Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

6 Jan. - 29 Dec. 1939

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Jan 1939:

Clifford Gunn Dies Saturday after Long Illness

             Clifford Gunn, merchant, died Saturday morning, December 31, at his home in Pulaski following a lingering illness of 18 months, much of this time having been spent in a hospital.

             Mr. Gunn was the son of the late George Wesley Gunn and Eugenia Rendleman Gunn of Villa Ridge, his father having passed away on November 26.  He is survived by his wife, Nettie Weiting Gunn; a daughter, Helen Jeanette; and a son, Harry Clifford Gunn, all of Pulaski; his mother; one sister, Miss Agnes Gunn, both of Villa Ridge; four brothers, George W. Gunn of Mound City, Don Gunn of Villa Ridge, Henry Gunn of Mounds and Ray Gunn of Maywood.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon in Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, Rev. S. H. Smith officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds, George C. Crain directing.

             (D. Wesley Gunn, 28, farmer from Alto Pass, Ill., born in Canada, son of George Gunn and Margaret Swane, married Eugenia Rendleman, 19, from Alto Pass, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Henry Rendleman and Agness Head on 1 Apr 1883, in Union Co., Ill.  When Clifford registered for the draft in 1918, he worked in Villa Ridge at the box factory.  According to his death certificate, Clifford Gunn, grocery merchant, was born 18 Oct 1883, in Alto Pass, Ill., the son of Wesley Gunn, a native of London, Canada, and Eugenia Rendleman, a native of Alto Pass, Ill., died 31 Dec 1938, in Pulaski, Ill., husband of Nettie Weiting, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Clifford Gunn 1883-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Funeral Services for David Brown Held Sunday

             Funeral services for David Brown, who met his death Thursday evening through an accident, were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Church of God with Rev. Martin officiating, assisted by Rev. Wilson of Cairo.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery, David’s young playmates serving as casket bearers, as follows:  Ernest Denham, Billy Denham, Calvin Wilson, Wilford Lowery, Victor Bucher, and Billy Ewing.  J. T. Ryan directed the funeral.

             The accident which caused the death of this 11-year-old boy, son of Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Brown, occurred at the Parmly home west of town Thursday afternoon, December 29, when a shotgun in the hands of Eugene Parmly, age 9, was discharged.  The children were under the impression that the gun was not loaded and it was said that young Parmley had snapped the gun several times before a shell left in the chamber exploded, the charge entering young Brown’s left leg near the torso.  These two boys and a third, Wilford Lowery, 9, were the only persons present at the time.  Before they could get help the boy had lost a great deal of blood and by the time George Moses, living between Parmly’s and Mounds, had reached the scene of the accident and had brought him to a local doctor in his pick-up truck, it was decided that a blood transfusion was the only hope of saving the child’s life.  He was taken by ambulance to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, but died soon after reaching the hospital.

             The boy leaves his parents, four brothers, Clarence of California, Billie, John and Morris at home; and one sister, Mary Ruth, also at home.  Also his grandparents, Mrs. Maggie Brown of Blandville, Ky., and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Decker of Mounds.  He was a favorite of his playmates and at school and had worked as a caddy, at the Egyptian Golf Club.  His father is an employee of the Illinois Central and the family residence is west of town just over the I. C. viaduct.

             (According to his death certificate, David Brown, school boy, was born 23 Jul 1927, in Mounds, Ill., the son of I. T. Brown, a native of Boxville, Ky., and Shellie Deckerd, a native of Elizabethtown, Ky., died 29 Dec 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker there has his picture and reads:  David L. Brown July 23, 1927 Dec. 29, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A. L. Watson

             Alaric L. Watson of Mound City, died Sunday night, January 1, at 11:55 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, following an emergency operation performed the day before.

             Mr. Watson was born in Mound City in 1860 and had therefore reached the age of 78 years.  While much of his life had been spent in Cairo he had lived for the past ten years in Mound City with his sister, Mrs. Alonzo Shelton.  He was a charter member of the Cairo Typographical Union and was foreman of the Cairo Bulletin for more than 30 years.  He had retired on pension from the Union some years ago.

             He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Joseph Murion and Mrs. Thomas Horner of Memphis, Tenn.; two sons, Earl K. Watson of Mound City and Clyde Watson of Cairo; one sister, Mrs. Shelton; several nieces and nephews.  His wife died in 1916.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Mound City, of which he was a member.  Interment was in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (Alaric Watson married Ruth Mallady on 18 Feb 1886, in Saline Co., Ill.  Alonzo H. Shelton, 36, married Mary Watson, 29, on 30 Oct 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Alaric Lexington Watson was born 8 Aug 1860, in Mound City, Ill., the son of James Madison Watson and Martha Carol Marshall, died 1 Jan 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Ruth Watson, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Charles R. Mott

             Mrs. Charles E. Mott, the former Miss Ella Pyatt of Villa Ridge, a foster daughter of Mrs. Ambrose W. Pyatt, died December 20, 1938, in a hospital at Blythe, Arizona, and was buried December 21 at Quartzsite.

             Mrs. Mott is survived by her husband; her foster mother and a foster brother, D. A. Pyatt of Villa Ridge; also a stepdaughter, Mrs. J. M. Woods of Los Angeles, Calif.

             (Her marker in Hi Jolly Cemetery in Quartzite, La Paz, Arizona, reads:  Ella M. Mott 1874-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Gunn of Maywood, who were called to Pulaski by the death of Mr. Gunn’s brother, Clifford, were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gunn the first of the week.

 

Henry Gunn and family were called to Villa Ridge Saturday morning by the death of Mr. Gunn’s brother, Clifford Gunn.  This is the second death in his family in a little over a month, his father, George W. Gunn, having died November 26.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Jan 1939:

DIED FROM FRACTURED SKULL

             Arthur Deaton, 57, living two miles northeast of New Burnsides, died Wednesday afternoon of last week after falling from a barn loft at his home earlier in the day.

             Deaton and his wife were at the barn preparing to feed the stock.  When he climbed to the barn loft to throw down some hay, it is thought that his foot slipped and he fell through a hole in the loft floor, falling at the feet of Mrs. Deaton.  She carried him to the house, while he was still conscious and upon examination the doctor reported a fractured skull and spine injury.

             He is survived by his widow and a daughter, Mrs. Frieda Heathmar, by a former marriage.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Reynoldsburg church with interment in the family lot.

             (Arthur Deaton married Sarah E. Ross in December 1903, in Williamson Co., Ill.  He married Amanda Elizabeth Lollis on 16 Nov 1926, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Arthur Deaton, general farmer, was born 22 Jul 1881, in Stonefort, Ill., the son of James S. Deaton and Paulina Lollis, natives of Alabama, died 28 Dec 1938, in Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Amanda Deaton, and was buried in Reynoldsburg Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Sarah Deaton 1883-1915 Arthur Deaton 1881-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Jan 1939:

William Earle Dies Suddenly Thursday Eve.

             William Earle, age 79 years, died Thursday at 4 p.m., at his home on North Blanche Avenue following a cerebral hemorrhage which he suffered Wednesday morning at 6 o’clock.

             Mr. Earle for many years was an engineer in the employ of the Illinois Central System and had retired on a pension some years ago.  He was a charter member of the Mounds Methodist church.  He was intensely religious, firm in his convictions of right and wrong and had the respect of the entire community.  In former years he had served faithfully as a member of the Mounds School Board.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Emma Poole Earle; one son, Harry Earle of Centralia, Ill.; two grandsons, Billy and James Earle of Centralia; one sister, Mrs. Annie Booth of Memphis, Tenn.  A son, Walter, died in 1912.

             The body was taken to the James Funeral Home, where it will remain until 2:30 Saturday afternoon, when funeral services will be held at the M. E. church.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, William Earle, engineer, was born 12 Nov 1859, in Myersberg, Tenn., the son of Thomas Earle and Sallie Roberts, died 12 Jan 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Jan 1939:

Titus Kessler and Harvey Johnson, both of Ullin, while investigating trouble with their car, were struck by another car and badly injured Saturday night at McClure.  Both men were taken to the hospital at Cape Girardeau and upon examination, Titus was found to be badly crushed.  Johnson’s injuries were not as serious.

             Kessler died Tuesday and his body was taken to the Ford Funeral Home at Dongola where it was prepared for burial and then removed to his home in Ullin.

             Funeral services were held at the Mt. Pisgah Church near Wetaug Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. William E. Bridges.  Burial was made in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

             Surviving are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kessler; and a son, Carl Eugene, of Ullin; two brothers and two sisters.

             He was a member of the M. W. of A. Lodge of Ullin and members of the lodge will serve as pallbearers.

             (Walter Kesler, 21, farmer, born in Wetaug, Ill., son of Monroe Kesler and Mary Ritchie, married Sallie Miller, 19, born in Wetaug, Ill., daughter of Joseph Miller and Alice Sowers, on 28 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Titus Kesler married Cynthia Provo on 21 Jan 1932, in Marble Hill, Bollinger Co., Mo.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  McTitus Kesler Son Dec. 22, 1911 Jan. 9, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

VETERAN JOHNSON COUNTY TEACHER DIED LAST WEEK

             Charlie Peterson, widely known former teacher, succumbed to an attack of bronchial asthma early Tuesday morning of last week at his home one mile east of Buncombe.  Mr. Peterson became seriously ill last Saturday, the acute bronchial condition following a cold.

             He was about 73 years of age and had taught thirty terms of school before his retirement several years ago.  He was born at Old Reynoldsburg and was a son of one of that erstwhile prosperous town’s merchants, Capt. William Peterson.

             Surviving are one son, one daughter, the widow, one grandson, and one granddaughter.  The funeral was delayed until Friday in order that the grandson, Paul Peterson, of Sidney, Neb., might arrive.

             (W. W. Peterson married Mary N. Gray on 10 Dec 1857, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Charles Peterson married Alice Elkins on 20 Sep 1890, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Charles Peterson, school teacher, of Buncombe, Ill., was born 23 Nov 1865, in Reynoldsburg, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Will Peterson and Mary U. Gray, natives of Illinois, died 6 Jan 1939, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Alice Peterson, and was buried at Vienna, Ill.  He was buried in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MARY L. SPIELMAN

             Mrs. Mary Lenora Spielman, 73, passed away Monday evening at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where she had been a patient for the past five weeks.

             Mrs. Spielman was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Wilson of America, pioneer residents of Pulaski County, and has spent almost her entire lifetime in this locality.  She is survived by her husband, O. A. Spielman, of Gillette, Wyoming, who was at her bedside at the time of her death.  A niece, Mrs. Roy Pierce of St. Louis, and one nephew, Charles Wilson, of Hynes, Calif., also survive.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the James Funeral Home in this city, with Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo, officiating.  The pallbearers were W. E. Schnaare, D. Brelsford, Walter Schwartz, George Lewis, Will Mason, and Ernest Steers, all neighbors of Mrs. Spielman.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Mary Leonora Spielman was born 28 Feb 1865, in America, Ill., the daughter of William Wilson, a native of Pennsylvania, died 9 Jan 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the wife of O. A. Spielman, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Nora Spielman Wife Feb. 28, 1865 Jan. 9, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. OCTAVY STEPHENSON

             Mary Octavy Stephenson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Stokes was born June 1st, 1868.  She was united in marriage to Weslie McClellan and to this union was born one daughter, Ethel, who died in infancy.  She was later married to John T. Lynch and to this union two children were born, William of Ullin and Rosie, who died at the age of 3 years.  On May 17th, 1900, she was united in marriage with John Stephenson.

             Surviving besides her husband, she leaves to mourn her departure, one son, William Lynch, of Ullin; one brother, Tom Stokes, of Grand Chain; a grandson, Scottie Lynch, of Ullin; and many other relatives and a host of friends; a half-sister, Mrs. Paul Geentally, of Champaign, Illinois; William Stokes; a half-brother, Hallie Fitzgerald, also of Pulaski.

             She departed this life at her home near Grand Chain, Ill., Saturday, Jan. 7, 1939, at the age of 71 years, 6 months, and 7 days.

             Services were held in the Congregational Church in Grand Chain Monday afternoon at two o’clock.

             Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, officiated.  The Wilson Quartet furnished the music.

             Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.

             (Thomas W. McClelland married Mary O. Stokes on 6 Mar 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John Lynch married Mrs. Mary O. Stokes on 1 Jun 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John W. Stephenson married Mary Lynch on 17 Feb 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  W. H. H. Stokes married Mary J. Coble on 23 Dec 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mary O. Stephenson was born 1 Jun 1867, in Illinois, the daughter of W. H. H. Stokes, a native of Kentucky, and Mary Cable, a native of Tennessee, died 7 Jan 1939, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of John Stephenson, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Mother Mary O. Stephenson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MOREHEAD

             Funeral services for Mrs. Hannah Morehead, who passed away Thursday morning of last week at her home in this city, were held Saturday afternoon at the family residence.  Rev. Overby, of Barlow, Ky., a former pastor of the First Baptist Church of this city, officiated.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery, with G. A. James in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Hannah Catherine Morehead was born 23 Dec 1864, in Arkansas, daughter of Allen Tally, died 5 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Henry Morehead, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OLD WORTHINGTON HOME BURNED FIRST OF WEEK

             The old Worthington home near Olmstead, long the home of the Worthington family and with only one member still living in it, burned the early part of this week.  The building, erected before the Civil War, was once the finest residence at that point, Worthington’s Landing, and in its spacious rooms, about eight or ten in number, many things happened.

             As the years went by, and days not so fortunate came on, three members of the family, three sisters, were left in the place.  Then two of them died, and only one remained at the time it burned.

             With the fire perished many old antiques and many things of historical value.

             The house had two fireplaces in four or five rooms, had two wide stairways that were of walnut, and some of its furniture dated way back to the days of canopy beds.  In fact, canopy beds were in that house, only the tops had been sawed off because of the labor incurred in dusting them off.

             But the burning of the home removes a landmark, perhaps a full century old, around which many stories can be told and the cemetery standing nearby will, in time, be about the only landmark of a once prominent and influential family.          

             (The cemetery mentioned may be the Calvin-Barber Cemetery northeast of Olmsted, where Isaac and Sarah Worthington are buried.—Darrel Dexter)

FORMER LOCAL RESIDENT DIES IN CALIFORNIA

             Mrs. Mary W. Bradley, a resident of Berkley, Calif., since 1920, passed away December 19, 1938, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. D. Geldert.  She was 83 at the time of her death and had been in failing health for the past year.

             Mrs. Bradley came to Mound City about 48 or 50 years ago as the bride of L. M. Bradley, a young and prominent lawyer in this city.  They were married in Chicago by Rev. Harris, who was then pastor of the Mound City Congregational Church and was a close friend of Mr. Bradley.

             Upon moving to Mound City they went to housekeeping in the Phoenix Block, which was erected in 1882 by Bradley and Dan Hogan.  When their first child, Lucille, was born they built their home on the corner of Pearl and N. First streets.  Both buildings remain standing in memory of their enterprises in this city.  Later, Mr. Bradley purchased Hogan’s interest in the Phoenix Block and it was at this time, during some repair work, that Mrs. Bradley had the inscription, “Alcohol is Poison” put into the floor of the entrance of the building.

             Mrs. Bradley was quite active in both church and civic work and upon moving to California transferred her membership to the Congregational Church in Berkeley and was quite active in church work there.  She was also an active member in the Berkeley League of Women Voters and was a member of the Berkeley Woman’s City Club.

