the workers while he was ______ of the National Cemetery in Mound City, he had ____ to in the community who ____ ___ed to hear of his death.

             ____ are three children, Mrs. ___ __it, Edwin and Robert, all of    ____.  His first wife, mother _____ three children, was Miss _____street, sister of Mrs. _____, who preceded him in death _____.

             (John E. Fitzpatrick was born 29 Jun 1871, in Washington, D.C., and died 14 Feb 1940, in Detroit, Wayne Co., Mich.  J. E. Fitzpatrick, 29, of Mound City, Ill., son of Thomas A. Fitzpatrick and Sarah A. Snyder, married on 23 Jan 1901, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., Blanch Overstreet, 20, of Mound City, Ill., daughter of George E. Overstreet and Myranda Franklin.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Arthur Britt

             Arthur Britt, age 6_, of Mound City, died Monday, Feb. 12, at the _____ Hospital, where he had spent only four days.

             He is survived by his wife, ____, __ sons, Clyde of Wolf Lake, ____se, Leonard and John of _____; three daughters, Mrs. ____er of Mound City, Mrs. _____ of Villa Ridge, and Mrs. ____er of Mound City; three _____ ___fus of Olmsted, William ____, Ill., and Randle of _____.

             Funeral services were held at ______ Mound City _____ at 2 o’clock _____ officiating.  Interment was in Concord Cemetery.  _______ Funeral Service was in charge of arrangement.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, Arthur Harry Britt was a farmer at Ullin, Ill.  His death certificate states that Arthur Britt, WPA worker, was born about 1882 in Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Jack Britt and Jane Chism, natives of Illinois, died 12 Feb 1940, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Elsie Britt, and was buried in Concord Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.   His marker there reads:  Arthur Britt Apr. 7, 1881 Feb. 12, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BROTHER OF J. E. HERMAN DIES

             Word of the death of his brother, Ernest Herman, which occurred Friday last at his home in Selma, Ala., was received by J. E. Herman, who was unable to get to Selma for the funeral.  The deceased was a twin brother of Art Herman, a former resident of Mounds.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, Ernest Edmund Herman stated he was born 3 Oct 1880, and lived in Vredenburgh, Monroe Co., Ala., where he worked in a sawmill.  According to his death certificate, Earnest Edmond Herman, farmer, was born 3 Oct 1883, in Flora, Ill., the son of Frank Herman and Jane Patton, died 9 Feb 1940, in Selma, Dallas Co., Ala., husband of Mamie Herman, and was buried at Selma, Ala.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Sarah Ann Atherton Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. Sarah Ann Atherton died Monday night, February 12, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Scruggs, at the age of 85 years, one month and one day.

             Sarah Ann May, born January 11, 1855, was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jackson May of Johnson County, Illinois.  She was married three times to Lindsey Carlock, Sam Smoot and Jasper Atherton, respectively, and to these unions were born eleven children, four of whom survive their mother, namely:  Mrs. George Scruggs of Mounds, Mrs. James Aldred and Mrs. Hallie Fitzgerald, both of Pulaski, and Mrs. Ed Jenkins of Phoenix, Arizona.  Also surviving are twenty grandchildren and several great-grandchildren.

For many years Mrs. Atherton had lived with her daughters, Mrs. Scruggs and Mrs. Aldred, who have tenderly cared for her in her long illness.  Her will power kept her up and about most of the time until this past Christmas, since which time she has been practically bedfast.

             A member of the Baptist Church for 69 years, funeral services were held in the church of her choice, Mt. Pleasant Church near Pulaski, with the pastor, Rev. Wilbert Snider, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Atherton of Dongola, officiating.  Burial was made in Rosehill cemetery nearby, with James Funeral service in charge of arrangements.

             (Jasper N. Atherton, 50, of Villa Ridge, Ill., married Mrs. Sarah A. Smoot, 45, of Pulaski, Ill., on 9 Sep 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Samuel W. Smoot, 34, farmer, of Dongola, Ill., born in Davie Co., N.C., son of Eliphlet Smoot and Mary C. Holman, married on 15 Dec 1881, in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Sarah A. Carlock, 26, born in Johnson Co., Ill., of Dongola, Ill., daughter of Andrew J. May and Elizabeth Branchcum.  Lindsey H. Carlock married Sarah Ann May on 9 Feb 1871, in Union Co., Ill.  A. J. May married Elizabeth Branscomb on 29 Sep 1846, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Sarah Ann Atherton was born 11 Jan 1855, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Andrew J. May and Elizabeth Branchcomb, natives of Illinois, died 12 Feb 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Jasper N. Atherton, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mother Sarah A. Atherton 1855-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Claren Casper motored ___ Stubblefield and wife, and ___ Harper and wife to Thomp___ on account of the death of ___ Stubblefield’s sister.  (Perks)

 

Cave-in-Rock Pirate Hanged in Summer of 1834

(Golconda Herald-Enterprise)

             Trees were a dull green, the sky a deep distant expanse of blue broken by white fluffy clouds when a hot bright summer sun saw ox carts, family surreys, wagons loaded with people and men on horseback riding into Golconda in 1834, over 105 years ago, to witness the county’s only legal hanging.  Henry C. Shouse, convicted murderer, outlaw and river pirate was to pay the penalty of death!

             According to written accounts, thousands came from Gallatin, Pope and Livingston counties to Golconda to wait for the hour and the hanging. Shouse’s sentence read, “Henry C. Shouse shall be hanged by the neck until he is dead. . . . on Monday, the ninth day of June, A. D. 1834, between 12 noon and four in the evening at some convenient place in the vicinity, not more than one-half mile from the town of Golconda.”

             The execution took place in the creek bottom immediately north of the town limits, at a spot where the slopes of the hills converge to form a natural amphitheater.

             “About two o’clock in the afternoon Shouse was placed on an ox cart and driven to the scaffold that had been built by erecting two heavy timbers with a cross beam over them.  Between these two upright posts the cart was placed, and into it the condemned man’s coffin was shoved, thus serving the purpose of a platform and trap.”

             Thousands of horror-expectant eyes looked up at a man about to leave a beautiful June day and a world until then not appreciated by Shouse.  In a suppressed midnight like silence Shouse’s hands were tied behind his back.  His last look at this world cut off by a blindfold.  Men forced him to stand erect on the very coffin he was to be buried in!  A rope was looped and tightened around his neck.  A bull whip struck the oxen, the cart moved forward.  Shouse fell, his neck snapped, a mob shuddered at a planned, dramatized death.

             Shouse, a member of the murderous Ford Ferry Gang above Cave-in-Rock, had tried to pick a fight with Vincent Simpson, a Kentuckian, who “knew too much” on Shouse’s boss, Ford.

             Simpson knew they were out to get him and started up Shouse’s house.  He went perhaps to reach an understanding, maybe to kill Shouse.  At any rate, Shouse fired a shot into his back and the next day Simpson died.

             The case was tried in Golconda by virtue of a change of venue.  A verdict of “guilty” was reached and for years afterwards people around Golconda spoke of a large crowd being “as big as the one when Shouse was hanged.”

             Shouse’s career and the “historical accounts of the famous highwaymen and river pirates who operated in pioneer days upon the Ohio River,” and especially the cave at Cave-in-Rock can be found in a limited edition of the book, “The Outlaws of Cave-in Rock” by Otto A. Rothert, at the Golconda Public Library.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Feb 1940:

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             Mrs. Emma Cole Pease of Bloomington, Ill., passed away at her home Wednesday, February 14, and will be buried in the family lot today.

             Mrs. Pease will be remembered as a former resident and for many years a school teacher in this city.  She was one of the teachers to en___ Lowell School building when it was first built, and many citizens of Mound City will remember having been one of her pupils in the ___d grade.

             She is survived by her husband, ___ is a retired Presbyterian minister; four daughters, Miss Wilma and Miss Harrieta, who are doing foreign missionary work in Iran or Persia; Miss Nola and Miss ___ Ella are also doing home missionary work.  Miss Nola is doing missionary work in the mountains of Kentucky and Miss Mary is working in Bloomington; ___ Charles and William ______.

             (William Pease married Emma D. Cole on 16 May 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Emma L. Pease was born 5 Jul 1863, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of W. Josephus Cole, a native of Keysville, Va., and Rebecca Delaney, a native of Tennessee, died 14 Feb 1940, in Bloomington, McLean Co., Ill., wife of William Pease, and was buried at East Lawn Memorial Park in Bloomington, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH CLAIMS ARTHUR BRITT

             Arthur Britt, age 58, of this city, passed away Monday morning at the Anna State Hospital, where he had been a patient for four days.

             Mr. Britt is survived by his wife, Elsie; five sons, Clyde of Wolf Lake, and Charles, Jake, Leonard and John of this city; three daughters, Mrs. Helen Parker of Mound City, Mrs. Stella Hiatt of Villa Ridge and Mrs. H. VanMeter of this city.  Three brothers, Rufus of Olmsted, William of Grafton, Ill., and Randle of Mounds, also survive him.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Earl Harp officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral service was in charge of arrangements.

 

TWO KILL EACH OTHER OVER $3.00 GAMING DEBT

             Loy Shockley, 29, of Rosiclare, Ill., died Wednesday afternoon of wounds received in a gun fight shortly after he was named as the slayer of Wilburn Collins, 24, Rosiclare, by a coroner’s jury.

             Sheriff Otis Brittain described the fight between the two men as a gambling house gun duel which climaxed an argument over a $3.00 debt.  Brittain said eye witnesses told him the following:  Shockley drew a revolver and shot Collins.  Collins died of a bullet wound in the chest.  Shockley was taken to the Rosiclare hospital, where he died from wounds yesterday afternoon.—Vienna Times

             (His death certificate states that Loy Shockley, Jr., a spar miner, was born 30 Nov 1910, in Rosiclare, Ill., the son of Loy Shockley, Sr., and __tie Turner, natives of Illinois, died 7 Feb 1940, in Rosiclare, Hardin Co., Ill., husband of Miss Lanham, and was buried in Stone Church Cemetery in Hardin Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Robert Wilburn Collins, spar miner, states he was born 11 Jun 1915, in Cave-in-Rock, Ill., the son of Clifford Collins, a native of Cave-in-Rock, Ill., died 6 Feb 1940, in Rosiclare, Ill., husband of Miss McDonald, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Hardin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OLD RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

Mrs. Sarah Atherton passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Scruggs, in Mounds Monday night.

             Mrs. Atherton was born January 11, 1855.  For the past several years she had been dividing her time between her daughters, Mrs. Scruggs and Mrs. James Aldred of Pulaski.  She had been a member of the Baptist church since 1871.

             Mrs. Atherton was married three times to Lindsey Carlock, Sam Smoot and Jasper Atherton, respectively, and to these unions were born 11 children, four of whom survive.  The surviving children are Mrs. George Scruggs of Mounds, Mrs. James Aldred of Pulaski, Mrs. Hallie Fitzgerald of Pulaski and Mrs. Ed Jenkins of Phoenix, Ariz.  Twenty grandchildren and several great-grandchildren also survive her.

 

J. E. FITZPATRICK DIES IN DETROIT

             Mrs. Charles Griffith of Mounds received word yesterday of the death of her brother-in-law, J. E. Fitzpatrick, who passed away at his home in Detroit, Monday.

             Mr. Fitzpatrick, a former resident of this city, was the son of Major Fitzpatrick, who was killed by one of the workers while he was superintendent of the National Cemetery.  He was raised in Mound City and had many friends in the community who mourn his death.

             He is survived by three children, Mrs. Harry Gaunt, Edwin and Robert, all of Detroit.  His wife, mother of the three children, was Miss Blanche Overstreet, sister of Mrs. Griffith.  She preceded him in death 25 years ago.

 

TWO SENTENCED AT CAIRO

             Leslie Irvin, 30 years old, colored, entered a plea of guilty in circuit court in Cairo Wednesday to the murder of a woman with whom he lived and got a life sentence.  The same day, the son of the woman killed, William Hathaway, about 22 years of age, entered a plea of guilty to theft and drew from one year to life.  Thus the common law stepfather who killed the mother of his stepson came into court the same day, before the same judge, and was sentenced.  In common terms, it was father and son day in court.

             (The murdered woman was Beatrice Hathaway, WPA worker, whose death certificate states was born 19 Dec 1894, in Humboldt, Tenn., the daughter of William Hughes, a native of Humboldt, Tenn., and died 10 Feb 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Walter Hathaway, and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

___b Wadlington left Sunday for Kutawa, Ky., where he was called by the death of his father.

             (According to his death certificate, William Miller Wadlington, farmer, was born 19 Mar 1858, in Lyon Co., Ky., the son of William Wadlington and Sarah Jones, natives of Kentucky, died 11 Feb 1940, in Kuttawa, Lyon Co., Ky., of uremia and influenza, husband of Annie L. Ramage Wadlington, and was buried in Kuttawa Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  William Miller Wadlington 1859-1940 Annie Laura Wadlington 1864-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. T. A. Thomasson and Miss Wilma Biggerstaff left yesterday for Bloomington, where they will attend the funeral for their aunt, Mrs. Emma Cole Pease.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Feb 1940:

YOUTH KILLED IN MINE

             Golconda—Donald Halter, 22, was ___ a cave-in in the Hamp spar ___ Hardin County last Saturday morning and it was 3 o’clock in the afternoon before rescue workers ___ remove the estimated 35 tons of ___d rocks to recover his body.  ___r and neither worker were ____ in a “drift” near the main ___ when the roof of the drift began to crumble.  Halter, trapped ___ mine car and bucket, was unable  reach the man shaft, but the other miner ran for the shaft and avoided the tons of debris.  Was heard to scream, “Get me out of here,” but more and more ___ and rock fell.

             ___ workers and friends in shifts __ worked furiously all day long ___ and sleet and had reached ___ __y when a second cave-in occurred delaying recovery of the body ___ __ed three o’clock.

             The mine is located about three miles east of the spot where route ___  crosses Hick’s Branch.  The Hardin County coroner conducted an inquest that resulted in a verdict of accidental death.—Herald Enterprise.

             (His death certificate states that Carl Donald Halter, miner, was born 11 Aug 1917, in Golconda, Ill., the son of Antoine Halter and Mary Joiner, natives of Golconda, Ill., died 10 Feb 1940, in Road District 1, Hardin Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Golconda.—Darrel Dexter)

 

G. J. MURPHY

             Granville Jackson Murphy, age 80, died at his home in Mound City Friday afternoon following an illness of several days.

             Mr. Murphy was born in New Madrid, Mo., moving to Mound City when a child.  He was the son of the late Dr. James Murphy and had been a resident of Mound City for 75 years.  He served for a number of years as city clerk, was a member of the school board, was one of the organizers of the Mound City Crystal Coal and Ice Company, which was organized in 1897, and served as manager of this organization during its existence.  He was also first vice president of the First National Bank of Mound City.

             Surviving are three grandsons, Jack Murphy of Detroit, Raymond Murphy of Mound City and Robert Murphy who is stationed at Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island with the U.S. Army; one granddaughter, Mrs. Barney Burns of Mound City; five great-grandchildren and one nephew and two nieces.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Mound City, of which he was a loyal member with the Rev. S. L. Hagan officiating.

             Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Granville J. Murphy married Ella F. Wilson on 28 Sep 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Granville Jackson Murphy, retired coal merchant, was born 28 Apr 1859, in New Madrid, Mo., the son of James H. Murphy and Rachel Jane Butler, died 16 Feb 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., divorced husband of Edna Murphy, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of E. A. Stokes Dies Tuesday near Anna

             Mrs. Flora Thornton Stokes, wife of James Stokes and mother of Ernest A. Stokes of this city, died Tuesday, February 20, at their farm home east of Anna in the Lick Creek neighborhood, the result of an attack of flu with complications.  Her age was 72 years.

             She is survived by her husband and five children:  Ernest of Mounds, Lester, Mrs. Florence Williams, Miss Hattie Stokes and Verdus, all of Union County.  Also surviving are several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock at Lick Creek Hall with the Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.  Burial was in Lick Creek Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock at Lick Creek Hall with the Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.  Burial was in Lick Creek Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (James Stokes married Flora Thornton on 5 Aug 1886, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Flora Stokes was born 4 Dec 1868, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of William Thornton, died 19 Feb 1940, in Road District 2, Union Co., Ill., wife of James Stokes, and was buried in Ebenezer Hall Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  James Stokes Feb. 2, 1863 Mar 3, 1946 Flora Stokes Dec. 4, 1868 Feb. 20, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Hathaway

             John Hathaway, prominent business man of Johnston City and stepfather of Mrs. George A. Tharp of Mound City, died Saturday evening, February 17, at Hurley Hospital, Flint, Mich., where he had been a patient for several months.

             Mr. Hathaway was a funeral director and the proprietor of a large furniture store.  He and Mrs. Maud Wall Southall, mother of Mrs. Tharp, were married in 1922.

             Surviving also are his daughter, Mrs. R. E. Curtis of Flint, Mich.; and two sisters, Mrs. Minerva Fleming of Chicago and Mrs. Minnie Hudgens of Detroit, Mich.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, John Hathaway lived at 408 Hendrick, Johnston City, Ill., and his occupation was recorded as undertaker.  His nearest relative was Augusta Hathaway, of the same address.  The Social Security death claim states that John Hathaway was born 12 Mar 1875, in Franklin Co., Ill., and died 17 Feb 1940.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., reads:  John Hathaway 1875-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Harvey Clanahan

             Harvey Clanahan, age 52, passed away at his home in Mound City Wednesday morning, Feb. 14.  Mr. Clanahan had been a resident of Mound City for the past seven years.

             Surviving are five children, Mrs. Virgil Glynn and Milas Clanahan of Mound City, Joseph, Bobbie Gene and Louise of Ullin; two sisters, Mrs. Rose Mize of Ullin and Mrs. Prude Ozment of Pulaski; two brothers, Guy of Brownsfield, Ill., and James of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Mound City Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock with the Rev. Mr. Montgomery officiating.  Interment was made in the Rose Hill Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (John W. Clanahan married Alma M. Franklin on 10 Jan 1878, in Pope Co., Ill.  When he registered for the draft in 1917, Harve Clanahan was farming for Charlie Gore at Pulaski, Ill., and gave his birthdate as 2 Dec 1888, near Brownfield, Ill. He did not sign his name, but made his mark.  According to his death certificate, Harvey Clanahan was the son of John Clanahan and Allie Franklin, and died 14 Feb 1940, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Bertha Mise.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski, Ill., reads:  Father Harvey Clanahan Dec. 2, 1887 Feb. 14, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William Alexander Toler

             William Alexander Toler was born to Mr. and Mrs. William Toler in Union County, Ill., March 20, 1867, and departed this life Feb. 15, 1940, at the age of 72 years, 10 months, and 26 days.

             He was married to Sarah N. Hightower June 6, 1889.  To this union were born 10 children, namely:  Mrs. E. S. Kimmel and Myrtle Toler of Chicago, Glenna Bryan who died in infancy, Mrs. Chester Wiggins, Mrs. Roy Pratt, and Charles of Anna, Herman Toler of Murphysboro, Ira Toler of Dongola, Mrs. Curtis Brown of Columbus, Ohio, and Irene Toler, who died at the age of 11 years.

             He professed faith in Christ at the age of 18 years and was united with the Friendship Baptist Church, later moving his membership to the First Baptist Church of Dongola, where it remained until his death.

             He leaves to mourn his departure his companion for more than 50 years having celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in June 1939, three sons and 5 daughters, sixteen grandchildren, one brother, Silas Marion, better known as “Will,” of Dongola; one half-brother, J. C. Toler of Paragould, Arkansas; and a host of relatives and friends.  He was a second cousin of W. L. Toler of this city.

             (William Alexander Toler, 21, a farmer from Mt. Pleasant, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of William Toler and Miss Thorn, married on 6 Jun 1889, at Lick Creek in Union Co., Ill., Sarah N. Hightower, 15, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of David Hightower and Miss Freeze.  His death certificate states that William Alexander Toler, farmer, was born 20 Mar 1867, in Union Co., Ill., the son of William Toler, a native of North Carolina, and Mary Thorn, died 15 Feb 1940, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., husband of Sarah Toler, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  William Alexander Toler 1867-1940 Nevada Hightower Toler 1873-1943.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Henry Gunn, Mrs. Lydia Jenkins, Mrs. C. R. Scott, Mrs. Frank Bour, and Mrs. Clarence Beedle attended the funeral of Mrs. James Stokes, mother of E. A. Stokes of this city at Lick Creek, Union County, Thursday of last week.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to express our sincere and heartfelt thanks to our neighbors and friends for the expressions of sympathy and for the beautiful floral offerings sent on the occasion of the death of our dear mother, Mrs. Flora Thornton Stokes.  Your kindness and thoughtfulness will long be remembered with grateful appreciation.

THE STOKES FAMILY

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Feb 1940:

INFANT DIES

             ___ May Helton, 15-day-old infant of Mr. and Mrs. Archie Helton of America, passed away at the home of her parents, Monday morning at 3 o’clock.

             ____ her parents, she is survived by two brothers, Robert and _____.

             Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery Monday afternoon with the James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Edith May Helton was born 4 Feb 1940, in Road District 4 Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Archie Helton, a native of Lyon Co., Ky., and Rosia Smith, a native of Anniston, Mo., died 19 Feb 1940, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH CLAIMS AGED RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY

             Granville Jackson Murphy, highly respected citizen of Mound City, passed away at his home in this city Friday afternoon at 4:15 o’clock following an illness of several days.

             Mr. Murphy was born in New Madrid, Mo., in 1860.  He was the son of the late Dr. James Murphy who came to Mound City in 1865.  Mr. Murphy attended school in Mound City and became prominent in the interest of the city and in its industries.  He was city clerk for a number of years, was a member of the school board, was one of the organizers of the Mound City Ice and Coal Company, which was organized in 1897, and served as manager of this organization during its existence.  He was also first vice president of the First National Bank of Mound City.  He was a faithful member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church and also a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge.

             Surviving are three grandsons, Jack Murphy of Detroit, Raymond Murphy of this city, and Robert  Wadsworth on Staten Island with the U. S. Army.  One granddaughter, Mrs. Barney Burns of Mound City.  Five great-grandchildren and one nephew and two nieces also survive him.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Rev. S. L. Hagen officiated.

             Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             The pallbearers were George Eichhorn, George Martin, Andy Campbell, Will Kennedy, William Hauf, and Rev. Charles Montgomery.

 

Robert Murphy, who joined the army several months ago, has been transferred from Staten Island, N.Y., to Panama.

 

JUDGE BRADLEY COMING TODAY FOR PERKS CASE

             Judge Loyd M. Bradley will be here today to hold court for a short time and to render the decision, it is believed in the Perks-Schuler case which has been in both circuit and county court.  The case involves the will of the L. C. Perks relative to the estate left Mrs. Perks and its disposition.  It also involves the will of Mrs. Perks.

 

JOHN HATHAWAY DIES

             Mrs. George A. Tharp of this city received a message Sunday morning that her father, John Hathaway of Johnston City, passed away Saturday night in the Hurley Hospital at Flint, Mich., following an illness of several weeks.

             Funeral services were held at Johnston City Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Baptist Church.

             Mr. Hathaway was a prominent business man of Johnston City.  Mrs. Hathaway was the former Miss Maud Wall of Mound City.

 

HARVEY CLANAHAN DIES

             Harvey Clanahan, age 53, passed away at his home in this city Wednesday morning at 7:20 o’clock.  Mr. Clanahan had been a resident of Mound City for the past seven years.

             Surviving are five children, Mrs. Virgil Glynn and Milas Clanahan  of Mound City, Joseph, Bobbie Gene and Louise of Ullin; two sisters, Mrs. Rose Mise of Ullin and Mrs. Prude Ozment of Pulaski; two brothers, Guy of Brownsfield, Ill., and James of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church here Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Montgomery officiating.  Interment was made in the Rose Hill Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Tharp left Sunday for Johnston City, where they attended the funeral Tuesday of Mrs. Tharp’s father, John Hathaway.

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Tharp returned home Thursday from Johnston City from where they were called by the death of Mrs. Tharp’s father, John Hathaway.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Mar 1940:

Mrs. Jennie Pyatt

             Mrs. Jennie Pyatt, age 78, passed away at her home west of Villa Ridge Friday evening, March 1, at __ o’clock after an illness of one ___.

             Mrs. Pyatt was the widow of Am___ Pyatt.  Mr. and Mrs. Pyatt were prominent in the business and ___ life of Cairo for many years.  Mr. Pyatt conducted a book store and a bindery.  They later moved to a farm near Villa Ridge, where he continued to conduct the bindery.  He passed away several years ago. 

             ___ Susanka was born in Cairo ____ 1861, a member of a pioneer family of Cairo.  Her parents were Mr. and Mrs. Albert Susanka.

             She is survived by one son, Don Pyatt with whom she lived; three sisters, Mrs. J. J. Lane of Chicago, ____ Huston and Miss Kate ____ of Little Rock, Ark.; two brothers, Bert and Frank Susanka of Chicago; and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at St. ___ Church in Mound City Monday morning at 9 o’clock with the ____ Gilmartin officiating.  The Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (There is a marriage record in Alexander Co., Ill., for Albert Sustan and Nella McGee on 8 Jul 1860, who could be Jennie’s parents.  The death certificate of Jennie Ann Pyatt states she was born 2 Apr 1861, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of Albert Susxinpa, a native of Bohemia, died 1 Mar 1940, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Ambrose Pyatt, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William Evers

             William Evers, age 73, passed away at his home in Belknap, Wednesday, March 6.

             He is survived by five children, James, Charles, Albert and John of Belknap, and Mrs. Fern Price of East St. Louis; two sisters, Mrs. Lizzie Tarr of Johnston City and Mrs. Maud Paulson of Joppa; three brothers, John Evers of Karnak, A. L. Evers of Salem and James Hal Evers of Aurora.

             Funeral services will be held at the Methodist church in Belknap this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Cummins of Karnak officiating.  Interment will be made in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.  Wilson Funeral Service will be in charge of arrangements.

             (William Francis Evers married Sarah Ellen Morgan on 22 Aug 1895, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Francis Evers, farmer, was born 24 Dec 1866, in Massac Co., Ill., the son of James Evers and Charlotte Copeland, natives of Massac Co., Ill., died 6 Mar 1940, in Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill., widower of Sara Ellen Evers,  and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Belknap, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Father William F. Evers 1866-1940 Mother Sarah E. Evers 1879-1936 Resting in Peace.—Darrel Dexter)

 

U. L. Curtsinger

             U. L. Curtsinger of St. Louis, age 56, died Tuesday at noon, having been stricken with a heart attack while at work in the Ambassador building where he was employed as an insurance salesman.

             Mr. Curtsinger was a brother of Mrs. Carroll Pulley, of Cairo, a former resident of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held in Cairo Thursday afternoon with burial in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             (He registered for the draft in Alexander Co., Ill., in 1918.  His name was Urban Lawson Curtsinger, 608th 12th St., Cairo, Ill., born 7 Jul 1883, a traveling shoe salesman for William Hoytt Company.  His nearest relative was his mother, Mrs. W. T. Curtsinger, who lived at the same address.  His Social Security application states he was born in Milburn, Ky., the son of  William T. Curtsinger and Addie E. Trimble.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Just as we go to press we hear of the death of G. H. Knight which occurred at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, this morning.  The funeral will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Pentecostal church.

             (When he registered for the draft, George H. Knight lived in Mound City and stated he was born 29 May 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was a clerk for the Illinois Central Railroad.  George Herbert Knight registered for Social Security and gave the same birthdate, but the place was recorded as Mill Creek, Ill., and his parents were George H. Knight and Tabby Eastwood.  George H. Knight married Tebitha Eastwood on 30 Aug 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that G. H. Knight, W. P. H. worker in sewing room, of Mounds, Ill., was born 29 May 1890, in Millcreek, Ill., the son of George H. Knight and Tibetha Eastwood, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 7 Mar 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Mammie Knight, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Dongola, Ill. His marker in American Legion Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Mother Mamie J. Knight 1899- Father George H. Knight 1890-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Herman and daughter, Mrs. August Crosson were called to Flora Friday by the death of Mr. Herman’s only sister, Mrs. A. L. Gibson, returning home Sunday.  This is the second death in Mr. Herman’s immediate family in less than a month, a brother having passed away February 9, in Selma, Ala.

             (Logan A. Gibson married Sarah Olive Herman on 23 Aug 1890, in Clay Co., Ill.  Francis M. Herman married Jane F. Compton on 30 Nov 1865, in Clay Co., Ill.  Sarah Olive Gibson, of Harter Township, Clay Co., Ill., whose death certificate states was born 14 Sep 1868, in Clay Co., Ill., the daughter of Frances Herman and Jane Compton, natives of Tennessee, died 29 Feb 1940, in Flora, Clay Co., Ill., wife of Logan Gibson, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Flora.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. L. L. Lane of Chicago, Miss Kate Susanka of Little Rock, Ark.  Frank and Bert Susanka of Chicago were called here Saturday by the death of their sister, Mrs. Jennie Pyatt.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Mar 1940:

LOREN C. STOPHLET DIED TUESDAY IN DETROIT

             L. C. Stophlet, former merchant here, died yesterday in a hospital in Detroit after an illness of a few weeks.  The funeral will be Saturday or Sunday here in Mound City.

             Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. Eva Stophlet; one sister, Mrs. Florence Rice; and two sons, Bill of Detroit and Morris of Chicago.

             Mr. Stophlet was in business here for many years with his father.  After the flood, he moved to Detroit.  Mr. Stophlet was about 55 years of age.

             (Loren C. Stophlet married Eva Ann Goldburgh.—Darrel Dexter)

 

VILLA RIDGE RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Jennie Pyatt, age 73, passed away at her home west of Villa Ridge Friday evening at 6:45 o’clock after an illness of one year.

             Mrs. Pyatt was the widow of Ambross Pyatt.  Mr. and Mrs. Pyatt were prominent in the business and social life of Cairo for many years.  Mr. Pyatt conducted a book store and book bindery.  They later moved to their farm near Villa Ridge, where he continued to conduct the bindery.  He passed away several years ago.

             She was born in Cairo, April 2, 1861, a member of a pioneer family of Cairo.  Her parents were Mr. and Mrs. Albert Susanka.

             She is survived by one son, Don, with whom she lived; three sisters, Mrs. J. J. Lane of Chicago, Mrs. James Heston and Miss Kate Susanka of Little Rock, Ark.; two brothers, Bert and Frank Susanka of Chicago and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at St. Mary’s Church in this city Monday morning at 9 o’clock with Rev. Lawrence Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was made in the family lot at Calvary Cemetery.

 

SECOND DEATH DUE TO AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT

             The second pedestrian to be killed on the streets of Cairo by motorists happened Monday afternoon when Mrs. Melville A. Lindsay, 81 years of age, was hit and died soon after of injuries.  The accident happened on Sycamore Street and the driver was Edward McDaniels, 23, of Tamms.

             The woman became confused in crossing the street, stopped and started back, it was reported.

             Lacel Wood, well known in the city, was killed on the street some weeks ago.  This makes two deaths on Cairo streets this year.

 

Dexter School didn’t have school last Friday due to the death of their teacher’s relative.  ____ attended the funeral.  (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Mar 1940:

INTERESTING LIFE OF R. A. CUNNINGHAM, AGE 92

             ___mas have we asked our friend, Robert A. Cunningham ___ a review of his long, active and interesting life, but not until a ___ ago did we succeed in securing the information we had long _____.

             Robert A. Cunningham, son of ___ Henry Cunningham and ___sbell Cunningham, was born at Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 7, 1848.  His parents were married in 1847 in ___gan, Tyrone County, Ireland ___ the young husband emigrating from Ireland to the United States ____.  When he had established himself he sent for his wife, who arrived at the Philadelphia, Pa., wharf ___ first of September 1848.  Her husband was working in Pittsburg and one week later, on Sept. 7, 1848, Robert A. Cunningham was born.  Only two or three weeks later the young wife died.  The father was making $3.50 per day and 50 ___ was paid for the baby’s ___ could visit the baby only ___ and on one visit he tossed an Irish potato to the baby instead of playing with it the baby ate the potato, skin and all, so ___ decided it was time to get ___ ___rding place for the child.

             Cunningham formed a partnership with a young man by the name of Irvin Reed.  Together they ran a “storeboat” and stock___  dry goods and groceries.  ____ from Pittsburg about the ___ they came down the Ohio River stopping at all the small towns along the way, trading and selling until they arrived at Cairo, Ill.

             At that time there were no buildings in Cairo but business was conducted on flatboats lined up along the ___ where the Halliday ____ called the St. Charles, ___ and the point of land ___ Ohio joins the Mississippi.  ___ __ce Lonergan McKinney, a ___ was conducting a hotel on a flatboat called “Strangers’ ____.  John Shields was the cook ____ was the barber.  Soon Mr. Cunningham and Mrs. McKinney became man and wife.  A little ____ sold the hotel and took ___ on a steamboat for Pittsburg

in order to get the baby boy Cunningham had left behind.

             ____ a boat was purchased and named Alice of Pittsburg ___ also, was stocked with dry goods and grocers, etc., and the Cunningham family floated down the river selling goods until they reached  ___ they built the first house ____, sold the boat and moved  ___ to the store building.

             The store was sold to Scott White in 1857 and Mr. Cunningham  ___ other store building on Ohio ___ then called the Levee.  This store sold to a man by the name ___on at the start of the Civil War.

             ____ Cunningham (our “Uncle Bob as he is lovingly called), was ____ when President ___ was inaugurated.  The President suffered from dyspepsia ___ to go to Bed___ __, Pa., each summer for ___.  His last trip to these ___ was made during President _____’s Administration and Mrs. ____ and “Bobby” were with President Buchanan and his ____ Harriett Lane were there and ___ at the same hotel.  The President would give each child a big ___ with which each would ___ __ke of maple sugar.

             He remembers distinctly the flood of 1858.  The family was living ___ some on Washington Avenue ___ 7th and 8th streets.  The ___ three or four feet deep in ___ upstairs.  He recalls that his ___ __me upstairs, took him in his ___ __d, carrying him downstairs, ___ tossed him in the water in ___ (as the best room was ___ed).  Only one man was ___ in Cairo during this flood.  ____ resided on 7th Street _____.  He recalls that ____ Hammitt” went ____ ____ in Washington ______ ____ the Mississippi ____ been cut to let ____.  The house at ____ standing.

             _____ the Civil War Uncle Bob’s father’s place of business in Cairo on the River Front was just next door to the office of General U. S. Grant.  General Grant, Oglesby and other men of prominence frequently came into the Cunningham store and General Grant would often hold “Bobbie” on his knees and talk to him about his own children.

             Uncle Bob was very fond of his stepmother and to this day, in speaking of her, says “God bless her!”  One day, however, he had disobeyed her and when she reprimanded him he ran from the house and to the building where soldiers were enlisting with the idea in his young head that he, too, would enlist.  He suddenly felt a hand on his shoulder and, turning, saw General Grant, who asked, “Bobbie, what are you doing here?”  He was given a pat on the back and told to hurry home.

             At the beginning of the Civil War the Relief Home Guards were organized in Cairo and were drilled the night before the U.S. Soldiers landed there.  Uncle Bob, who was attending a private school in the old M. E. church, ran away from school the day the soldiers arrived and while standing watching the son of General Prentiss directing the soldiers as they unloaded, someone again tapped him on the back.  This time it proved to be his father, who ordered him back to school.

             He was present during a service at the Cairo Presbyterian Church when the pastor was sick and unable to preach.  Commodore Foote was in the congregation and, going to the pulpit, preached the sermon.

             In the early sixties, he was sent to Notre Dame at South Bend, Ind., where he remained for two years.  Near him in the class room sat General Sherman’s son, Tom, also Gen. Rosecrans’ son and Bob and Allen Pinkerton, sons of the great detective.

             Later he was sent to the Pennsylvania Military Academy at Chester, Pa., where he remained for three years.  He played baseball with the Athletics of Philadelphia who came to the Academy to play.

             Returning to Cairo, he worked for his father until 1869 when he entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad at Cairo, doing clerical work.

             On April 5, 1870, he was married to Miss Sarah Holmes of Cairo, who was born in Princeton, New Jersey, Nov. 1, 1852.  They were married by the Rev. C. H. Foote, Presbyterian minister of Cairo, and Mr. Cunningham has in his possession their marriage certificate.

             Moving to Vandalia, the young couple lived there two years.  Here Mr. Cunningham was employed by the I. C. and Vandalia R. R., now the Pennsylvania R. R.  Their first child, Emma (later Mrs. I. N. Taylor) was born in Vandalia.

             They returned to Cairo where he entered the commission business, moving in 1873 to Arlington, Ky., where they lived two years and where their second child, Robert, now living in Cape Girardeau, Mo., was born.

             His health failing, he was told by Dr. Dunning of Cairo that he must get out in the air.  He purchased a farm near Villa Ridge and on this farm their third child, Roy, now living on a farm near Mounds, was born.  During the winter seasons he worked for the I. C. at Cairo until the railroad moved its Division to Mounds.  Here Mr. Cunningham was the passenger agent for 13 years.

             At first the depot was down near the old Banana Shed and the stop was called Mounds Junction.  The depot stood in the middle of the tracks and there was also a building there for the Division superintendents.  One day while Mr. Cunningham was at work, in walked President Fish and General Manager Harrihan.  Pres. Fish had to stoop as he entered the low door and told Uncle Bob he would soon have better quarters, meaning the present depot here which they were at that time planning.

             In 1902 his father died and Uncle Bob moved to Cairo where he built the large house at the corner of 20th and Walnut streets, which he later sold to St. Joseph’s Catholic Church.  He went into business with the Weber Drygoods Co., but later sold his interest to Jesse Miller.  He then purchased the Hogan farm west of Mounds and built two houses on it, one for each of his sons, repairing the old house for the use of himself and wife.  His sons would not remain on the farm so he traded it back to Mr. Hogan, receiving the 80 acres now occupied by Otto Kekow in return for the work he had done on the place.  He gave his three children 40 acres each of the old farm at Villa Ridge and sold the remaining acres to E. G. Britton,

             He returned to Mounds and first built the house, now occupied by Mrs. Anna Laura Titus.  Later he built what is now the Ray Mahoney residence at the corner of Delaware and First Street.

             He served as Commissioner of Road District No. 1 for more than 10 years.

             Mrs. Cunningham, who had been blind for about ten years, died January 17, 1939.  They had been living with their sons for some time before her death and Mr. Cunningham continues to spend his time at Cape Girardeau, in the country near here, at the Spence House where a granddaughter resides and at Trumann, Ark., where he has two grandsons, Norris and Robert Taylor, sons of his daughter who died in 1925.

             Uncle Bob has many mementoes of other days which he values highly, among them several daguerreotypes of himself as a boy at different ages and one of his stepmother, many photographs of his father alone and in groups of prominent citizens of the early days in Cairo.  One, a group of men who were the real founders of the town.

             Those were the days of big business in Cairo—of shipping and manufacturing and selling of goods and cotton.  Many fortunes were made at that time and ever since those days the descendants of some of these founders have reaped from the sowing of their fathers.

             One of his happy memories is that of seeing Abraham Lincoln in Cairo at the time of the now famous Lincoln and Douglas debates; another is the visit of the Prince of Wales (who later became King Edward VII of England) to St. Louis, where Uncle Bob was visiting some cousins.  He was taken down to the wharf and a cousin placed him on his shoulder from which position he could see the royal visitor.  In Cairo he saw the race between the Robert E. Lee and Natchez.

             Always smiling, courteous and thoughtful of others, still able to walk down the street with a pleasant greeting for his many friends, he is a living example of the type of man that any boy should wish to emulate.  As he said of his stepmother, we say of him, “God bless him!”

             (Ivel N. Taylor married Emma Cunningham on 23 May 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Thomas A. Parham

Thomas A. Parham, conductor on the Illinois Central, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia Tuesday, March 5.  He was stricken in Bluford and was taken to Centralia where he died later that day.

             Mr. Parham formerly lived in Mounds, but had since made his home in Fulton, Ky.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen.

             He is survived by his wife:  six children, Thomas of Jonesboro, Ark., William, Gerald and Bryon of Fulton, Mrs. M. S. Barger of Jackson, Tenn., and Miss Emily Parham of Long Beach, Calif., besides a number of brothers and sisters.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Fulton Friday.  Interment was made in Fulton cemetery.

             Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Koonce and Mrs. J. S. Johnson were among those who attended the funeral.

             (Thomas A. Parham married Geraldine Powell on 30 Jun 1907, in Madison Co., Tenn.  When he registered for the draft in 1918, Thomas Anderson Parham lived in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was a railroad conductor for the Illinois Central.  His nearest relative was Geraldine Parham.  According to his death certificate, Thomas G. Parham, railroad conductor, of Obion Co., Tenn., was born 2 Oct 1883, in Jackson, Tenn., the son of William H. Parham and Susan Guderson, natives of Madison Co., Tenn., died 6 Mar 1940, in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill., husband of Clara Parham, and was buried in Fairview Cemetery in Fulton, Fulton Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Mar 1940:

ROSICLARE WOMAN SENTENCED TO PRISON FOR LIFE TERM

             Vivian Jones, 36, was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary for Women at Dwight on Tuesday by Circuit Judge ____earce on her plea of guilty ___ poison murder of her husband, ___ah Jones, 47 years old fluorite ___er of Rosiclare.

             In her confession, Mrs. Jones admitted intimacy with Vernon Snow, ___ power and asserted that she ___ intended to buy a trailer ___ husband’s one thousand dollars insurance money and make ___ together.

             Mrs. Jones told the court after pleading guilty that she had not ___ her husband strychnine ___, but that he had taken the ___ himself knowing it was poison and denied that she had given ___ capsule which was one that ___ mixed to use in destroying ___nding dogs.  In her confession officers quoted her as admitting she gave Jones the capsule.  __ is also held on a murder ___ and his preliminary hearing ___ for last Friday.—Herrin ______

             (Francis Marion Jones married Ellen Staney on 18 Sep 1892, in Hardin Co., Ill.  When he registered for the draft in 1917, Noah Jones stated he was a carpenter for Fairview Fluorspar & Lead Company at Rosiclare, Ill.  The death certificate of Noah Jones, mechanic at the spar mines, states he was born 14 Mar 1894, in Elizabethtown, Ill., the son of Frances Marion Jones and Mary Ellen Stacey, natives of Elizabethtown, Ill., died 19 Feb 1940, in Rosiclare, Hardin Co., Ill., husband of Vivian Gladys Jones, and was buried in I. O. O. F. cemetery in Rosiclare.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUNDS PASSES AWAY

             Thomas A. Parham, conductor on the Illinois Central, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia Tuesday, March 5.  He was stricken in Bluford, Ill., and was taken to Centralia, where he died later that day.

             Mr. Parham formerly lived in Mounds, but had recently made his home in Fulton, Ky.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Trainmen.

             He is survived by his wife; six children, Thomas of Jonesboro, Ark., William, Gerald and Byron of Fulton, Mrs. M. S. Barger of Jackson, Tenn., and Miss Emily Parham of Long Beach, Calif., besides a number of brothers and sisters.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Fulton last Friday,  Interment was made in Fulton Cemetery.

 

FRED ULEN DIED USDDENLY WEDNESDAY

             Fred J. Ulen, of Ullin, age 67 years, 7 months and 23 days, well-known contractor and builder, died suddenly Wednesday afternoon at 1:19 at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo.  He was stricken Tuesday night with an apoplectic stroke and was taken in an ambulance to St. Mary’s Infirmary early Wednesday morning.

             Mr. Ulen has been a resident of Pulaski County all his life, and has long been in the contracting and bridge building business.

             He was a member of the First Methodist Church of Ullin.

             He was associated with Frank Gandy in business and the firm bid in many jobs in this end of the state.  He was not seriously ill recently and his death was a shock.  Mr. Ulen attended the levee meeting at Karnak Tuesday night and seemed to be in very good health at that time.

             He is survived by his wife:  two sons, Sam of Ullin and Fred M. of Dongola; two daughters, Mrs. Beulah Scott of Marengo, Ill., and Mrs. Ilene Stanley of Evansville, Ind.; two brothers, Sam of Dexter, Mo., and J. A.; and one granddaughter.

             Funeral services will be held today at the First M. E. Church in Ullin at 2:00 with Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Interment will be made at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, Fred Ulen, farmer, of Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 20 Jul 1872, near Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Frederick G. Ulen, a native of Greenup Co., Ky., and Rebecca Nalley, a native of Illinois, died 13 Mar 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Verge Ulen, and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Fred Ulen July 20, 1872 Mar. 13, 1940 Verge Ulen Jan. 10, 1881 Aug. 26, 1960.—Darrel Dexter)

 

IRON LUNG FAILED TO KEEP INFANT ALIVE

             A desperate father and helpful physician staged an experiment in Herrin this past week in an effort to keep a baby, prematurely born and weighing about 3 ½ pounds, alive.  When the baby began to suffocate, the father devised an iron lung with the aid of the physician.  An oil can, with inner tube rubber for the ends, was put together.  The head of the baby protruded.  A washing machine motor provided the energy to pull out one of the rubber ends and then push it back, causing a partial vacuum in one instance and compressing air the next.  It seemed for a while this enforced breathing would save the child.  Perhaps it was too late or perhaps it lacked the force or had too much.  No one will ever know how Jimmie Bailey and Dr. Lanke worked and felt as they tried to save the life, which seemed in their hands and then played out.  Monday of this week the baby died.

             (The death certificate of Paul Oscar Bailey states that he was born 9 Mar 1940, in Herrin, Ill., the son of James O. Bailey and Pearl Jacobson, natives of Herrin, Ill., died 11 Mar 1940, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Herrin City Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Among those from out of town attending the funeral services for L. C. Stophlet Saturday afternoon were:  Mrs. W. A. Dougherty of Metropolis, Mr. and Mrs. John Moore of Cairo, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Marfquis of Mount Vernon, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Huett of St. Louis, Mrs. M. L. Hughes of Olmsted and daughter-in-law, Mrs. M. L. Hughes, Jr., of Karnak.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Mar 1940:

Mike Egner

             Mike Egner, age 72, died at his home in Olmsted ___ evening  ____ at 7 o’clock following an illness of several months.  Mr. Egner was born in Kentucky, moved Olmsted community with his ___ when three years old and has lived there ever since.

             ___ his wife, Alice; he is survived by __ daughters, Mrs. Anna ____, Mrs. Rena Mitchell of ___:_ __sons, William of ___, Walter and Fred of ____; three sisters, Mrs. Mary ___ of Grand Chain, Mrs. Kate ___ of Grand Chain, and Mrs. ___mon of Olmsted; two ____ of Belleville and Tony ___ __s; eight grandchildren ___ great-grandchild.

             Services were held at the Methodist church Sunday at 2 o’clock with Rev. ___ officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery, nephews ___ __sed serving as casket bearers.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge.

             (According to his death certificate, Mitchell M. Egner, retired farmer, was born 2 Jul 1867, in Kentucky, the son of Mike Egner, died 15 Mar 1940, in Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Alice M. Egner, and was buried in Concord Cemetery in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Mike M. Egner 1867-1940 Alice M. Egner 1872-1952.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Nannie A. Colwell Dies in the West, Age 96

             Mrs. Nannie A. Colwell of San Bernardino, Calif., formerly of Villa Ridge, passed away March 15, at the home of her niece, Mrs. Watt Wright, according to word received by her niece, Mrs. Hannah Travis of Mound City.

             The body will be brought to Mound City by John Tobin and will arrive Sunday, March 24, at 3 o’clock a.m.  It will be taken to the James Funeral Home in Mound City, where funeral services will be held that afternoon.

             Mrs. Colwell was the widow of Seamon Colwell, one of the first county superintendents of schools in Pulaski County.  Had she lived until April 10, she would have reached the age of 96 years.

 

F. J. Ulen Funeral Services Held Friday Afternoon

             Funeral services for Fred J. Ulen, age 67, prominent Ullin contractor who died Wednesday, March 13, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, were held Friday afternoon at the Methodist church in Ullin, of which he was a member, with the Rev. R. J. Weiss of Ullin officiating.  Burial was made in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

             Mr. Ulen had attended a levee meeting in Karnak Tuesday night and seemed at that time to be in good health.  That same night he was stricken with a cerebral hemorrhage from which he failed to rally.  He was born near Ullin in 1872 and had always lived in that community.

             He was associated in business with Frank Bandy much of the time, the two being contractors and builders.  Only last year Mr. Ulen built the Mounds levee, receiving the contract from the State of Illinois.

             He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Beulah Scott of Marengo, Ill., and Mrs. Eileen Stanley of Evansville, Ind.; two sons, Fred M. Ulen of Dongola, and Sam Ulen of Ullin; a granddaughter, Vercee Scott; and two brothers, James A. of  Madill, Okla., and Sam of Dexter, Mo.

             His death, coming so suddenly, was a great shock to his family and friends.

 

Mrs. Winna J. Toler Dies at Home of Son in Pulaski

             Mrs. Winna Jane Tolar, age 89 years, died Thursday, March 14, at the home of her son, Harry Toler, in Pulaski, Ill., following a week’s sickness.  Mrs. Tolar had made her home with her son and family in Pulaski for the past seven years, but for many years she had been a resident of the state of Kentucky.

             She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Lucy Gaines of St. Louis, Mrs. Mary Etheridge of Cairo, Ill., and Mrs. Fanny Browning of New Haven, Ill.; four sons, Thomas of Ironing, Ohio, Robert of Long Island, Sam of Coldwater, Mo., and Harry of Pulaski; thirty grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church of Pulaski, the Rev. Wilbert V. Snider officiating.  Burial was made in nearby Rose Hill cemetery, grandsons of Mrs. Tolar serving as casket bearers.

             (Her birth certificate states that Winney Gregory was born 20 Mar 1852, in Caldwell Co., Ky., the daughter of Thomas Gregory and Mary A. Barrett.  Her death certificate states that Winna Jane Tolar was born about 1852, the daughter of Thomas Gregory, and died 14 Mar 1940, in Pulaski, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of John Lewis Tolar.  Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski, Ill., reads:  Winnie J. Toler 1850-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Young Boy Dies Friday of Typhoid Fever

             James William Roberts, age 10, son of the Rev. and Mrs. James A. Roberts of South Delaware Avenue, died Friday, March 15, of typhoid fever.

             Surviving are his parents and one sister, Juanita Mae.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Assembly of God Church in Marion, the Rev. C. S. McGinnis officiating.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Marion, with Wilson Funeral Service conducting.

             (According to his death certificate, James William Roberts was born 19 Dec 1929, in Marion, Ill., the son of James A. Roberts, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., and Ina Peterman, a native of Johnson Co., Ill., died 15 Mar 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill.  His marker reads:  Billie Dec. 19, 1929 Mar. 15, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Emma Prindle, who became seriously ill the first of last week, was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where she died this (Thursday) afternoon.

 

Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the Methodist Church, was called to Carrier Mills Sunday to preach the funeral sermon of a friend.

 

Ed Hale was called to Anna on account of the death of his stepmother, Mrs. Ida Osborne, who died Thursday at her home in Mattoon and was brought to Anna for burial.  (Perks)

             (Marion Osborne married Ida Mae Lewis on 3 Apr 1911, in Cape Girardeau, Mo.  Her death certificate states that Ida May Osborn, of 1813 Dewitt, Mattoon, Ill., was born 12 Apr 1882, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of William R. Lewis, a native of Union Co., Ill., died 15 Mar 1940, in Mattoon, Coles Co., Ill., the wife of Marion Osborn, and was buried in Casper Cemetery, Anna, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ida Mae wife of M. Osborne Apr. 12, 1882 Mar. 15, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Mar 1940:

RESIDENT OF OLMSTED DIES

             Mike M. Egner, age 72, passed away at his home in Olmsted Friday evening at 8 o’clock following an illness of several months.  Mr. Egner, who was born in Kentucky, moved to the Olmsted community with his parents when three years old and has lived here his entire life.

             Besides his widow, Alice, he is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Anna Corzine and Mrs. Rena Mitchell of Olmsted; three sons, William of Olmsted, and Walter and Fred of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Mary Ulrich of Grand Chain, Mrs. Kate Rude of Grand Chain, and Mrs. Caroline Hannon of Olmsted; two brothers, Ed of Belleville and Tony of Metropolis; eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

             Funeral services were held at the Olmsted Methodist Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Beatty officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.  Nephews of the deceased served as casket bearers.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF VILLA RIDGE DIES

             Mrs. Hannah Travis received word of the death of her aunt, Mrs. S. A. Colwell of San Bernardino, Calif., formerly of Villa Ridge.  Aunt Nannie Colwell as her many friends called her, died at the home of her niece, Mrs. Watt Wright and she would have been ninety-six years of age April 10th.

             John Tobin is bringing the body back to Mound City arriving about 3:00 a.m. Sunday and funeral services will be sometime Sunday afternoon.

 

BEG PARDON            

             Last week, in speaking of the death of Fred Ulen, the cause was given as apoplexy.  The cause given by doctors was cerebral hemorrhage, which is a form of apoplexy.  Mr. Ulen was not associated with Frank Gandy and had not been for some three years, but prior to that they had been associated together for years.  Mr. Ulen had been in Mound City two days before his death, and the news here last week was almost unbelieved for some time.

 

PATIENT ON OPERATING TABLE DURING HOLDEN HOSPITAL FIRE DIES

             Francis Berg, 24, of Mt. Erie, Ill., who was operated on for appendicitis while fire raged at the Holden Hospital at Carbondale, died.

             The youth, a student at Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondale, died last Sunday in Murphysboro, where he was taken after being removed from the burning Carbondale hospital.—Herrin News

             (The death certificate of Francis Marion Berg, school boy, states he was born 7 Sep 1915, in Mt. Erie, Ill., son of D. D. Berg, died 10 Mar 1940, in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill., and was buried in Cisne Cemetery in Wayne Co., Ill. His marker in Scott Cemetery in Mount Erie, Wayne Co., Ill., reads:  Francis M. Berg 1914 -1940 Son.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Death of Lyn Smith Recalls Visit Here

             The representative of Governor Henry Horner, who propped his feet on the table in the office of the Illinois Iowa Power Co. office some three years ago, is quite vividly recalled by the rather sensational charges and surroundings of Lynden Smith in Springfield some time ago.  Smith was the man who came into this town after the flood to hear what people had to say. The final verdict was death from natural causes.

             Arriving in a state car and flanked by one or two state policemen and with a stenographer at hand, he was met by a delegation.  He heard what was said largely in the attitude of one who wished he had somewhere else to go.  Those present recall his feet on the table and chair tilted back.

             And Mound City got from the half million flood relief a small pittance.  The back levee strengthened and raised in low spots—about $20,000.  Then it got state funds to back up WPA projects to rework the courthouse and schools, and part of that work is bad.  The desks at the courthouse were made of green oak and are now cracked apart.  The price for some of them is said to have made one wonder if someone had not resorted to multiplication and addition.

             When his death was announced, dead in a bathtub and at the age 42, and with the dispute over the cause, and with a lot of noise about him keeping certain political funds and the insinuation that he feared for his life and had ridden in his car with him lying down to keep out of view, it makes a contrasting picture to the feet on the desk in this town, the big car and the state police.