             Mr. Bradley, who died about 20 years ago in Carbondale, where they were then residing, was quite prominent in politics and was state’s attorney for a number of years.

             Surviving are her daughter, Mrs. Lucille Geldert of Berkeley; a son, Attorney Lloyd M. Bradley of Carbondale; and one sister, Mrs. N. M. White, also of Berkeley.

 

YOUTH KILLED SELF OVER WRECK COSTING $100

             Raymond Trexler of Alto Pass, living on a farm near there, killed himself last Thursday because he could not face telling a car owner that he had wrecked the car the night before and damages were about $100.  He was riding with his brother and another party when he asked them to stop, pulled the gun from the car pocket, and killed himself.  He had previously said that he did not know how he could face the car owner and his mother.

             (According to his death certificate, James Raymond Trexler, laborer, was born 4 Feb 1920, in Alto Pass, Ill., the son of James Edgar Trexler, a native of Saratoga, Ill., and Myrtle Hattie Yates, a native of Temple Hill, Ill., died 5 Jan 1939, in Road District 4, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Raymond Trexler 1920-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Jan 1939:

Grandmother of Mrs. Ray Keller Dies Suddenly

             Mrs. Sarah C. Dick of Dongola, grandmother of Mrs. Ray Keller of Cairo, died Wednesday night about midnight at the home of her stepson, Emmett Dick of Christopher, where she was visiting.

             Mrs. Dick, age 78 years, was the widow of the late Dr. J. F. Dick of Mount Pleasant, Union County.  Their only child, Chloe Dick Toler, was Mrs. Keller’s mother.  Mrs. Toler died when her daughter was a child and Mrs. Dick reared her granddaughter.

             Surviving are her granddaughter, Mrs. Keller; and two stepsons, Emmet Dick of Christopher and Dr. E. B. Dick of Chester; also one brother, J. P. Grear of Anna.  The body was taken to the Ford Funeral Home in Dongola Thursday where funeral services will be held today at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Interment will be made in McGinnis Cemetery east of Anna and near Mount Pleasant on Highway 146.

             (James F. Dick, 34, physician from Mt. Pleasant, born in Kentucky, son of William Dick, Sr., and Permelia A. Frances married 2nd Sarah C. Grear, 20, from Mt. Pleasant, born in Illinois, daughter of James M. Grear and Elizabeth Halterman, on 4 Sep 1881, in Union Co., Ill.  James M. Grear, son of William Greer, married Elizabeth Halterman on 21 Oct 1858, in Union Co., Ill.  James M. Grear married Mrs. Sarah C. Ballard on 7 Dec 1873, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Sarah Christina Dick was born 8 Dec 1860, in Mt. Pleasant, Ill., the daughter of James Grear, a native of Illinois, and Christina Schelenberger, a native of North Carolina, died 19 Jan 1939, in Christopher, Franklin Co., Ill., and was buried at Dongola, Ill.  Her marker in McGinnis Cemetery near Mt. Pleasant reads:  Father Dr. J. F. Dick April 19, 1847 Dec. 2, 1910 Mother Sarah C. Dick Dec. 8, 1860 Jan. 18, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Robert A. Cunningham Dies Early Wednesday Morning

             Mrs. Robert A. Cunningham, age 86 years, died at 3:30 o’clock Wednesday morning, Jan. 18, at the home of her son, Robert C. Cunningham, west of Mounds, where she and her husband had made their home for some time. She had been in failing health for a number of years.

             Before coming to Pulaski County 65 years ago the Cunninghams lived in Cairo, having arrived there during Civil War time.

             For many years Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham made their home here at the corner of Delaware and First Street where Ray Mahoney now resides.

             Surviving are two sons, Robert C. Cunningham of Mounds, and Roy Cunningham of Cape Girardeau; 15 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.  Their daughter, Mrs. I. N. Taylor died October 15, 1925.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at the residence, Rev. Joseph W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge.

             (Robert A. Cunningham married Sarah H. Holmes on 5 Apr 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Sarah H. Cunningham was born 1 Nov 1852, in Princeton, N. J., the daughter of James Holmes, a native of New Jersey, died 18 Jan 1939, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Robert A. Cunningham, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker reads:  Robert Cunningham 1848-19 Sarah Cunningham his wife 1852-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Funeral Services for William Earle Held Saturday

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock for William Earle who died Thursday, January 12, at his home here.  Rev. Joyce Rue Reid, pastor of the church, assisted by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty of Golconda, the preceding pastor, conducted the services which were attended by a large concourse of relatives and friends.  Mr. Earle, a lifelong member of the Methodist Church, had seldom missed a church service and his absence will be greatly felt.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, the casket bearers being Richard Copeland, C. R. Scott, C. A. Ragsdale, of Murphysboro, Adolphus Laws, Eugene Miller and Albert Simpson, G. A. James directed the funeral.

             Mr. Earle had been an employee of the Illinois Central for 41 years, retiring as engineer in 1930.  He had lived in Mounds for 38 years.  He was born in Tennessee on Nov. 12, 1859, and was married to Miss Emma Poole, on March 29, 1893, who, with one son, Harry, of Centralia, survives.  Another son, Walter, died in 1912.  Surviving also are two grandsons, Billy and James, of Centralia; and a sister, Mrs. Anna Booth of Memphis, Tenn.

 

Refused a Crown

             Prince Valdemar of Denmark, who once refused the crown of Bulgaria, is dead, at the age of 90 years.  He was once nicknamed “The Uncle of Kings.”  Before the World War, his nephews occupied the thrones of five countries:  Great Britain, Norway, Denmark, Greece, and Russia.

             Valdemar, who preferred the life of a prince of Denmark and his career in the Danish navy rather than a throne, was the uncle of King Christian of Denmark and the youngest brother of the late Queen Alexandria of Great Britain, wife of King Edward VII.

            

Pioneer Resident of Pulaski County Dies at 83

William J. Biggerstaff

             William James Biggerstaff, pioneer resident of Pulaski County and long a prominent citizen of Mounds, passed quietly away Sunday, January 15, at his home on McKinley Avenue, after an illness of several months.

             Born west of Villa Ridge in Shiloh neighborhood, Sept. 2, 1855, he was the son of William and Rebecca Elizabeth DeLaney Biggerstaff.  His father was a farmer and stock raiser.  At an early age he moved with his parents to Mound City, where he was reared to manhood and married Dora Elizabeth Fair, who had been reared in Charleston, Mo.

             Mr. Biggerstaff, while living in Mound City, was foreman at the Marine Ways.  In an interview early in 1938, he told us that during his early days in Mound City, the town was surrounded by a black oak swamp populated with wild turkey, deer, coons, and other animals.  When the Illinois Central was built, the junction between the main line and the branch to Mound City was called Burkville.  Spreading north it became Beechwood.  He became an employee of the Illinois Central and from 1909 until 1928 when he retired he was car foreman in the Mounds yards.  He was a member of the village board when the town was called Beechwood and was the first mayor of the city of Mounds.  He also served as councilman and altogether served on the village and city boards for 20 years.  He was a member of the school board of Mounds for a number of years.

             Surviving are four children:  one son, J. W. Biggerstaff of Mounds; and three daughters, Miss Wilma Biggerstaff of Mounds, Mrs. John Osborne of Beaumont, Texas, and Mrs. W. T. Head of Oklahoma City, Okla.; one sister, Mrs. William Pease of Bloomington, Ill.; also eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren, one of whom is William Biggerstaff IV.  His wife and a daughter preceded him in death.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church with Rev. S. C. Benninger, the pastor officiating.  Members of the Odd Fellows Lodge served as casket bearers.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, J. T. Ryan Funeral Service directing.

             (William J. Biggerstaff married Dora E. Fain on 20 Jan 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William J. Biggerstaff, farmer, was born 27 Sep 1855, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of William Biggerstaff and Elizabeth Delaney, died 15 Jan 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Dora Biggerstaff, and was buried Thistlewood Cemetery.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  William James Biggerstaff 1856-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. W. C. Hogg of Cairo was here Saturday to attend the funeral of William Earle.

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Hironimous of St. Louis attended the funeral of W. J. Biggerstaff Tuesday.

 

Among those from out of town attending the funeral of William Earle Saturday were Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Eastman of Anna.

 

Mrs. Anna Booth, who was called here on account of the death of her brother, William Earle, has returned to her home in Memphis, Tenn.

             (J. M. E. Booth married Annie Prince Earle on 15 Sep 1886, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Berry Biggerstaff and son have returned to their home in Mattoon after having been called here by the death of Mr. Biggerstaff’s grandfather, W. J. Biggerstaff.

 

Joe Talmage Biggerstaff, a student at the University of Illinois, who was called home on account of the death of his grandfather, W. J. Biggerstaff, on Sunday, returned to Champaign Tuesday night.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Earle and sons, who were called here by the illness and death of the former’s father, William Earle have returned to their home in Centralia, Mrs. Earle accompanying them for a short visit.

 

Mrs. William Pease of Bloomington, Ill., sister of W. J. Biggerstaff and her daughter, Miss Wilma Pease of Teheran, Iran (old Persia) were called to Mounds on account of the death of Mr. Biggerstaff.  Miss Pease is at home on a vacation from her work in a Presbyterian mission in Teheran.

 

J. N. Smith of Boaz, age 80 years, died at noon Sunday, Jan. 15, at his home.  Mr. Smith had been a merchant at Boaz for 50 years and had retired about five years ago.  He was a member of the Masonic Lodge No. 822 at Belknap.

             Surviving are his wife, Emily; one daughter, Mrs. Maude Smith of Karnak; two sisters, Mrs. Kate Dillow and Mrs. Allie Galeener; and one brother, A. Smith, all of Karnak.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Frank Corzine assisted by the Rev. Mr. Wright at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon in Anderson Church.  Interment was made in Anderson Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Services directing.

             (James N. Smith married Emily Graham on 18 Sep 1878, in McCracken Co., Ky.  Percy Hasbrook Galeener married Laura I. Smith on 11 Mar 1878, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, James Nelvills Smith, merchant, was born 8 Feb 1858, in Massac Co., Ill., the son of Daniel D. Smith, a native of North Carolina, and Sarah Thompson, a native of Ohio, died 15 Jan 1939, in Massac Co., Ill., husband of Emily Smith, and was buried in Anderson Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Mary Wilson Spielman

             Funeral services were conducted Wednesday of last week at the James Funeral Home, Mound City, for Mrs. Mary Lenora Spielman of Gillette, Wyoming, who had been a patient at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo for five weeks.  Rev. Joseph W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Casket bearers were W. E. Schnaare, D. Brelsford, Walter Schwartz, George Lewis, Will Mason and Ernest Steers.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

             Mrs. Spielman had reached the age of 73 years.  She was a member of an old family in Pulaski County, was born at America, and had spent the greater part of her life there.  She is survived by her husband, O. A. Spielman of Gillette, who was with her at death; one niece, Ms. Roy Pierce of St. Louis, the former Agnes Wilson of Mounds; and one nephew, Charles Wilson of Hymes, Calif.

 

Mrs. Hannah C. Morehead

             Mrs. Hannah Catherine Morehead, age 74, died at her home in Mound City Thursday, Jan. 5th, following an illness of a few days.

             She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Edith Meredith and Miss Blanch Morehead, both of Mound City; two stepdaughters, Mrs. Minnie Moody, Naperville, Ill., Mrs. Clara Gillam, Haleyville, Ala.; one son, Otto Morehead, Mound City; one half brother, William Tally, Grand Chain,

             Funeral services were conducted from the home on Saturday by Rev. Overby of Barlow, Ky., a former pastor of the Baptist Church of Mound City and interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Hannah Morehead Dec. 23, 1865 Jan. 5, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John H. Gates

             Funeral services for John H. Gates, prominent Cairo man who died Thursday, Jan. 12, in Cairo, were held Sunday afternoon at the family residence, the Rev. Wesley B. Pearce, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church officiating, assisted by Rev. Joseph W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, John Herman Gates, pharmacist, of Cairo, Ill., was born 15 Jun 1875, in Cairo, Ill., the son of John W. Gates, a native of Ohio, and Laura C. Hunsaker, a native of Cairo, Ill., died 12 Jan 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Edith H. Gates, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.  He was buried in Cairo City Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  John H. Gates 1875-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

News was received here Sunday afternoon by the Graves family of the death of Mrs. Annetta Wakeland of St. Louis.  Mrs. Wakeland was a sister of the late L. F. Graves.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Jan 1939:

MRS. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM

             Mrs. Robert A. Cunningham passed away Wednesday morning at the home of her son, Robert C. Cunningham, at Mounds.  She had been ill the past two months.

             Mrs. Cunningham, who was 86 at the time of her death, came to this section of Illinois during the Civil War period and has lived in Pulaski County for some 65 years.

             She is survived by her husband; two sons, Robert, with whom they made their home, and Roy, of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; and a number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the family residence west of Mounds, Thursday afternoon, with Rev. Joseph Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo, officiating.  Interment was made in the Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

PIONEER RESIDENT OF COUNTY DIES AT MOUNDS

             William James Biggerstaff, 83 years of age, died at his home in Mounds Sunday, following a long illness.

             Mr. Biggerstaff was a pioneer resident of this county, was a former mayor of Mounds and for twelve years served as a city councilman.  He was a car foreman in the Illinois Central yards at Mounds from 1909 to 1928, retiring on pension at that time.  Prior to his work for the Illinois Central, Mr. Biggerstaff was foreman at the Marine Ways in Mound City.

             He is survived by one son, J. W. Biggerstaff of Mounds; three daughters, Mrs. John Osborne of Beaumont, Tex., Mrs. W. T. Head of Oklahoma City, Okla., and Miss Wilma Biggerstaff of Mounds; one sister, Mrs. William Pease of Bloomington, Ill.; eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held in the Congregational church in Mounds Tuesday afternoon with Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, officiating.  Members of the Odd Fellows Lodge served as casket bearers.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

DIED IN ST. LOUIS

             Mrs. Nettie Wakeland, who has been quite ill for the past several weeks, passed away Sunday afternoon in a St. Louis hospital.  She had been at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. J. Higgins of St. Louis, until her condition became so serious that she was removed to the hospital. Services were held in St. Louis Thursday and interment made in a cemetery at that place.

             Mrs. Wakeland was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Graves of Villa Ridge and spent many of her childhood days in this city.

             She is survived by the daughter with whom she made her home; three sons, Harry of St. Louis, Ed of New Orleans, La., and Charles of Texas; a brother, W. O. Graves of this city; a sister, Mrs. Flo Bundschuh of Thermal, Calif.; and four grandchildren.  Mrs. Gene Hughes and Cal Sheerer of this city, a niece and nephew of Mrs. Wakeland, also survive her.

 

WILLIAM EARLE PASSES AWAY AT HIS HOME IN MOUNDS

             William Earle, 79 years of age, passed away Thursday afternoon, January 12, at his home in Mounds.  He had been seriously ill for several ____.

             Earle had been a resident of Mounds for the past 38 years, and before his retirement in December ___ was an engineer for the Illinois Central Railroad.

             He is survived by his wife, Emma; ____, Harry of Centralia; a sister, Mrs. Annie Booth of Memphis; ___grandsons and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon in the M. E. church in Mounds.  Rev. Rue Reid officiated, assisted by Rev. T. R. Glotfelty, former pastor of the church.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Jan 1939:

Mrs. Elizabeth A. Ozment

             Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Ozment, age 80 years, died Sunday, January 22, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Hayden of Valley Recluse, following a short illness.