             How the mighty are fallen.

             He once wrote this paper a letter, and this paper once wrote a reply.  The state’s attitude toward this town and flood relief was disappointing from the start to finish.

 

This community (Beech Grove) was shocked and grieved of the death of Fred Ulen, our old neighbor and friend.  He was reared in this vicinity and owns several hundred acres here.  He was always looking out for the drainage and better roads.  He will be greatly missed.

 

Mr. Ed Hale was called to Anna due to the death of his stepmother, Mrs. Ida Osborne, who died Thursday at her home in Mattoon.  She was brought to Anna for burial.  (Perks)

 

 

The Mounds Enterprise, Friday, 29 Mar 1940:

Mrs. Logan French

             Mrs. Mary French, age 39, whose home was near Mounds, passed away at 4:15 o’clock Thursday afternoon, March 21, at the Alexander County Tuberculosis Sanatorium, which institution she entered as a patient only Wednesday afternoon.

             She is survived by her mother, Mrs. John Benoit, who made her home with Mrs. French; three children, Margaret Ann, age 12, Juanita Rose, age 8, and Charles, age 6; five sisters, Mrs. George Ruschulte, Mrs. George Daumeyer, Misses Lola, Edna and Stella Benoit, all of Cincinnati, Ohio; two brothers, Roy Benoit of Olmsted and Willard Benoit of Cincinnati, Ohio, besides several nieces and nephews.

             Mrs. French’s husband, Logan French, who was for many years a member of the Cairo Police Department, preceded her in death about six years ago.  Mrs. French was a devout member of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church of Cairo and for many years was an employee of St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Mound City, with Rev. Fr. Lawrence Gilmartin officiating.  Burial was in the family lot in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, beside her husband.  The following friends served as casket bearers:  William Grootens, Tony Walsh, Harry Berry, C. W. Berbling, Cyril Powell and B. Mattingly, all of Cairo.

             (According to her death certificate, Mary Elizabeth French was born 2 Oct 1902, in Edwardsville, Ill., the daughter of John Benoit, a native of France, and Sarah Rhodes, a native of Cairo, Ill., died 21 Mar 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Logan French, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  J. Logan French 1887-1934 Mary E. French 1900-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Daughter of Pioneer Family Joins Those Gone Before

Miss Emiline Minerva Prindle, lovingly called “Miss Emma” and “Aunt Emma” by friends of all ages, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Thursday, March 21, following a ten days’ illness, one week of which had been spent in the hospital.  She had become sick while visiting at the home of a life-long friend, Miss Emma Welson of Villa Ridge.

             Miss Emma was the last member of her immediate family. She was the third of four children of Daniel Webster Prindle and Lucy M. (Hurd) Prindle, who were married at Sandgate, Vermont, on January 6, 1857.  Her father had settled in Fort Dodge, Iowa, in 1854, three years before he returned to his old home in Vermont to marry his boyhood sweetheart.  The children were born in Iowa coming with their parents to Villa Ridge, Illinois, in 1879.  Miss Emma was born February 19, 1867.  Her age at death was 78 years, one month and two days.

             She was a descendant of Zalmon Prindle, a Revolutionary soldier and was a member of Egyptian Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.  Her grave will be marked by the Chapter with a permanent emblem in bronze.  She was the ninth generation from William Prindle (also spelled Pringle) who emigrated from Scotland and settled in New Haven, Conn., in 1654.

             She and her older sister attended high school in Cairo and were schoolmates of Maud Rittenhouse Mayne, whose diary, “Maud,” has been a best seller the past winter.  Her sister Carrie was mentioned in the book which had no more interested reader than Miss Emma.

             She lived on the Prindle farm near Villa Ridge until a few years ago when she moved to Mounds.  She had a brilliant mind and was specially interested in the sciences.  Her great love of good books whiled away many hours for her during her last years.

             She had nursed her parents and her sister in their last days; her brothers also had died, but she remained brave, courageous, cheerful and helpful to others until the end.

             Her nearest relatives were three nieces, Mrs. Mabel Williams, Mrs. Carrie Thomas, both of Mounds, and Mrs. Vina Rode of Nameoki; one nephew, E. H. Prindle of Mounds; and a foster daughter, Mrs. Allene Green of Salem, Ill.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the Ryan Funeral Home.  Miss Sara Struckmeyer sang, “Perfect Day,” Mrs. T.M. Ridgeway read, “Crossing the Bar,” Rev. J. Rue Reid, said a prayer and Mrs. G. E. Chance read the Eastern Star service for the dead.  Burial was in the family lot at Villa Ridge by the side of her loved ones gone before.

 

George Eller of Effingham was called to his home here in Perks by the death of his grandfather, Mike Eller.

 

MICHAEL D. ELLER

             Michael D. Eller was born March 24, 1850, in Salisbury, N.C., and departed this life March 22, 1940.  He was united in marriage to Mary Ann Ceals.  To this union were born seven children, four of whom preceded him in death.  Left to mourn their loss are David Eller of Perks, Liza Babe Parmley and Annie Arnhart both of Johnston City; 20 grandchildren, 34 great-grandchildren; other relatives and a host of friends.  He was a member of the Baptist Church of Perks.  Uncle Mike was known by everyone for his sunny smiles and cheerful disposition.

             (Michael Eller married Mary Ann Seals on 31 May 1874, in Union Co., Ill.  Michael D. Eller, 41, farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in North Carolina, son of George Eller and Rosena Goodman, married 2nd  on 1 Jan 1893, near Dongola in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Docia Blackburn, 42, of Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Abner Keller and Polly Gales. His death certificate states that Michael D. Eller, farmer, of Perks, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 24 Mar 1850, in Salisbury, N.C., the son of George Michael Eller, a native of North Carolina, died 22 Mar 1940, in Perks, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Mary Ellen Eller, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Mar 1940:

FOUR KILLED AT COBDEN IN WRECK

             Four were killed at Cobden Sunday evening about 8 o’clock on what is known as the lower grade crossing of the Illinois Central.  Two were from Carbondale, one a senior in high school and the other a freshman in S. I. N. U.  The two girls were from Cobden and were seniors in the high school there.  The four were all killed almost instantly by the train and the car in which they were riding was demolished.

             (Information from death certificates record the following:  John Franklin Baine, student, was born 27 Nov 1922, in Carbondale, Ill., the son of Herman Baine, a native of Carbondale, Ill., and Mamie White, a native of Brookport, Ill., died 24 Mar 1940, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Snyder Cemetery in Jackson Co., Ill.  Robert Warren Goodell, student, of Carbondale, Ill., was born 2 May 1921, in East St. Louis, Ill., the son of Warren B. Goodell, a native of St. Louis, Mo., and Georgia M. Metzger, a native of East St. Louis, Ill., died 24 Mar 1940, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Valhalla Cemetery, Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill.  Betty Jean Noel, student, was born 27 Mar 1923, in Carbondale, Ill., the daughter of Horace L. Noel and Edith Sheppard, natives of Makanda, Ill., died 24 Mar 1940, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  Her marker there reads Betty Jean Mar. 27, 1923 Mar. 24, 1940.  Herbeita Lee Stroud, student, was born 12 Dec 1922, in Cobden, Ill., the daughter of Herbert L. Stroud and Helen F. Clark, natives of Cobden, Ill., died 24 Mar 1940, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Herbeta Lee daughter of Herbert & Helen C. Stroud Dec. 12, 1922 Mar. 24, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MISS EMMA PRINDLE DIES

             Miss Emma Prindle, age 73, of Mounds, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary last Thursday afternoon at 1:10 o’clock following a week’s illness.

             She is survived by one nephew, E. H. Prindle of Mounds; three nieces, Mrs. A. H. Rode of Granite City and Mrs. L. H. Williams and Mrs. Melvin Thomas of Mounds; and a foster daughter, Allene.

             Miss Prindle, a member of a pioneer family of Villa Ridge, was a descendant of Zalmon Prindle, a Revolutionary soldier.  She was a member of Egyptian Chapter, and a D. A. R. emblem will be placed on the grave.

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home in Mounds Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Burial was made in the family lot at Villa Ridge Cemetery.

 

MICHAEL D. ELLER

             Michael D. Eller, of Perks, was born March 24, 1850, in Salisbury, N.C., and departed this life, March 22, 1940.  He was united in marriage to Mary Ann Ceals; to this union was born 7 children, 4 of which preceded him in death.  Liza Babe Parmley and Annie Arnhart, both of Johnston City; 20 grandchildren; and 34 great-grandchildren.  Other relatives and a host of friends also survive.

             He was a member of the Baptist Church of Perks.

             Uncle Mike was known by everyone for his sunny smiles and a cheerful disposition. Mr. Eller was buried on his 90th birthday.

 

MOUNDS RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Mary French, age 39, of near Mounds, passed away at 4:15 o’clock Thursday afternoon at the Alexander County Tuberculosis Sanatorium.

             She is survived by her mother, Mrs. John Benoit, who made her home with Mrs. French; three children, Margaret Ann, age 12, Juanita Rose, age 8, and Charles age 6; five sisters, Mrs. George Ruschulte, Mrs. George Daumeyer, Misses Lola, Edna, and Stella Benoit, all of Cincinnati, Ohio; two brothers, Ray Benoit of Olmsted and Willard Benoit of Cincinnati, Ohio; besides several nieces and nephews.

             Mrs. French’s husband, Logan French, who was for many years a member of the Cairo Police Dept. preceded her in death about six years ago.  Mrs. French was a devout member of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church of Cairo and for many years was an employee of St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in this city with Rev. Fr. Lawrence Gilmartin officiating.  Burial was made in the family lot in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.

 

George Eller of Effingham was called to his home here (Perks) on account of the death of his grandfather, Mike Eller.

 

Lewis R. Dunn was called to Joppa on account of the death of his father, Mr. Dunn.

             (Marida Dunn married Mary C. McGinnis on 19 Mar 1874, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Lawrence Learing Dunn married Minnie Bell Gray on 5 Nov 1899, in Massac Co., Ill.  This may refer to Lawrence L. Dunn, car inspector, whose death certificate states was born 27 Sep 1877, in Abilene, Kansas, the son of Meridith Dunn, a native of Kansas, and Mary McGinis, a native of Johnson Co., Ill., died 19 Mar 1940, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Minnie B. Dunn, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Joppa, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Apr 1940:

MEETS DEATH UNDER TRAIN

             Johnny Moss, a negro residing in North Mounds, was killed late Saturday night at a point on the Illinois Central tracks, east of the old Light property on the hill north of town, when struck by a train.  His dismembered body was found early Sunday morning.  It is thought he had been drinking and had fallen asleep on the tracks.

             (His death certificate states that John Moss, W. P. A.. laborer, was born 13 Feb 1900, in Tate Co., Miss., the son of John Moss, died 31 Mar 1940, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Addie Lee Moss, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

George B. Waldron Dies in Tampa, Florida

             ______ have received of the death of Rev. George Waldron at his home in Tampa, Florida, at the age of 77 years. 

             Rev. Waldron was pastor of the Congregational church in Mounds ____ ____nties.  Under his _____ 1925 the church was ____ rededicated.  He was ____ flood of 1937 and it ____ that portrayed most _____ __as that were a latter-___ on postcards.  These ___ ___taken by him as he ____  best ___s place to ___.

             ___ ___from Florida, ___ to the place of his ____ from his ministry ___.

             (George Burnside Waldron, born about 1863 in Illinois, minister, of Benson, Vt.,  son of Traverse M. and Cordelia L. Waldron, married on 7 Feb 1889, in Benson, Vt., Mabel Barker Strong.  His marker in Hillside Cemetery in Ormond Beach, Volusia Co., Fla., reads:  George B. Waldron 1862-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Judge Albert Spence Dies Following Brief Illness

             Judge William Albert Spence, age 84 years, died Tuesday morning, April 2, at 4 o’clock following a brief illness.  He is survived by his wife, age 80, who is a patient in St. Mary’s Hospital suffering from a fractured hip received in a fall two weeks ago.  It is thought that worry over her condition may have hastened his death.

             Also surviving are eight nephews:  Mark Spence of Willisville, New York, Dr. Frank Crain of Deep River, Iowa, William R. Crain, James and William Clanton of California, Warren Crain, Valley Recluse, Sylvester Clanton and Thurman Carson of Mounds; also six nieces:  Miss Alma Crain and Mrs. Mary Crain Goe of Florida, Mrs. Agnes Gallion and Miss Norma Clanton of Champaign, Mrs. Mary Calon of San Francisco, Calif., and Mrs. Bertha Skiles of Mounds.

             Mr. Spence was born near Olmsted and has been a lifelong resident of Pulaski County.  He had been married three times, first to Mrs. Mary Carson Brown, second to Mrs. Nannie Hays and the present Mrs. Spence was Mrs. America Carrington.  He had no children.  He has resided in Mounds for 40 years.

             During his early residence here he was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad and later entered the real estate business.  He built the large frame building on North Oak Street which was at first used for a hotel.  Later he remodeled the hotel and made an apartment house reserving an apartment house reserving an apartment for himself and wife.

             He held the office of police magistrate for several terms and had also served as justice of the peace, holding this office at the time of his death.

             Funeral services were held at the Spence house on Oak Street Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with Rev. J. Rue Reid of the Methodist Church officiating.  The Masonic Lodge of which the deceased was a member, conducted its ritual at the graveside in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service had charge of the funeral arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that William Albert Spence was born about 1856, the son of William J. Spence and Christie Ann Aubert, and died 2 Apr 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of America Spence.  He is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  William A. Spence 1856-19.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Hazel G. Bagby

             Miss Hazel Gertrude Bagby, age 32, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Friday night at 9 o’clock.  Miss Bagby, who was the daughter of Loy Bagby, postmaster at Olmsted, had been employed as a beauty operator at St. Louis for some time, but had returned to Olmsted because of ill health.

             Besides her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Loy Bagby, she is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Helen McKinney of Vienna and Mrs. Pearl Smith of St. Louis; and three brothers, Paul of Chicago, Ward and Delmar of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Olmsted Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Beatty officiating.  Casket bearers were Harry Walker, A. M. Huddleston, Fred Koch, Doyle Karraker, William Kennedy and Louis Kennedy.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service directing.

             (Hazel Gertrude Bagby, beauty operator, of Cairo, Ill., according to her death certificate, was born 15 Dec 1907, in Olmsted, Ill., the daughter of Loy Bagby, a native of Olmsted, Ill., and Mollie Wilkeram, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 25 Mar 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Concord Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Apr 1940:

MRS. CARL CUNNINGHAM KILLED IN ACCIDENT

Word has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Cunningham that their son’s wife, Mrs. Carl Cunningham, of Rockford, Ill., was killed last Saturday in an automobile accident.  Mr. Cunningham and his mother, Mrs. Mary Cunningham left Sunday for Rockford.  Carl’s mother, Mrs. Jesse Cunningham, due to illness, was unable to go.

             (According to her death certificate, Agnes Mae Cunningham was born 3 May 1917, in Canton, Mo., the daughter of George Slater, a native of LaGrange, Mo., and Myrtle Mullin, a native of Rushville, Ill., died 31 Mar 1940, in Rock Island, Ill., wife of Carl H. Cunningham, and was buried in Memorial Park in Rock Island, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DAUGHTER DIES

             Word was received by relatives here Tuesday announcing the death of Janet Marie Cull, eight months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Cull of Billings, Mont.

             Mr. Cull, a former resident of Mound City, is a brother of Gwin Cull.  He attended school in Mound City and will be remembered by many.

             (Her marker in Riverside Cemetery in Cody, Park Co., Wyo., reads:  Janet Marie Cull Sept. 1, 1939 Apr. 1, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLED ON TRACKS

             Johnny Moss of North Mounds, colored, was killed on the Illinois Central tracks Saturday night.  The mangled body was found next morning.  It is presumed that he was drinking and fell asleep on the tracks.

 

DEATH CLAIMS HAZEL G. BAGBY

             Miss Hazel Gertrude Bagby, age 32, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Friday night at 9 o’clock.  Miss Bagby, who was the daughter of Loy Bagby, postmaster at Olmsted, had been employed as a beauty operator at St. Louis for some time, but had returned to Olmsted because of ill health.

             Besides her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Loy Bagby, she is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Helen McKinney of Vienna and Mrs. Pearl Smith of St. Louis; and three brothers, Paul of Chicago, and Ward and Delmar of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Olmsted Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Beatty officiating.  Casket bearers were Harry Walker, A. M. Huddleston, Fred Koch, Doyle Karraker, William Kennedy.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

MOUNDS RESIDENT DIES

             “Judge” William Albert Spence, age 84, passed away at his home in Mounds Tuesday morning at 4 o’clock following a brief illness.

             Mr. Spence had been a resident of Mounds for the past 40 years.  He was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad several years after moving to Mounds, before going into the real estate business.  He built the Spence Hotel in Mounds.  The building was later made into apartments and Mr. Spence retained one of them for himself.

             He served as police magistrate for a number of years and for the last several years had been a justice of the peace, which office he held at the time of his death.

             He is survived by his wife, who is a patient at St. Mary’s Hospital suffering from injuries received in a fall some time ago.

             Funeral services were held at the residence yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of William Lynch Monday afternoon in the Methodist church at Ullin.  He passed away at Jefferson Barracks Saturday after several weeks’ stay.  A large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends paid their last respect to this devout church man, soldier and citizen.  Rev. Elmer Smith officiated and he was laid to rest in the Ullin Cemetery with military honors.

             (The application for a military headstone states that William A. Lynch enlisted 18 Sep 1917, and was honorably discharged 31 May 1919. The marker was sent to Edith Lynch at Ullin, Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  William A. Lynch 1892-1940 Illinois Pvt. 1 cl. 132 Inf. 33 Div. Mar. 30, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Apr 1940:

Mrs. Nannie A. Higgins of Mound City Dies Wednesday

             Mrs. Nannie Perks Higgins of Mound City died Wednesday morning, April 10, at eleven o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, following an illness of about one week’s duration.

             Mrs. Higgins, the widow of the late Thomas Higgins of Mound City and the sister of the late Leslie Perks, had been prominent in the social and community life of that town for many years.  She was a member of the Mound City Woman’s Club and in earlier years, a member of the 25th District Board of the I. F. W. C.  Since the death of one of her nephews she had lived alone.

             Surviving are four nephews, Thomas J. Perks and Harry Perks of Mound City, Alex Perks of Canada and J. E. Brown of Olive Branch; also two nieces, Mrs. Clara Bonner of Mounds and Mrs. Minnie Freeze of Natchez, Miss.

             Funeral services will be held this afternoon at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Mound City, with the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Burial will be made in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Mounds, with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Nannie A. Higgins was born about 1857 in Virginia, died 10 Apr 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Thomas Higgins, and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Nannie A. Higgins 1858-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. G. W. Chapman

             Mrs. Clara Chapman, age 61, passed away at her home here, Saturday, April 6, at 5 o’clock a.m. as the result of injuries received in a fall February 15.

             She is survived by her husband, G. W. Chapman; three sisters, Mrs. James Lacey of Flora, Ill., Mrs. Indiana Bagby of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Cynthia Bass of Los Aninan, Colo.; three brothers, Freeman Inman of Karnak, Norwood Inman of Poplar Bluff, Mo., and Norman Inman of Metropolis, Ill., and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at the New Hope Baptist Church near New Columbia in Massac County Monday morning at 11 o’clock.  Burial was made beside her mother in the New Hope Cemetery, with James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Joshua Inman married Mariann Maxwell on 22 Oct 1867, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Clara Chapman was born about 1879, the daughter of Joshua Inman and Mary Ann Maxwell, died 6 Apr 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of G. W. Chapman.  Her marker in New Hope Baptist Church Cemetery at Mermet, Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Clara Chapman Mar. 7, 1879 Apr. 6, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. William P. Ledbetter

             Mrs. Armilda Ledbetter, widow of the late William P. Ledbetter of Ullin, died Saturday, April 6, at her home in Ullin, at the age of 86 years.

             Surviving are one son, Wesley Ledbetter of Ullin; and three daughters, Mrs. Ida Sichling and Mrs. Nora Stull of Ullin, Mrs. Julia Guy of Mounds; eighteen grandchildren and sixteen great-grandchildren.  Her husband and four children had preceded her in death.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon in the Methodist church of Ullin, with the Rev. R. J. Weiss, pastor, officiating.  Grandsons of Mrs. Ledbetter were casket bearers and granddaughters and great-granddaughters were flower girls.  Burial was in New Hope Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Armilda Ledbetter was born about 1854, the daughter of Josiah Dillion, and died 6 Apr 1940, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT SONS DIES

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Prim, one day old, passed away Thursday morning at 4:30 o’clock.  Surviving are the parents, one brother, Harold G. Prim; the paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Prim of Mounds and the maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George E. Wilson of Barton, Ark.  Burial was made Thursday afternoon in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James in charge.

             (His death certificate does not give his name, but states he died 11 Apr 1940, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Harold Prim and Dorothy Wilson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Walker and little son returned last week from Ripley, Tenn., where they had been called by the death of an aunt, Mrs. Fred Holloway.

 

Chops Father’s Arm with an Axe after Quarrel

             His right arm chopped so seriously that it eventually may have to be amputated as the result of an attack upon him with an ax by Vernice, his 18-year-old daughter and mother of a baby 18 months old, at their home in the outskirts of Olmsted Tuesday morning, Robert Shaw, Negro, was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital says the Cairo Citizen.

             Joel, 12-year-old son, said his sister had run out into the yard, grabbed up the ax and struck her father after the father had slapped her once, after giving her a “talking to,” because she did not stay home and take care of her baby.  Joel said that his sister had been gone all night, and that he and his father had to care for the baby.  He said his sister was not married.

             After his sister had chopped his father with an ax, Joel said he had ran to the home of Dr. O. Karraker in Olmsted and asked him to come to his father, but that the father had followed and was helped to the doctor’s place before the  doctor could dress and leave on the call.  The doctor then brought Shaw immediately to the hospital here.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Apr 1940:

Mrs. Nannie Higgins Died Wednesday A.M.

             Mrs. Nannie Higgins, widow of the late Thomas Higgins, formerly ___ of the firm of Perks & Higgins, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital, Wednesday morning at 10:50, of ill ____ induced by high blood pressure and was taken to the hospital on ___ay morning when her condition was found to be unsatisfactory.

             Mrs. Higgins, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Perks, came to Mound City from Villa Ridge in the early 1870s.  She was formerly from Petersburg, Ky., where she made her home before going to Villa Ridge.  In 1888 she was married to Thomas Higgins, member of the firm of Perks & Higgins, who preceded her in death 18 years ago.  Mrs. Higgins was a resident of Mound City for many years, where she was prominent and active in the interest of the community.

             She was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church and a former president of the Mound City Woman’s Club.

             She is survived by four nephews, ___ and Harry Perks of this city, ___ Brown of Olive Branch and ___ Perks of Canada; two nieces, Mrs. Clara Bonner of Mounds and Mrs. Minnie Freeze of Natchez, Mississippi; four grand nephews, Lester perks of Cairo, Oran Frederick Perks of New York City, Bobbie and Thomas Marion Perks of this city; and one grandniece, Mrs. Burgess ___er of Mounds; and many other relatives.

             Funeral services will be held this evening (Friday) at 9:00 at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Mounds.  Pallbearers are Carl Bode, Carl McIntire, Sr., C. E. Richey, Danny Finley, __. C. Hunt, Fred Culp, and Albert __kenkamp.
 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. G. W. CHAPMAN SATURDAY

             Mrs. Clara Chapman, age 61, passed away at her home in Mounds Saturday morning at 5 o’clock as the result of injuries received in a fall February 15.

             She is survived by her husband, G. W. Chapman; three sisters, Mrs. James Lacey of Flora, Ill., Mrs. Indiana Bagby of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Cynthia Bass of Los Aninan, Colo.; three brothers, Freeman Inman of Karnak, Norwood Inman of Poplar Bluff, Mo., and Norman Inman of Metropolis, Ill.; and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at the New Hope Baptist Church near Columbia, in Massac County Monday morning at 11 o’clock.  Burial was made beside her mother in the New Hope Cemetery.  James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

SWINGS AX ON FATHER WHEN HE CRITICIZES HER ACTIONS

             Robert Shaw, colored, of Olmsted, had one arm near chopped off by his enraged daughter Tuesday morning.  He had upbraided her for not staying at home and taking care of her baby, which is a year and a half old and had slapped her.  The father was taken to the hospital at Cairo.

 

INJURY FATAL TO BOY

             Lawrence Hurley, 15 years of age, of Karnak, died at the hospital in Cairo Tuesday evening of injuries received a week earlier when roller skating.  He fell very hard, when a wheel came off his skate and his liver was ruptured.  He was not brought to the hospital until a short time before he died.  His mother is Mrs. Bessie Ramsey.

             (The death certificate of Lawrance Hurley, school boy, states that he was born 15 Mar 1925, in Ullin, Ill., the son of Bessie Steers, a native of Olmsted, Ill., died 9 Apr 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Concord Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Apr 1940:

Mother of J. B. Dunivant Dies Sunday in Cairo

             Mrs. N. Hattie Dunn, wife of Dr. J. W. Dunn of 229-6th Street, Cairo, died Sunday afternoon, April 14, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo of cerebral sclerosis.  She had been a hospital patient for more than 12 months.  Her only immediate survivors are her husband and a son, J. B. Dunnivant of Ullin, Ill.

             Funeral services were held at the Cairo Baptist Church Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

             From the Cairo Citizen we take the following sketch of her life.

             “Mrs. Dunn was born at Newbern, Tenn., March 31, 1864.  Her father was William Hampton, a descendant of the famous Hamptons of the Revolutionary and Civil War periods.  Her mother was Mary Craig of the pioneer family of Craigs that settled near Lexington, Ky., while that state was a territory.  Mrs. Dunn and an older brother who died early in life, and a sister, Mrs. Kittel Taylor, late of Rankin, Texas, were the only issues of that union.

             “She was educated in the schools of Newbern, Tenn., and the Peabody Institute of Nashville, Tenn.  After her graduation from the latter college she taught for a number of years at Newbern and at Columbia, Tenn.

             “She and Dr. Dunn were married at Newbern, Jan. 1, 1896, and the first day of September of that year came to Cairo.  In the latter part of 1901 they built the office and residence at 6th Street and Washington Ave., where they have resided ever since.

             “In 1898 she joined the Cairo Baptist Church and lived as a consistent and active member of the same.  She was particularly interested in the work among the children and was superintendent of the children’s division of the Sunday school for 24 years, when she retired on account of failing health.”

             (Her death certificate states that Nancy Hattie Dunn was born 31 Mar 1864, in Newbern, Tenn., the daughter of William Hampton and Mary Craig, died 14 Apr 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the wife of James W. Dunn, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  N. Hattie Dunn 1864-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Albert Spence Dies Saturday at Cairo Hospital

             Mrs. Albert Spence of this city, age 80 years, died Saturday afternoon, April 13, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where she had been a patient for three weeks, following a fall on the steps at her home.

             Only eleven days previous to her death, her husband, Judge William Albert Spence, passed away after a brief illness at the age of 84.

             Mrs. Spence, before her marriage to Mr. Spence, was Mrs. America Eddington of Cairo, mother of Mrs. H. A. Moreland of Cairo.  She also leaves a son, Dr. R. L. Eddington of Lacon.

             Funeral services were held in Cairo Monday morning and burial was made in Woodlawn Cemetery near Mt. Vernon, Illinois.

            

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Apr 1940:

CARD OF THANKS

             We kindly wish to thank our neighbors and friends for their many acts of kindness and sympathy in the death and funeral of our dear mother, Mamie Brown.

             We especially thank the minister, pianist and the quartette for their sympathy, in message and in song, also the casket bearers and those expressing sympathy with flowers.  We sincerely thank you and appreciate all that has been done by everyone.

             May God bless you all.

The Family

 

RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES SATURDAY AFTERNOON

             Mrs. Eddington Spence of Mounds passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

             Mrs. Spence is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Howard H. Moreland of Cairo; a son, Dr. R. L. Eddington of Lecan, Ill.; one granddaughter, Mrs. William B. House of Tionesta, Pa.; a grandson, Elwood Addington of Philadelphia, Pa.; three sisters, Mrs. Lou Rodgers, Mrs. Mellie Lewis and Mrs. Emma Sides, all of Woodlawn, Ill.; three brothers, Robert Lacey of Mt. Vernon, Ill., Charles Lacey of Woodlawn and Jack Lacey of Topeka, Kansas, besides many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Berbling Funeral Home Monday morning at 9 o’clock with Rev. J. Rue Reid of Mounds, officiating.  Immediately following the service the cortege left by automobile for Woodlawn, Ill., where another short service was held at the grave.  Burial was made in the family lot in Woodlawn Cemetery.

             The following friends served as casket bearers:  James Johnson, Roswell Rennie, John Jones, Arthur Thistlewood, Jr., Nell Edwards, and George Smith.

             Berbling Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (J. F. Edington married America E. Lacey on 16 Nov 1878, in Jefferson Co., Ill.  Thompson Lacy married Nancy Reed on 2 Dec 1858, in Jefferson Co., Ill.  R. A. Rogers married Lou Lacey on 23 Jan 1883, in Jefferson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, America Eddington Spence was born 3 Mar 1860, in Woodlawn, Jackson Co., Ill., the daughter of Thompson Lacey, a native of Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill., and Nancy Reed, a native of Woodlawn, Jackson Co., Ill., died 13 Apr 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

WILL IS FILED

             The will of Mrs. Nannie Higgins was filed in county court this week.  It names Tom Boyd as executor to serve without bond and Leslie Perks as the sole beneficiary.  The will was made on January 10, 1939, and was signed by G. A. James and M. C. Hunt.

             No inventory of the estate has been filed, but common report is that Mrs. Higgins has spent most of the fortune that was left her on the death of her husband.

 

Golden Wedding Celebration Tuesday

             Tuesday, April 23, will mark an unusual event in the lives of Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Britton, prominent citizens of this county, when they celebrate their Golden Wedding at the home on the Beech Wood Dairy Farm on the old Villa Ridge Road near Mounds.

             The years have dealt kindly and ___ly with Mr. and Mrs. Britton.  They have arrived at their golden anniversary in vigorous ___ keen and alert mentally and ___ capacity to enjoy life and _____undings almost to its utmost.  Their appearance, their ___ activities, and their unbounded interest indicate that there are many useful years ahead.

             Mr. Britton was born in 1862 at ___rnon, Ohio, and came to _____ as a babe in arms in a covered wagon.  With his five brothers and __o sisters, he grew up on the farm in a double log house, so com___ for that time, at Mason, in Effingham County.  His education ___ed of 12 years in public schools off and on, as he said, and nearly as much off as on.

             In 1883, when he was 21 years of age, he moved with his parents and brothers and sisters to a farm about ___ and a half southwest of Pulaski where general farm work was ____ on and all hands turned to their chores.  Women were not always ___spared from field work or ___ about the barn in those days.  ____ hand labor and hard for the ___ pieces of machinery farmers now have were not present then, ___ not far from the days of ___ing wheat nor long after the ___g of the mowing machine.

             Mrs. Britton was Miss Alda Gould, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Solon Gould and was born at Bone Gap, ____ in 1865.  Her father was a soldier in the Civil War and fought for three years in the army.  He was also a school teacher and his ____ was a school teacher, which helps to explain the school teaching train that broke out in the third generation.  They had met at school before the war, but when the troubled days were over, they settled down on the farm where their family of four children were born.

             Miss Gould was sent to McKendree College at Lebanon to finish her education, and this, perhaps as much as anything, might be called the thing that started her towards her romance.  For she then decided to go to Northwestern University and there boarded with Mrs. J. W. Britton, a cousin, and also the wife of the Rev. J. W. Britton, a brother to E. G. Britton.

             The kindly cousin could introduce her to a brother-in-law with a great deal of ease when Mr. Britton had come to Evanston to visit.  That was Christmas, 1888 and in April 1889, just a year and four months away, the romance was turning into a wedding.

             The wedding day was the 23rd day of April.  The day before, Mr. Britton was on his way to Albion to get the marriage license when the train ran off the track and it was midnight when he got in.  That required fast thinking.  He routed the county clerk from bed and was on his way back to arrive in time to play the part of groom at the wedding.  It did not keep him from being nervous about getting back in time as the hours sped by.

             For a short time after their marriage, they lived with Mr. Britton’s parents at Pulaski and then moved to a farm about a half mile west of Mounds, where they remained for seven years.  Three children were born during this time, Henry, Ethel and Ralph.  Henry died when he was one year of age and Ralph when he was 11.  In January 1898 they moved to their present home, Beech Wood Dairy Farm and there two boys were born, Virgil and Ernest.  But Virgil died when two years of age, so that only Ralph and Ethel survive the five children.

             Their farm first had 80 acres, but it now covers 372 acres, which indicates the industry and business ability of the couple.

             In speaking of his success as a dirt farmer, Mr. Britton places much of it to the growing of alfalfa on hillsides.  Before this, it had been grown on the level places, but he raised it on hillsides and it furnished hay for his growing dairy herd of fine cattle.  C. Hopkins, dean of the College of Agriculture, University of Illinois, made a trip to the farm to see what was then considered a wonder.

             The dairy wagon from this farm used to make its rounds in Mounds and for 37 years it did not miss a day on those rounds.  In 1927 they entered into a contract with the Midwest Corporation for the milk, and have not since retailed their product.  In the early days Mr. Britton once refused to sell a man a quart of milk.  It was gallon sales in those days.

             There were four houses in Mounds when the Brittons first moved there.  They have seen great changes in the span of years—automobiles, electric lights, tractors, hard roads, furnaces and bathrooms, and such things as high schools and motion pictures.

             Their activity in the community has been very great.  Both have been active in the Methodist church of Mounds and both always were interested in the betterment of the community.  Their two children have grown and Ernest, former principal at Mound City, now is superintendent of the city schools at Effingham.  Mrs. Hartman, county superintendent for two terms, is now principal of the grade schools of Mounds.

             The Hartmans took into their home a seven-year-old niece, Kathleen Pifer of Virginia and after finishing McKendree College, she married Rev. Hugh McNelly and is now in New York State.

             This, in short, is some of the history of this interesting couple who will meet many friends next Tuesday afternoon at their home and again at the Methodist church that night at a dinner and vesper service.  Life has had its joys and sorrows.  They have seen death in their home and have been broken-hearted.  They have lived to see a grown grandson and one pushing upward.  They have experienced the joy of a happy home of work and toil well and honestly done and have maintained a close relation with the church of their choice.  They have exerted a good influence all around them and have dwelt in peace and charity with their neighbors.

             Their friends and neighbors will speak to them kind words Tuesday and the day will be happy for them.  It will be their golden wedding day—50 years, and a testimony that such homes and such people are the salt of the earth which has not lost its savor.

(Accompanying the article is a four-column photograph of “The Britton Family Group.”  The caption reads:  This is the family of Mr. and Mrs. E.G. Britton with their son Ernest, and daughter, Mrs. Ethel Hartman.  Between them is their grandson.  Standing is M. M. Hartman, his son, Miles, and Mrs. Ernest Britton.  Solon H. Gould married Laura L. Thrall on 3 Apr 1862, in Edwards Co., Ill.  Solon H. Gould, 24, a native of Edwards Co., Ill., laborer, of Shawneetown, Ill., married, dark complexion, gray eyes, dark hair, 5’9”, enlisted as a private in Co. B, 18th Illinois Infantry, on 28 May 1861, in Anna, Ill., and was transferred to the Invalid Corps 9 Oct 1865.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Apr 1940:

Pioneer Mounds Couple Marks Golden Wedding

             Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Britton, at their beautiful dairy farm, Beechwood, near here, celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary Tuesday, April 23, surrounded by their family and a host of well-wishing friends.

             From 2:30 to 5 o’clock in the afternoon a stream of cars wended its way to their home bearing guests from far and wide to greet the worthy couple of this auspicious day.  The house was filled with flowers and in the late afternoon the electric lights which had reached this spacious dwelling, through rural electrification only last week, added their cheering rays to the already brilliant scene.

             Mrs. Lucy Rife Prindle who was present at the wedding reception given 50 years ago in Pulaski by Mr. Britton’s parents, assisted in receiving the guests as also did Miss Edith Gould, sister of Mrs. Britton.

             In the dining room the table centerpiece consisted of a lovely, large, golden wedding cake of three tiers topped with a bride and groom, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Wiedemann.  On either side was a yellow vase filled with gorgeous yellow roses.  Punch and cookies were served by Dean Britton, Lois Fisher, Harold Crippen and Harold Vick.  One room contained many lovely gifts from admiring relatives and friends.

             At six o’clock, the Methodist church dining room was the scene of another gathering in their honor, given by the Ladies’ and the Men’s Bible classes of the church.  A covered dish luncheon had been prepared and all relatives and close friends of Mr. and Mrs. Britton had been invited to partake of this delicious repast.

             The climax of the day came at 7:30 o’clock when, in the auditorium of the church, a vesper service was held.  Flowers were everywhere and the church had never found more inviting.

             The program opened with a cornet solo by Edward Gould of St. Louis, nephew of Mrs. Britton.

             Mrs. B. A. Stalcup, representing the Cheerful Workers’ Class, presented to the church in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Britton, the Christian flag, borne by Miss Vivian Reid.  The National flag was brought forward to flank the pulpit on the opposite side and with fitting words Mrs. Stalcup expressed devotion and service in the twain.

             Miss Sara Struckmeyer, accompanied by Miss Evelyn Simpson, delighted her hearers with the song, “Because.”

             The Rev. Mr. Virgil Gould of St. Louis, a retired Methodist minister and brother of Mrs. Britton, read an original poem, which he had written expressly for the occasion and had dedicated to the honored couple.

             Mrs. C. H. Bauer, in behalf of the church membership, presented a beautiful floor lamp to Mr. and Mrs. Britton in an appropriate talk, Mrs. Britton responding in like manner.

             The Rev. E. B. Phillips of Murphysboro, a former pastor of the local church, gave a brief talk, in the absence of the present pastor, the Rev. J. Rue Reid, who is attending General Conference.

             Miss Sara Struckmeyer, Miss Lois Fisher and Ray Lentz, accompanied by Miss Evelyn Simpson, sang a trio.

             J. C. Mench, for many years the efficient secretary of the Mounds Y. M. C. A., which is now no longer functioning, led in prayer.  This was especially fitting as Mr. Britton had been a member of the Board of Directors of the Y. M. C. A. for 12 years.

             The closing number was a lovely solo by Ray Lentz, “My Peace I Leave with You,” with Miss Simpson at the piano.

             The enjoyment and success of this day’s festivities were largely due to Mrs. Ethel B. Hartman and Ernest R. Britton, the two living children of the home who spared no time and effort to make this golden milestone a happy one and a time long to be remembered and cherished by all who had any small part therein.

             Mr. and Mrs. Britton are both of English descent.  Mr. Britton’s grandfather came to this country direct from England.  Mr. Britton was born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, in 1861 and came with his parents, John and Harriett Beaney Britton to Mason, Effingham County, Illinois, when only three months old.  The trip was made in a covered wagon.  This family lived 19 years in the county on rented farms.  Through the late Congressman N. B. Thistlewood and his brothers, John and David, who visited in Effingham County, the Brittons were influenced to come to Pulaski County where they purchased a 200-acre farm west of Pulaski.

             Mrs. Britton’s recorded ancestry has been traced back to Thomas Gould of Bovington, England, who was born about 1455 and died Sept. 28, 1520.  Thomas Gould’s great-great-great-grandson, Zaccheus Gould emigrated to Massachusetts Colony and settled at Ipswich, later Topsfield, in 1635.  Solon Gould, father of Alta Gould, who later became Mrs. Britton, was the 13th generation from Thomas Gould.

             The romance of Edward G. and Alta Gould Britton started in December 1888 at Evanston where Miss Gould was attending Northwestern University and living in the home of the Rev. and Mrs. Joe Britton and where young E. G. went to visit.  In April 23, 1890, their marriage was solemnized and they came to Pulaski and three months later to Mounds (then Burkeville) moving to the Dan Hogan farm just across from what is now the Wheeler farm west of town.  There were only four houses here at that time, one a hotel that housed the workmen who were building the Illinois Central Roundhouse.  Mule teams pulled the cars on the short line between here and Mound City.

             Mr. and Mrs. Britton started housekeeping with the sum of $40.00 using $17.00 of that amount for a cook stove and kitchen utensils.  Out of the $40.00, two and a half dollars were saved for living expenses during the first month,

             Mr. Britton has farmed with oxen, mules, horses and tractors and the home has been lighted with candles, coal oil lamps, acetylene gas and electricity.

             In 1895, they purchased their first 80 acres of their present 400-acre farm.  They developed a dairy farm and built their huge dairy farm which accommodates 80 cows.  A milking machine was added to their equipment and for many years a regular milk route was covered twice daily in Mounds by the Britton milk wagon a picture of which may be seen in this paper.

             Mrs. Britton did her full share in the work of dairying and also in poultry raising as is evidenced in the picture of her also shown.

             The Britton Brothers owned the first store in Mounds, which was located on the lot now occupied by J. J. Blum Department Store.

             Mr. and Mrs. Britton have been active in all the community and church affairs.  Mr. Britton is a charter member of the Farm Bureau, a member of the first Board of Education of District 34, which established Mounds Township High school, a member of the American Dairyman’s Association and he was made a Master Farmer of the State of Illinois in 1930.  He has been active in all the work of the Methodist Church.

             Mrs. Britton has served in many capacities in the work of the local Methodist Church and the Missionary Society and as District President of the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society.  She is a charter member of the Mounds Woman’s Club.  She is a graduate of McKendree College and taught five years in Edwards County where her father settled and where she was born and reared.  She has been a competent helpmate to her husband in all his endeavors.

             Five children blessed this home, Henry, Ethel, Ralph, Virgil and Ernest.  Ethel, now Mrs. Milton M. Hartman, and Ernest survive.  There are two grandchildren, Miles Hartman, a senior at the University of Illinois, and Dean Britton, nine years old.  Ernest married Miss Martha Hughes of Robinson, Illinois.  Their home is in Effingham, where Ernest is head of the public schools.  Mrs. Hartman is principal of the Thistlewood Grade school of Mounds and a former county superintendent of schools in Pulaski County.

             Mr. and Mrs. Britton have the best wishes of the entire community and many more happy years together.

             (Published with the article are photographs labeled “The First Store in Mounds,” “Mr. Britton and His Milk Wagon,” and “Mrs. Britton on the Farm.”—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             I wish to thank the friends of my mother, Mrs. America Spence for the kindness and attention given her during her illness and the thoughtfulness shown following her death.  All your kind deeds will be gratefully remembered.

Mrs. H. A. Moreland

 

Merchant of Mounds Dies Early Friday Morning

             William C. V. Prather, a merchant in Mounds for many years, died Friday morning, April 19, at one o’clock, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ocean McKenzie, following a short illness.  While he had not been in robust health for some time, Mr. Prather was able to attend to business until a few days before his death.

             Mr. Prather had conducted a confectionery store here for 27 years.  One of his early locations was at the corner of Oak and Thistlewood, a two-story frame building just across the street from the corner lot north of the present city hall.  Later he was located in the Windland Building just north of Wood’s Drug Store on Front Street and, for the past three years or since the flood, he has occupied one of the Light buildings on Front Street.

             Surviving are one son, Joyce Prather of Cairo; one daughter, Mrs. Ocean McKenzie; and one granddaughter, Sylvia Patricia McKenzie of Mounds.  Mrs. Prather passed away on Nov. 22, 1922.  A son, William, who was in the U. S. Navy, also preceded him in death.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church with the pastor, Rev. J. Rue Reid, officiating.  The deceased had been a devout member of the church for many years, having transferred his membership here from the Methodist Church at Brazil, Ind., his former home.

             Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski by the side of his wife.  Pallbearers were Richard Copeland, Herman Peak, Arthur Tucker, Earl Sitton, Henry Gunn and Ward Garrett.  James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski, Ill., reads:  William C. Prather 1861-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 May 1940:

Tornado Tuesday Eve Sweeps Country Surrounding Mounds

Douglass Grade School Building Unroofed and Badly Damaged

             A tornado which barely missed the main part of Mounds swept through this section at about 5:15 Tuesday afternoon.  Rain and hail preceded the twister, which suddenly loomed up in the sky just over the old Illinois Central Railroad yards as a huge black cloud with a swirling tail that descended earthward.  There was a roaring noise as if a dozen fast trains were passing through at one time.

             The dense cloud lifted a little and floated northward, barely missing the main section of the town, but unroofing the Douglass (colored) grade school building on N. Blanche Ave., causing a loss of several thousand dollars.  One corner of Britt’s garage was also damaged.  It then dipped to strike North Mounds, where it completely demolished more than twenty homes of negro residents, from there tearing its way through a valley just northeast, topping or uprooting all trees as it crossed to U. S. Highway 51, where it tore off roofs, wrecked houses and barns and uprooted orchards in its path.  Just like a roaring monster it seemed to take a direct path down the black top between highways 51 and 37, leveling the old Crain homestead, now the Swoboda property occupied by Ralph Cruse, practically demolishing the Connell home on the Connell Fruit Farm, the Tally residence, the large residence of Forrest Nixon and many others with their barns and outbuildings.

             Not known here at the immediate time, the tornado had struck Cache as it whirled in from Missouri and had destroyed that village then swept across the river Cache and leveled the farm homes southwest of here including those of Lawrence Smith, Vernon Martin, John Sheets, Edgar Koonce, Fred Butler, Wallace Albritton, colored, Manuel Jackson and Milton Shaffner, also colored.

             I. C. employees driving home from Cairo junction say that the tornado had three tails or funnels hanging down from the main cloud.

             North of Mounds on the old Villa Ridge road the Stone Fisher residence was completely demolished.  Mrs. Fisher was sitting in a Morris chair in the living room with two children on her lap.  The next thing she realized she was sitting in the yard in the same chair with one child still on her lap.  Mrs. Fisher is one of twenty or more victims of the storm who are patients in St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.  Her nose was broken and she suffered other face and head injuries.  Her 11-year-old daughter, Betty, suffered an injured back.

             Mrs. Lloyd Grey whose home just across the highway from Bellview was flattened to the ground, suffered a broken leg and a badly lacerated foot and is in a serious condition.

             Mrs. Anna Love of North Mounds, colored, wife of Sam Love, was probably fatally injured, having suffered a fractured skull.

             Scores saved themselves by going to their cellars.  This was true of most of the residents in the houses along the blacktop road.  Mrs. Forrest Nixon was hit by a window frame and injured after going to the basement.

             The Christian church near America, an old landmark, was completely wrecked.

             The tornado continued on east, crossing the Ohio at Golconda and going on into Kentucky.

             This is the second tornado to strike this section, the other one having struck here on May 30, 1917.

             The Village of Pulaski was severely damaged.  Homes and barns were demolished and some livestock killed, in a second storm which hit the place about six o’clock.  The farm home of Mr. and Mrs. Olan Parker, the latter formerly Miss Mildred Melton of Mounds, was wrecked, also the barn and its contents including a fine span of horses.

             (The death certificate of Anna E. Love states that she was born 15 Oct 1877, in Paris, Tenn., the daughter of John Barr and Margaret Howard, died 6 May 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Sam Love, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 May 1940:

S. I. N. U. FACULTY MEMBER IS KILLED BY HIS WIFE

             Lewis E. Peterson, head of the industrial arts department at Carbondale Normal, was killed by his wife on Monday night.  The circumstances caused the arrest of his wife, Maude, who posted a $10,000 bond.

             Peterson was dozing in the chair at the time and called aid before collapsing by using the telephone.  His wife fled from the house, according to her own statement, to the home of her mother, returned, hid the pistol under a pile of coal and was there when aid came.  She said that the gun accidentally discharged and that she had bought it because of prowlers only a week earlier.

             There are several children in the family, all grown and away.  Mrs. Peterson it is said, has been treated for mental derangement and released, but lately, her health was not good.

             Authorities, apparently, are puzzled as to find the motive, if murder, and cannot understand her actions, if it were an accident.           

             (His death certificate states that Louis Christian Petersen, teacher, was born 23 Mar 1878, in Thisted, Denmark, died 30 Apr 1940, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., the husband of Maude Petersen, and was buried at Carbondale, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH CLAIMS HIRAM HINKLE

             Hiram Hinkle, age 85, well known and prosperous farmer of Dongola, passed away at Hale-Willard Hospital in Anna Tuesday morning at 2:30 o’clock.  He had been a patient at the hospital for the past few days.

             The body has been removed from the Elmer J. Ford Home to the home of his son, Harvey, near Dongola where Mr. Hinkle had made his home for the past several years.

             Funeral services were held at the Mt. Olive Baptist Church near Dongola, Wednesday afternoon, at 2 o’clock with the pastor, Rev. C. W. Penrod, assisted by Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Interment was made in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

             Mr. Hinkle is survived by three children, Harvey E. and Mrs. Vesta Otrich of Dongola and Homer of Taylorville; two sisters, Mrs. Maria Douglas and Mrs. Edna Keller of Dongola; four grandchildren.  Ford Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Hiram Hinkle, 23, of Dongola, Ill., married Mary P. Richardson, 17, of Dongola, Ill., on 15 Jul 1877, at the house of W. W. Karraker in Union Co., Ill.  Phillip Hinkle, Jr., married Sarah Keller on 22 Sep 1853, in Union Co., Ill.  Jacob Douglas, 20, farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the son of Alexander Douglas and Sarah Garrott, married on 25 Apr 1878, in Union Co., Ill., with the consent of his guardian, Henry Keller, Mariah E. Hinkle, 18, of Dongola, born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Philip Hinkle and Sarah Keller.  The death certificate of Hiram Hinkle, farmer, states that he was born 30 Jun 1854, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Phillip Hinkle and Sarah Keller, natives of Illinois, died 30 Apr 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., widower of Mary Hinkle, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Father Hiram Hinkle June 30, 1854 Apr. 30, 1940 Mother Mary P. Hinkle Sept. 10, 1859 Jan. 2, 1932 Son Uri O. Hinkle June 15, 1878 Apr. 1, 1893 Daughter Bertha L. Hinkle  Nov. 8, 1882 Jan. 26, 1896.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 May 1940:

First Death from Tornado Injuries Occurs Monday

             Annie E. Love (col.), age 63 years, wife of Samuel Love, died Monday night, May 6, at St. Mary’s Annex, Cairo, a victim of injuries received in the tornado of Tuesday, April 30, when the Love home was destroyed.  She was the first in this section of Illinois to die from the effects of the tornado.

             Sustaining a skull fracture and other injuries, Mrs. Love  was unconscious most of the time and physicians had little hope at any time for her recovery.

             Houses on both sides of the street in North Mounds where the Loves lived were demolished and few traces left of any habitation except the Ben Clemons place where two back lean-to rooms were left.

             Thirteen people who were injured in the tornado remain in the hospital in Cairo.

 

Joe Pelley of Illmo, Mo., Victim of Recent Tornado

             Joe Pelley of Illmo, Mo., a victim of the storm of April 30, was buried in the Anna Cemetery.

             Joe Pelley, president of the Association of American Railroads of New York, a former resident of Anna, was there to attend the funeral of his brother.

             (His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Joe Pelley May 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John D. Strohm

             John D. Strohm of Granite City, a former resident of Cairo, died suddenly, Thursday, May 2, at  home, and was brought to Mound City to the James Funeral Home.

             Surviving are his wife, the former Miss Minnie Boyd of Mound City; two brothers, W. G. Strohm of St. Louis and Ed Strohm of Johnstown, Ohio; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Brehm of Philadelphia, Pa., and Mrs. Frank Paul of Carlyle, Pa.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock at the Congregational church in Mound City, with Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo, officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.  Pallbearers were George Eubanks of East St. Louis, Hardin Jackson of Granite City, Ernest Crain of Villa Ridge, L. B. Armstrong of Mounds, Jesse Beadles and Charles Hunley of Cairo.  All of his immediate relatives except one sister were present at the funeral, also many friends from various places.

             (His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  John Davidson Strohm 1883-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Paul E. King

             Paul E. King of East St. Louis died Friday night, May 3, in the Illinois Central Hospital, Chicago, where he had been taken for treatments.

             Mr. King was reared in Mounds and was the brother of Mrs. Nellie Robert and Mrs. Otto Moore of this place.  He is also survived by his wife, Mrs. Florence Bird King.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church of Mounds Sunday afternoon at two o’clock with Rev. H. E. Lockhard officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, Paul Ellsworth King, clerk, of East St. Louis, St. Clair Co., Ill., was born 17 Aug 1898, in Mound City, Ill., the son of George King, a native of Union City, Tenn., and Armelia Smith, a native of Kentucky, died 4 May 1940, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., wife of Florence King, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  A marker in Mound City National Cemetery reads:  Paul E. King Illinois Pvt. 1 Cl. Evac. Hosp. 19 May 4, 1940.  His interment record states he enlisted 17 Mar 1918, and was honorably discharged 18 Aug 1919.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 May 1940:

DEATH CLAIMS JOHN D. STROHM

             The body of John D. Strohm, a former resident of Cairo, who passed away suddenly at his home in Granite City, Ill., Thursday at noon, arrived at the James Funeral Home in this city Saturday afternoon.

             Funeral services were held at the funeral home Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Cairo, officiating.

             Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Pallbearers were Leonard B. Armstrong of Mounds, Ernest Crain of Villa Ridge, Jessie A. Beedles and two friends of the deceased from Granite City, who accompanied the body to Mound City.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Storm Victim Died Monday Morning

             Out of 18 tornado victims taken to St. Mary’s Hospital from Pulaski County and from the Bertrand and Charleston areas, one victim died, Annie E. Love, 63, Negro woman of North Mounds.  A child three months old of Charleston, Mo., remains in a critical condition.  The others are expected to recover.

             Mrs. Love died early Monday night of a skull fracture she received when the tornado hit her home.  Her husband, who ran outside and clung to a peach tree, was unhurt, although covered by wreckage.  The child, Elsie Mae Johnson, daughter of Mrs. Opal Johnson, received severe burns when their trailer was turned over in Missouri by the tornado and the coals in the fire fell out of the stove onto the child.

             Besides injuring a great many people and doing much damage, the storm did strange things, such as moving a well belonging to Ernie Parker about six inches to the side.  The top of the concrete collar extends about two feet below the surface of the ground and was shoved out.  It was reported that a stick was run though the side of a hog on Carl Swoboda’s farm north of Mounds.

 

GEORGE P. BIRD

             George P. Bird, Wetaug, was born in Ballard County, Ky., September 29, 1860, and passed away April 30, 1940.  Age 79 years, 7 months and one day.

             He and Mrs. Bird were married in Mound City May 4, 1880.  To this union three children were born, Ward and Arthur, deceased, and Miss Genevieve Bird of Wetaug, who survives.  He also leaves his wife, one granddaughter, Mrs. Lewis Dipert, Centralia, Ill.; also one sister, Mrs. A. G. Bennett, Madison, Wis., and many friends.  Mr. Bird was a retired merchant.