             Surviving are her daughter, Mrs. Hayden, with whom she made her home; three sons, Robert Ozment of Mounds, Louis of Villa Ridge and John of Peoria; a brother, Phillip Sams of Olive Branch; eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at 1 o’clock Tuesday afternoon at the Hayden residence, Rev. William Snyder officiating.  Burial was made in Liberty Cemetery.  Charles Ozment, Clyde Ozment, Roy Ozment, Troy Adams and Oscar Atherton, all grandsons, served as casket bearers.  George C. Crain directed the funeral.

             (According to her death certificate, Elizabeth Ann Ozment was born 5 Jul 1858, in Fayville, Ill., the daughter of Nathan Sams and Amanda Bridgeman, died 22 Jan 1939, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of McDonald Ozment, and was buried in Liberty Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Elizabeth A. wife of McDonald O. Ozment July 5, 1858 Jan. 22, 1939.  He is buried next to her with a marker that reads:  McDonald Ozment Co. D, 18th Ill. Inf.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DIES

             Jacqueline, three-day-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Anderson of Olmstead, died Saturday, Jan. 21, at the family home.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Mr. Martin officiating.  Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead, Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (Her marker in Olmsted Masonic Cemetery reads:  Jacqueline Anderson Jan. 19, 1939 Jan. 21, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Leonard Mahoney Brought from Ohio for Burial

             Leonard Mahoney, who died at his home in Cleveland, Ohio, Saturday, January 21, was brought to Mounds Tuesday and taken to Ryan Funeral Home, where services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. J. Rue Reid officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, George C. Crain directing.

             Mr. Mahoney is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney; two brothers, Robert and Leo Mahoney; and two sisters, Mrs. Ruby Gravette and Mrs. Ellen Klever, all of Cleveland.  He was a cousin of Ray and Dewey Mahoney of this city. And the family formerly lived in Pulaski County.  His cousins served as casket bearers.

 

Former Villa Ridge Woman Dies in California

             Mrs. Mayme Powers, formerly of Villa Ridge and Cairo, died Tuesday, January 10, at the home of her brother, Will Powers in Pasadena, California.  She had been ill for several weeks having suffered a stroke of paralysis.  Burial was made at Pasadena.

             Miss Powers formerly held a position with Kaufman Brothers Drygoods Company in Cairo, later making her home with her sister, Mrs. Kate Fursy, in Brooklyn, N. Y.  Upon the death of this sister, Miss Powers went to California to make her home with a younger brother, Will Powers, who is the only surviving member of the family.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Jan 1939:

LEONARD MAHONEY

             Funeral services for Leonard Mahoney, who passed away at his home in Cleveland, Ohio, were held Wednesday afternoon at the Ryan Funeral Home in Mounds.

             Mr. Mahoney is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney; two brothers, Robert and Leo; and two sisters, Mrs. Ruby Gravette and Mrs. Ellen Klever, all of Cleveland; and several relatives in Mounds.

 

MRS. ELIZABETH ANN OZMENT

             Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Ozment, 80 years of age, passed away after a brief illness Sunday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Hayden of Valley Recluse.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Hayden residence with Rev. Wilbert Snyder officiating.  Interment was made in the Liberty Cemetery.

             Besides the daughter with whom she made her home, Mrs. Ozment is survived by three sons, Robert of Mounds, Louis of Villa Ridge and John of Peoria; one brother, Phillip Sams of Olive Branch; and a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren and other relatives.

 

Two Killed and One Beaten in One Night

             Two killings and one beating marked Saturday night in Cairo as Old Demon Rum and some of his wicked associates got under way to help out.

             James William DeJarnett, 53 years of age, a constable and not very large in size, was killed when John Morehead, 25 years of age, a WPA timekeeper from Charleston, Mo., struck him a forceful blow in the face and DeJarnett fell to the sidewalk and never again regained consciousness.

             At the Turf Tavern where Morehead had trouble because of too much liquor, he had been knocked down and ordered out.  Outside, the constable, who had not said much, told Morehead he had better go on home as he did not wish to lock him up.  Morehead is said then to have struck him a hard blow and DeJarnett fell, probably fracturing his skull on the sidewalk.  He died not long after.

             Then Morehead prepared to drive off in a car not his and another row ensued with the owner or owner’s friends and Morehead was held until night officers took him over.

             That was about 1:30 o’clock and an hour before, not more than a few blocks away, a negro woman, Jonnie May Woodson, 22 years old, plunged a knife into the heart of Booker T. West, after calling him from a tavern where he was drinking beer.  The row there is said to be over him deserting her for some other woman.

             And only a few minutes earlier, Robert Briggs, negro, had been beaten unconscious and B. E. Baggot, a white man, is said to have either done it or helped.  The reason is given as an alleged insult to a white woman.  Demon Rum & Infidelity seems to have made a night of it in Cairo and robbed some of the roadhouses in this county of their Saturday night rows.

             (A marker in Shiloh Cemetery in Clinton, Hickman Co., Ky., reads:  James DeJarnett Mar. 8, 1886 Jan. 22, 1939.  Booker T. West, truck driver, according to his death certificate, was born 22 Jan 1916, in Forest City, Ark., the son of Jack and Sally West, died 21 Jan 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Alma West, and was buried in Charleston, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY MAN DIES

             Ernest Nordman, city comptroller of Cairo, formerly of this city, died in Cairo Tuesday night of pneumonia at the age of 61.  He moved from this city about 1888 and has since lived at Cairo.

             (According to his death certificate, Ernest Nordman, Cairo comptroller and treasurer, was born 31 Mar 1877, in Indianapolis, Ind., the son of Fred Nordman and Augusta Rau, natives of Germany, died 24 Jan 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Grace Little Nordman, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery reads:  Grace E. Nordman Sept. 22, 1885 March 11, 1965 Ernest Nordman March 31, 1877 Jan. 25, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TRIPLETS BORN IN THIS CITY SUNDAY MORNING

             Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Bough are the parents of triplets, two girls and one boy, born at their home in this city Sunday morning, about 9 o’clock.  The smallest, a girl, weighs less than two pounds, was stillborn, while the other girl, weighing two pounds and the boy weighing a little less than two and three-quarters pounds were placed in an incubator and are doing nicely.  Dr. W. R. Wesenberg was the physician called on the case and the county has made arrangements for the proper nursing facilities.

             Mr. and Mrs. Bough are also the parents of four other children, three boys and one girl.  Mr. Bough is an unemployed cobbler.

             Interment for the third child was made Tuesday morning in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that she was stillborn 22 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of L. D. Bough, a native of Indiana, and Kate Sowers, a native of Perks, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Word was received here (Beech Grove) of the serious illness of Grandmother Sowers.  Mr. and Mrs. Ray Mowery and Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Miller left Saturday for a visit with her at her son’s, Rev. Ben Sowers and family.  The community wishes her a speedy recovery.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Feb 1939:

Norma Lou Miller

             Norma Lou Miller, 27-day-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Miller, died about 8 o’clock Friday ___ning, Jan. 27, at the home of her parents in Ullin.  She is survived by her parents; a brother, Donald Miller; one sister, Marilyn Jean; her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Sydenstricker of Ullin and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Miller of Dongola; and her great-grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Z. Rider of Dongola.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon at the ___ifly residence, Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Burial was made in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug.

             (According to her death certificate, Norma Lou Miller was born 1 Jan 1939, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Raymond Miller and Helen Sydenstricker, natives of Illinois, died 27 Jan 1939, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Norma Lou Miller Jan. 1, 1939 Jan. 27, 1939—Darrel Dexter)

 

Bough Triplets Die

             Robert Bough, the last of the triplets born Sunday, January 22, to Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Bough of Mound City, died at five o’clock Saturday morning, Jan. 27.  The first one born, a girl and the smallest of the three, died at birth and was buried Monday, Jan. 23.  Roberta, who weighed two and one-half pounds, lived five days.  Robert, the largest, lived six days.

             The doctor in attendance, Dr. W. R. Wesenberg of Mound City, assisted by Miss Hazel Korando, Pulaski County health nurse, and relief organization workers did everything in their power to save the lives of Robert and Roberta by placing them in improvised incubators and giving them every attention.  The father, we understand, is out of employment.

             The tiny bodies were placed in the same casket and buried Saturday afternoon in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Robert Bough was born 22 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Ill., the son of L. D. Bough, a native of Indiana, and Kate Sowers, a native of Perks, Ill., died 28 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  The death certificate of Roberta Bough states she was born 22 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Ill., died 27 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of L. D. Bough, a native of Indiana, and Kate Sowers, a native of Perks, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Negro Eighty Years Old Killed by Switch Train

             Frank Musgraves of Cairo, eighty-year-old negro, was killed by an Illinois Central switch train between the Illinois Central bridge approach and the McFarland Lumber Co. plant in Cairo Tuesday night at 11:15 o’clock.

             Testimony at the inquest indicated that the old man had rolled a bridge timber from the top of the bridge approach, had then sawed it in two on the switch tracks and had loaded a push cart with it, preparatory to taking it home.  His back must have been approaching train when the first car struck the timber, the timber striking him and throwing him under the train.  Among those testifying were Charles Walbridge, acting yardmaster; Horace Fellenstein, switchman, both of Mounds; and Charles McKinney, special officer for the Illinois Central.  The verdict returned was that Musgraves was killed accidentally while trespassing on I. C. property.

 

Mrs. W. P. Lackey

             Mrs. Mary E. Lackey, age 76 years, 8 months and 15 days, wife of W. P. Lackey, died Thursday afternoon, Jan. 26, at their home near Ullin.  Besides her husband, she is survived by three children, Mrs. R. L. Willis and Mrs. Sadie Caudle of Ullin and S. P. Lackey of Olive Branch; twelve grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon in the M. E. church at Ullin, Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Interment was made in New Hope Cemetery with W. J. Rhymer directing.

             (William P. Lackey married Mary E. Lentz on 17 Jul 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin, Ill., reads:  Mary E. Lackey May 11, 1862 Jan. 26, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Porter Duncan

             Mrs. Sarah Briscoe Duncan, wife of Porter Duncan, died Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 31, at the family home in Mound City at the age of 75 years, as the result of an attack of pneumonia.  She had lived in Mound City for 17 years.

             Surviving, besides her husband to whom she was married only last year, are two daughters, Mrs. Bertie Mathis, of Paducah, Ky., and Mrs. Lettie Hardison of Chicago; one son, Thomas Tolley of Johnsonville, Tenn.; a sister, Mrs. Lizzie Ball of Providence, Ky.; 13 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon in the Pentecostal church, Mound City, Rev. Earl Harp officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (According to her death certificate, Sarah Emaline Duncan was born 28 Sep 1863, in Kentucky, died 31 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Ill., wife of Porter Duncan, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Malinda Sowers

             Mrs. Malinda Sowers, widow of Eli Sowers, died Monday evening, January 30, at the home of her son, Rev. T. B. Sowers, pastor of the Methodist Church in Benton, where she had been making her home in recent months.  She passed away on her 84th birthday, after an illness of long duration.

             Mrs. Sowers, who was the aunt of B. A. Braddy of Mounds, leaves three sons, Rev. Sowers, Roy of Dix, Ill., and Seth of St. Louis; three daughters, Mrs. Mary Hartman of Tamms, Mrs. Ona Mowery of Ullin and Mrs. Florence Shelton of Pontiac, Mich.; a brother, George Braddy of Ullin; a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock at the Ullin M. E. Church with interment at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug.

             (Eli Sowers married Malinda Braddy on 27 Mar 1873, in Union Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Margret Malindy Sowers was born 30 Jan 1855, in Illinois, the daughter of Benjamin Sowers and Sarah Lentz, natives of North Carolina, died 30 Jan 1939, in Benton, Franklin Co., Ill., widow of Eli Sowers, and was buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Ill., reads:  Eli Sowers Born Feby. 1, 1853 Died Aug. 27, 1914 Aged 61 Y., 6 M., 26 D. Malinda Sowers his wife Born Jan. 30, 1855 Died Jan. 30, 1939 Aged 84 Y.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Quaint Old Print

             An old Currier & Ives print of an albino family (you know, the white-haired people with the pink eyes) was reproduced in Karl K. Knecht’s daily cartoon in the Evansville Courier Monday.  Knecht’s inspiration is owned by an Elberfield, Ind., lady.

             The legend under the old lithograph states that this family of man, wife and two children was first exhibited in P. T. Barnum’s Museum in New York.  It is not dated.

             Knecht’s cartoon attracted the attention of Dan Smith of this city who Tuesday brought in the same ancient picture in a handmade frame.  Mr. Smith said that the old picture was owned by his father, who died 45 years ago at the age of 72.  Mr. Smith said his father saw the famous family in Barnum’s museum shortly after he came over from England and was so impressed that he bought the picture.—Albion Journal-Register

 

Mrs. Jenny Riddle

             The body of Mrs. Jenny Riddle, who died in Chicago, was brought to the James Funeral Home here early this morning and will be taken to Olmstead for burial.  Funeral arrangements have not been made at this writing.

 

Three Killed in Illinois Central Wreck on Cut-off

             Three of the train crew of an Illinois Central freight were killed and one injured Sunday night between 8 and 9 o’clock when an engine and 29 cars were derailed on the single track cut-off branch one mile north of Robbs, in Pope County.

             Engineer Adolphus J. West of Paducah, Ky., Fireman M. C. Waterbury of Centralia, formerly of Mound City, and Brakeman Walter Choate of Reevesville, all in the engine cab at the time of the accident were killed as the locomotive struck a slide of dirt in a cut, evidently caused by the heavy rains.

             Rescue crews worked for hours in a steady rain to remove the bodies, which were taken to a Vienna funeral home.

             West and Choate were fatally scalded, according to reports.  The body of Waterbury was found pinned under the engine and workers using blow torches labored for hours to extricate it.

             Brakeman Paul Wiederman suffered a broken collarbone and other injuries and was removed to a Paducah hospital.

             Conductor C. A. Elliott of Centralia was not injured.

             The train was en route to Paducah from Bluford and carried about 100 cars, 29 of which were derailed with the locomotive.  The cut-off route is used only for freight trains and has many high hills, cuts and tunnels along its bedway.  It is a single track and all railroaders dread it.    

             Fireman Waterbury’s wife is seriously ill in a San Francisco hospital.  The family moved to California when railroads put so many of their employees on lay-off.  Mr. Waterbury later returned to work on the I. C. with headquarters in Fulton, Ky., afterward going to Centralia.

             Engineer West lived here for years and the two men have many friends here who are deeply shocked at their tragic passing.