             Services were held at the home in Wetaug Friday morning at 11 o’clock.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiated.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiated.  Interment was made in the Lorimer Cemetery, Cape Girardeau, Mo.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that George P. Bird was born about 1861, the son of John Bird and Virginia J. Wood, and died 30 Apr 1940, in Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Eliza A. Bird.—Darrel Dexter)

 

RESIDENT OF KARNAK DIES

             Mrs. Minnie Briley, age 58, passed away at her home in Karnak Monday morning.  Although Mrs. Briley had been ill for several weeks, death was unexpected.

             Mrs. Briley is survived by her husband, Sam Briley of Karnak; two children, Mrs. Ruth Staton and Willis Briley of Karnak; and one sister, Mrs. Effie Reid, also of Karnak.

             Funeral services were held in the Baptist church in Karnak Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Atherton of Dongola officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Samuel Scottland Briley married Minnie Belle Havens on 28 Jul 1897, in Massac Co., Ill.  Jeremiah Havens married Sebrina E. Anderson on 1 May 1873, in Massac Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Minnie Bell Briley was born 22 Feb 1881, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Jerry Havens and Malwina Anderson, died 6 May 1940, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of S. S. Briley, and was buried in Grand Chain cemetery.  Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Minnie B. Briley 1882-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Among those from a distance attending the funeral services for John D. Strohm at the Congregational church at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon were:  Brothers W. G. Strohm and wife of St. Louis, Ed Strohm and wife of Johnstown, Ohio; a nephew, Lewis C. Strohm and wife of St. Louis; sister, Mrs. Mary Brehm of Philadelphia; Mr. and Mrs. Harden Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Minnick, L. C. Koltenback and wife, Mesdames Lynch, McGraw and Kirby, all of Granite City; Mr. and Mrs. George Eubanks and son from East St. Louis; Mrs. Frank Shepherd of Dyersburg, Tenn.

 

Claude Crain of St. Louis was in this city Sunday to attend the funeral of John Strohm.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 May 1940:

GIRL DIES OF BURNS

             Ernestine Walton, 10-year-old Negro girl, of Pulaski, died at St. Mary’s annex, Cairo, Monday night from accidental burns received when her dress caught fire at her home at Pulaski Monday morning.

             (Her death certificate states that Ernestine Walton was born 10 Jun 1930, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of George Walton and Alice Tharp, natives of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 13 May 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Henderson Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Sawyer Dies Early Tuesday Morning at St. Mary’s

             John F. Sawyer, well-known resident of Pulaski County, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, at 1:10 o’clock Tuesday morning, May 14, at the age of 81 years.  Mr. Sawyer had been in failing health for several years and had been a patient at St. Mary’s previously, but had improved.  Growing worse again he had been taken to the hospital only on Monday evening.

             Mr. Sawyer had been a resident of Villa Ridge for 64 years and had been employed as sexton of the Villa Ridge cemetery for more than forty years.

             His only surviving relatives are nieces, nephews and cousins.  Three cousins, Mrs. William Buckles of Villa Ridge, Dr. Frances Titus of Mounds and Seth R. Titus of Topeka, Kan., are the only relatives in the Middle West.

             The body was taken to the James Funeral Home in this city and on Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock funeral services were held in the Villa Ridge cemetery with the Rev James Tucker of Thebes officiating.  Interment was made in a vault Mr. Sawyer had built several years ago.

             (His death certificate states that John F. Sawyer was born 29 Oct 1858, in Coshocton, Ohio, the son of Joseph Sawyer, a native of England, and Frances C. Titus, a native of Mounds, Ill., died 14 May 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John F. Sawyer 1858-1940 Lydia A. dau. of P. G. & R. Fahr Jan. 7, 1875 July 6, 1875.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. E. Crippen Dies Wednesday, Age 76 Years

             J. E. Crippen who for the past 5 years has made his home in Mounds with his son, O. H. Crippen, died Wednesday at the age of 76.

             “Uncle Jim” as he was usually called, was well known in the county as well as in Mounds.  He is survived by his wife; two sons, Wiley of St. Louis and O. H. of Mounds; one daughter, Miss Bertha, of Texas; a brother, Henry Crippen of Ullin and a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services will be held today (Friday) at 2:00 p.m. at Rosehill Cemetery in Pulaski, J. T. Ryan, undertaker, in charge.

             (James E. Crippen married Isabell Eastwood on 18 Aug 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate of James Edward Crippen, fruit shipper, states he was born 8 May 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill., died 15 May 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Vina Crippen, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 May 1940:

JOHN F. SAWYER

             John F. Sawyer, age 81 passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Tuesday morning at 1:10 o’clock.  Mr. Sawyer, a well-known resident of Southern Illinois, had been in failing health for some time and had been removed to the hospital Monday evening.

             He had been a resident of Villa Ridge for 64 years and had been employed as sexton of Villa Ridge cemetery for over 40 years.

             His only surviving relatives are ___ nephews and cousins.  Three ___ Mary E. Buckles of Villa Ridge, Dr. Franklin C. Titus of ___s, and Seth I. Titus of Topeka, Kansas., are the only relatives in the Midwest.

             Funeral services were held at the Villa Ridge cemetery yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. ___r of Thebes officiating.  Interment was made in the vault Mr. ___r prepared a number of years with G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

FALL OR THROWN FROM BRIDGE FATAL TO MAN

             Herschel Johnsan, 35 years of age, was instantly killed when he either jumped or fell or was thrown from a car driven by Harold Weigland on Route 3 on the long bridge over Lake Creek north of Cache.

             Both men were from Murphysboro and were with their wives.  It was Sunday morning about 6 a.m.  The car skidded on the bridge and Johnson jumped or was thrown out of the car and landed on the ground about 15 feet below.  His skull was fractured.  Others in the car were shaken and bruised as the car skidded from one side of the bridge to the other. It was a sad ending of a day of intended to be pleasure.

             (His death certificate states that Herschel V. Johnson, military field auditor, of Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill., was born 22 Aug 1900, in Farmington, Ill., the son of Herschel V. Johnson and Essa Russell, died 12 May 1940, in Road District 7, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Madeline Johnson, and was buried in Peoria Cemetery in Peoria, Ill.  His marker in Parkview Cemetery in Peoria reads:  Hershel V. Johnson Jr. 1900-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LLOYD S. HOUCHIN

             Lloyd S. Houchin, age 46, died suddenly at his home in Osceola, Ark., Tuesday evening about 5:00 o’clock.  The body was removed to James Funeral Home in this city.

             Mr. Houchin is survived by his wife, Edna, who is confined to the home of her sister, Mrs. Carson at Ullin, following an operation at St. Mary’s Hospital.  Three sons, Kenneth, who is with his mother at the home of his aunt; Curtis of Dayton, Ohio; Wilbert of Louisville, Ky., and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Houchin of Lawrenceburg, Ky.  Funeral services will be held today (Friday) at 2:00 o’clock at the Olmsted Methodist church with Rev. Beatty officiating.  Interment will be made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted.  G. A. James Funeral Service will be in charge of arrangements.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1917 in Jessamine Co., Ky., Lloyd S. Houchin lived at High Bridge, Ky., and stated he was born 18 Jan 1895, in Lawrenceburg, Ky., and had a wife and two children.  According to the Arkansas Death Index, Lloyd S. Houchin died 14 May 1940, in Mississippi Co., Ark.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FRANK CUNDALL

             Word has been received of the death of Frank Cundall of Chesterfield, Ill., age 51, husband of the former Miss Zella Caster, of this city.  Mr. Cundall has been in failing health for some time, but had become serious in the next three weeks when he was removed to St. John’s Hospital in Springfield.  Mr. Cundall held the position as cashier in the First State Bank in Chesterfield.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 May 1940:

Mrs. W. H. Leidigh Dies Monday in Gulfport, Miss.

             Mrs. Alice Sarber Leidigh, wife of W. Harry Leidigh, of Gulfport, Miss., died at her home there Monday morning, May 20, following a long illness.

             The body was brought Tuesday night to Villa Ridge, the former home of the family, and taken to the home of the Misses Minnie and Maggie Leidigh.  Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Villa Ridge Community Church with the Rev. James Tucker of Thebes, formerly of Villa Ridge, officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.

             Mrs. Leidigh is survived by her husband and two daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Ramsey of Biloxi, Miss., and Mrs. Frances Simmers of Boston; a sister, Mrs. C. K. Ball of East Orange, N. J.; and a brother, John Sarber of Topeka, Kan.; and two grandchildren.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 May 1940:

JAKE OLIVER

             Jake Oliver, age 64, lifelong resident of this city, died suddenly of a heart attack last Friday morning at his home on Railroad Street.  He is survived by his wife; one sister, Mary Modglin, Unity; a daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Jobe of St. Louis; four stepchildren, Howard Parker of Foley, Mo., Mrs. Clinton Russell of Valley Recluse, Leslie Parker of Mound City, Mrs. Myrtle Rice, also of this city; and many nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church in Mound City, Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Earl Harp officiating.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Jake Nathaniel Oliver, mill laborer, was born 2 Jun 1875, in Berkley, Ky., died 17 May 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Dora M. Oliver, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  His Social Security death claim gives his birth place as Burkesville, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AMOS D. CLARDIE

             Amos Daniel Clardie, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Amos Clardie, passed away at the home of his parents in Mound City Friday evening at the age of nine months and 26 days.  He had been ill only one day.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by two sisters, Romoni Joy and Marylin Joan; and his maternal and paternal grandparents.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church in this city Sunday morning at 10 o’clock with Rev. Fred Harpo officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate states Amos Daniel Clardie was born 21 Jul 1939, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Amos Clardie, a native of Anna, Ill., and Virginia Parker, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 17 May 1940, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

UNCLE JIM IS DEAD

             J. E. Crippen, familiar figure around Pulaski and around the courthouse at Mound City, died last week on Wednesday at the home of his son in Mounds at the age of 76.  He had been in failing health for some time and had not made any calls at the courthouse.

             Uncle Jim was justice of the peace for many years and held other offices in the road district or village.  He was quite well known over the county.

             Funeral services were held Friday at the Rosehill Cemetery.  He is survived by O.H. of Mounds, Miss Bertha of Texas and Henry Crippen, a brother, of Ullin.

 

Golden Wedding Anniversary for Easterdays

             Saturday, May 25, will mark the Golden Wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Easterday, prominent residents of Mound City.

             Mr. and Mrs. Easterday have been residents of this city for 48 years of their married life, living the other two years in Cairo.  They are outstanding citizens and prominent in numerous organization.

             Mr. Easterday has been connected with the courthouse for the past 52 years.  Mrs. Easterday is a graduate of the Mound City Community High School and is only one living out of a class of three.  The high school where Mrs. Easterday attended was located in the old fire house on Main Street where the band stand is now.  Graduation exercises were held in the city hall, which was where the Memorial Park is now located.

             Mr. Easterday was born in 1866 in Vandalia, Ill., the only son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Easterday.  He received eight years of his education at Vandalia.  His father was in the undertaking business.  At the age of 13, Mr. Easterday with his father, as his mother had died some years before, came to Cairo where his father entered into the abstract business, and Mr. Easterday attended school for two years.  It was at this time that Mr. Easterday first entered into the abstract business, following in his father’s footsteps.  At the age of 23 he was married to Miss Bertie Kennedy.

             Mrs. Easterday was born near Villa Ridge, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Kennedy.  Mr. Kennedy was a former Civil War veteran.  His occupation consisted of farming and mill work.  Mrs. Easterday was raised by her grandmother, Mrs. Ruth Kennedy, as her mother died when she was but an infant.  In 1880 Mrs. Easterday with her aunt, Mrs. Anne Painter, now Mrs. A. Pearce of St. Louis, came to Mound City in a “mule car” operated by Leslie Perks to make their home in the jail house as Mr. Painter was deputy sheriff.  One year after her graduation, Mrs. Easterday was married in her aunt’s home in this city.  The wedding was performed by Rev. John Pearce of the Methodist Church.  Witnesses at the wedding are all living in St. Louis now with the exception of one, who died some years ago.

             It was the custom at this time to have your home fully furnished before marriage.  And so, according to custom, Mr. and Mrs. Easterday too had their home, which was located in Cairo, furnished.

             After living in Cairo for several years, where Mr. Easterday was employed, the couple moved to this city where they have made their home ever since.

             A son, Floyd, was born to this couple in 1891, but passed away in March 1915, a young man, well liked and beginning his career.

             Mr. Easterday has been president of District 15 Grade school Board for the past 15 years.  In January, 1888, he was appointed deputy circuit clerk by B. L. Ulen, which he held for 15 years.  He was later elected circuit clerk and held this office for 20 years.  Mr. Easterday is a member of the Odd Fellows, Knights Pythias, Masons, and the only member of the Knight Templars living in this city.

             Mrs. Easterday has for many years been president of the Woman’s Club and is a member of the Eastern Star.  She has always been active in civic interest.  Both are members of the Methodist Church.

             The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Easterday wish them much success and happiness on this great event, their Golden Anniversary.  The celebration will be very quiet and aside from a few messages and calls is to pass quietly.

 

HAROLD DENFIP

             Harold Denfip, age 19, of near Olive Branch, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital last Friday morning about 1:15 following a short illness.

             He is survived by his mother, Mrs. John Bishop; two half-sisters, Grace and Irene Bishop; two half-brothers, James and Elijah Bishop; two great uncles, Levy and Frank Denfip, all of Olive Branch; four uncles, five aunts, besides many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Assembly of God church in Olive Branch Sunday at 2 p.m. with Rev. Ray Hall officiating.  Burial was made in Mt. Zion Cemetery.  Berbling Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Harold Denfip, farmer, states he was born 1 Sep 1920, in Ogden, Mo., the son of Jessie Denfip, a native of Olive Branch, Ill., and Ella Bilderbach, a native of Pascola, Mo., died 17 May 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery at Olive Branch, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 May 1940:

Eugene Hoffner, of Flint, Mich., is in this city visiting his aunt, Mrs. Sam Shifley.  It will be remembered that Mr. Hoffner was in a serious automobile accident last June when he and other relatives were en route to this city from Flint with the body of his mother, Mrs. Lula Ward.  He has since been confined to a hospital for ten months.

 

Mother of Mrs. Ed Adams Dies at Home in Anna

             Funeral services were held Friday afternoon in the First Baptist Church of Dongola for Mrs. Sarah M. Hinkle, who died at her home in Anna Wednesday, May 22, at the age of 72 years.  Rev. H. B. Atherton officiated at the funeral and burial was in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Ed Adams of Mounds and Mrs. Oscar Adams of Dongola; 11 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.  Her husband, Jacob Hinkle, died in 1934.

             (Jacob Hinkle, 23, a farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the son of John Hinkle and Rachel Toller, married on 20 Dec 1885, at Dongola Baptist Church in Union Co., Ill., Sarah M. Stephens, 18, from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of William Stephens and Lucinda Stephens.  According to her death certificate, Sarah Margaret Hinkle was born 15 Apr 1868, daughter of William Stephens, died 22 May 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., widow of Jacob Hinkle, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  Her marker in American Legion Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Jacob Hinkle Oct. 14, 1865 Mar. 6, 1934 Aged 69 Ys., 5 Ms., 15 Ds. Sarah Hinkle  his wife Apr. 15,1866 May 22, 1940 Gone but not forgotten.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Brother-in-Law of J. L. and Albert Taylor Dies

             Tom Hooker, 82 years old, passed away Monday evening at 8:30 at his home in Creal Springs after a short illness.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Ellen Hooker, and one son, Alonzo Hooker, of Vienna.

             Mr. Hooker had been a prominent farmer in Johnson County, but had been retired for the past few years.

             Funeral services were held at Creal Springs Thursday at three o’clock.  Burial was made in the County Line Cemetery.

             Those attending the funeral from here were J. L. Taylor, Mrs. Frank Ebbs, Mrs. Theo Endicott, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Taylor, Mrs. John O’Daniels, and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Taylor.

             J. L. and Albert Taylor are brothers of Mrs. Hooker.

             (Thomas W. Hooker married Mary Ellen Taylor on 5 Feb 1883, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Henderson C. Hooker married Lydia E. Gore on 8 Dec 1853, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Thomas Wesley Hooker, retired farmer, was born 18 Sep 1857, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Henderson Hooker, a native of North Carolina, and Emaline Gore, a native of Illinois, died 28 May 1940, in Creal Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Mary Ellen Hooker, and was buried in Grove Cemetery in Township 11 south range 5, Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Arthur Scruggs

             Arthur Scruggs, long a resident of Mounds, who, with his family had moved to Mound City several months ago, passed away Sunday morning, May 26, at the Anna State Hospital, where he had been taken for medical treatment for tuberculosis.  He had previously been in a hospital in Colorado and had come home several years ago much improved.  His age was 53 years at death.

             He is survived by his wife and four children, Mrs. Wanda Southerland of Paducah, Ky., James Scruggs, manager of the Kroger Store in Mound City, Miss Pauline and Charles of Mound City; also one brother, James of Olmsted; five sisters, Mrs. Harry Hazzard of Centralia, Mrs. Roy Britt and Mrs. Homer Britt of Olmsted, and Mrs. Virgil Bankson of Villa Ridge; an uncle, George Scruggs of Mounds; and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock with the Rev. Mr. Montgomery of Mound City, pastor of the Methodist Church, officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with Ryan Funeral Service in charge.

             (Arthur Benjamin Scruggs, farmer, of Olive Branch, Ill., was born 23 Aug 1886, in Olmsted, Ill.  The death certificate states that Arthur Scruggs, carpenter, was born 23 Aug 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Jim Scruggs, a native of Knoxville, Tenn., and Eliza Heniken, a native of Illinois, died 26 May 1940, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Effie Scruggs, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Effie Scruggs 1888-1966 Arthur Scruggs 1886-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Justus Duckworth

             Justus Duckworth, 80, died at his home in Ullin Tuesday evening, May 28, at 10:45 o’clock following a long illness.

             He is survived by his wife, Angeline; two daughters, Mrs. Flossie Dillingham of Cairo and Mrs. Grace Smith of Perks; three sons, Walter and Howard of Perks and Glenard of North Little Rock, Ark.; two brothers, Will of Oklahoma and Addna of Indiana; also a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Ullin Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Eli Dunn officiating, assisted by Rev. Hobart Peterson.  Interment was made in Ullin Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Justice Duckworth married Angeline Moore on 28 Feb 1883, in Coles Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Justus Duckworth, farmer, was born 17 Mar 1860, in Indiana, the son of Elija Duckworth and Sarah Bullord, natives of Indiana, died 28 May 1940, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Angeline Duckworth, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Mother Angeline Duckworth 1867-1945 Father Justus Duckworth 1860-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Thomas Clancy

             Mrs. Mary Ellen Clancy, wife of Thomas Clancy of Valley Recluse, died Sunday night, May 26, at her home following a long illness.  She and her husband had resided near Villa Ridge for many years.  On February 17, 1934, this couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.

             Surviving are her husband, one daughter, Mrs. Alice Richardson of Mound City; three sons, John and William of Valley Recluse and David of Peoria; one sister, Mrs. Joseph Austin of Mound City; two brothers, William and David Winan of California; and several grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the family residence with Rev. James Tucker of Thebes officiating.  Burial was made in Villa Ridge Cemetery with the James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Thomas Clancy married M. E. Winans on 17 Feb 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mary Ellen Clancy was born 7 Sep 1865, in Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of D. H. Winam and Ellen Norton, died 26 May 1940, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Tom Clancy, and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery.  Her marker at Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Mary Clancy 1866-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 31 May 1940:

MRS. THOMAS CLANCY

             Mrs. May Ellen Clancy of Valley Recluse passed away Sunday night at 8:30 o’clock after an illness of five weeks.

             She is survived by her husband, Thomas Clancy; one daughter, Mrs. Alice Richardson of Mound City; three sons, John and William of Valley Recluse and David of Peoria; one sister, Mrs. Joseph Austin of Mound City; two brothers, Will Winan and Dave Winan of California; and two grandchildren.

             Mrs. Clancy has been a resident of Valley Recluse practically her entire life.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence in Valley Recluse.  Rev. James Tucker of Thebes, former pastor of the Union Church in Villa Ridge officiated.

             Interment was made in Villa Ridge Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

ARTHUR SCRUGGS

             Arthur Scruggs, age 53, passed away at his home in Mounds, Sunday morning at 10 o’clock following a long illness.

             Besides his wife, Effie, he is survived by four children, Mrs. Wanda Sutherland of Paducah, Miss Pauline, James and Charles of this city; one brother, James of Olmsted; five sisters, Mrs. Harry Haggard of Centralia, Mrs. Roy Britt and Mrs. Homer Britt of Olmsted and Mrs. Virgil Bankson of Villa Ridge; an uncle, George Scruggs of Mounds; and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home in Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Montgomery of the Mound City Methodist Church officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds independent, Friday 7 Jun 1940:

David Roberts

             Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Grand Chain Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock for David Roberts, age 51, who passed away at his home east of Grand Chain Saturday morning at 8:55 o’clock, Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating. Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Surviving are his wife, Ida; and the following children, Mrs. Grace Dunn of Perks, Kenneth, Mary Alice, Margaret and Ruby Jane of Grand Chain.  A sister, Mrs. William Pearson of Chicago, also survives him.

             (David H. Roberts married Annie Lang on 25 Dec 1881, in Coles Co., Ill.  When he registered for the draft in 1917, he gave his name as David Hill Roberts.  According to his death certificate, David H. Roberts, farmer, was born 16 Aug 1888, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of David Roberts Sr., and Anna Lang, died 1 Jun 1940, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Ida Roberts, and was buried in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  David H. Roberts 1888-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ruth Duckworth, who was visiting in Rosiclaire, was called home by the illness and death of her grandfather, Justus Duckworth of Ullin.

 

OBITUARY

             Justus Duckworth of Ullin, formerly of Perks, passed away on Tuesday, May 28.  He was born in Indiana March 17, 1860, and was aged 80 years, 2 months and 11 days at death.

             He was married to Angeline Moore on February 28, 1883, at Cooks Mill, Ill.  He was a member of the Baptist Church for 57 years.

             Surviving are his wife, five children, 20 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren; also two brothers, Will of Deer Creek, Okla., and Addna of Westport, Ind.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Jun 1940:

FIRST TOLL OF LIFE BY RIVER TUESDAY

             The first toll of human life as the swimming season opens was Tuesday afternoon when Howard Milligan, 15, a sophomore in the high school of Cairo, drowned in  the Mississippi not far from 37th Street in water about 10 feet deep.  Cramps and not being able to swim well are reasons for the tragedy.

             He and others were swimming there and only two remained, the second being Eugene Perkins.  He said he attempted to help Milligan out and came near being drowned himself.

             Milligan lived with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Ford.  His father is dead and his mother, Mrs. Pearl Howard, lives at Flint, Mich.

             (According to his death certificate, Howard Raymond Milligan, school boy, of Cairo, Ill., was born 21 Dec 1924, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Edward Milligan, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Pearl Ford, a native of Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., and died 4 Jun 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Thebes Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DAVID ROBERTS

             Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Grand Chain Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock for David Roberts, age 51, who passed away at his home east of Grand Chain last Saturday morning at 3:55 o’clock. Rev. S. C. Benninger officiated.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             Surviving besides his wife, Ida, are the following children, Mrs. Grace Dunn of Perks, Kenneth, Mary Alice, Margaret and Ruby of Grand Chain.  A sister, Mrs. William Pearson of Chicago also survive him.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Jun 1940:

Miss Opal Barnwell Dies Early Wednesday Morning

             Miss Mary Opal Barnwell, sister of Cecil Barnwell, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, early Wednesday morning following a month’s illness.

             Miss Barnwell, age 29, was born in Charleston, Mo.  She was a graduate of St. Mary’s School of Nursing, class of 1937.  For the past 18 months before her illness she had been nursing in the Centralia Hospital.

             Surviving are her father, G. H. Barnwell of Charleston, Mo.; and three brothers, Noel of Charleston, Walter of Detroit, and Cecil of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock in the Cairo Baptist Church.  Burial was in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Charleston with G. A. James in charge.

             (The death certificate for Mary Opal Barnwell, registered nurse, states she was born 6 Oct 1910, in Charleston, Mississippi Co., Mo., the daughter of G. H. Barnwell and Martha Hurley, natives of Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., died 12 Jun 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Charleston, Mo.  Her marker there reads:  Mary Opal Barnwell Oct. 16, 1910 June 12, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Jun 1940:

KILLED BY TRUCK

             A truck of the Highway Express Co. ran over and killed Henry E. “Strawberry” Jackson of Gale on Route 146 on Tuesday night about 11:30.  The driver of the truck said that Jackson purchased out into the road and the truck hit him and run over his head and shoulders.  The truck driver stopped and found the victim past all aid and reported the accident.

             (Henry Edward Jackson registered for the draft in 1918 and stated his nearest relative was Luta Jackson of Gale, Ill.  The death certificate states that Henry Jackson, common laborer, of Gale, Alexander Co., Ill., was born 13 Mar 1897, in Gale, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Thomas Jackson, a native of Virginia, died 11 Jun 1940, in McClure, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Hutchinson Cemetery near Thebes, Ill.  His marker in Hutchinson & Gale Cemetery reads:  Henry E. Jackson Mar. 18, 1897 June 11, 1910.  His Social Security application gives his mother’s maiden name as Luda Thorp.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. L. RAINN

             John Lunis Rainn, age 67, passed away at his home west of Olive Branch Saturday morning at 7 o’clock after an illness of one month.  He had been a resident of that community practically all his life.

             He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Earl Durham of Granite City, Mrs. Teresa Seip; three sons, John of Roxana, Boyd of Manteno and Fred of Valley Park, Mo.; three half-sisters, Mrs. Ollie Stone of Jacksonville, Mo., Mrs. Ora Smith and Mrs. Bessie Cook of Kelso, Mo.; three half-brothers, Frank, Jesse and Leslie Rainn of Fordville, Mo.; and 12 grandchildren.  His wife preceded him in death in December 1939.

             Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion Baptist Church Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Interment was made in Mt. Zion Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (A death certificate for John Lunia Rains, farmer, of Thebes, Ill., states that he was born 28 Dec 1872, in McClure, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Joseph Rains and Caroline Upchurch, natives of Illinois, died 8 Jun 1940, in Alexander Co., Ill., widower of Sarah Rains, and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Sarah Ellen Rains Oct. 27, 1872 Dec. 23, 1939 John L. Rains Dec. 28, 1871 June 8, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Boy and Girl Drown in River near Brookport

             Marietta Smith, 18, of Brookport, and Frank Schoolcraft, 16, of Metropolis, lost their lives by drowning above Dam 52 near Brookport Sunday afternoon, June 2.  The body of the girl was found yesterday by the crew of the Metropolis ferry and an inquest was set for today.  Schoolcraft’s body has not been found.

             A party of young people were on the river in a motor boat.  They were pulling a row boat behind the motor boat, when Marietta Smith and her sister, Mary Smith, 16, decided that it would be fun to ride in the row boat and when the motor boat took up the slack in the tow line, the front of the row boat was jerked out, throwing the girls in the water.