             (When Adolphus F. West registered for the draft in 1917, he stated he was born 22 Jan 1891, in Belknap, Ill., and worked as a locomotive engineer in the Mounds yards for the Illinois Central.  The death certificate of Adolphus Frank West, engineer, of Paducah, Ky., states that he was born 22 Feb 1891, in Boaz, Ill., the son of Frank James West, a native of Boaz, Ill., and Sarah Ellen Medders, died 29 Jan 1939, in Road District 8, Pope Co., Ill., husband of Laura West, and was buried in Anderson Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Adolphus F. West Feb. 22, 1892 Jan. 29, 1939.  When Murl Clifford Waterbury registered for the draft in 1917, he was a hoop coiler for O. L. Bartlett in Mound City, Ill.  According to his death certificate, Murl Clifford Waterbury, fireman, of Paducah, Ky., was born 30 Oct 1891, in Bellevue, Mich., the son of Fred Waterbury, a native of Belleville, Mich., and Anna Grisold, a native of New York, died 29 Jan 1939, in Road District 8, Pope Co., Ill., the husband of Ruth Waterbury, and was buried in Dexter Cemetery in Dexter, Stoddard Co., Mo. His marker there reads:  Murl C. Waterbury Oct. 30, 1893- Jan. 30, 1939.  Walter Choate, brakeman, according to his death certificate, was born 25 Jun 1891, in New Burnside, Ill., the son of Marion Choate, a native of New Burnside, Ill., and Jennie Kuykendall, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 29 Jan 1939, in Road District 8, Pope Co., Ill., husband of Gertie Choate, and was buried in Reevesville, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Reevesville Cemetery reads:  Walter Choate 1891-1939 Gertrude Choate 1893-1981.  The 1918 draft registration for Walter Choate states he was born in New Burnside, Ill., a farmer for Frank Marbury  at Reevesville, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Circuit Court Convened Yesterday in Mound City

             An adjourned session of circuit court was convened in Mound City yesterday with a full schedule.

             Judge Hal A. Spann of Anna presided and the first case on the schedule was that of W. L. Burns, administrator vs. Henry Richardson.  This is a damage suit which has been pending in court for a number of years, resulting from the death of Esther Burns, daughter of W. L. Burns, who was killed in an automobile accident in which young Richardson was driver of the car, which turned over on an embankment at the intersection of Route 37 and the blacktop road.

 

William H. Gibson

       William H. Gibson of Cairo, father of Mrs. James E. Wilhoit, formerly of Mounds, died at his home on Pine Street, Thursday, January 19, following a long illness.  His age was 78 years.  He was born in Metropolis, but had made his home in Cairo for 55 years, and was employed by the Woodward Hardware Co., for 48 years, retiring five years ago on account of failing health.

       Surviving are his wife, three sons, William of Huntington, W. Va., Eugene of St. Louis, and Ralph of Little Rock, Ark.; two daughters, Mrs. Wilhoit of Cairo and Mrs. Charles Porter of Tamms; also six grandchildren.

       Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery Friday afternoon.

       (His death certificate states that William Henry Gibson was born 1 Jan 1861, in Metropolis, Ill., the son of Davis Gibson, a native of Paisley, Scotland, and Susan Pierce, a native of Pennsylvania, died 19 Jan 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Lena Gibson, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  William H. Gibson 1861-1939 Cairo, Ill. Husband of Magdalena Father of Mabel, Iva, William, Eugene and Ralph.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to express our thanks for the many kindnesses shown us during the illness and ___ of our wife, mother and grandmother, Mrs. Sarah Cunningham.  We especially wish to thank Rev. Fix of Cairo, Rev. Rue Reid and Judge Dewey for their consoling words and prayers.  ___ Lansden and Mrs. Can___ for the beautiful hymns and ____ Gladys Reno for her ____ and nursing; those who sent the beautiful flowers and provided their cars and the Ryan Funeral Home for their services.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Feb 1939:

SARAH BRISCOE DUNCAN

             Sarah Briscoe Duncan, 75 years of age, died at her home in ____ Tuesday afternoon following a week’s illness.  She has been a resident of this city for 17 years and was more familiarly known as “Aunt Sarah.”

             She is survived by her husband, ____Duncan, to whom she was married Oct. 11, 1938; also two ____, Mrs. Bertie Mathis of ___, Ky., and Mrs. Lettie Har___ of Chicago; one son, Thomas ____ of Johnsonville, Tenn., and _____, Mrs. Lizzie Ball of Provi_____.  Thirteen grandchildren, ____ great-grandchildren, also ______.

             Funeral services were held Thursday _____ at the Pentecost church, with Rev. Earl Harp officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

ULLIN WOMAN DIES

             _____ Sowers, 84 years of age, a resident of the Beech Grove community near Ullin, died at the home of her son, Rev. Ben Sowers, in Benton, Monday.  Three sons survive, Ben, Roy of Dixon, and ____ of St. Louis; and three daughters, Mary Hartman of Tamms, Mrs. Ray Mowery of Ullin and Mrs. ___ Shelton of Pontiac, Mich.  Funeral services for this well-known woman were held Wednesday morning at the Methodist church at Ullin and burial was in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug.

 

COMPLAINING ABOUT JANITOR

             The school boards are hearing complaint about Granville Allen, colored, who is janitor at the Lovejoy School.  A girl has been to the boards with the story about her baby born some time ago and for support of which, she said, Allen paid sums of money.  Now the child is dead and no more money is paid.

             (This may be a reference to Harold Eugene Allen, who was born 11 Nov 1938, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Granville Allen and Eula Mae Kilgore, a native of Arkansas, died 9 Dec 1938, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LAST OF TRIPLETS BORN LAST WEEK, DIED SUNDAY

             The last of the triplets born Sunday to Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Baugh, died Saturday morning at their home in this city.

             One of the children, a girl, died at birth, the other two, a girl, Roberta, and a boy, Robert, lived five and six days respectively.  Roberta died Friday morning and Robert died Saturday morning.  All three children were buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

Martin Henderson, colored, was indicted on charge of murder of Roy Davis, colored, at Olmstead.

 

Bessie Meals, colored, was indicted for the killing of her husband.  This was the colored woman with very young baby who walked a couple of miles to give herself up and seemed little concerned about her act.

 

Mrs. Ray Mowery spent several days recently at the home of her brother, Rev. T. B. Sowers of Benton, nursing her mother who has been seriously ill for several weeks and passed away Monday night, Jan. 30.  The funeral was held at the Ullin M. E. Church Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock and burial was made in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  This community (Beech Grove) has lost a great church worker, spiritually and financially, for Grandmother was always about her Master’s business.

 

Earl Miller’s and Van Short’s families attended the burial of the infant baby of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Miller one day last week.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Feb 1939:

Infant Dies

             Harry Jacobson, Jr., infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jacobson, died at birth Thursday afternoon February 2, at 2:35 o’clock.  The baby was born at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Maude Arnold, where Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson are making their home.  The mother is Theda Arnold Jacobson.

             Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery Friday afternoon, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

INFANT DIES

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde A. Hogendobler of Villa Ridge died at birth Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.  His parents and one brother, Clyde Kennedy, survive.

             (His death certificate states he was stillborn 7 Feb 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Clyde Hogendobler, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Florita Kennedy, a native of Mound City, Ill.  His marker at Beech Grove Cemetery reads:  Andy Hogendobler Born and Died Feb. 7, 1939 Infant Son of Clyde A. & Florita K. Hogendobler.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Alice Beaver Lewis

             Mrs. Alice Beaver Lewis, 86, of America, died Tuesday afternoon.  Mrs. Lewis, the widow of Elisha Lewis, leaves three daughters, Mrs. Lenora Unger and Mrs. Pearl Martin of America and Mrs. Bert Helwig of Chicago; nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.  She also leaves a brother, Abe Beaver of Mounds and a half-brother, John Roulette of Los Angeles, Calif.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the home with Rev. Joseph Fix of Cairo officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (Elisha R. Lewis married Alice Beaver on 29 Apr 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary Alice Lewis was born 19 Feb 1853, in America, Ill., the daughter of Joe Beaver, died 7 Feb 1939, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Elisha Lewis, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

“U. S. Grant’s Nephew Dies of Starvation”

             The above headline appeared in a Chicago morning paper on Monday and below was a lengthy article telling its readers of the death of Jesse Root Grant, 75, of Wilmette, a nephew of General and later President Ulysses S. Grant, at Cook County Hospital of starvation and exposure.

             Grant, once wealthy, had retired years ago and lived, together with his 38-year-old son, Ulysses S., in an eight-room house at 1327 Washington Avenue, Wilmette.

             The son said he himself had been unemployed since 1930, when an injury caused him to lose a position he had held since 1912 with the Continental Illinois National Bank in Chicago.

             The two had been without funds for several weeks and had had no food or fuel for a number of days.

             Relief authorities were to be asked to defray funeral expenses.

             (His death certificate states that Jesse R. Grant was born about 1866, the son of Orvel and Gertrude Grant, died 4 Feb 1939, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., and was buried at Norwood Park, Cook Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Feb 1939:

Mrs. Emma Hartline and Mrs. Doll Beaver of Johnston City and Mrs. Zelma Sowers of Harvey and Mrs. Ella Sowers and son Walter of Perks were the guests Monday of the later Mrs. Sowers’ daughter, Mrs. L. D. Bough.  They were surprised to hear of the death of the triplets recently born to Mr. and Mrs. Bough.

 

PIONEER RESIDENT DIES AT AMERICA

             Mrs. Alice Beaver Lewis, born Feb. 19, 1853, passed away Tuesday afternoon, February 7, at her country home at America, Ill.

             Mrs. Lewis had spent her entire life in this community.  On April 29, 1870, she was married to Elisha Lewis, who preceded her in death 15 years ago.  To this union five children were born, four of which are still living.  A daughter, Miss Minnie Lewis, passed away, April 4, 1934.

             Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Pearl Martin and Mrs. Lora Unger of America and Mrs. Bert Helwig of Chicago; one son, George of America; one brother, Abe Beaver of Mounds; and one half brother, John Roulette of Los Angeles, Calif.  Five grandchildren and several nieces and nephews also survive her.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the home, Rev. Joseph Fix of the Congregational Church of Mound City officiating. 

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

             G. A. James directed the funeral.

 

INFANT DIED

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Hogendobler of Villa Ridge, born Tuesday afternoon at St. Mary Infirmary, died following birth.  He leaves, besides his parents, a brother, Clyde Kennedy Hogendobler.  Interment was made Wednesday morning in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to express our gratitude and thanks to those who in any way assisted during the illness and death of our dear wife and mother, Sarah Briscoe Duncan.  May God bless you.

Porter Duncan

Letty Hardison

Bertie Mathis

Thomas Talley, children

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Feb 1939:

Vernon William Webb

             Vernon William Webb, age 16, and the older son of County Superintendent of schools, Marvin W. Webb and Mrs. Webb, died Thursday afternoon, February 9, at the family home in Mound City following a long illness.  For many weeks he was a patient in Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, but when hopes for his recovery had been given up, he was brought home.  He had been confined to his bed since the first of last July.

             Surviving him are his parents, a younger brother, Marion E. Webb, and his paternal and maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Webb of Karnak, and Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Thornton of Ullin.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Mound City, Rev. S. L. Hagan, vicar of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds.  Casket bearers were Noah Tapley, Warren Vine, George L. Walker, James Westerman, Joseph Westerman, and Harry Hickman.  Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

             (According to his death certificate, Vernon William Webb was born 22 Sep 1922, in Ullin, Ill., the son of Marvin W. Webb, a native of Pulaski, Ky., and Sena E. Thornton, a native of Ullin, Ill., died 9 Feb 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker there reads:  Son Vernon W. Webb Sept. 27, 1922 Feb. 9, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Grandmother of Fred Walker Dies Monday in Cairo

             Mrs. Florence E. Wood, age 71 years, died Monday afternoon, Feb. 13, at her home, 4222 Thirtieth St., Cairo.  She had been a resident of Cairo for the past 37 years, having formerly lived in Johnson County, where she had been a lifelong member of the Pleasant Grove Baptist Church.

             She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. T. A. Forehand of Fulton, Ky.; two grandsons, Fred Walker of Mounds and Bernard Walker of Fulton; a granddaughter, Mrs. K. C. Borgeson of Chicago; two great-grandsons, Freddie Gene Walker of Mounds and Jimmie Wall of Cairo; and two nephews, William and Ernest Dolan of Centralia.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Berbling Funeral Home, Cairo, Rev. L. H. Anderson of Washington St. Baptist Church officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds.

             (Her death certificate states that Florance E. Wood was born 10 Apr 1868, in Pleasant Grove, Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Francis L. Dolan, a native of Ireland, and Mary Ann Pender, a native of Pleasant Grove, Johnson Co., Ill., died 13 Feb 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Newton Wood, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Feb 1939:

____ WEBB DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

             ____ William Webb, more popularly known as “Buddy,” passed away Thursday afternoon at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin W. Webb in this city.  ___ who was sixteen years old, ___ been sick for the past year or so and had been bedfast since the ___ mer.

             The particular disease of insufficient corpuscles which beset this ____ one that baffled medical ____.  The parents were told ___ ago that the end would ____ it they hoped against their ____ge, that he might regain ____ strength.  They stood by as the ____ gained a stronger foothold.   ___ was sleeping that morning, ____don, he was in a coma, and _____ became delirious, he was ____ never conscious of any ____e had worn and wasted in ____as, and illness that deprived ____ energy and strength until ____ functions could not go on.  ____ breathing almost required ____s effort.  To the parents, the ____ many times as he lay in ____ly wearing out.

             He is survived by his parents; one ____ Marion; and his grand_____ Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Webb of Karnak and Mr. and Mrs. F. M. ____n of Ullin.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon in St. Peter’s Episcopal Church with Rev. S. L. Hagan, officiating.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery.  The pallbearers were Noah Tapley, ___ Vines, George L. Walker, ___ Westerman and Harry Hick___.

             ___ Webb is superintendent of the _____ County Schools and Ver____ a junior in the Mound City ____ity High School at the time _____ sick.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Feb 1939:

Louise Cunningham Miller

             Mrs. Louise Cunningham Miller, wife of Ervin Miller of Van Nuys, Calif., died at her home Friday, February 17, at 8:20 p.m.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Cunningham of this vicinity, and a sister of Mrs. Joseph Fox, the former Alice Cunningham.

             She is survived by her husband, a daughter and two grandsons, her parents, sisters and brothers.

             Interment was made in California.

 

IN MEMORIAM

             In loving remembrance of ___ Edgar Clanton our dear husband, father and grandfather, who departed this life February 25, 193_.  __ sadly missed by his wife, ___ and grandchildren.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Feb 1939:

SWEETIE KILLS TOM BUTLER, CONSTABLE

             Ida Bell Allen, colored woman, the reputed sweetie of Tom Butler, colored constable, confessed to Sheriff I. J. Hudson that she killed Butler about midnight last Friday as he was approaching his home.  Butler was shot three times with a .38 caliber revolver, once through the stomach, once through the neck and ranging downward and once in the top head, apparently as he fell forward.  Nearly any one of the shots would have brought instant death.

             The story back of the killing runs to the days when Butler and she began to meet and when she parted from her husband who lives at Cairo.  It is said that threats against her if she returned to her husband and over $8 that he obtained from her, brought her to the point where she feared for her life and decided to defend herself.  Butler, in years gone by, had killed a man at Olmstead and here among colored people he was feared and very much disliked.

             The coroner’s verdict required that she be held and is in jail without bond.

             Butler is divorced from his first wife.  He has six children.  He became constable here when a chance was made to interpret the law for an additional constable, and so was appointed by the County Board.  He had no opposition at his last election.

             Butler was known about town and sometimes did work for the courthouse group.  His name figured in several cases and was considered to have an “in” at the courthouse.

             (According to his death certificate, Thomas Butler, constable, was born 8 Sep 1885, in Illinois, the son of John D. Butler and Emma Thomas, died 17 Feb 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., divorced husband of Ida Wilson Butler, and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Tom Butler Father Sept. 8, 1885 Feb. 17, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DISAGREEMENT OF JURY IN MANSLAUGHTER CASE

             The jury disagreed at Cairo in circuit court in the case of John Morehead, 25 years of age, over the killing of James DeJarnatt, a Cairo constable.  The affair grew out of a row in a tavern and further rows outside in which DeJarnatt was killed after being hit by the defendant, who testified that he was quite drunk and knew nothing of what he did.  The fight was first in the Turf Tavern and then outside, when DeJarnatt took some hand, the blow or blows ending in death took place.

             With the jury disagreeing, probably another chapter written, one dead and only booze to blame.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Mar 1939:

Sudden Death of John Littell a Shock to the Community

             The sudden passing of John Littell Friday morning, February 24, in the office of Dr. O. T. Hudson, brings to mind the thought that today we are here, tomorrow we are gone.

             Mr. Littell was in the grocery store of Henry Gunn when he complained of feeling ill and was taken by someone present to the office of Dr. Hudson where he died from a heart attack.

             For many years Mr. Littell was an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad.  At his death he resided in one of the houses belonging to the Thistlewood Estate just west of Mounds.  His age at death was 52 years.

             He is survived by his wife, three daughters, Mrs. Ruby Wehrenberg, Hazel Ruth and Carole Jean Littell; two sons, Clyde and Jack Littell, all of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. George Hawkins of Illmo, Mo., and Mrs. Ella Hagey of Cairo; a brother, Lonzo Littell of Talapoosa, Mo.; and a half-brother, William Cheniae of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock in the First Baptist Church, Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor, officiating.  Casket bearers were M. M. Shifley, S. A. Shifley, P. W. Scott, Harry B. Williams, Ed Adams and Wave Wingo.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

             (His registration for the draft states John Clyde Littell was born 10 Jul 1877, and that he was a machinist for the Illinois Central Railroad at Mounds, Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Clyde Littell, farmer, was born 10 Jul 1878, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of Adam Littell, a native of Texas, and Hannah Beals, a native of Louisiana, died 24 Feb 1939, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Ethel Littell, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Ethel W. Littell 1892-1978 John C. Littell 1877-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Mounds Resident Dies Sunday in Cairo

             Emmett J. Sackman, age 47, died Sunday afternoon, February 28, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he had been a patient only a few days.  It was thought shortly before his death that Mr. Sackman was improving.

             Mr. Sackman, a former general foreman in the Illinois Central yards at Mounds was transferred to Cairo some years ago when the yards were moved to Cairo junction.  He was a member of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in Cairo and of the Masonic Lodge in East St. Louis.

             Surviving him are his wife, Florence, and a son, Emmett, Jr.  Also two sisters, Mrs. Charles Hauss and Mrs. Charles Winning, and two brothers, Charles and Henry Sackman, all of East St. Louis.

Short funeral services were held Sunday evening at the Berbling Funeral Home in Cairo, with Rev. S. L. Hagan, rector of the Church of the Redeemer, officiating.  The funeral cortege went to East St. Louis Monday and funeral services were held there Wednesday afternoon in the Linder Funeral Home with interment in Mt. Hope Cemetery, Belleville.

             (The 1917 draft registration card for Emmett J. Sackman, of 1753 N. 46th, East St. Louis, Ill., machine shop foreman for American Zinc Co., in Fairmont City, Ill., states he was born 21 Mar 1890, in East St. Louis.  His death certificate states that Emmett J. Sackman, general foreman on Illinois Central Railroad, of Cairo, Ill., was born 21 Mar 1892, in East St. Louis, Ill., son of Henry Sackman, a native of Germany, died 26 Feb 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Florence A. Sackman, and was buried in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. George Hawkins has returned to her home in Illmo, Mo., after being called here by the death of her brother, John Littell.

 

Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Pawlish are in Fort Wayne, Ind., called there by the death of the former’s sister.

 

Many friends of John Littell of Mounds were saddened to hear of his death, which occurred suddenly last Friday.  Mr. Littell was a brother of W. M. Cheniae, a prominent grocer here (Villa Ridge).

 

Word was received here of the death of Mrs. Mollie Jones, who resided with her daughter, Mrs. Paul Phelps in Chicago.  Her body was brought to Harrisburg, where the funeral was held Wednesday.  Her nieces, Mrs. W. B. Kennedy and Mrs. D. C. Gunn, and families from here (Villa Ridge) were in attendance.

             (This is Nellie Jones, daughter of Cornelius Mangan, whose death certificate states died 2 Mar 1939, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the wife of Alonzo Jones.  There is also a marriage certificate in Johnson Co., Ill., for James A. Jones and Lillie Mangum, which could refer to her.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Mar 1939:

Maggie Kerley and Joy Dexter attended the funeral of Mrs. Ellen Corzine in Dongola Friday afternoon.  (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Mar 1939:

Alfred Lee Seals

             Alfred Lee Seals, 26 years of age, passed away Wednesday evening, March 1, at his home in Ullin, following a prolonged illness.  He is survived by his wife, Esther; two sons, Johnnie Lee and Alfred Jr.; and one daughter, Mrs. Dora Seals of Ullin; four sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Jones of Hanford, Calif., Mrs. Iva Mae Williams of Mounds, Mrs. Grace Dodson of Tamms and Miss Mildred Seals of Ullin; also five brothers, Ralph Seals of Hanford, Calif., and Omar, Ira, Sylvester and Frank Seals, all of Ullin.

             Funeral services were held at 1 o’clock Friday afternoon in the Baptist Church at Elco, Rev. Parker, the pastor, officiating.  Interment was in the Ullin Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Alfred Lee Seals, fireman, of Ullin, Ill., was born 6 Dec 1912, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Sylvester Seals and Dora Mize, natives of Ullin, Ill., died 2 Mar 1939, in Ullin, Ill., husband of Ester Seals, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Alfred L. Seals Dec. 6, 1912 March 2, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie McKenzie, daughter Sylvia Patricia and W. C. V. Prather, father of Mrs. McKenzie spent Saturday and Sunday in Brazil, Ind., called there by the death of Mr. Prather’s sister, Mrs. Sarah Prather.

             (Her marker in Harmony Cemetery in Clay Co., Ind., reads:  Sara C. Prather 1861-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wilkerson received word Monday of the death of Mr. Wilkerson’s uncle, Alfred Ireland, who died at his home in Aberdeen, Wash., Saturday, March 4.  Burial was made Thursday in Wickliffe, Ky., and the funeral was attended by Mr. and Mrs. Wilkerson, Mrs. Carrie Wilkerson, and son Raymond of St. Louis, and Mrs. Victor Reagan of Ullin.  Mr. Ireland was at one time a resident of Cairo.

             (A death certificate for Frank N. Ireland states he was born about 1867, son of J. M. Ireland and Betty Neache, and died 3 Mar 1939, in Aberdeen, Grays Harbor Co., Wash., husband of Belle Ireland.  His marker in Wickliffe Cemetery reads:  Alfred N. Ireland 1866-1939.  Alfred Neale Ireland was born 20 Aug 1866, in Ballard Co., Ky., and was the son of  James Morton Ireland and Elizabeth Neale.—Darrel Dexter)

 

News was received here last week of the death of Mrs. Nellie Jones, the mother of H. E. Jones of Harrisburg.  They were former residents of this place and their friends were much shocked.  Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Gunn and Mr. and Mrs. William Kennedy attended the funeral.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Mar 1939:

Mrs. Earnest Smith

             Mrs. Donna Belle Smith, 47 years of age, has passed away Thursday, March 9, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Frances Walters, near Karnak, following an illness of about two years.  She had been a resident of the same community during her entire life, a member of the Royal Neighbors Lodge of Karnak and was a highly esteemed citizen.

              Mrs. Smith is survived by her husband, Earnest Smith; and her daughter, Mrs. Walters; her father, W. F. Evers of Buncombe; two sisters, Mrs. Maude Poulson of Joppa and Mrs. A. W. Tarr of Johnston City; also three brothers, John Evers of Karnak, A. L. Evers of Salem and J. H. Evers of Aurora.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon in the M. E. church.  Rev. Wright officiated and interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.  The casket bearers were Paul Mathis, Ray Mathis, Charles Evers, Clellan Walters, Kenneth Walters, and Elmer Baccus.

             Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (Her death certificate states that Donna Bell Smith was born 16 Jun 1891, in Belknap, Ill., the daughter of William F. Evers, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Mollie Green, a native of Pennsylvania, died 9 Mar 1939, in Massac Co., Ill., wife of Earnest Smith, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Roscoe Wood

             Roscoe Wood passed away Saturday morning, March 11, at his home in Ullin, at the age of 40 years, after a brief illness of pneumonia.  In addition to his wife Augusta, he leaves three children, Victor, Elva Ruth and Darrel Gene.  He also leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Wood of Ullin; three brothers, Nile A. Wood of Pulaski, Ollie Lester Wood of Ullin, Delbert Wood of Shamrock, Texas; and one sister, Mrs. Florence Kraatz of Ullin.  Funeral services were held at Cache Chapel Church at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon with Rev. N. R. Burris officiating, assisted by Rev. R. J. Weiss.  Interment was made in Cache Chapel Cemetery with W. J. Rhymer in charge.

             (He signed his name as Roscoe Vernard Wood on his 1918 draft registration card.  His death certificate states that Roscoe Verne Wood, farmer, of Ullin, Ill., was born 2 Feb 1899, in Mt. Carmel, Ill., the son of John H. Wood and Clara Campbell, natives of Mt. Carmel, Ill., died 11 Mar 1939, in District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Augusta Wood, and was buried in Cache Chapel Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Elizabethtown Hotel Owner Dies at 87

             Mrs. Sarah Rose, 87, proprietor for many years of the Rose Hotel at Elizabethtown, was buried Friday.  She was a direct descendant of James McFarland, founder of the city, who built the Rose Hotel as a family residence in 1818 on land he acquired from the government during the administration of George Washington.  The city was named for his wife, Elizabeth.  The two grandparents of Mrs. Rose are buried on the residential lot.—Marion Post.

             (Wiley Rose married Sarah E. Baker on 27 Jul 1869, in Gallatin Co., Ill.  Calvin M. Baker married Frances Colbert on 10 Jan 1850, in Gallatin Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Sarah E. Rose, hotel proprietor, states that she was born 5 Nov 1851, in Illinois, the daughter of Calvin Baker and Frances Colbert, natives of Illinois, died 7 Mar 1939, in Elizabethtown, Hardin Co., Ill., widow of Wiley Rose, and was buried at Elizabethtown.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Mar 1939:

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Roscoe Wood at Cache Chapel Tuesday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Mar 1939:

Infant Dies

             Charlotte Marian, age two months and 25 days, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Wilson died at the home of her parents on Oak Street Sunday morning, March 19.  She leaves her parents and two sisters, Terry Dean and Teddy Gene.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Cache Chapel Church, Rev. Mr. Martin conducting.  Burial was in Cache Chapel Cemetery, Wilson Service in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Charlotte Marion Wilson was born 23 Dec 1938, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Clinton Wilson and Cleone Albright, natives of Ullin, Ill., died 19 Mar 1939, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Cache Chapel Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Charlotte daughter of Clinton and Cleona Wilson Dec. 23, 1938 Mar. 19, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Celebrates 95 Birthday

             Mrs. Catherine Aydt Wallbaum, widow of the late Henry Wallbaum of Cairo, celebrated her 95th birthday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. A. Williams of Villa Ridge with whom she has lived for the past six years.  Mrs. Ed Dyas of Villa Ridge is another daughter.

             She was born in the little town of Piopolis, Ill., of German parents, March 20, 1844.  There were 11 children in the family.  At twenty years of age she went to Cairo on a visit, met and married Henry Wallbaum and the young couple established their home there.  They became the parents of 12 children, eight of whom are living.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 Mar 1939:

Mrs. Mary Belle Taft

             Mrs. Mary Belle (Thomas) Taft of Cairo, age 34 years, died Sunday morning after an illness of nine days due to pneumonia.  She had been with the McKesson-Schuh Drug Co., for the past twelve years.

             Surviving are her daughter, Joan, age nine; her mother, Mrs. Grace Thomas; two brothers, Prentiss and Marshal Thomas of Spencer Heights, Mounds; one sister, Mrs. Iva Jane Hartigan of Lexington, Ky., and other relatives less near.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Lutheran Church with Rev. C. R. Dunlap officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Mary Bell Taft, clerical worker for McKesson & Schuh, of Cairo, Ill., was born 29 Oct 1904, in Charleston, Mo., daughter of Joseph Thomas, a native of Oakland, Ind., and Grace Marshall, a native of Smithland, Ky., died 26 Mar 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., divorced wife of Normand Taft, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Mary Belle Taft Oct. 29, 1904 March 26, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ruth Inez Mattson

             Rosalie Inez Mattson, age ten years and 18 days, passed away at her home in Independence, Mo., Saturday evening, March 25, following an illness of two months.

             She is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John E. Mattson of Independence; her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Smith and Mrs. Josephine Hanes; a great-grandmother, Mrs. J. M. Castle, all of Mounds; three aunts, two uncles, six cousins and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon and burial made at Independence.

             Mr. and Mrs. Mattson and Rosalie were former residents of Mounds, having moved to Independence in 1937 to make their home.

 

From Slave to Teacher

             A death was reported recently which occurred at the neighboring town of Carrier Mills.  The man who died was a negro and a retired principal of schools in Saline, Alexander and Pulaski counties.  His name was Samuel Patrick Gardner.  The story of his life is interesting enough, we believe, to reprint in this column:

             Gardner was born in 1862 in Weakley County, Tenn., at a time when his mother was owned by the owner of a large plantation.

             When he was four years old he and his mother were sold at auction to an abolitionist, a “Mr. Hill.”

             That was shortly before the Civil War began and the terms of the purchase provided that in event of the slaves being freed by war, payments would stop.

             Gardner learned to read and write from three other children in the Hill home who taught him what they in turn had learned at school each day.

             In 1870, his parents brought him to Illinois, where he attended his first term of country grade school at the age of 15.

             His first work as a teacher was with a Sunday school class.  Later he was certified to teach in the public schools at Cairo, although he was not qualified.

             Determined to qualify, he entered a grade school at the Southern Illinois Normal University for the summer term and in addition studied with a private teacher, a young high school principal on whose farm he worked during his vacation.

             Gardner’s first pay as a teacher was $20 per month.  When he retired in 1929 as principal of the school at Muddy, his salary was $__ per month.

             The former slave’s constant struggle to improve himself provided inspiration for many of his pupils.

             Some of them have distinguished themselves as negro educators and are listed in a pamphlet “Up from Slavery” written by Gardner to commemorate completion of 50 years as a teacher.

             (According to his death certificate, Samuel P. Gardner, retired school teacher, was born 8 Jan 1857, in Tennessee, died 4 Mar 1939, in Carrier Mills, Saline Co., Ill., husband of Adeline Gardner, and was buried in Lake View Cemetery near Carrier Mills, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 31 Mar 1939:

AGED COUPLE BURNED

             A fire which took the lives of two aged and highly respected residents of New Burnside, occurred about 4 o’clock Tuesday morning.  Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Hampton, who had been lifelong residents of New Burnside were burned to death when their home was destroyed.  Inez Reed who was living with the Hamptons barely escaped with her life.