             Clyde Littlemeyer, who was operating the motor boat, jumped into the water and held the girls above the surface, but he was unable to bring both to safety. Schoolcraft jumped in and took Marietta and after struggling for some time, both went down.  Littlemeyer took the other to the boat.—Vienna Times

             (Her death certificate states that Marietta Smith, student, of Brookport, Ill., was born 5 Jun 1922, in Unionville, Ill., the son of Robert Smith, a native of Unionville, Ill., and Sarah Leeper, a native of Providence, Ky., died 2 Jun 1940, in Ohio River near Brookport, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Pell Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Marietta Smith June 5, 1922 June 2, 1940.  The death certificate of William Frank Schoolcraft, school boy, of Metropolis, Ill., states he was born in October 1926, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., the son of Oscar Schoolcraft, a native of Metropolis, Ill., and Ruth Robbs, a native of Pope Co., Ill., died 2 Jun 1940, in Brookport, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. in Metropolis, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Jessie Schoolcraft 1905-1921 Lee Schoolcraft 1894-1937 William Schoolcraft 1859-1938 Mary Schoolcraft 1861-1952 Frank Schoolcraft 1923-1940 Ruth Schoolcraft 1905-1934 Oscar Schoolcraft 1903-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Jun 1940:

Father of Corum and Cletus Ragsdale Dies

             William T. Ragsdale, 75 years old, retired sawmill man, passed away suddenly at his home in Jonesboro, Ill., Wednesday morning at 11:30 o’clock.

Besides his wife, Emma, he is survived by five sons, Adolphus of West Frankfort, J. C. of Ashley, C. C. of Effingham, C. A. of Murphysboro, and A. W. of Flint, Mich.; five sisters, Mrs. Mary Throgmorton of Goreville, Mrs. Lou Modglin of Metropolis, Mrs. Emma Childers of Marion, Mrs. Laura Reed and Mrs. Myrtle Fly of Flint.  A brother, Charles Ragsdale of Flint, also survives him.

Mrs. Ragsdale and family at one time resided in Mounds and two of his sons made their home here for years.

Funeral services were held at the family residence Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Earl Throgmorton of Mounds officiating.  Music was furnished by the Wilson quartet.  Interment was in Jonesboro Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, William Thomas Ragsdale, miller, of Jonesboro, Ill., was born 12 Mar 1866, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Thomas Ragsdale, a native of Illinois, and Nancy Escue, a native of Johnson Co., Ill., died 12 Jun 1940, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Father William T. Ragsdale 1866-1940 Mother Emma O. Ragsdale 1869-1940 Brother Donald Ragsdale 1912-1920.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Community Shocked by Sudden Death of Fred L. Hoffmeier

             The news of the death of Fred L. Hoffmeier, which occurred Tuesday night at 11:55 o’clock, came as a shock to the entire community in which he had spent the mature years of his life.

             While Mr. Hoffmeier had not been in good health, he went about his duties as usual the day of his death and was planning to drive to Springfield on Wednesday.  On account of this trip he retired early, but was taken seriously ill about nine o’clock and lived only about three hours.  He was of naturally robust constitution and a great lover of golf and other outdoor sports, hence his sudden death was entirely unexpected.  His age was 47 years.

             He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hoffmeier of Ullin.  Following the World War he came to Mounds as cashier of the First National Bank, which was later absorbed by the First State Bank of Mounds.  He also served as clerk of Road District No. 7 for several years,

             For the past five years Mr. Hoffmeier had been employed as cashier at the Roberts Cotton Mill, Cairo.  He was a member of Trinity Lodge No. 562 A. F. & A. M., Mound City, the American Legion Post and also the Kiwanis Club of Cairo.

             Surviving are his wife, Gladys Train Hoffmeier; two brothers, Sam and William of Ullin; one niece, Miss Virginia Hoffmeier of Ullin; and one nephew, LeRoy Hoffmeier of Virginia.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at two o’clock at the Methodist church with the Rev. J. Blue Reid officiating.  Burial will be made in the Ullin Cemetery with the Masons conducting services at the grave.  A military salute will be fired by Company K.  Ryan Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements.

             (Fred Lasco Hoffmeier registered for the draft in 1917 in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., and stated he was born 23 Oct 1892, in Ullin, Ill., and was cashier for Anna State Bank Trust Bank in Anna, Union Co., Ill.  He claimed exemption from military service because of “near relatives in Germany.” His death certificate states that Fred L. Hoffmeier, cashier, of Mounds, Ill., was born 18 Oct 1892, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Fred L. Hoffmeier, a native of Germany, died 18 Jun 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Gladys Hoffmeier, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His application for military headstone states he enlisted 4 Sep 1917, and was honorably discharged 12 Dec 1918, as 1st lieutenant of C. I. O. T. S.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Fred L. Hoffmeier Illinois 1 Lieut. Inf. Oct. 23, 1892 June 18, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Della Vaughn

             Mrs. Della Vaughn, age 59, passed away at her home in Mound City, where she has lived for the past 18 years, Tuesday morning, June 18, at 10 o’clock, following a long illness,

             She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Flossie Laws of Risco, Mo., Mrs. Fay Staten of Greenville, Miss., and Mrs. Velma Robertson of Mound City; one son, Joyce, of Mound City; one sister, Mrs. Fanny Duncan of Tunnel Hill, Ill.; ten grandchildren and many other relatives.

             (The death certificate of Della Vaughn Robertson states she was born 2 Sep 1880, in Tennessee, died 18 Jun 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Jerry Robertson, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. John Porterfield

             Mrs. Cora I. Porterfield of Dongola, wife of John Porterfield, died at the Anna city hospital, Tuesday morning, June 18, at the age of 59 years.

             She is survived by her husband, John Porterfield; three daughters, Pearl Hileman and Lena Smoot, both of Dongola, Lillian Henderson of St. Louis, Mo.; one son, Clarence Porterfield of Dongola; four sisters, Ettie Lentz and Ina Lentz both of Dongola, Nellie Sivia of St. Louis, Mo., and Nancy Lingle of Ullin.  She leaves also her stepmother, Mrs. Minnie Karraker; one half-sister, Lois Hinkle of Anna; one half-brother, Oral Karraker of Dongola; and nine grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Christian Chapel Church east of Dongola Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Services were conducted by Rev. Wiley Mathis of Vienna and burial was made in a nearby cemetery.

             (John Wilson Porterfield, 40, from Dongola, Ill., farmer, born in Clear Creek, Ill., son of J. W. Porterfield and Nancy Phillips, married 2nd on 29 Nov 1900, at Harvey Karraker’s in Union Co., Ill., Cora Idella Karraker, 19, from Dongola, Ill., born in T. J. Karraker and Marie Keller.  Thomas J. Karaker, 20, from Dongola Precinct, Union Co., Ill., married on 18 Nov 1877, at the house of Elcano Keller in Union Co., Ill., Mariah Keller, 17, from Dongola Precinct.  Her death certificate states that Cora I. Porterfield was born 6 Feb 1881, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Jasper Karraker and Mariah Keller, natives of Illinois, died 18 Jun 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., wife of John Porterfield, and was buried in Christian Chapel Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  John W. Porterfield 1858-1943 Cora I. Porterfield  1881-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

NEGRO BOY DROWNED

             LeRoy Johnson, a sixteen-year-old negro youth of Mound City was drowned Friday, June 14, about 4:30 o’clock while learning to swim in a drag line hold one half mile north of the city limits of Mound City on the old river road.  The body was recovered about one hour later by Eric Davis, negro.  The boy had made his home with an aunt, Mrs. Josie Johnson.

             (According to his death certificate, Leroy Johnson, student, was born 15 Apr 1924, in Hayti, Mo., the son of Leroy Johnson, a native of Mississippi, and Josia Rodgers, a native of Water Valley, Miss., died 14 Jun 1940, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Jun 1940:

BOY LOSES LIFE ATTEMPTING TO SAVE HIS SISTER

             Ellis Eugene Metcalf, 13, Kevil, Ky., Route 1, drowned in the Ohio River opposite Joppa, Thursday afternoon when he attempted to save the life of his sister, Nellie Mae, 17, who was unable to swim and had stepped into water over her head. 

             The Metcalf children and two neighbor girls had gone to the river to wade, none of them being able to swim.  While they were wading, the Metcalf girl stepped into deep water.  In an effort to rescue her, the brother ran along the bank and got out into the river by holding on to willow branches.  He lost his grip on the willows and sank.

             Walter Metcalf, father of the Metcalf children, was working in a field nearby and rushed to the river when attracted by the cries of the other children.  He rescued the daughter who was revived by the neighbor children and then got the boy out of the river.  He placed the boy in a row boat and rowed to the Illinois side of the river at Joppa to secure a physician’s aid in reviving the youth.  The boy was pronounced dead by the physician who examined him.

             (According to his death certificate, Ellis Eugene Metcalf was born 19 Jul 1926, in Kevil, Ky., the son of Walter Metcalf, a native of Bay City, Ill., and Mamie Hankins, a native of Kentucky, died 6 Jun 1940, in the Ohio River opposite Joppa, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Newton Creek Cemetery near Kevil, McCracken Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             Mrs. Della Vaughn, age 59, passed away at her home in Mound City, where she has lived for the past 18 years, Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock following a long illness.

             She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Flossie Laws of Risco, Mo., Mrs. Fay Staten of Greenville, Miss., and Mrs. Velma Robertson of Mound City; one son, Joyce of Mound City; one sister, Mrs. Fanny Duncan of Tunnel Hill, Ill.; ten grandchildren and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Thursday (at the) Pentecost church in this city.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

DROWNED IN BARROW PIT NORTH OF MOUND CITY

             Leroy Johnson, colored, 16 years of age, was drowned last Friday afternoon while swimming in one of the barrow pits north of Mound City on the old river road.  He and two others went to the pool, but he alone went in.

             The pool about 50 feet wide, was nearly crossed when Johnson began to fail and went under.  One of his companions, much smaller, did not dare to attempt the rescue, and the one the same age could not swim.  The body was recovered an hour later.  Johnson lived on Pearl Street.

 

DEATH CLAIMS MRS. JOHN PORTERFIELD

             Mrs. Cora I. Porterfield of Dongola, wife of John Porterfield, died at the Anna city hospital, Tuesday morning, after an illness of about one week, at the age of 59 years.

             She is survived by her husband, John Porterfield; three daughters, Pearl Hileman and Lena Smoot, both of Dongola, Lillian Henderson of St. Louis, Mo.; one son, Clarence Porterfield of Dongola; four sisters, Ettie Lentz and Ina Lentz both of Dongola, Nellie Sivia of St. Louis, Mo., and Nancy Lingle of Ullin.  She leaves also her stepmother, Mrs. Minnie Karraker; one half-sister, Lois Hinkle of Anna; one half-brother, Oral Karraker of Dongola; and nine grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the Christian Chapel Church east of Dongola Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Services were conducted by Rev. Wiley Mathis of Vienna.  Burial was made in a nearby cemetery with the Ford Funeral Service in charge.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Jun 1940:

Fred Hoffmeier Funeral Services Held Friday

             Funeral services for Fred L. Hoffmeier were held at the Frist Methodist Church Friday afternoon at two o’clock with Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the church, officiating.  The services were attended by a large group of friends from Mounds, Cairo, ___ and other towns.  Floral offerings were many and beautiful.

             ___ the grave in the Ullin Cemetery by Lodge No. 562 A. F. and A. M. conducted Masonic rites, Company __ Illinois National Guard fired a military salute.  Casket bearers were ___er Masons, I. B. Armstrong, __ Connell, Mack Ferrill, Ward __tt, Frank Ellis and Henry ___rson.  Funeral arrangements were in charge of J. T. Ryan.

 

Jeannine Cockrum

             Jeannine Cockrum, age 12 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cockrum, of the Horner Hotel, died Friday morning, June 21, at 1:25 o’clock at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, where she had been taken from St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, for further treatment for a heart affection.

             She is survived by her parents and one sister, Genice.  Mrs. Cockrum is the former Inez Horner.

             The body was brought to Mounds by the G. A. James ambulance and was taken to the funeral home from where it was taken on Saturday afternoon to the family residence on ____ Street.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock at the First ____ist Church with the pastor, Rev. ___  Throgmorton, assisted by Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the Methodist church, officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.  Casket bearers were Earl Nicholson, _____ Richardson, Lee Ewing, Clyde ____, ___ Lefler and Ernie ___.

 

Three Killed, Three Injured in Car Collision Tuesday

             Mrs. J. L. Harris of Cairo, John V. Steiner, 47, fan salesman of St. Louis, and Eli Kenevich of St. Louis, riding with Steiner, are dead, while Mrs. Arthur Thistlewood, Sr., of Cairo, riding with Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Mattie Verble and Mrs. Ray Verble of Wolf Lake are injured, Mrs. Thistlewood seriously—the result of a car collision on Route 3, one mile north of Ware shortly after six o’clock Tuesday afternoon.

             Mrs. Harris and Mrs. Thistlewood were returning from St. Louis and driving south.  Mr. Steiner was also driving south.  Mrs. Verble, driving north, gave as her version of the accident the opinion that the car driven by Mrs. Harris had left the pavement on the west and that as the car was swung full on the pavement, it skidded to the left and struck her car, the Steiner car plunging into the Harris car from behind at about the same time.

             Mrs. Harris was the wife of J. L. Harris, Cairo business and banker, president of the Harris Saddlery Co., and also president of the Security National Bank.  She was buried in the family mausoleum in Temple Israel Cemetery, Paducah, Ky., Thursday afternoon.

             (Julius L. Harris, 32, of Cairo, Ill., married on 9 Dec 1909, in Ouachita Co., Ark., Hattie Friedhem, 28, of Camden, Ouachita Co., Ark.  The death certificate of Hattie Harris, of Cairo, Ill., states she was born 29 May 1882, in Camden, Ark., the daughter of Jacob Friedheim and Melanie Goldsmith, natives of Louisiana, died 25 Jun 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the wife of Julius L. Harris, and was buried in Temple Israel Cemetery in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky.  His birth certificate states that Johann Steiner was born 21 Jan 1893, in St. Louis, Mo.  When he registered for the draft in 1917, he lived at 4959 Loughborough, St. Louis, Mo., and was a newspaper man for John Willie.  He said he had a sick father and a mother who were dependent upon him for support.  John V. Steiner’s death certificate states he was a grocery store clerk, of 4959 Loughborough, St. Louis, Mo., a World War I veteran, born 1 Jan 1893, in St. Louis, Mo., the son of John Steiner and Miss Gunekunda, natives of Germany, died 25 Jun 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Saints Peter & Paul Cemetery in St. Louis, Mo.  His application for a Social Security number states that John Victor Steiner was born 21 Jan 1893, in St. Louis, Mo., the son of John Steiner and Caroline Kochbauer.  According to his death certificate, Eli Knezevick, of 6831 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, Mo., electrical businessman, was born 5 Apr 1895, in Yugoslavia, died 25 Jun 1940, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in St. Marcus Cemetery in Gravois Township, St. Louis, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Joseph Bucher Sr.

             Joseph Bucher, Sr., well known resident of Cairo, died Friday, June 21, at St. Mary’s Hospital, that city.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Cairo, with burial in Calvary Cemetery.

             The deceased was an uncle of Louis Bucher of this city and John Bucher of Ullin.

             (According to his death certificate, Joseph Bucher, retired merchant, of Cairo, Ill., was born 18 Mar 1862, in Ravensburg, Germany, the son of Aloysius Bucher and Mary Meir, natives of Germany, died 21 Jun 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widower of Mary Bucher, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Joseph Bucher Mar. 18, 1862 June 21, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ed D. Robinson

             Ed D. Robinson, age 70, and a familiar figure in Mounds, died Saturday morning, June 22, at 5:15 o’clock at the home of Earl Biggs on Delaware Avenue where he had lived for the past seven years.

             For many years Mr. Robinson was the owner of a variety store on Front Street and was known by everyone, especially the children of the community.

             He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Jennie Shadowen of Christopher.

             Funeral services were held at 3:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon in the First Baptist Church with the pastor, Rev. Earl Throgmorton, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with J. T. Ryan in charge of arrangements.

             (Lenny Shadowens married Jennie Robinson on 16 Feb 1894, in Williamson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Edward B. Robinson, retired storekeeper, single, was born about 1870, died 22 Jun 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Jun 1940:

RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

             Jeannine Corkum, 12-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Corkum of Mounds, passed away at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Friday morning at 1:25 o’clock.

             Besides her parents she is survived by one sister, Genice, also of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Mounds Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor, assisted by Rev. J. Rue Reid, will officiate.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

Three Meet Death on Highway 3

             Three persons met death on Highway Three north of Ware in Alexander County a little after 6 __ Tuesday when cars collided in a peculiar manner.  The dead are:

             Mrs. J. L. Harris of Cairo, wife of the president of the Security National Bank and prominent in ____ affairs.

             ___ V. Steiner of St. Louis, a salesman.

             ____ Knesevich of St. Louis who was with Steiner.

             The injured are Mrs. Arthur Thistlewood of Cairo; Mrs. Mattie ____ of Wolf Lake and Mrs. Ray ___ of Wolf Lake.

             ___ the inquest is held, and ___ probably after the injured ___er, the cause of the accident ____as unofficial.

             The cause given seems to be that ___ Thistlewood, who was driving ___ Harris’s car, went off the pavement as the Steiner car, also coming north, was about to go around.  ___ car driven by Mrs. Verble was approaching, going north.

             The Verble women, seeing the other car about to come around, ran off the pavement and came  ___ to a stop.  It is possible that Mrs. Thistlewood pulled off the pavement to make room, and in getting back on the pavement, the ___ot across the road and hit the Verble car.  About that moment, the Steiner car crashed into them, ___t there was two crashes, almost in the same fraction of a second death and destruction was quick and fast.

             Mrs. Harris died at the time of the crash or a few minutes later.  One of the men was dead and the other died on the way to the hospital.  Mrs. Thistlewood was hurt about the mouth, arm and chest and the Verble women were cut ___ bruised.

 

BROTHER OF MRS. BESSIE BUIE DIES

             Barney Jordan, age 41, passed away at Lincoln Park, Mich., Friday night.

             Mr. Jordan, a World War veteran, is survived by three sisters, Mrs. W.T. Thomas of Cairo, Mrs. Bessie Buie of Mound City, and Miss Mildred Jordan; two brothers, William of Cairo and Bartlett of Detroit; besides other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the Karcher Brothers Funeral Home in Cairo Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. H. E. Lockard, pastor of the Mound City Baptist Church, officiating.  Burial was made in the National Cemetery.  Pallbearers were John Minor, Albert Wilson, David Thomas, Sidney Cloutre, Arthur Buie.  Karcher Brothers were in charge of arrangements,.

             (The interment form for Mound City National Cemetery states that Barney F. Jordan, private, Co. D, 22nd Illinois Infantry, died 21 Jun 1940, and was buried in Grave 5156A.  He enlisted 28 Jun 1918, and was honorably discharged 20 Jun 1919.—Darrel Dexter)

 

E. D. ROBINSON DIES

             Ed D. Robinson, age 70, passed away at 5:15 o’clock Saturday morning at the home of Earl Biggs in Mounds where he had lived for the past seven years.

             He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Jennie Shadowen of Christopher.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Mounds Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock with Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Mrs. Artie Parker has returned home after several days visit with her sister and children in Peoria.  Her brother-in-law was killed while trying to rescue a small child from being killed by a train recently. (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Jul 1940:

A. Beaver Dies Suddenly Early Saturday Morning

             Abe Beaver died suddenly Saturday morning, June 29, at his home on Delaware Avenue.  His age was 76 years.

             While Mr. Beaver had been in failing health for some time, he had risen as usual Saturday morning, death claiming him shortly thereafter.

             He was born and reared in America and was a prominent farmer in that community for years, later going to Mound City where he conducted a grocery store until the flood of 1937.  Since that time he and his family have lived in Mounds.  He is survived by his wife, Lucy; one son, George Beaver of Mound City; a step-daughter, Mrs. George Hardesty; and six grandchildren, two of whom, Rosemary and Roberta Beaver, having made their home with their grandparents.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the family residence with the Rev. S. C. Benninger of the Congregational Church officiating, assisted by the Rev. J. Rue Reid of the Methodist Church.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.  Casket bearers were Henry Darragh and Bud Crain of Mound City, George Hardesty and Walter Schnaare of America, Walter Egner of Mounds and Maywood Pearson of Cairo.

             (The death certificate of Abraham Beaver, retired farmer, states he was born 23 Nov 1863, in Illinois, the son of Abraham Beaver, a native of Pennsylvania, and Malinda Rhoden, died 29 Jun 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Lucy Beaver, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds reads:  Abraham Beaver Nov. 23, 1863 June 29, 1940—Darrel Dexter)

 

Calvin Louis Beggs

             Calvin Louis Beggs, age 61, passed away at his home in Belknap, Ill., Saturday evening, June 29.

             He is survived by five children, Mrs. Mary Henry, Mrs. Irene Keys and Robert of Belknap, Miss Bernice Beggs of DeSoto, Ill., and Mrs. Gladys Gurley of Olmsted.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Pentecostal church in Belknap with Rev. William Henry officiating.  Casket bearers were Rev. Hopkins, Arthur Wood, Willie Wood, Rannie Huckleberry, John McCluskey and Cecil Cheek.  Interment was made in the Church of God Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Isaac Beggs married Mary Jane Hoffner on 19 Mar 1878, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Calvin Louis Beggs, farmer, was born 8 Apr 1879, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Isaac Beggs and Mary Jane Hoffner, natives of Dongola, Ill., died 29 Jun 1940, in Road District 10, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Louisa Beggs, and was buried in the Church of God Cemetery in Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Calvin Beggs 1881-1940 Louisa Beggs 1881-1945.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Appreciation

             I desire to thank everyone who expressed sympathy following the death of my husband, Fred L. Hoffmeier.  Especially do I wish to thank those who sent flowers, those who offered the use of their cars, the minister and the choir, all individuals and all organizations who assisted me during this time of great sorrow.  Your kindness and thoughtfulness will ever be remembered and cherished in my heart.

GLADYS TRAIN HOFFMEIER

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Jul 1940:

Mrs. Eleanor Wilson

             Mrs. Eleanor Wilson, age 74, died Wednesday morning at 6:40 o’clock following an illness of six months at the home of Miss Belle Goldsmith in Mound City.  Mrs. Wilson had made her home or the past 11 years with Miss Goldsmith and had lived in Mound City for 55 years.

             She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Mattie Glass of Metropolis; two granddaughters, Virginia Fay Wilson and Eleanor Ann Goodhart of Grand Chain; and three nieces, Mrs. Mary Raub of Mounds, Mrs. Lulu Essex of Poplar Bluff, Mo., and Mrs. Mary Ahring of St. Louis.

             Funeral services will be held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mound City of which she was a devoted member this (Friday) afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. S. L. Hagan officiating.  Interment will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery in the family lot.  G. A. James Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Eleanor Wilson was born 23 Aug 1866, in Grand Chain, Ill., died 10 Jul 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of George W. Wilson, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Elanor Wilson 1866-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Filbert Reno

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock for Filbert Reno, who died at the Anna hospital Sunday night, July 7, after an illness of many years.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiated.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Mr. Reno is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Reno of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Ed Schuler and Mrs. Ray Murphy of Mound City and Miss Gladys Reno of Mounds; and one brother, Daniel Reno of Cairo.

             (Thomas Reno, 23, of Beechwood, Ill., married on 19 Jun 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Viola Miller, 22, of Beechwood, Ill.  According to his death certificate, Felbert Reno was born 9 Mar 1910, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Thomas Reno and Viola Miller, natives of Illinois, died 7 Jul 1940, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Jul 1940:

DEATH CLAIMS FILBERT RENO

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock for Filbert Reno, who passed away at the Anna Hospital Sunday night after an illness of many years.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiated.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             Mr. Reno is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Reno of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Ed Schuler and Mrs. Roy Murphy of Mound City and Miss Gladys Reno of Mounds; and one brother, Daniel Reno of Cairo.

 

RESIDENT OF DONGOLA DIES

             Mrs. Margaret Armentrout, age 72, wife of J. R. Armentrout, former postmaster at Dongola, passed away at her home near Dongola Tuesday, July 2, at 6 o’clock p.m. after an illness of several weeks.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Friday morning at 7:00 o’clock with Rev. W. E. Bridges officiating.  Interment was made in Maple Hill Cemetery near Westfield, Ill., the former home of Mrs. Armentrout.

             Mrs. Armentrout is survived by her husband; one daughter, Margaret of Dongola; two sons, Eugene of Benton, Ill., Frank of Overland, Mo.; one grandchild; one sister, Mrs. Vernon A. Payne of Tuscola, Ill.; and one brother, Archibald Alexander of Oakland, Ill.

             (Her death certificate states that Margaret Sue Armentrout was born 9 Apr 1868, in Dudley, Ill., daughter of Robert Alexander and Amanda Lydick, natives of Virginia, died 2 Jul 1940, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., wife of J. F. Armentrout, and was buried in Maple Hill Cemetery in Westfield, Clark Co., Ill. Her marker there reads:  Margaret Sue Armentrout Died July 2, 1940 Aged 72 Yrs., 2 Mos., & 23 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. ELEANOR WILSON DIES

             Mrs. Eleanor Wilson, age 73, passed away at the home of Miss Belle Goldsmith on South 4th Street, Wednesday morning at 6:40 o’clock following an illness of several months.

             Mrs. Wilson had been a resident of Mound City for the past 51 years and has many friends here.  She was born in Grand Chain, Ill., and was the widow of the late George Wilson, who died July 8, 1915.  Three sons were born to this union, Everett, Roscoe and Roy, all of whom are dead.

             Mrs. Wilson is survived by two granddaughters, Miss Virginia Gay Wilson and Mrs. Werner Guthers, both of Grand Chain; one sister, Mrs. Mattie Glass of Metropolis; three nieces, Mrs. Mary Raub of Mounds, Mrs. Luella Essex of Poplar Bluff, Mo., and Mrs. R. E. Ellington of Indianapolis, Ind.; and Miss Belle Goldsmith who has made her home with ____ for many years.

             Funeral services will be held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o’clock with Father Hagen of Cairo officiating.  Interment will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service has charge of arrangements.

 

RESIDENT OF DONGOLA DIES

             William M. Toler, age 69, died at his home in Dongola Sunday morning about three o’clock after a heart attack Friday afternoon.

             Mr. Toler has been a shoe cobbler in Dongola for 53 years.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. H. G. Peterson, pastor of the church, and burial was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery under the direction of Elmer J. Ford.

             He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Burel Miller; and one grandson, Shirley Calvin, both of Dongola; with other relatives and friends.

             (According to his death certificate, William Marion Toler, shoe cobbler, of Dongola, Ill., was born 20 Jan 1871, in Dongola, Ill., the son of William Toler, a native of North Carolina, and Mary Thorn, died 7 Jul 1940, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., divorced husband of Melissa Toler.  His marker in the American Legion Cemetery in Dongola reads:  William M. Toler 1870-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH CLAIMS LUCILLE BUTLER

             Funeral services were held at the Big Creek Church near Dongola Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock for Lucille Butler, 16-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Butler, who passed away at the home of her parents, Saturday evening at 6 o’clock following an illness of six months.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by one sister, Daisy.

             Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery, with Rev. Hobart Peterson officiating.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate states that Mabel Lucille Butler was born 25 Mar 1924, in Tamms, Ill., the daughter of Richard Butler, a native of Jackson Co., Ill., and Ruth Light, a native of Thebes, Ill., died 6 Jul 1940, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mable Lucille Butler 1924-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Jul 1940:

Robert Wadlow, Alton Giant, Dies Monday

Robert Pershing Wadlow of Alton, 22 years old and 8 ft. 10.3 inches in height, the tallest person in American medical history and perhaps in the world, died Monday, July 15, in a hospital at Manistee, Mich., the result of complications following an infection in the left ankle.

             Young Wadlow was on a tour, traveling for a shoe company, under the management of his father, Harold F. Wadlow, at the time he was taken ill.

             His size was normal at birth, 8 ½ pounds, and his unusual growth was not noted until he was one year old.  At 18 months he weighed 62 pounds.  He had reached the height of 8 ft. 4 inches when he graduated from the Alton High School.  He was given a scholarship at Shurtleff College and attended one year.