             The origin of the fire is unknown.  Miss Reed told a coroner’s jury that Mrs. Hampton awakened her, shouting that the house was on fire.  She gathered a few bits of clothing about her and ran to the front room where she was almost overcome by smoke.  She unlocked the front door and ran to the neighbors spreading the alarm.—Vienna Times

             (William Hampton married Miss McNew on 19 Aug 1886, in Pope Co., Ill.  Charles McNew married Anna Stone on 29 Mar 1863, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Wade Hampton, retired salesman,  was born 2 Jun 1864, in McCormick, Ill., died 21 Mar 1939, in New Burnside, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Mary Hampton, and was buried at New Burnside, Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mary Susan Hampton was born 12 Apr 1866, in Stonefort, Ill., the daughter of Charles McNew, a native of Tennessee, and Anna Stone, a native of Kentucky, died 22 Mar 1939, in New Burnside, Johnson Co., Ill., wife of W. W. Hampton,  and was buried at New Burnside, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CREAL SPRINGS MAN AND WIFE DIE IN FLAMING FIELD

             Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Smith of Creal Springs were found burned to death about one-eighth of a mile east of their home in a field, Wednesday morning.

             The bodies were found by Jess Arnold of Carrier Mills.  The discovery was made about 1:00 o’clock in the afternoon.

             Mr. and Mrs. Smith had gone to the field from their home and were burning it off.  It is thought that Mr. Smith became surrounded by the burning sage grass in the field and Mrs. Smith started to his rescue.  There were no eye witnesses to their tragic death.  The body of Mrs. Smith was found about 100 yards from that of her husband.  All of the clothing was burned from their bodies which were badly charred by the flames.  The watch in Mr. Smith’s pocket stopped at 11:32.             

             Coroner L. W. Gasoway of Williamson County held an inquest at Creal Springs Thursday afternoon and the jury empaneled returned the verdict of “accidental death by fire.”  The jury was composed of Elbert Ford, Arlie Odum J. R. Rector, Joe Lauderdale, C. O. Addlesburger and Howard Byassee.

             Neighbors fought the flames in the field and finally brought them under control.  The home of Mrs. Alice Reagan was threatened.

             The Smiths had recently purchased a small farm in the edge of Creal Springs.  Mrs. Smith is a former resident of Johnson County and was formerly Miss Nora Calhoun and her home was at Buncombe.  Until a few years ago she owned a farm near Buncombe.  She was one of this county’s foremost teachers and had a wide acquaintance here.  Her many friends will be saddened to learn of her tragic death.  Her age was about 64 and Mr. Smith was 68 years of age.—Vienna Times.

             (According to his death certificate, Herbert R. Smith, retired G. W. employee, was born 5 Aug 1871, in Canada, died 22 Mar 1939, in Creal Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Nora Smith, and was buried in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Nora Calehoun Smith was born 22 Jul 1874, in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of James Franklin Calehoun, a native of Tennessee, and Francis Reid, a native of Illinois, died 22 Mar 1939, in Creal Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., the wife of Herbert R. Smith, and was buried at Vienna, Ill.  Their marker there reads Herbert R. Smith 1872-1939 Nora wife of Herbert Smith 1874-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Apr 1939:

William Baker

             William Baker, age 70, died Saturday morning, April 1, at the home of his son, Noel Baker, at Villa Ridge.

             Surviving are three sons, Noel of Villa Ridge, James of Bluford and Rex of Pulaski; one daughter, Mrs. Mamie Modglin of Bluford; two brothers, Lee and Fred Baker of Mounds; nineteen grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

             (The death certificate states that William Washington Baker, farmer, was born 20 Dec 1868, died 1 Apr 1939, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Mary Baker, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Clifford Van Meter

             Clifford “Weary” Van Meter, 24, passed away at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Van Meter of Mound City, Sunday evening at 9:35 o’clock after a lingering illness.  He had been a resident of Mound City for eight years and had been employed by the Piggly Wiggly store.

             Besides his parents, he is survived by three sisters, Hattie Mae and Elizabeth Van Meter of Mound City and Mrs. Hazel Daley of Karnak; three brothers Walter Jr., Isaac and Paul of Mound City; his maternal grandmother, Mrs. Hattie Mossburger of Karnak, and his paternal grandmother, Mrs. May Van Meter of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon with Rev. Will Sires of Cairo officiating.  The casket bearers were Richard Evans, Paul McDown, Robert Murphy, Harry Huft Oral Cartner and Clarence Voiles.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (According to his death certificate, Clifford Van Meter, grocery clerk, was born 1 May 1915, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of Walter Van Meter, a native of Humboldt, Ill., and Beulah Van Meter, a native of Brookport, Ill., died 2 Apr 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

W. V. Volner

             William V. Volner, 74, passed away at 9:40 o’clock Thursday evening, March 30, at his home in Mound City, after an illness of one year of heart disease.  He has been a resident of Mound City since 1921.

             He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. G. H. Knight of Mounds, Mrs. Robert Deckard; and two sons, Roy of Alton and Hallie of Mound City; three brothers, Frank, Oscar and Charles of Carterville; five sisters, Mrs. Mollie Penrod and Mrs. Nora Evans of Benton, Mrs. Mattie Stewart of Olive Branch, and Mrs. Hattie McCall of California; and eighteen grandchildren and two great grandchildren also survive.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Mound City Sunday afternoon, Rev. Robert Shelton officiating.  Burial was made in Camp Ground Cemetery near Anna, J. T. Ryan officiating.

             (Albert Volner married Nancy R. Crabtree on 18 Sep 1864, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that William V. Volner, retired inspector, was born 27 Jun 1865, in Union Co., Ill., son of Nancy Crabtree Volner, died 30 Mar 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Mary Volner, and was buried in Camp Ground Cemetery near Anna, Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  William Volner 1866-1939 Mary Volner 1871-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. George Severs

             Mrs. Emma Severs died at her home in Ullin Sunday afternoon, April 2.  She is survived by her husband and ten children, Wayne, George Jr., Harvey, Ray, Truman, Marie and Iris Fay Severs of Ullin, John Severs of Pulaski, Mrs. Nellie Shifley of Brookport, and Mrs. Flora Culverson of Ullin.  One sister, Mrs. Della Summers of Perks and three brothers, Orville Johnson of Dongola, Osa Johnson and Floyd Johnson of Pennsylvania; and one grandchild and many other relatives also survive.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist church in Ullin, with Rev. Hobert Peterson officiating.  Interment was made in Butter Ridge Cemetery.

             (Joseph Johnson married Mary F. Dale on 27 Jun 1886, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Emma Severs was born 7 Jun 1892, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Joe Johnson and Mollie Dale, natives of Illinois, died 2 Apr 1939, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of George Severs, and was buried in Butter Ridge Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Emma Severs 1892-1939 George Severs 1882-1969.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Prominent Pulaski County Farmer Dies March 30

             M. J. McBride, for many years a prominent farmer and fruit grower of the Villa Ridge community, died Thursday evening, March 30, at his home following a stroke of apoplexy suffered while in Mounds on Saturday, March 25.

             Martin Joseph McBride, age 79 years, was born at Baltimore, Md., and was reared in Dayton, Ohio.  He moved to Villa Ridge in the year of 1876, working on farms and as a carpenter for the I. C. Railroad.  He helped build the old Cairo elevator on the Ohio levee.  In January 1884, he was married to Lizzie A. Scheirich and the couple settled on the farm upon which they lived until their deaths, his wife dying in 1924.  He was a charter member of the Odd Fellows Lodge of Villa Ridge, transferring to the Mound City lodge when the Villa Ridge Lodge was dissolved.  He also held membership in the Modern Woodmen of America.

             Mr. McBride was one of the pioneer orchardists of this section of Illinois and his peach orchards were known far and wide.  He kept constantly in touch with the latest methods in horticulture.  Other interests were the organization of the Ullin Mutual Fire Insurance Co., the rural electric line at Villa Ridge and the first rural telephone company there.

             He is survived by one son, Orlan L. McBride of Villa Ridge and several nieces, nephews and cousins, some of whom came from Dayton, Ohio, to attend his funeral.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Union Church of Villa Ridge cemetery with the G. A. James Funeral Service directing.  Casket bearers were John Clancy, Louis Graves, W. E. Rife, William Bride, Fred Whelan and Walter Hogendobler.

             (M. J. McBride married Lizzie A. Sherrick on 16 Jan 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Martin Joseph McBride, farmer and fruit grower at Pulaski, Ill., was born 16 Oct 1859, in Emmetsburg, Md., the son of Patrick McBride and Mary Ganon, natives of Ireland, died 30 Mar 1939, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Lizzie Ann McBride, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Martin J. McBride 1859-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Willis Weaver

             Willis Weaver, 57, died at his home in Karnak, April first.  He is survived by his wife, Martha Weaver; three children, Fred, Robert and Blanche Weaver of Karnak; one sister, Mrs. Renda Holt of Parma, Mo.; five brothers, James of Parma, Joseph and William of Lite, Ark., Charles of Cavalue, Mo., and Lem of Gideon, Mo.

             Services were held in the Pentecostal Church in Karnak Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with Rev. Hal Corzine officiating.  Burial was made in the Lutheran Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service conducting.

             (Her death certificate states Willis Weaver, farmer, was born 8 Oct 1881, in Massac Co., Ill., the son of Enoch Weaver, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Nancy Gregory, a native of Benton, Ill., died 1 Apr 1939, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Martha Nusor, and was buried in Lutheran Chapel Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Apr 1939:

WILLIAM VOLNER

             William V. Volner, 74, passed away Thursday evening, at his home in this city after a year’s illness of heart disease.  He had been a resident of this city for the past 18 years.

             Mr. Volner is survived by two daughters, Mrs. G. H. Knight of Mounds and Mrs. Robert Deckard of this city; two sons, Roy of Alton and Hallie of this city.  Three brothers, Frank, Oscar and Charles of Carterville; five sisters, Mrs. Mollie Penrod and Mrs. Nora Evans of Carterville, Mrs. Alice Evans of Benton, Mrs. Mattie Stewart of Olive Branch and Mrs. Hattie McCall of California; and 18 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren also survive.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Mound City Baptist Church with Rev. Robert Shelton, assisted by Rev. Will Farrell officiating.

             Interment was made in Camp Ground Cemetery near Anna.

 

M. J. McBRIDE, PIONEER FRUIT GROWER, DIES AT VILLA RIDGE

             Funeral services for Martin Joseph McBride, who passed away at his home near Villa Ridge, Thursday evening, March 29, were held Saturday afternoon at the Union Church in Villa Ridge, with Rev. James Tucker officiating.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery beside his wife who preceded him in death in 1924.

             He is survived by one son, Orlan, and several nieces, nephews and cousins, some of whom came from Dayton, Ohio, to attend the funeral.  Casket bearers were:  John Clancy, Louis Graves, Billie Rife, Bill Bride, Fred Whalen and Walter Hogendobler.

             Born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1860, Mr. McBride was reared in Dayton, Ohio, and came to Villa Ridge when he was 16 years old.  He hired out as farm hand on numerous farms in that community, finally establishing himself on the farm of the late G. W. Endicott, where he became interested in the orchard business.

             In 1884 he married Lizzie A. Scheirich, sister of Andrew Scheirich, who resides in the old Scheirich home near Villa Ridge.  The young couple took up their abode in a small dwelling near the present site of the McBride home.

             His interest in orchard growing increased and due to diligence and application he became one of the most prominent fruit growers in Southern Illinois.  Peach growing was his special interest and his peaches commanded much attention in the fruit markets throughout the state.

             Not only a pioneer in the fruit business, Mr. McBride was first in many civic social undertakings in his community.  He helped organize the Ullin Mutual Fire Insurance Co., the rural electric line in the Villa Ridge locale and the first rural telephone company at Villa Ridge.  He was a charter member of the Odd Fellows Lodge at Villa Ridge and transferred to the lodge at Mound City when the Villa Ridge lodge dissolved.  He was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America.

             A resident of Pulaski County for the past 62 years or so, Mr. McBride had many friends, not only through the state, all of whom mourned the news of his death.

             G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

 

CLIFFORD (WEARY) VANMETER

             Funeral services for Clifford VanMeter were held Thursday afternoon at the Pentecostal church of this city with Rev. Will Fires of Cairo officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  The casket bearers were:  Dick Evans, Paul McGowan, Robert Murphy, Harry Hust, Oryn Cartner and Clarence Voiles.

             Clifford, more popularly known as “Weary,” was 24 years old at the time of his death, Sunday evening, and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter VanMeter of this city.  Besides his parents, he is survived by three sisters, Hattie Mae and Elizabeth VanMeter of this city and Mrs. Hazel Daley of Karnak; three brothers, Walter Jr., Isaac and Paul of this city; his maternal grandmother, Mrs. Hattie Mossburger of Karnak and his paternal grandmother, Mrs. May VanMeter of this city.

             “Weary” was well known by Mound City residents, having been employed at the Piggly Wiggly where he made many friends.  About a year ago he had his tonsils removed and had been in ill health ever since, most of the time confined to his bed.                         

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Apr 1939:

ELDERLY COLORED WOMAN DIES

             Mrs. Ellen Walker, aged 104 years, died early Wednesday morning at her home near Olmstead, where she resided with her son, Gus Walker.  She was the wife of Abraham Walker, a Civil War veteran and was a resident of this county for some 40 years.  It is thought she is the oldest resident of this county.

             Funeral services will be held Sunday at Mt. Zion Church and burial will be in Mt. Zion Cemetery.

             (According to her death certificate, Ellen Walker was born 10 Feb 1835, in Nashville, Tenn., the daughter of Daniel Cunard, a native of Virginia, died 12 Apr 1939, in Road District No. 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Abraham Walker, and was buried at Mt. Zion Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOE P. GORE OF MT. PISGAH DIES OF CARBOLIC ACID BURNS

             Joe Gore, 60, passed away at the Fisher Hospital in Metropolis, Sunday.  He had been taken there from his home in the Mt. Pisgah settlement near Cypress, suffering from carbolic acid burns about the mouth, throat and probably stomach.

             Gore, it is reported, drank the acid by mistake, while en route to his home in an automobile driven by a daughter.  He was returned to Cypress, where he received medical attention and later was taken to his home.  His condition was such that he was later removed to the Fisher Hospital.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday.  Gore was one of four candidates for road commissioner in Road District No. 3.—Vienna Times.

             (Joe P. Gore married Lula B. Campbell on 22 Jul 1900, in Johnson Co., Ill.  When he registered for the World War I draft in 1918, in Matthews, New Madrid Co., Mo., he signed his name as Josiah Patterson Gore.  He was born 11 Sep 1877, and was a fireman for Garver Lumber Co., in Matthews, Mo.  His death certificate states that Joe P. Gore, farmer, of Vienna, Ill., was born 11 Sep 1876, in Illinois, son of Joe Gore, died 2 Apr 1939, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  His marker at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Father Joseph P. Gore 1875-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Joy Dexter attended the funeral of Mrs. George Seivers in Ullin Tuesday.  (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Apr 1939:

F. H. Leidigh

             Fred H. Leidigh of Cairo, a former resident of the Villa Ridge community, died Friday evening, April 14, at 7:30 o’clock at his home, 501 Washington Avenue, at the age of 69 years.  He had been ill for several months.

             Mr. Leidigh was born in Villa Ridge, son of William Henry and Elizabeth Hogendobler Leidigh.  He had lived his entire life in this locality.

             Surviving are his wife, one son, Elmer Leidigh, a state highway police officer; three brothers, Harry of Gulfport, Miss., Charles of Jackson, Mo., and Dee of Villa Ridge; three sisters, Misses Minnie and Maggie Leidigh of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Elizabeth Niestrath of America, Ill.