             The injury to his ankle was attributed to a brace which he wore to assist him in supporting his enormous weight of 491 pounds.

             His funeral probably will be held today with the Rev. W. L. Hanbaum of the Alton Methodist Church, a former pastor of the Mound City Methodist Church, officiating.

             (His marker in Oakwood Cemetery in Upper Alton, Madison Co., Ill., reads:  Robert P. Ludlow Feb. 22, 1918 July 15, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Emma Lackey

             Mrs. Emma Lackey, 70 years old, widow of the late Harry Lackey of Pulaski, passed away at her home in St. Louis Thursday night last.

             She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Altha Bradley of St. Louis and two sons, Clarence of Springfield, Mo., and Forrest of St. Louis.

             The body was brought to Pulaski Sunday morning at 3 o’clock and was taken to the Crain Funeral Home where it remained until time for funeral services, which were held at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Raymond J. Weiss of Ullin, officiating. Burial was made in the Lackey Cemetery.  Pallbearers were H. Smoot, W. E. Parker, C. B. Sharp, Fred Davis, Harry Tolar, and W. H. Aldred. George Crain Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (H. W. Lackey married Emma Bagby on 1 Feb 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Lackey Cemetery reads:  Emma Lackey May 30, 1871 July 11, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Junkerman were called to Marion and Herrin recently by the serious illness and death of Mrs. Junkerman’s father, Jake Adams, who died Thursday afternoon, July 11, at a hospital in Herrin.

             (Jacob Eligh Adams registered for the draft in 1917 in Ponola Co., Miss., and stated he was born 17 May 1888, in Guin, Ala., was a salesman for Taylor Drug Co., in Como, Miss., and was partially deaf.  The death certificate of Jacob E. Adams, traveling salesman, of Marion, Ill., states that he was born 17 May 1893, in Guren, Ala., the son of Willis Adams, died 11 Jul 1940, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., the husband of Helen McSwne (?), and was buried in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Jul 1940:

INFANT DAUGHTER DIES

             Margaret Dyas, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Dyas of Cairo passed away at birth Tuesday morning.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by one brother, James; one sister, Ann Ellen; paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George Sweeney of Mound City; and other relatives.

             Burial was made late Tuesday in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge with Karcher Brothers in charge.

             (The death certificate of Margaret Dyas, of 2215 Pine, Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., was born 16 Jul 1940, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of E. F. Dyas, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Catherine Sweeney, a native of Mound City, Ill., died 16 Jul 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Jul 1940:

RONALD HOLDERFIELD DIES

             Funeral services were held at the Ullin Methodist church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock for Ronald Holderfield, one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Holderfield, who passed away at the home of his parents in Ullin at 8:30 o’clock.  Rev.  J. R. Weiss officiated.

             Interment was made in Ullin Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             Besides his parents he is survived by one sister, Marlene, of Ullin.

             (The death certificate of Ronald Paul Holderfield states that he was born 14 Jun 1939, in Ullin, Ill., the son of Richard Holderfield, a native of Mounds, Ill., and Juanita Echols, a native of Ullin, Ill., died 22 Jul 1940, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  A 1983 inventory of the cemetery included a tin funeral home marker for Ronald P. Holderfield 1939-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Got 14 Years for Reichert Killing

             Elle Milton, colored, got 14 years last Thursday night at Cairo in circuit court when a jury returned a verdict of guilty for the killing of Fletcher Reichert, deputy sheriff from Charleston, Mo., and a former resident of Grand Chain.  His father is Fred Reichert, well known in this county.

             Reichert was killed during the labor troubles at one of the cotton oil mills when he sent his father to open up a barricade while he sat in the truck guarding.  Molton was charged with doing the shooting.

             Someone in the crowd of pickets shot Reichert in the back of the head while he was watching his father out in front of the car.

             A great deal of difficulty was experienced in finding the person who did the shooting and feeling around Cairo ran high.  It had in it both labor and racial feelings and the defense of Molton is said to have been provided for by his fellow union members.

             Much of the evidence that a confession carries was lost when it was shown that the offer to plead for clemency was used to obtain the confession.  Judge Rumsey ruled this out and it left positive identification weakened and crippled the state’s side.

             The defense produced a number who were there, some who saw Molton, but none saw him shoot, nor knew who it was who did the shooting.

             After Molton’s arrest he was held in jail away from here for a long time.

             The cost of this case and its resulting feeling will be several thousands of dollars for Alexander County.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Aug 1940:

Moten Given 14 Years for Strike Killing

             Eli Moten was formally sentenced to 14 years in the penitentiary by Judge Darce F. Rumsey in circuit court in Cairo Monday afternoon for the murder of Fletcher Reichert of Charleston at the Roberts Cotton Oil Plant in that city last November 8.  Moten was found guilty by a jury at a trial which was concluded two weeks ago, according to the Cairo Citizen.

             A formal motion for a new trial made by the defense was overruled by Judge Rumsey, who before he passed sentence, dwelt at length on strikes and disorders attending them.  It was during a strike that Moten, who was acting as picket, was charged with killing Reichert, who attempted to drive his truck into the plant.

             Strikes, Judge Rumsey said, are the only weapon of the laboring man to bring about adjustment of conditions, which are sometimes intolerable, and an orderly strike always wins confidence and acclaim of the community.  But, he continued, disorders often spoil the effect of that confidence and are not to be tolerated by the people.

 

Mrs. Otto L. Moore Dies Monday Evening July 29

             Mrs. Delphia King Moore, wife of Otto L. Moore, died at her home on South Delaware Avenue, this city, Monday evening, July 29, at 8:45 o’clock following an illness of many months.

             Surviving besides her husband are two sons, Robert C. of Vienna and Cecil of Cairo; two daughters, Pauline and Frances at home; four grandchildren; also one sister, Mrs. Nellie Roberts of this city.  A brother, Paul King of East St. Louis, died only a short time ago.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at the Methodist church, the pastor, Rev. J. Rue Reid, officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, with the J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (The death certificate of Delphia Moore states that she was born 8 Feb 1890, in New Columbia, Ill., the daughter of George King, a native of Kentucky, and Amelia C. Smith, a native of Tennessee, died 29 Jul 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of O. L. Moore, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Ellen E. Mathis

             Mrs. Ellen Elizabeth Mathis, age 80, died at Anna Friday afternoon, July 26.  She was born to Asa C. and Elizabeth Kelley Atherton, near Shiloh Church in Pulaski County, and was a civil engineer and school teacher and was one of the pioneers of Pulaski County.  She spent her entire life in Pulaski and Johnson counties.

             She was baptized into the Shiloh Baptist Church near Villa Ridge April 1, 1877, when a young lady and afterwards moved her church membership to the Christian Church at America, Ill., where she remained a true and faithful member until her death.

             A short funeral service was held at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alice Whiteaker, in Dongola, Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward and then the regular funeral service was held at the Methodist church in Vienna at 3:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. Charles Day, and burial was made in the Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna.

             She is survived by four children, Mrs. Alice Whitaker, Dongola, Fred L. Mathis, Montpelier, Idaho, Otto P. Mathis, Thebes, and Guy H. Mathis, East St. Louis, Ill.; five grandchildren as follows:  Hall Whiteaker, St. Louis, Mrs. Warren Morgan, Salem, Ill., Mrs. Warren Morgan, Salem, Ill., Wayne Mathis, St. Louis, Mo., James Mathis, Thebes, and Virginia Mathis, East St. Louis, Ill.; and one great-grandchild, Susan Morgan of Salem, Ill.

             (James P. Mathis married Ellen E. Atherton on 6 Jul 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Ellen Mathis, of Salem, Marion Co., Ill., was born 17 Feb 1860, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Asa Atherton and Eliz. Kelley, native of Illinois, died 26 Jul 1940, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., widow of John P. Mathis, and was buried in the Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ellen E. Mathis 1860-1940 James P. Mathis 1850-1900.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Guy Casper

Guy Casper, age 12, passed away Saturday morning, July 27, at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Casper, in Karnak after an illness of two weeks.

Besides his parents, he is survived by four brothers, Ernest of Chicago, Artie of Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Harlie and Leland of Karnak; five sisters, Frances, Ulah, Carol, Olive and Effie of Karnak.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Chapel Church near Cypress, Rev. J. W. Hogg of New Burnside officiating.  Burial was made in Chapel Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

(His death certificate states that Guy L. Casper was born 10 Sep 1927 in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Robert Casper, a native of Dongola, Ill., and Francis Steer, a native of Olmstead, Ill., died 27 Jul 1940, in Road District 12, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Lutheran Chapel, Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. M. C. WATERBURY

             Mrs. M. C. Waterbury, a former resident of Mound City, died recently in the French Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., where she had been a patient for some time.  She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Marcel Marquess; a sister, Mrs. Roger Griffith of Mound City; and two brothers, Rolf and Leslie Hubbard of San Francisco.

             (The California Death Index states that Ruth Hubbard Waterbury was born18 Jan 1892, in Kentucky, died 28 Jul 1940, in San Francisco, Calif.  Her application for Social Security states she was born 19 Jan 1892, in Shady Grove, Ky., the daughter of John H. Hubbard and Anna M. Morse.  She was buried in Cypress Lawn Memorial Park in Colma, San Francisco Co., Calif.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Aug 1940:

BACK BROKEN WHEN RUN OVER BY AUTO

             Mrs. H. W. Kavanaugh, 46, of Peoria, Ill., was run over by an auto Saturday night, and suffered a broken back.  She is confined to her bed in St. Mary’s Hospital.

             Mrs. Kavanaugh was visiting in Belknap and while there she had gone with a group on a picnic.  Their car was parked on a hill and when it started to roll, Mrs. Kavanaugh is said to have rushed in front of the automobile, in an attempt to stop it.  She was thrown to the ground and the wheels passed over her back.

             Two of Mrs. Kavanaugh’s daughters of Peoria chartered a plane from an airport there and flew to Bellview Airport, where John W. Bell, Sr., met them and drove them to Cairo to the bedside of their mother.

 

RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

             Mrs. Delphia Moore, age 50, passed away at her home in Mounds Monday evening at 8:45 o’clock following a prolonged illness.

             Besides her husband, O. L. Moore, she is survived by two daughters, Pauline and Frances of Mounds; two sons, Robert C. of Vienna and Cecil of Cairo; four grandchildren; and one sister, Mrs. Nellie Roberts of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church.  Rev. J. Rue Reid officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

DEATH CLAIMS H. L. RUSSELL

             Herbert L. Russell, age 72, died at his home near Dongola, Thursday afternoon, July 25, at 3:30 o’clock after an illness of five weeks.

             Mr. Russell was born in Pope County, but had lived in Union County near Dongola for the past 45 years.  He was a retired insurance agent.

             Funeral services were held at the Friendship Baptist Church near his home at 2 o’clock Saturday and burial was made in the Friendship Cemetery.  Elmer J. Ford directed the funeral.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Amy Russell of Dongola, and the following children:  Willis Russell, Dongola, Wilda Epson Hastings, Gary, Ind.  Several grandchildren also survive.

             (Herbert Russell, 28, a farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in Illinois, the son of Mr. Russell and Miss Stroud, married 3rd on 4 Jan 1900, at the bride’s residence in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Amy E. Parr, 35, from Dongola, Ill., born in Illinois, daughter of Mr. Penrod and Miss Thompson.  According to his death certificate, Herbert Lionel Russell, retired insurance agent, was born 9 Mar 1858, in Glendale, Ill., the son of John B. Russell, died 25 Jul 1940, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Amy Russell, and was buried in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Friendship Cemetery near Dongola, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Herbert Russell 1868-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PERKS WILL CASE TAKEN UNDER ADVISEMENT TUESDAY

             Judge Loyd M. Bradley of the circuit court took the will contest case of Harry and Tom Perks of Mound City vs. George Schuler of Mounds under advisement, pending presentation of briefs by the participants’ lawyers to show he has authority to make equitable disposal of the estate.

             George Schuler was called to the stand Monday to testify regarding identity of cancelled checks written by Nettie Perks.

             The content developed as a result of the mixup of the estate of the late L. C. Perks of Mound City and his wife, Nettie B. Perks.  Heirs on both sides of the case are trying to differentiate between the property legally belonging to Mrs. Perks’ heirs, and that belonging to the heirs of Mr. Perks.  Judge Bradley expressed doubt as to his jurisdiction in the matter and asked for briefs stating the case more clearly under his court.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Aug 1940:

Aged Pulaski County Man Dies Friday Eve at Anna

             Daniel Knupp, age 87 years and long a resident of Pulaski County, died Friday evening, August 2, at the Anna Hospital.  He was the father of J. T. Knupp of this city.

             Surviving are four daughters:  Mrs. Jacoba Edwards and Mrs. Josie Burd of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Joyce Bagby of Olmsted and Mrs. Jennie Reece of Hot Springs, Ark.; two sons, Jonas of Villa Ridge and J. T. of Mounds; two brothers, Thomas of Illmo, Mo., and Otto of Zeigler; one sister, Mrs. George Resh of Dongola; 23 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock at Center Church with Rev. A. N. Burris officiating.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Daniel Knupp, 21, from Wetaug Precinct, Pulaski Co., Ill., married on 17 Jan 1875, at the house of Moses Casper in Union Co., Ill., Catherine Hoffner, 23, from Dongola Precinct, Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Dan Knupp, farmer, of Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born in 1854 in Illinois, the son of Eli Knupp, died 2 Aug 1940, in Union Co., Ill., widower of Katherine Knupp, and was buried in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Daniel Knupp 1852-1940 Katherine Knupp his wife 1855-1933.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of Russell Ward Dies Friday of Last Week

             Mrs. Stella E. Ward, age 60, wife of Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola and mother of Russell Ward, a teacher in Thistlewood School, died at the hospital in Anna, Friday, August 2.

             Mrs. Ward was born in Kentucky, was married and lived in Missouri for a number of years, and for the past twenty years has lived in Illinois, at Mound City, Jonesboro and last at Dongola where her husband was pastor of the Baptist Church for several years.

             Rev. Ward was at one time pastor of the Immanuel Baptist and Calvary Baptist churches of Cairo and the First Baptist Church of Mound City.  Mrs. Ward always took great interest in the missionary work of the church.

             Her body was removed to the Ford Funeral Home at Dongola and later to her home.  Funeral was at 2:30 o’clock Sunday at the First Baptist Church in Dongola conducted by Rev. Earl Throgmorton, assisted by Rev. H. G. Peterson and Rev. H. W. Karraker and burial was in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             She leaves her devoted husband, Rev. W. J. Ward; and one son, James, of Dongola; one son, Russell, of Mounds; one grandchild, Muriel Jean Ward, of Mounds; and two sisters, Mrs. Nannie May Daniels and Mrs. Hester Anderson, both of Detroit, Mich.

             (William J. Ward, of Charleston, Mo., married Stella Edith Leet, of Charleston, Mo., on 25 Jul 1904, in Mississippi Co., Mo.  Her death certificate states that Stella Ward was born 2 Oct 1879, in Kentucky, the daughter of Benjamin Leet and Ellen Thompson, natives of Kentucky, died 2 Aug 1940, in Union Co., Ill., wife of W. J. Ward, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Stella E. Ward 1879-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Aug 1940:

WELL KNOWN RESIDENT OF PULASKI COUNTY DIES

             Daniel Knupp, age 87 years, passed away at an Anna Hospital Friday evening at 8:30 o’clock.  Mr. Knupp had been a resident of Pulaski County for many years and was well known in this vicinity.

             Surviving him are four daughters, Mrs. Jacoba Edwards and Mrs. Jos___ ___rd of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Joyce ___ of Olmsted and Mrs. Jennie ___ of Hot Springs, Ark.; two sons, Jonas of Villa Ridge and J. T. of Mounds; two brothers, Thomas of Illmo, Mo., and Otto of Zeigler; one sister, Mrs. George Resh of Peoria; 23 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the ____ church with Rev. A. N. Bur__ officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Stella E. Ward, age 60, wife of Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola, died at the hospital in Anna, Ill., August 2nd.

             Mrs. Ward was born in Kentucky, was married and lived in Missouri for a number of years, and for the past twenty years has lived in Illinois, at Mound City, Jonesboro and last at Dongola where her husband was pastor of the Baptist Church for several years.

             Rev. Ward was at one time pastor of the Immanuel Baptist and Calvary Baptist Church in Cairo and the First Baptist Church in Mound City.  Mrs. Ward always took great interest in the missionary work of the church.

             Funeral services were held at 2:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church in Dongola conducted by Rev. Earl Throgmorton, assisted by Rev. H. G. Peterson and Rev. H. W. Karraker and burial was in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             She leaves her devoted husband, Rev. W. J. Ward and one son, James, of Dongola; one son, Russell, of Mounds; one grandchild, Muriel Jean Ward, of Mounds; and two sisters, Mrs. Nannie May Daniels and Miss Hester Anderson, both of Detroit, Mich.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Aug 1940:

Dr. J. B. Mathis of Ullin Dies Tuesday at Hospital

             Dr. J. B. Mathis of Ullin, prominent physician and resident of Pulaski County, died Tuesday evening, August 13, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he had been taken the previous Saturday night for an emergency operation.  His age at death was 68 years.

             Dr. Mathis, besides having practiced medicine in the county for forty years or more, with his home and office in Ullin, was prominent in the politics of the Democratic Party and had served as Pulaski County chairman for a number of years.  He also served as county commissioner a few years ago.  He was a part of every movement for development in Ullin.

             He is survived by his wife; three sons, Delbert of Chicago, John and Russell of Ullin; one daughter, Mrs. Raymond Britton of Cairo; two grandchildren; three brothers, Arch P. Mathis of Tamaroa, J. W. Mathis of America, and M. P. of Oklahoma; and one sister, Mrs. Nell Neadstine of Murphysboro.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church in Ullin with Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Burial was made in Ullin cemetery amidst a large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends.

             (John B. Mathis married Mary S. Mason on 24 Jul 1865, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Brown Mathis, of Ullin, Ill., was born 24 Sep 1871, in America, Ill., the son of John Brown Mathis and Mary Mason, a native of America, Ill., died 13 Aug 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Nellie Mathis, and was buried at Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Father of Doyle Jordan Dies Sunday at St. Mary’s

             James Henry Jordan, age 62, of this city, a former resident of Elco, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Sunday morning, Aug. 11, at 5:30 o’clock after a few days’ illness.

Surviving are four sons, Louis, John and Fred of Gary, Ind., and Doyle of Mounds; two daughters, Mrs. Roy Miller of East Moline, Ill., and Mrs. Oris Jordan of Elco; four brothers, Tom of Cairo, Harry of Mt. Vernon, Pete of Mill Creek and Scott of Macomb; and one sister, Mrs. Della Bradley of Mill Creek.

The body was brought to the home of Doyle Jordan in this city where it remained until time for the funeral services which were held Tuesday morning at 11 o’clock at the Mill Creek Baptist Church with Rev. H. G. Peterson officiating.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, he lived at Mill Creek, Union Co., Ill., and was a miner for E. H. Bryden of Tamms, Alexander Co., Ill.   John F. Jordan married Malinda Price on 18 Jul 1875, in Alexander Co., Ill.  James Henry Jordan, farmer, of Elco, Alexander Co., Ill., was born 15 Jan 1879, in Mill Creek, Ill., the son of John Jordan and Malinda Price, natives of Illinois, died 11 Aug 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Minnie Jordan, and was buried in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Sims Cemetery near Elco, Ill., reads:  James H. Jordan 1879-1940 Minnie I. Jordan 1886-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Chairman L. A. Downs Dies Aug. 10 in Illinois Central Hospital

             L. A. Downs, chairman of the board of the Illinois Central System, died Aug. 10, in the Illinois Central Hospital, Chicago.  He was 68 years old.

             Mr. Downs, who had been in declining health since the summer of 1938, entered the hospital for the last time two weeks ago, immediately after attending the July meeting of the board.

             Forty-six years a railway man, Mr. Downs climaxed his career by serving for twelve years, from 1926 to 1938, as president of the Illinois Central System, after two years as president of the Central of Georgia, a subsidiary line.  In addition to receiving many distinctions in railway and business circles, he had been highly honored as a Catholic layman and as an alumni member of Sigma Chi fraternity.

A widower, he is survived by one daughter, Mrs. John F. Oakley of New Orleans; and three brothers, T. A. Downs of Princeton, Ky., J. L. Downs of Champaign, Ill., and J. E. Downs of Terre Haute, Ind.

             (His death certificate states that Lawrence Aloysius Downs was born 9 May 1872, in Green Castle, Ind., the son of James Downs and Mary McCarthy, natives of County Clare, Ireland, died 10 Aug 1940, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., widower of Ida M. Downs, and was buried in Metarie Cemetery in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Aug 1940:

Dr. Mathis Dies Tuesday Evening

             Dr. J. B. Mathis, prominent physician and prominent in politics in this county, died Tuesday evening at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo following an emergency operation on Saturday night.  He has been in failing health for some time and it was due to this decline that he relinquished the office of county chairman of the Democratic Party of Pulaski County, where Dr. Mathis had practiced medicine for 40 years in Pulaski County. ___ time, he had answered calls far and wide and had endured hardships that country doctors are called on to endure—long ____ over frozen and snowy ___ in the winter and across ____ streams.  The story is told that Doc Mathis, in his younger years did not avoid these, and has ____ and swum streams to reach patients whose finances were very limited.

             This perhaps is why a great many people liked him.  He was ____ed to bar nor to deny ____ medical service in any walk _____.

             He was a Democrat and while living in a Republican county, made _____ of it, being allowed to sit ____ county board in Republican _______.  In Democratic years, he _____ have power.  His political re____ was never great, for a member of the health staff of the state was ____y state job he held, and ____ this he resigned some time ago.

             Funeral services were held yesterday (Thursday) afternoon at the Methodist church at Ullin, Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating and interment was in the Ullin Cemetery.

             There survives him three sons, ____ of Chicago and John and ____ of Ullin and one daughter, Mrs. Raymond Britton of Cairo.  He left three brothers, Arch, of Tamaroa, __ill of America, and M. P. of ____, Oklahoma; and one sister, ____ Neidstine of Murphysboro.  There are two grandchildren.  Besides these, there are many relatives and numerous friends who are left to mourn his loss.

 

FORMER RESIDENT OF OLMSTED DIES

             Word has been received of the death of Ed Dover, age 71, formerly of Olmsted, who died at his home in Campbell, Mo., Saturday after an illness of several weeks.  Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock in Campbell.

             (His marker in Woodlawn Cemetery in Campbell, Dunklin Co., Mo., reads:  Edward Dover Born Oct. 14, 1871, Died Aug. 10, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Aug 1940:

OBITUARY

SUSAN JAMES GREEN

             Susane James Green was born Jan. 14, 1844, in Hickman County, Ky., daughter of parents who were slaves.  She herself was born before the days of freedom.

             She married Wise James and moved to Perks, March 25, 1904.  During the past 36 years every citizen, young and old, who has lived in Perks has known and loved her and learned to call her Aunt Susan.  She found her way into the hearts of all and many of us remember the days when Aunt Susan could be heard coming down the street, humming a good Christian hymn and finding her way to some home to do a deed of kindness.  Many years of her life were spent in caring for little children and helping the parents when help was needed.  The nights were never too dark nor the days too cold or hot for Aunt Susan to come when needed.  Her life was a living example of God’s promise to man that your years shall be three-score and ten and by your goodness your days shall be prolonged.  When we think of this promise we do not wonder that Aunt Susan lived to see 96 years, seven months and two days.

             She bore her illness patiently.  She told her nephew George only last week, “I feel very well.  I am going on.”—never complaining of her illness.  There were always the words, “Please” and “Thank you” on her lips.  When her last hours drew near she began singing, “And must I be in Judgment called, and answer in that day, For every idle thought and every word I say?  Yes, every secret of my heart shall shortly be made known, When I receive my just deserts for all that I have done.”

             Faithful to the end, Aunt Susan left us peacefully on August 16, 1940.  She had at her side her devoted niece, Katie Stubblefield, whom she had reared from a little girl.  She also leaves five grand-nieces and five grand-nephews.

             The Rev. Crosslin conducted the funeral services.  Burial was in Cypress Grove Cemetery.—Contributed.

             (Her death certificate states that Susan Green was born 14 Jan 1844, in Kentucky, died 16 Aug 1940, in Pulaski Co., Ill., in Cypress Grove Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Moses Green.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Wife of Congressman Keller Dies in Boston Sanitarium

             Mrs. Olive Robertson Keller, wife of Congressman Kent E. Keller, died Monday morning, August 19, in a Boston sanitarium.  She had been an invalid for many years.  Congressman Keller was in Boston at the time of her death.

             Funeral services were held Thursday at Ava, Illinois, the home of the Keller family.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Aug 1940:

YOUNG BOY DIES TUESDAY

             Lilburn Lloyd, Jr., six-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lilburn Lloyd of Pulaski, passed away at the home of his parents Tuesday morning at 2 o’clock following an illness of two weeks.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by one brother.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday morning at 10:30 o’clock and the cortege was later brought to Fosandale, Ky., where services were held at the Baptist church at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon.  Burial was made in Fosandale Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Lilburn E. Lloyd, Jr., was born 21 Mar 1934, in Miller, Graves Co., Ky., the son of Lilburn Floyd, a native of Carlyle, Ky., and Estelle Burton, a native of Linville, Ky., died 20 Aug 1940, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Kancio Cemetery in Road District 2, Graves Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MARION MINER BURNS TO DEATH:  HELPER INJURED

             Sam Parla, 45, of Marion, died last Tuesday morning in the West Frankfort hospital of burns sustained in an accident in the Wallace Coal Company mine northeast of Marion Monday about 7 p.m.

             Parla, a shot-firer, was preparing to fire shots in the mine to bring down the coal.  He was in the act of opening a 50-pound box of powder when it exploded in his hands.

             A helper, Robert Christ, who was 15 feet away when the blast occurred, was also injured, but his condition is not at present considered serious.

             Parla served in the Italian army during the World War in 1917.

             He is survived by his widow and two children, a son and a daughter.

             Funeral services were conducted from the Catholic church at Marion last Wednesday—Herrin News

             (The death certificate states that Sam Parla, coal miner, of Marion, Ill., World War veteran, was born 25 Jan 1895, in Aragona, Italy, the son of Frank Parla and Susie Cipollo, natives of Aragona, Italy, died 13 Aug 1940, in West Frankfort, Franklin Co., Ill., husband of Rosie Parla, and was buried in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill.  His Social Security death claim gives his birthdate as 17 Jan 1895.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. ADELINE ISOM DIES

             Adeline Isom, age 80, died at her home on a farm near Dongola Thursday evening at 6:30 o’clock after an illness of 4 weeks of duration.

             She is survived by her husband, James Isom, Sr., and the following children:  Lizzie Isom, Dongola; Frank Isom, Stockton, Calif.; Annie E. Carter, Anna; Mary Smoot, Dongola; Eda Miller, Cypress; and James Isom, Jr., of Dongola; and many grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at her residence at two o’clock Saturday afternoon, August 17, conducted by Rev. A. M. Troutman and burial will be made in the Mt. Zion Cemetery.  Elmer J. Ford was in charge of the funeral arrangements.

             (James Isom married Adaline Adams on 14 Sep 1879, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Nimrod C. E. Adams married Pernecy Ann Keller on 1 Jan 1850, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Adeline Isom was born 7 Aug 1860, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Columbus Adams and Neicie Keller, natives of Illinois, died 15 Aug 1940, in Union Co., Ill., wife of James Isom, Sr., and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  At Rest Mother Adeline Isom 1860-1940 Father James Isom 1861-1945.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Boen Tyra, for many years a resident of this community (Grand Chain), passed away at the Anna State Hospital on August 17th.  He had been ill only a few days, death being caused by cerebral hemorrhage.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery, G. A. James conducted the funeral. 