             Funeral services were held at the Berbling Funeral Home in Cairo Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, Rev. Robert C. Dunlap officiating.  Interment was made in Alto Pass Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Frederick Horace Leidigh, farmer, was born 4 Jun 1869, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of William H. Leidigh and Elizabeth Hogendobler, natives of Pennsylvania, died 14 Apr 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Fannie Leidigh, and was buried in Alto Pass Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Fred H. Leidigh June 4, 1869 April 14 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. W. Painter

             James Ware Painter, 65, died at his home in Mound City Tuesday morning, April 18, at 12:20 o’clock.  Mr. Painter moved to Mound City in 1895 from Hallen Center, Ohio, where he was born.  October 20, 1901, he married Miss Hannah May Knowlton of Mound City.  To this union were born two children; a son, Marvin Ware, who passed away in 1915; and a daughter, Mrs. Pearl Salmon of Mound City; and a sister, Miss Jennie Painter of Champaign also survive.

             For several years Mr. Painter conducted a transfer between Cairo and Mound City for the St. Louis Traction Company.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock in the James Funeral Home at Mound City, with Rev. J. W. Ward of Dongola, former pastor of the First Baptist Church of Mound City and a very good friend of the deceased officiating, assisted by Rev. James Henderson, pastor of the First Methodist Church.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, with James Funeral Service in charge.

             (In 1918, when he registered for the draft, he was a self-employed teamster in Mound City, Ill., and his nearest relative was Anna May Painter of Mound City.  According to his death certificate, James Ware Painter, farmer, was born 23 Dec 1873, in Allen Center, Ohio, the son of Jacob R. Painter and Samantha J. Ware, natives of Ohio, died 18 Apr 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Hannah Painter, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  James Ware Painter Dec. 23, 1873 April 18, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Apr 1939:

J. W. PAINTER

             James Ware Painter, 65, passed away at his home in this city Tuesday morning after several years’ illness from asthma.

             Mr. Painter was born at Allen Center, Ohio.  He first moved to Natchez, Miss., then to Champaign, Ill., and came to Mound City in 1895, where on October 20, 1901, he married Miss Hannah May Knowlton of this city.  To this union were born two children; a son, Marvin Ware, who passed away in 1915, and a daughter, Mrs. Pearl Salmon of this city.  His widow and a granddaughter, Miss Treva Salmon, also of this city; and a sister, Miss Jennie Painter of Champaign also survive.

             For several years Mr. Painter conducted a transfer between Cairo and Mound City and later became an agent for the Traction Company.  When his health began to fail, he retired from business and farmed near his home.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the James Funeral Home in this city.  The services were conducted by Rev. J. W. Ward of Dongola, former pastor of the First Baptist Church of Mound City and a very good friend of the deceased.  Rev. Ward was assisted by Rev. James Henderson, pastor of the First M. E. Church of this city.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             The Casketbearers were:  George R. Martin, James Rushing, Claud Stout, C. F. Bode, George Eichhorn and George W. Gunn.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Apr 1939:

             Mrs. Sarah J. Horner, 79, passed away Wednesday morning at 4:30 o’clock at Karnak.  She was the widow of the late J. C. Horner.

             She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Maggie Brown of Vienna, Mrs. May Wadkins and Mrs. Dollie __ey, both of Karnak; three sons, Frank and Henry of Vienna, and John of Grand Chain; and a sister, Mrs. Nellie Miller of Marion, Ark.

             Funeral services were held at the home of R. D. Wadkins at Karnak, Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock with Rev. Wilburn Sutton officiating.  Burial was made in Mt. Olive Cemetery.  Pallbearers were Paul Horner, Carl Horner, Elmer Horner, Everett Brown, William Brown, and Floyd Brown.  Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

 

M. A. Pulley who was called to Carterville Saturday by the death of a relative has returned home.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Carson were called to Perks Tuesday afternoon to attend the funeral of Jean Christian, a nephew of Mrs. Carson, who was drowned Saturday night when the auto in which he was riding plunged into a ditch of water.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Curtner of Chicago were called here Tuesday on account of the death of their brother-in-law, Herschel Foutch of Gale.

             (The death certificate of Herschel Foutch, laborer, of Gale, Alexander Co., Ill., states that he was born 11 Aug 1907, in Gale, Ill., the son of John and Rose Foutch, died 24 Apr 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in McCrite Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Hearschel Foutch 1907-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Victim of Auto Wreck Dies Unexpectedly Monday

             William Herschel Foutch, age 32 years, of Gale, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Monday morning, although it had been believed for several days that he was recovering from injuries he had sustained in an auto accident on April 2, south of Thebes.

             Foutch, who married Thelma Boren of this city, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Boren, had suffered a fracture of the skull and other injuries and had been treated for about a week of St. Mary’s before going to his home in Gale.  Mrs. Foutch was also injured, having suffered a fractured jaw.

             Funeral services were held at Diswood Tuesday afternoon, Rev. Smith of Thebes officiating.  Burial was at Diswood.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Apr 1939:

COUSINS DENIED ESTATE OF HUGH THOMASSON

             Sustaining a defense demurrer, Circuit Judge Robert J. Kirkwood Wednesday dismissed a suit filed in 1934 by 2 cousins of the late Hugh W. Thomasson, wealthy St. Louis real estate owner, seeking his entire $500,000 estate.  The plaintiffs were Tower A. Thomasson of Mounds, Ill., and E. M. Thomasson of Denver.

             The claim was based upon a contract Thomasson is alleged to have executed in 1932, promising to leave them his estate in return for their loyalty and their agreement to assist him in defending insanity proceedings and other litigation instituted against him.—St. Louis Star-Times

 

Three Die When Truck Plunges into Ditch

             Three young people came to sudden death Saturday night early, possibly 9:30 or 10 o’clock when the pickup truck in which they were riding plunged into a ditch about a mile and a half east of Route 37 on the road to Perks.  The truck turned down to the temporary bridge, but went on the outside of the guard railing to a point nearly midway across on two wheels and then, tilting downward, struck the projecting center beam wrecked the car, probably stunning, if not actually killing one of the occupants and turned over sidewise as it settled into about six feet of water.

             The dead are:  Luther Green, 21, Brownfield, in Pope County; Jean Christian, 14, of Perks; and Enos Elizabeth Brush, 16, of Perks.  The truck belonged to Harold Clanahan of Brownfield and had been borrowed by Green, who came to see the Brush family, lately of Brownfield.

             The trio, it is understood, were on their way from Perks to Spur Inn.  The road, which is a good road most of the way, runs straight east from Perks and is broken by this bridge, which is of considerable length and size.  The temporary bridge, of wood, was to one side, and it was necessary to drive off the road to reach it.  Flares were burned, indicating danger, and it is not understood how they came to drive off the road and then out on the outer edge of the bridge, holding up on two wheels, until the car wrecked on the center timber.  Green, who was large, was driving, some thought, had his neck broken.

             No one knew of the accident for some time.  The parties in the wrecked truck, stunned by the collision with the projecting center timber, or killed, may never have known and the truck settled bottom side up in about five or six feet of water.

             Lowell Kessler and Earl Robinson of Grand Chain made the discovery.  The lights of the truck, although submerged in water, were still burning.  In crossing this bridge, they had killed their motor, and that pause caused them to see the lights in the water.  The alarm was spread and the truck was turned over and the bodies, after considerable effort, were dragged up the steep bank.  It was near midnight when all was over.

             The coroner’s jury under Dr. O. T. Hudson returned a verdict next day that their death was accidental.

             Funeral services for the three were held Tuesday, with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge of all three.  Miss Brush is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cephas Brush; two sisters, Mary and Velma; and one brother, Donald, all of Perks.  Her funeral was at the Pleasant Valley Church at Grantsburg.

             Jean Christian is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Christian of Perks; three sisters and one brother, all of Perks.  Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church there.

             The funeral of Luther Green, the oldest of the trio, was held at the residence at Brownfield.

             (The death certificate of Luther Elisha Green, laborer, of Brownfield, Pope Co., Ill., states he was born 16 Sep 1917, in Brownfield, Ill., the son of Luther M. Green, a native of Golconda, Ill., and Rose Joiner, a native of Brownfield, Ill., died 22 Apr 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery at Golconda, Pope Co., Ill.  Luther M. Green married Rosie Joiner on 27 Nov 1911, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Jean Christian was born 12 Dec 1924, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Clarence Christian, a native of Indiana, and Opal Price, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., died 22 Apr 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Mount Olive Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Jean Christian 1924-1939.   According to her death certificate, Enos Elizabeth Brush was born 9 Jun 1923, in Illinois, the daughter of Cephas Brush and Ethel Nelson, natives of Illinois, died 22 Apr 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Nelson Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  Cephus Brush married Ethel Nelson on 31 Jul 1917, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIED IN KENTUCKY

             Word has been received of the recent death of Mrs. Kate Wilcox of Morganfield, Ky., who died at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Ruby Brown, in that city.  Mrs. Wilcox was 70 years old and death was caused from a heart attack.  She was the widow of Charles D. Wilcox, who was in the hoop mill business in Mound City in 1901-02.  When Mr. Wilcox died in 1902, Mrs. Wilcox and family of three children moved to Sturgis, Ky., where they made their home for some time.  A son, O. H. Wilcox, is mayor of Sturgis and the other daughter surviving is Mrs. R. E. Hare of Zanesville, Ohio.

             (According to her death certificate, Kate Wilcox was born 3 Oct 1869, in Union Co., Ky., the daughter of Charles E. Wilcox (?) and Kathrine Liebenguth, natives of France, died suddenly on 15 Apr 1939, in Morganfield, Union Co., Ky., of thrombosis, widow, and was buried in Sturgis Cemetery in Sturgis, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to express our sincere thanks and heartfelt appreciation for the many kindnesses during the illness and after the death of our loved one, James W. Painter.  We especially wish to thank Rev. J. W. Ward and Rev. James Henderson for their consoling words, those who sent flowers, those who gave the use of their cars, the casket bearers and all who assisted in any way.

The Painter Family

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 May 1939:

Mrs. Nannie Stone

             Mrs. Nannie Stone, age 86 years, daughter of Samuel and Caroline Kennedy, pioneer citizens of Villa Ridge, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. L. Grandstaff, in Mounds, Thursday, April 27, where she had resided for the past six years.  She was a sister of the late M. L. Kennedy of Tunica, Miss.  Besides her daughter, she is survived by three grandchildren:  Dr. Harry Grandstaff of Rockford, Ill., Mrs. Katherine Wyman of Mobile, Ala., Lester Grandstaff, Jr., of Mounds; one great-granddaughter, Lynda Wyman.

             Funeral services were conducted at the James Funeral Home in Mounds Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. S. C. Benninger of Grand Chain and interment was made in Liberty Cemetery three miles southeast of Pulaski, G. A. James directing.

             The casket bearers were:  John Newell, J. L. Wanura, W. J. Crocker, Frank Bour, Mr. Corzine of Cairo and Clarence Beedle.

             (Her death certificate states that Nannie Stone was born 16 Jan 1851, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the daughter of Samuel Kennedy, a native of Illinois, died 27 Apr 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of P. H. Stone, and was buried in Liberty Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Willis Goza will graduate from the Northwest Missouri Teachers College at Maryville, Mo., on May 25.  Since the death of his mother and the breaking up of the Goza household, Willis has made his home with his uncle and aunt, Dr. and Mrs. J. R. Titus of Spencer Heights.

 

William O’Sullivan

             William O’Sullivan, age 70, died suddenly at 5:30 a.m. Friday, April 28, at his home in Mound City. He had been ill with heart trouble and had been confined to his home for several weeks.

             Mr. O’Sullivan, a lifelong resident of Mound City, was known to his friends as “Cappy.”  He was an employee of the Marine Ways as a ship carpenter.  Because of his efficiency in the profession he was called to various parts of the country, serving in this capacity overseas during the war.

             He is survived by a ____ James O’Sullivan, with whom he made his home; three nieces, Mrs. Joe Westerman of Mound City, Mrs. Kate Mathis of Tamms, and Mrs. George Noeman of Chicago; and two nephews, Dan and ___ O’Sullivan of Mound City.

             Funeral services were ___ Sunday afternoon at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, of which he was a member, by Rev. Gilmartin.  Interment was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Mounds, Ryan Funeral Service directing.

             (When he applied for a passport in 1917 in Paducah, Ky., he stated that his father, a naturalized citizen, had been dead about 30 years and his mother about 25 years.  William was going to France for construction work for the Engineers Corps.  His death certificate states that William O’Sullivan, retired ship carpenter, was born 20 Apr 1869, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Timothy O’Sullivan and Katherine Shea, natives of Ireland, died 28 Apr 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  William O’Sullivan 1869-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 May 1939:

JIM HARBISON ILL

             Jim Harbison, 85 years of age, village clerk of Olmstead and road clerk, also justice of the peace, has been a sick man.  A bunion on his foot that has been there for years, began to swell and hurt.  Last week, for four days he got no sleep save a little induced by medicine and Harbison was a sick man, and it came very near putting him in bad and out.  Word yesterday was that he was still a very sick man.

 

WILLIAM “CAPPY” O’SULLIVAN

             Funeral services for William O’Sullivan, who passed away suddenly Friday morning at his home in this city were held Sunday afternoon at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, with Rev. Lawrence Gilmartin officiating. Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

             Mr. O’Sullivan was familiarly known to Mound City residents as “Cappy.”  A life-long resident of this city, he was employed at the Marine Ways as carpenter, and in this capacity served overseas during the war.

             He is survived by one brother, James, who is the last of a large family, all of whom had spent almost their entire life in Mound City and who had been prominent in the community.  Of the many nephews and nieces who were able to attend the funeral were Mrs. J. S. Westerman, in whose home he had been living, George W. Sweeney of this city, Mrs. A. M. Mathis of Tamaroa, Mrs. Rose Cavanaugh of Shreveport, La., Mrs. Elmer Cowell and Mrs. Herbert Neff of Cairo, Attorney Joe O’Sullivan and Dan O’Sullivan, Jr., of this city.  A number of grandnieces and grandnephews were also present at the funeral services.

 

74 YEARS AGO

April 27, 1864

             Mrs. Lizzie Booth, the widow of Major Booth of the Federal Army, who was killed during the recent battle at Fort Pillow, arrived in Memphis at Fort Pickering this morning on a steamer bound from Cairo.  Memphis Federal Army officers sent a group of soldiers to the boat landing to receive her.  She came off the steamer carrying a United States flag, stained with the blood of Major Booth.  Taking her position in front of 14 surviving soldiers of her dead husband’s command, she raised the flag above her head, stepped forward and said:  “Boys, I have come from a visit to the Army hospital at Mound City, Ill., where I saw your wounded comrades, still bloody from the struggle at Fort Pillow.  I saw the one who saved this flag from the insulting touch of traitors’ fingers.  I have given the country all I had to give—my husband—yet I have given him for the freedom of my country.  Soldiers, if you give this flag that waved in proud defiance on the works at Fort Pillow, I know you will remember the last words of my noble husband, ‘never surrender the flag to traitors.”—Memphis Commercial Appeal

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to express our most sincere thanks to our many friends who so kindly assisted us during our recent bereavement, the sudden passing of our beloved brother and uncle, the late William O’Sullivan.

James O’Sullivan

Joseph O’Sullivan and family

 

MRS J. B. WILLIAMSON

             Mrs. J. B. Williamson, mother of Mrs. J. M. Monan, of this city, died at her home in Lexington, Ky., Saturday morning, April 15.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. A. H. Miller.  Interment was made in Bethesda Cemetery.