             (The death certificate states that J. B. Tyra, farmer, single, was born in 1871 in Tennessee, the son of Bob Tyra and Lovica Phillips, natives of Tennessee, died 17 Aug 1940, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Aug 1940:

Mrs. Alex Deeslie Dies as Result of Fall from Steps

             Mrs. Alex Deeslie died Tuesday night, Aug. 27, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, from injuries received the previous Saturday at her home on South Reader Avenue, this city, when she fell from the steps, striking a concrete pavement, suffering a broken leg and internal injuries.

             Lorena Auld was born in Harrison County, Ohio, August 22, 1867, the daughter of Samuel A. Auld and Alwilda Holmes Auld, both natives of Ohio.  She was married to Alex Deeslie at Dennison, Ohio, Dec. 22, 1887.  They had known each other as children and had attended the same Sunday school.

             When 13 years of age Mr. Deeslie had started working for a railroad company in Ohio.  On June 25, 1891, he arrived in what is now Mounds to serve as boiler maker for the Illinois Central, Mrs. Deeslie joining him a month or so later.  They have since lived continuously in this community and Mr. Deeslie is now the oldest white man, in point of residence, in Mounds.  Their five children, all daughters, with their father survive Mrs. Deeslie:  Mrs. May Sweaney (whose husband died only last Friday) and Mrs. Florence Doughty of St. Louis, Mrs. Edna McKinzie and Mrs. Wilda McKinzie of Michigan City, Miss., and Mrs. Helen Hunt of Mound City.  Miss Jessie Auld and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun of Mounds, sisters of Mrs. Deeslie, also survive her, as do ten grandchildren.

             On Dec. 22, 1937, Mr. and Mrs. Deeslie celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at their home here.

             Mrs. Deeslie was a member of the Congregational Church of Mounds and also belonged to the Mounds Woman’s Club, the Queen of Egypt Chapter No. 509 O. E. S. of Mound City and Zion Shrine, No. 58 O. W. S. J. of Mound City.

             (Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Mother Lorena Deeslie 1867-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. J. W. Lackey

             Mrs. Eliza Lackey, age 55, passed away at her home in Tamms Sunday morning at 1 o’clock after a lingering illness.

             Surviving her are her husband, J. W. Lackey; one daughter, Mrs. Lelia Waseman of Roxanna; three sons, Rance, Jake and Scott of Tamms; two sisters, Mrs. Dixie Spencer of Tamms and Mrs. Clara Dailey of Mill Creek; two brothers, Harvey and Chester Jordan of East St. Louis; and two half-sisters, Mrs. Frances Shelling of Tamms and Mrs. Thompson of Elco.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church at Tamms Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Hunsacker, pastor, assisted by Rev. A. C. Vick officiating.  Interment was made in Rosehill Cemetery at Pulaski.

             (Levi Jordan, 45, farmer from Mill Creek, Ill., born in Rowan Co., N.C., the son of John Jordan and Mary Yost, married on 22 Feb 1882, in Union Co., Ill., Martha Kerr, 16, from Mill Creek, Ill., born in Whitley Co., Ky., daughter of Hugh Kerr and Matilda Smith.  Her death certificate states that Eliza Lackey, of Road District 7, Township 15 south, Tamms, Ill., was born 11 Mar 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of Levi Jordan and Martha Kerr, died 25 Aug 1940, in Tamms, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of J. W. Lackey, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Liza Jane Lackey.  The marker beside hers reads:  Joseph Wm. Lackey.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Brother of Mrs. C. Ray Scott Meets Tragic Death Aug. 20

             Roy Phelps, farmer of Robbs, Ill., and brother of Mrs. C. R. Scott of this city, died Tuesday, Aug. 20, at Riverside Hospital, Paducah, Ky., from fractures of the skull received at 9 o’clock that morning when according to the Golconda Herald-Enterprise, a dead limb fell on his head while he and other men were cutting timber for a new barn on Phelps’ farm near Renshaw.

             As one tree was felled, it dislodged a dead limb which struck Mr. Phelps and crushed his head.  It also struck Roy Lauderdale and rendered him unconscious for 15 minutes.

             Mr. and Mrs. Scott and their daughter, Mrs. W. H. Berry, husband and son of Detroit, attended the funeral which was held in the Dixon Springs church Thursday afternoon.

             Others from Mounds who attended the funeral were Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the Methodist Church who assisted in the services, Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Stalcup, Mrs. Henry Gunn, Mrs. Clyde Bruce, Mrs. E. C. Buchanan, Mrs. Clarence Beedle, Mrs. James Martin and Mrs. Frank Bour.

             (His death certificate states that Roy Phelps, of rural Pope Co., Ill., farm superintendent, World War veteran, was born 20 Nov 1891, in Dixon Springs, Ill., the son of J. P. Phelps and Elizebeth Ditterline, natives of Dixon Springs, Ill., died 20 Aug 1940, in Riverside Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., of hemorrhage of the brain from tree falling on him, husband of Clara Phelps, and was buried in Kerley Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Son-in-Law of Mounds Couple Dies Friday

             Mr. and Mrs. Alex Deeslie received word Friday last of the death of their son-in-law, Charles C. Sweaney of St. Louis, who died that day following a long illness.  Mrs. Sweaney is the former May Deeslie, their eldest daughter.

             Funeral services were held Monday at 1:30 p.m. at the Roberts Funeral Home in Murphysboro, with burial in a Murphysboro cemetery.  Attending from Mounds were Mr. Deeslie; Miss Jessie Auld and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun, aunts of Mrs. Sweaney; also Mr. Calhoun from Mound City; Mrs. M. C. Hunt, sister of Mrs. Sweaney; and Mr. Hun; from Michigan City, Miss.; another sister, Mrs. Homer McKenzie; Mr. McKinzie and son.  Another sister, Mrs. Harold Doughty of St. Louis, accompanied the Sweaney family to Murphysboro.

             (Charlie Clifford Sweany, of Hurst, Williamson Co., Ill., registered for the draft in 1918 and stated he was born 3 Nov 1881, was an engineer for Missouri Pacific at Bush, Williamson Co., Ill., had an injured left thigh, and his nearest relative was May Sweany. His application for Social Security states he was born in Seymour, Jack Co., Ind., the son of William Sweany and Zilphia A. Scott.  His marker in Tower Grove Cemetery in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill., reads:  Father Charlie C. Sweaney 1881-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. HARRY E. PARKER

             Mrs. Harry E. Parker of Paxton, formerly of Mounds, died Monday, August 26, at her home in Paxton.

             Formerly Miss Blanche Curry of Ullin, she was first married to Sam Sheerer of this city.  She is survived by Mr. Parker and her two sons by her first marriage, Sam Edward Sheerer of Ullin and Dale Sheerer of Paxton; also one brother, James Curry of Ullin.

             (Samuel Curry married Mrs. Phena Thompson on 25 Feb 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William M. Thompson married Peney White on 5 Mar 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Flora Blanche Parker was born 4 Jan 1890, in Illinois, the daughter of Samuel E. and Phena Curry, natives of Pulaski, Ill., died 26 Aug 1940, in Paxton, Ford Co., Ill., wife of Henry Parker, and was buried at Paxton, Ill.  Her marker in Glen Cemetery in Paxton, Ill., reads:  Blanche Parker 1892-1940 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. PAUL ELSNER

             Mrs. Lola Elsner, wife of Paul Elsner, died at her home in Port Huron, Mich., Monday, August 26.

             Mrs. Elsner was the former Lola Benton Britt of this city.  H. C. Elsner, father of Paul Elsner, left Monday night for Port Huron.

             (The Michigan Death Index states that Lola Sadler Elsner died in 1940 in St. Clair Co., Mich.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Connie Sue Thomas, little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Thomas, died August 19, 1940.  She was born Nov. 2, 1939, and was one year, nine months and 17 days old at death.  She is survived by her parents; one brother, Harold Dean; and one sister, Peggy Joan; also her paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas; and her paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilkerson.  (Perks)

             (Her death certificate states that Connie Sue Thomas was born 2 Nov 1938, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Howard Thomas, a native of Dongola, Ill., and Nellie Wilkerson, a native of Perks, Ill., died 19 Aug 1940, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.  Her marker in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery at Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Connie Sue Thomas 1938-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Aug 1940:

SON-IN-LAW OF MOUNDS RESIDENT DIES

             Word has been received stating that Charles C. Sweany died Friday morning at his home in St. Louis following a lingering illness.  Mrs. Sweany was the former Miss May Deeslie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Deeslie of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Roberts Funeral Home in Murphysboro.

             Those attending the funeral from here were A. Deeslie, Miss Jessie Auld and Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Cahorn, all relatives of Mrs. Sweany’s from Mounds; Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Hunt of this city, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. McKenzie and son, and Mrs. Homer McKenzie, husband and son of Michigan City, Miss. Mrs. Harold Doughty and family of St. Louis accompanied the family to Murphysboro.

 

MRS. ALEX DEESLIE DIES

             Mrs. Lorena Deeslie, age 73, of Mounds, died at St. Mary’s Hospital Tuesday evening at 11:53 o’clock as the result of  injuries received from a fall at her home in Mounds last Saturday.

             Mrs. Deeslie fell from the back steps to a concrete slab, suffering a compound fracture of her right leg.  Her husband, who is hard of hearing, did not hear her calls, and she lay for quite a while before she was discovered and suffered a considerable loss of blood for the bone protruded though the flesh.

             She was taken to the hospital and the best care given.  Shock, loss of blood and the seriousness of the injury were more than she could overcome.

             Besides her husband, Alex Deeslie, she is survived by five daughters, Mrs. Harold Doughty and Mrs. May Sweaney of St. Louis, Mrs. Homer McKenzie and Mrs. J. R. McKenzie of Michigan City, Miss., and Mrs. M. C. Hunt of Mound City; two sisters, Miss Jessie Auld and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun of Mounds and ten grandchildren.

             Mrs. Deeslie was a member of the Queen of Egypt Chapter No. 509 O. E. S. of Mound City and Zion Shrine, No. 58, O. W. S. J. of Mound City and also the Mounds Woman’s Club.

             Funeral services will be held at the First Congregational Church in Mounds, of which she was a devout member, this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o’clock with the Reverend S. C. Benninger officiating.  The four sons-in-law and two eldest grandsons of the deceased will serve as casket bearers.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service will be in charge of arrangements.

 

OBITUARY

             Connie Sue Thomas was born November 2, 1938, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Albert Thomas.  She departed this life August 19, 1940, age 1 year, 9 months and 17 days.  She leaves to mourn her going, besides her parents, one brother, Harold Dean; and a sister, Peggy Joan; her paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas; her maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilkerson; and a host of other relatives and friends.

A Sunbeam from our home is gone.

             A light we’ll see no more

Until we meet with Connie Sue

             Upon the other shore.

A precious one from us has gone.

             A voice we loved is still.

A place is vacant in our hearts

             That never can be filled.

God, in his wisdom, has recalled

             The one we loved He given.

Her body lies slumbering here

             Her soul sleeps safely in Heaven.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Sep 1940:

Mrs. Martha George

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist church in Ullin for Mrs. Martha A. George, 86, who passed away Sunday, Aug. 25, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. R. Farmer in St. Louis.  Grandmother George, as she was lovingly called, was born at McMinder, Tenn., on March 1, 1854.  She leaves two sons, John of Ullin and Wallan of St. Louis; two daughters, Mrs. Antha Doles of McClure and Mrs. Della Farmer of St. Louis; 24 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren.  Mr. George preceded her in death 11 years ago.  She was a member of the Ullin Baptist Church.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer McKenzie and son, Bobby, J. R. McKenzie and son, Deeslie, who were called here by the death of Mrs. A. Deeslie, mother of the Mesdames McKenzie, returned to their homes in Michigan City, Miss., Saturday.  Mrs. J. R. McKenzie remained for a longer visit with her father.

 

Mrs. May Sweaney and sons Charles Calvert and C. C. Sweaney and daughters, Mrs. Jack Hofer and Miss Florence Calvert, also Harold W. Doughty and daughter, Joan, returned to their homes in St. Louis Sunday, having been called here by the death of Mrs. A. Deeslie.  Mrs. Doughty remained for a longer stay with her father.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the acts of kindness, messages of sympathy and beautiful floral offerings received from our many friends during our recent sad bereavement in the loss of our beloved wife and mother, Lorena I. Deeslie.

A. Deeslie and Family

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Sep 1940:

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the acts of kindness, messages of sympathy and beautiful floral offerings received from our many friends during our recent sad bereavement in the loss of our beloved wife and mother, Lorena I. Deeslie.

A. Deeslie and Family

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Sep 1940:

Three Killed in Auto Accident near Ullin Saturday Morn

             Three persons dead and one seriously injured was the toll of an auto accident which occurred one mile north of Ullin on U. S. Highway 51 at four o’clock Saturday morning.

             Floyd Omer, 46, his wife, Grace, 44, both of Camp Point, their daughter, Mary Pearce, 23, wife of Warren F. Pearce, 24, of Canton, were killed and young Pearce was seriously injured when their car struck a culvert abutment.  Omer and his daughter, Mrs. Pearce, died at the place of accident, Mrs. Omer at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, at 7:40 a.m., where she and her son-in-law had been taken in an ambulance shortly after the crash.

             Pearce, who suffered brain concussion, deep cut on head, fractured ribs and a foot injury, was unable to remember who was driving or what caused the accident.  There was no other car involved.  The four had been driving all night, having planned to reach Cranshaw, Miss., at noon on Saturday for a visit with Mrs. Omer’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Siegler, and her brother, Barnett Siegler, a funeral director.  Omer was an automobile salesman.

             Pearce, an employee of the International Harvester Co., is the son of Dr. Warren F. Pearce of Quincy and had attended the business school of Harvard University.

             Dr. Pearce was called to Cairo as were the parents of Mrs. Omer.  Young Pearce, although severely injured, was taken north by his father.  The bodies of the three victims were returned to Camp Point, where funeral services were held Monday afternoon.

             (Robert A. Omer married Jessie B. Dewey on 29 Dec 1881, in Adams Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Floyd Omer, car dealer, states he was born about 1892 in Camp Point, Ill., the son of Robert Omer and Jesse Dewey, died 7 Sep 1940, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Grace Omer, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Camp Point, Adams Co., Ill.  Floyd D. Omer registered for the draft in Camp Point, Ill., in 1917 and his birthdate was recorded as 16 Nov 1890, while his occupation was battery serviceman and vulcanizer.  The death certificate of Grace Omer states she was born 17 Oct 1893, in Moody, Mo., the daughter of Charles L. Sigler, a native of Pana, Ill., and Mary J. Pumphrey, a native of Viola, Ark., died 7 Sep 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Floyd D. Omer, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Camp Point, Ill.  The death certificate of Mary O. Pearce states she was born 6 Jan 1918, in Camp Point, Ill., the daughter of Floyd Omer, a native of Camp Point, Ill., and Grace Seigler, a native of Moody, Mo., died 7 Sep 1940, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Warren F. Pearce, Jr., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Infant Dies

             James Edward Davis, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Davis of Karnak, died at birth Sunday night about 10 o’clock.

             A brief service was held Monday afternoon about 1:30 at their home in Karnak, conducted by Rev. Mr. Cummins and burial was made in the Mt. Zion Cemetery near Dongola.  Elmer J. Ford of Dongola directed the funeral.

             The baby leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Davis of Karnak, and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Davis of Dongola, and Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Taylor of Karnak.

             (According to the death certificate, James Edward Davis was stillborn 8 Sep 1940, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Howard Davis and Juanita Taylor, natives of Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

.

Mrs. Ruth Oliver

             Mrs. Ruth Oliver, age 53, passed away at her home near Pulaski, Monday, Sept. 9, after an illness of several weeks.  Previously Mrs. Oliver had lived in Mound City, but moved to Pulaski in 1934.

             She is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Libby Staten and Mrs. Florence Benton of Mound City, Mrs. Birdie Salmon of Cairo and Mrs. Roxie Roach of Moline, Mich.; two sons, Ralph of Detroit and Hubert of Pulaski; and a brother, Marion Futrill of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Mr. Leathers officiating.  Burial was in Rose Hill Cemetery, with G. A. James in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Ruth Oliver was born 10 Jan 1887, in Tennessee, the daughter of Henry Futrill, a native of Tennessee, died 9 Sep 1940, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widow of Charles Oliver, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Charles Oliver 1878-1936 Ruth L. Oliver 1887-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Not Indicted

             Word came from Murphysboro Wednesday to the effect that a Jackson County grand jury had returned a no-true bill in the fatal shooting of L. C. Peterson, a professor at the Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondale, whose wife had been charged with murder at the time of his death several months ago.

             State’s Attorney Clarence A. Wright was quoted as saying that the murder charge against Mrs. Peterson and her bail of $10,000 would be dismissed as a result of the grand jury action.

             Mrs. Peterson had admitted that a gun she was handling was discharged and caused her husband’s death, but contended the shot had been fired accidentally.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Sep 1940:

THREE PERSONS KILLED IN AUTO CRASH NEAR ULLIN

             Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Omer of Camp Point, Ill., and Mrs. Mary Pearce of Benton, Ill., were fatally injured when the car in which they were riding struck a culvert abutment on Route 51 near Ullin, Saturday morning.

             Mr. Omer and Mrs. Pearce died at the scene of the accident and Mrs. Omer died within a few hours at St. Mary’s Hospital.  Another in the car, Warren F. Pearce, Jr., 24, of Benton, Ill., husband of Mary Pearce, was severely injured.  He suffered fractured ribs, broken bones in his right foot and head injuries.  He was removed to his home Sunday by his father, Dr. Pearce of Quincy, Ill.

             Funeral services for Mr. and Mrs. Omer and Mary, their daughter, were held Sunday afternoon.

             The couples were going to Crenshaw, Miss., to visit relatives when the accident occurred.  It is thought Mrs. Omer was driving the car and that she fell asleep, the __vement and striking the abutment without any attempt to stop.

 

RESIDENT OF PULASKI DIES

             Mrs. Ruth Oliver, age 53, passed away at her home near Pulaski, Ill., Monday morning after an illness of several weeks.  Prior to 1934, Mrs. Oliver was a resident of this city.

             She is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Libby Staten and Mrs. Florence Benton of this city, Mrs. Birdie Salmon of Cairo, and Mrs. Roxie Roach of Moline, Mich.; two sons, Ralph of Detroit and Herbert of Pulaski; and a brother, Marion Futrill of this city.

             Funeral services were held at the Rose Hill Church in Pulaski Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Leather, pastor, officiated.  Burial was made in Rose Hill Cemetery at the side of her husband.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

INFANT SON DIES

             James Edward Davis, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Davis of Karnak, died at birth Sunday night about 10 o’clock.

             Services were held Monday afternoon at 1:30 at the parents’ home in Karnak, conducted by Rev.  Cummins and burial was made in the Mt. Zion Cemetery near Dongola.  Elmer J. Ford Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             The baby leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Davis of Karnak; and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Davis of Dongola, and Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Taylor of Karnak.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Sep 1940:

John Merchant

             John Merchant, age 80, of Grand Chain, died at a hospital in Anna Wednesday morning, September 18, at 2:30 o’clock.

             Mr. Merchant was born in Mound City, but had lived in Grand Chain for 70 years.

             He is survived by four brothers:  J. M. of Grand Chain, Ernest of Memphis, Tenn., E. L. of Los Angeles, Calif., and W. T. Merchant of Texarkana, Texas; also one sister, Mrs. Mary Gaimeet of Indianapolis, Ind.

             Funeral services were held at the home of his brother, J. M. Merchant in Grand Chain Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was in Grand Chain cemetery with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge.

             (John H. Merchant married Augusta Jane Drake on 20 Nov 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John H. Merchant, 33, farmer, of New Grand Chain, Ill., born in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of John Merchant and S. C. Love, married 2nd on 27 Dec 1893, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Anna Goodman, 26, of Cobden, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Thomas Goodman and Nancy Biggerstaff The death certificate of John Merchant states that he was born about 1860 in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of John Merchant, a native of South Carolina,  died 18 Sep 1940, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Sep 1940:

FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

             John Merchant, age 80 years, died at a hospital in Anna Wednesday morning at 2:30 o’clock.  Mr. Merchant was born in Mound City, but has spent the past 70 years of his life in Grand Chain.

             Surviving him are four brothers, J. M. of Grand Chain, Ernest of Memphis, E. L. of Los Angeles, Calif., W. T., Texarkana, Tex.; one sister, Mrs. Mary Jaimet of Indianapolis, Ind.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the residence of J. M. Merchant by Rev. S. C. Benninger.  Interment was made at Grand Chain cemetery.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

RESIDENT OF ULLIN DIES

             Ted Brown, age 31, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo Monday evening at 5:20 o’clock after an illness of two and one-half months.

             Mr. Brown was born in Arthur, Ind., and had made his home for the past nine years in Ullin.  He is survived by his wife, Flora Belle; a daughter, Marian, age 9; two sons, Teddie, age 5, and Carl, age 1; and one brother, Fred of East St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held at the Ullin Baptist Church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Tellis Young officiating.  Interment was made in Butter Ridge Cemetery.  W. J. Rhymer Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (The birth certificate if Teddy C. Brown, the son of Gus Brown and Mary Risley, was recorded in Daviess Co., Ind.  His death certificate states that Teddy Calvin Brown, day laborer, of Ullin, Ill., was born 20 May 1909, in Arthur, Ind., the son of Augustus Brown and Mary Jane Risley, died 16 Sep 1940, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Flora Bell Brown, and was buried in Butter Ridge Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Ted Brown May 20, 1909 Sept. 16, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Sep 1940:

Mrs. Sarah E. Taylor

             Mrs. Sarah E. Taylor, age 71, passed away at her home in Karnak, Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 19.

             She is survived by the following children:  Mrs. Walter Billingsly, Germantown, Tenn., Mrs. Harry Richardson, Belknap, Roy Taylor, Karnak, Mrs. Bessie Whitnel, Anna, Mrs. Lennie Bolen, Karnak, Mrs. Helen Whitnel, Vienna, and Mrs. Edna Hill, Karnak; also a sister, Mrs. Terry McCormick, Madisonville, Ky.; and one brother, Joe Arnold of Memphis.

             Funeral services were held Friday at 2:00 p.m. at the Methodist church in Karnak.  The Rev. S. C. Wright officiated, assisted by Rev. Cummins.

             Casket bearers were Sam Briley, George Bunker, Fred Reed, B. M. Altenberger, George Barber, and David Main.

             Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Joppa with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (John Franklin Taylor married Sarah O. Arnold on 3 Oct 1886, in Massac Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Sarah E. Taylor, of Karnak, divorced, was born 19 Jul 1869, in Joppa, Ill., the daughter of Jim Arnold, a native of Joppa, Ill., died 18 Sep 1940, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Sep 1940:

MOUND CITY MAN FOUND DEAD AT HIS HOME SUNDAY

             Jack Roach, age 65, of this city, was found dead at his home Sunday afternoon.

             Mr. Roach, a resident of Mound City for several years, was the husband of the late Betty Oliver of Mound City.  Mr. Roach was a part-time employee of Swisshelm Veneer Mill.  It was reported that Mr. Roach had been troubled with his heart and had complained of feeling ill to his friends early Sunday.

             He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Fannie Blanks of Blandville, Ky.

             Burial was made Monday morning at 11:30 o’clock in the Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds.  G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge.

             (The death certificate of Jack Roach, laborer, of Mound City, Ill., single, states that he was born about 1875, died 22 Sep 1940, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Oct 1940:

Henry H. Hale Dies Suddenly Sunday Morn

             Henry H. Hale, age 60 years, died Sunday morning, September 29, soon after arising.  While he had been in failing health for several months, his death was unexpected.

             Mr. Hale is survived by his widow; one daughter, Mrs. Mark Yoakum of Charleston; one son, Melvin, of Mounds; three step-children, Walter Ozee of Dupo, Miles Ozee of Benton and Mrs. John Malley of Mounds; four brothers, Edward of Water Valley, Miss., Royal of Mound City, Charles of Marked Tree, Ark., and Hamilton of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Adolphus Clifford of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Charles Renfro of Hollywood, Calif.; 16 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren, besides many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (He registered for the draft in 1918 and lived in Miller City, Alexander Co., Ill., and was a farm laborer for Henry Almond Calvert.  His nearest relative was listed as Mary Elizabeth Hale.  According to his death certificate, Henry Harrison Hale, railroad car inspector, of Mounds, Ill., was born 21 Mar 1880, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Robert E. Hale, a native of Kentucky, and Mary McDowell, a native of Little Rock, Ark., died 29 Sep 1940, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mary Hale, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker there reads:  Father Henry H. Hale 1880-1940 Mother Mary E. Hale 1872-1948.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Arthur Treece

             Mrs. Pauline Treece, age 31 of near Buncombe, passed away at Hale-Willard Hospital in Anna Sunday night, Sept. 29.

             Surviving her are her husband, Arthur; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Cavitt of Buncombe; one brother, Robert Cavit of Belknap; four sisters, Mrs. Leona Childs of Belknap, Mrs. Tessie Clark of Karnak, Doris Cavitt of Karnak, Mrs. Geneva Baggs of Buncombe, and Mrs. Mabel Treece of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held at the New Hope Church Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock with Rev. Eli Dunn officiating.  Casket bearers were William Clark, Hale Beggs, Elbert Treece, Herschel Childs, Von Boyd, and Wayne Elkins.  Interment was in Webb Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (According to her death certificate, Pauline C. Treece, of Buncombe, Ill., was born 17 Jan 1909, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Sylvester Cavitt and Dora Nibb, natives of Johnson Co., Ill., died 29 Sep 1940, in Union Co., Ill., the wife of Arthur Treece, and was buried in Webb Cemetery in Road District 4, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Pauline Treece Jan. 17, 1909 Sept. 29, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Oct 1940:

PERKS NEGRO KILLED IN SHOOTING NEAR CHURCH

             John Baker, Negro of Perks, was fatally wounded on the schoolhouse grounds near the Perks church around noon Sunday morning just as preparations were being made to serve a church dinner.  The assailant, Oscar Harbor, Negro, attempted to take his own life, it is reported, and failed, although he is in the Cairo hospital critically wounded.

             It is reported that Harbor was angry at Baker because the latter had refused to go out with him Saturday night.  Harbor was also reported drunk at the time of the shooting.

             Harbor was held over for action of the grand jury after a coroner’s jury recommended that he be held without bond for the shooting.

             (His death certificate states that John Baker, laborer, was born 11 Aug 1920, in Illinois, the son of Oliver Baker and Mary Pack, natives of Illinois, died 29 Sep 1940, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Cypress Grove Cemetery in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOUNDS RESIDENT DIES

             H. H. Hale, age 60, passed away at his home in Mounds Sunday morning at 7:15 o’clock following an illness of four months.

             He is survived by his widow; one daughter, Mrs. Mark Yoakum of Charleston; one son, Melvin of Mound City; three step-children, Walter Ozee of Dupo, Miles Ozee of Benton and Mrs. John Malley of Mounds; four brothers, Edward of Water Valley, Miss., Royal of Mound City, Charles of Marked Tree, Ark., and Hamilton of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Adolphus Clifford of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Charles Renfro of Hollywood, Calif.; 16 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren, besides many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Sunday’s shooting scrape happened at the Magdelene School, which occurred by Oscar Harbor who shot and killed Johnny Baker and then ran off and shot himself twice.  He is now in the Cairo hospital and is improving.  (Perks)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Oct 1940:

Brother of Mrs. M. A. Pulley Dies Friday in East St. Louis

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