             Mrs. Williamson was a native of Holmes County and had spent many years in the community where she died.  She was a member of the Baptist Church.

             Besides her husband, J. B. Williamson, she is survived by the following children:  Mrs. J. M. Monan, Mound City; Mrs. Josie Truitt, Mrs. Alice Walker, Jackson, Tenn.; Miss Myrtle Williamson, McMillan, Tenn.; Ollie Williamson, Kerrville, Tenn.; J. B. Williamson, Jr., Crigler, Ark.

 

DR. A. E. McKENZIE, VETERAN DENTIST OF VIENNA, DEAD

             Dr. A. E. McKenzie, 67, who practiced dentistry in Vienna for over forty years, passed away at his home on West Main Street, Tuesday afternoon, April 25.  Dr. McKenzie had been in failing health for several months and in an effort to improve his health had made two trips to the West for a vacation and rest.  He returned to Vienna about two months ago suffering from a number of ailments.  On Tuesday his condition became serious and within a few short hours he passed away.

             Funeral services were held at the family home Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. J. B. Jones, pastor of the Christian Church, and Rev. H. G. Hurley, pastor of the Methodist Church, were in charge of the service.  Interment was made in the Fraternal Cemetery.  Pall bearers were:  A. D. Stanley, Ward Stanley, Ned Stanley, C. J. Huffman, Dr. C. R. Moschenross and Dr. Royce S. Hundley.

             He was married to Alice Cook of Delhi, Cincinnati, Ohio, July 29, 1897, who survives.  The children are:  Harold of Carbondale; Mary B., Herbert, George and Mrs. Myra Ruppert of Vienna; Donald of Alton; Mrs. Martha Adamson and A. E., Jr., of Streator; and Mrs. May Jones of Roxana, Ill.  Three children, Mildred, Mabel and Lewis, have preceded him in death.  Nine grandchildren and three sisters, Mrs. P. T. Chapman, Mrs. C. J. Huffman of Vienna and Mrs. A. D. Stanley of Chester, Ill., survive.

             (Peter S. McKenzie married Mary J. Smith on 30 Oct 1868, in Massac Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Dr. A. E. McKenzie, dentist, was born 12 Nov 1871, in East St. Louis, Ill., the son of Dr. P. S. McKenzie, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, and Mary J. Smith, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 25 Apr 1939, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Alice McKenzie, and was buried in Road District 5, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads:  Adolphus E. McKenzie 1871-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. NANNIE STONE

             Mrs. Nannie Stone, 88 years old, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C.L. Grandstaff in Mounds, Thursday morning, April 27, where she had resided for the past six years.  She was a sister of the late M. L. Kennedy.

             Besides her daughter, she is survived by three grandchildren; Dr. Harry Grandstaff of Rockford, Mrs. Katherine Wyman of Mobile, Ala., Lester Grandstaff, Jr., of Mounds; and one great-granddaughter.

             Funeral services were conducted at the James Funeral Home in Mounds, Friday afternoon by Rev. S. C. Benninger of Grand Chain.  Interment was made in Liberty Cemetery, three miles southeast of Pulaski.

             The casket bearers were:  John Newell, J. L. Wanura, W. J. Crocker, Frank Bour, and Clarence Beedle of Mounds and Mr. Corzine of Cairo.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

MRS. MARY BLATTLER

             Mrs. Mary Blattler passed away Saturday evening after an illness of ten weeks, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Noel Jones, Cairo, where she has made her home since last September.

             She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Emma Mertz of St. Louis; two nieces, Mrs. M. L. Atherton of Cairo and Mrs. Ralph Loehr of Evansville, Ind.; and a nephew, Earl Coneter of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at St. Patrick’s Church, Cairo, with Rev. Bernard Pender officiating.  Interment was made in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 May 1939:

Jesse Knupp of Villa Ridge Dies Suddenly

             Jesse Knupp of Villa Ridge, age 63, died suddenly Wednesday afternoon from a heart attack at his home.

             Surviving are his wife, Minnie; four sons, William of Texas, Edward of Villa Ridge, Lee of Cairo and Omar of Sikeston, Mo.; one daughter, Mrs. Kathyrn Gunn of Villa Ridge; also two brothers, Jonas of Olmstead and J. T. Knupp of Mounds; and four sisters, Mrs. Ed Burd of Pulaski, Mrs. Owen Edwards of Olmstead, Mrs. Joy Bagby of Olmstead and Mrs. Jennie Rees of Hot Springs, Ark.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o’clock at Union Church, Villa Ridge, Rev. J. A. Tucker officiating.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (Jesse Eldridge Knupp, farmer, 23, of Wetaug, Ill., born in Illinois, son of Daniel Knupp and Catharine Hoffner, married Minnie Staudacher, 20, of Ullin, Ill., born in Germany, daughter of John Staudacher and Marie Sebackley, on 30 Jul 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Daniel Knupp married Catherine Hoffner on 17 Jan 1875, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Jesse Eliza Knupp, farmer, was born 10 Mar 1876, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Dan Knupp and Catherine Hoffner, natives of Illinois, died 10 May 1939, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Minnie Knupp, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Father Jesse E. Knupp Mar. 10, 1876 May 10, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Edgar S. Miller

             Edgar S. Miller died Thursday morning at 9 o’clock at his home in Webster Groves, Mo., after a lingering illness.

             He leaves his wife and two daughters, also a brother, Judge C. S. Miller of Cairo.  He and his family formerly resided in Mound City.

             The body will be brought to Mound City and the funeral will be held Sunday.

 

Napoleon was located just at the foot of the Grand Chain of Rocks, which extends five miles upstream with a fall of five feet within that distance.  In the early days of steamboating, the chain was a great menace to navigation and special pilots were used to navigate the Chain.  One special pilot, Mr. Moyers mentions by name, a Mr. McDonald, the father of Mrs. Henrietta Clemson Bartleson, whom he knew personally.  Within the decade of 1820-30 the Government undertook to remedy matters by building a loose stone dyke at the lower end of what is now Dam 53.  During this construction, on a Sunday, some of the workmen were joy riding in a yawl.  Someone rocked the boat; it was capsized and 19 men were drowned.  Their bodies were recovered and were buried on the high ground near the river bank.  Later a man name Joe Lipe, who had a wood yard there, died and was buried in the same ground as were two of his little girls.

             (James Bartleson married Mrs. Henrietta Clemson on 14 Mar 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 May 1939:

EDWARD MILLER DIED IN ST. LOUIS THURSDAY MORNING

             Edward Miller, for a long time a resident of this city in the lumber business and born and raised in the Villa Ridge community, died at Webster Groves, Mo., yesterday morning about 9:30 o’clock after an illness that dates back for a number of years.

             While the details could not be secured at press time, the body will be shipped to Mound City for funeral services and burial, according to G. A. James, who has charge of arrangements.

             The funeral will be Sunday afternoon at the Congregational church of which he was a member and burial will be at the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             Besides his wife, who is in poor health, there are two children, Mrs. Carl Westerman of Castle Gate, Utah, and Mrs. Leonard Gay of Webster Groves; and two grandchildren.  He is a brother of C. S. Miller of Cairo and formerly of here.  Mr. Miller was about 68 or 69 years of age.

 

ANOTHER DEATH ALONG “DEATH AVENUE” INTO CAIRO

             William Helton, 66, of Cairo, was killed and his son, Marion, 27, hurt Monday night about 7:30 on Route 2 in the Drainage District near the artesian well.  With no lights on their pushcart on which was loaded some of their belongings, they were trudging up the road.  The trees, while having little to do in this case, prevented them from operating their cart with one or both wheels off the pavement.  When a car approached from one direction, a truck from the other, they were not seen, and the truck, driven by Edward Young of Trimble, Tenn., crashed into them with fatal results.  The coroner’s jury did not order Young held.

             (According to his death certificate, William Helton, common laborer, of Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., was born 15 Feb 1873, in Lyon Co., Ky., the son of William T. Helton and Martha Ridgo, died 8 May 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the widower of Ethel Helton, and was buried at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ACTIVITY ABOUT PERKS ESTATE

             There appears to be some activity about the Nettie B. Perks estate around the courthouse.  Considerable litigation over this has been pending for some time.  Part of it will be in circuit court and part in county court when it is all threshed out.

 

C. S. MILLER VERY ILL

             C. S. Miller of Cairo, who was operated upon Wednesday of last week at Cairo for appendicitis, is reported to be seriously if not critically ill.  Infection developed in the wound and it was necessary for a second operation Wednesday night and the report at Mound City was yesterday that a blood transfusion was ordered.

             His many friends here hope for his recovery and are shocked by the turn of his condition.

 

BOY KILLS ANOTHER WHILE PLAYING WITH SHOTGUN

             Sunday afternoon tragedy came to the home of Arthur Denton, about four miles south of Thebes, when Herbert Lovell, 11 years of age, got a shotgun down from the wall and in some manner discharged it so that Vernon Denton, 13 years old, was hit with the full load in the chest.  From four boys who were playing, happy and gay, came rank tragedy.  The Denton boy died en route to Cairo in an ambulance summoned at the same time a doctor was called.

             The coroner’s jury said it was accidental and placed no blame.  The 11-year-old boy said he hardly knew how it happened.  An older brother had warned them to put the gun up some few minutes before, a .410 gauge shotgun. 

             (His death certificate states that Vernon Franklin Denton, school boy, of Thebes, Ill., was born 11 Jun 1925, in Thebes, Ill., the son of Arthur Denton, a native of Thebes, and Grace May Bracken, a native of Anna, Ill., died 7 May 1939, in Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried at Thebes, Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 May 1939:

Mrs. Julia Rogers

             Mrs. Julia Rogers, age 77, died at her home in Ullin Friday night, May 12.  She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Ada Romain, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; two sons, Joseph and Omer Rogers, both of Ullin; and a brother, Harvey Dillon of Dallas, Texas.

             Funeral services were held at the home Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. R. J. Weiss officiating.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.

             (William O. Rodgers married Julia Dillon on 15 Aug 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Julia Rogers was born 25 May 1862, in Olmstead, Ill., daughter of Sirus Dillon, died 12 May 1939, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Stalcup and son, Keith, have returned from Morton, where they were called by the death of Mrs. Stalcup’s brother, Harry Braden.

             (According to his death certificate, Harry Braden was born 6 Jan 1908, in Morton, Ill., the son of Bion C. Braden, a native of Oreel, Ohio, and Vioma Grant Von Note, a native of Farmer City, Ill., died 11 May 1939, in Morton, Tazewell Co., Ill., and was buried at Morton, Ill.  His marker in Roberts Cemetery in Morton, Tazewell Co., Ill., reads:  Harry Braden 1908-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Henry Wallbaum

             Mrs. Catherine Aydt Wallbaum, age 95 years, died Thursday, May 11, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. A. Williams of Villa Ridge.

             Mrs. Wallbaum was born in Piopolis, Ill., in 1844 and moved to Cairo in 1864.  She resided in Cairo 69 years, going to Villa Ridge in 1933 to make her home with her daughter.

             Surviving are eight children:  William of Piopolis, Ill., Mrs. Louis Casey and Walter F. of Cairo, Mrs. W. A. Williams and Mrs. Ed Dyas of Villa Ridge, Rudy of Kenner, La., Fred of Helena, Ark., and Mrs. Katie Huckabay of Henshaw, Ky.; 20 grandchildren and 29 great-grandchildren.  Two sisters, Miss Christine Aydt and Mrs. Charles Brummer of DeSoto, Mo., also survive her.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Cairo, of which she was a devout member.  Rev. Father L. Gilmartin, pastor of St. Mary’s Church, Mound City, officiated.  Burial was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Catherine Aydt Walbaum was born 20 Mar 1844, in Piopolis, Ill., the daughter of William Aydt, a native of Germany, died 11 May 1939, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Henry Walbaum, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Catherine Wallbaum 1844-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Omer Knupp and daughter Peggy Earle of Sikeston, Mo., who were called here by the death of Mr. Knupp’s father, who passed away at Villa Ridge Thursday of last week, have returned home.

 

William D. Knupp of Houston, Texas, arrived in Villa Ridge Friday called there by the death of his father, Jesse Knupp.

 

Mr. and Mrs. William Strohm and Mr. and Mrs. John Strohm have returned to their homes, having been called here (Villa Ridge) by the death and funeral of Ed Miller, a former resident of Mound City.  Mr. Miller is a brother-in-law of Mrs. E. L. Crain.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Krummel of Springfield spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Crain, also attended the funeral of the latter’s uncle, Ed Miller.

 

The remains of Guy Delaney arrived here Monday from California and were entered in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  Mr. Delaney was a former resident here (Villa Ridge) residing on a farm with his parents east of town.

             (The California Death Index states that Guy H. Delany died 27 Apr 1939, in Los Angeles Co., Calif.—Darrel Dexter)

Alderman F. W. Hallerberg informs us that Grandma Lockhart was his own great-grandmother and that her farm lay just north over the ravine from the present site of the houses at Dam 53.  John Guy, the old light tender, was also a relative of his.  Mrs. George T. Schuler tells us that Mr. McDonald, a special pilot mentioned, was her great-great-grandfather, that Col. James B. Clemson, one of the soldiers of 1812, who settled Napoleon, was related through marriage to her mother’s aunt.  Col. Clemson died in 1889.  He was a member of the Cairo Knights Templars.  Mrs. Schuler’s grandfather, Morgan Boren, came to this section with the company of men who established Old Fort Wilkinson and was one among their number who occupied the fort.

             (George Thomas Schuler was born 1 Jan 1875, in Illinois, the son of George Schuler and Julia Kennedy.  His wife was named Frances Angie Schuler, of 122 N. Blanche St., Mounds, Ill., who, according to her death certificate was born 24 Dec 1883, in Arkansas, the daughter of Hiram Calvin and Angie Bourn, died 8 Feb 1951, at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Shelby Co., Tenn.  Hiram Calvin married Gussie Boren on 24 Jan 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Their marker in Calvin-Barber Cemetery reads:  Hiram Calvin May 31, 1864 March 5, 1921 Gussie Calvin Jan. 29, 1854 Mar. 15, 1916.  The 1883 county history states that Morgan Boren was born in Tennessee in 1795, died in January 1851 in Pulaski Co., Ill., and came to Fort Wilkinson in 1827, where he had earlier been stationed as a soldier.  His wife was Anna Lathum, also a native of Tennessee, who died in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Olmsted Masonic Cemetery reads:  James Y. Clemson Mar. 20, 1822 Mar. 20, 1889.  He was the son of Col. Eli B. Clemson, who was the one who served in the War of 1812, according to the 1883 county history.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 May 1939:

ANOTHER TO TOLL

             Miss Lillian Hammock, 27, of Natchez, Miss., was killed near Curce Inn near McClure about 1 o’clock Tuesday morning while riding with Mrs. Lillian Husky of Cape Girardeau.  Mrs. Husky said she had had only two small beers and was not under the influence of alcohol.  She drove the car across and over the road and down a six-foot embankment.  One man in the car was scratched up, but Miss Hammock was either suffocated or had her neck broken.

             (Her death certificate states that Lillian Hammock, store clerk, of Alexander Co., Ill., was born 1 Mar 1912, in Natchez, Miss., died 16 May 1939, in McClure, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Natchez, Miss.—Darrel Dexter)

 

C. S. MILLER STILL QUITE ILL

             C. S. Miller is still seriously and dangerously ill at the hospital in Cairo after his operation of two weeks ago.  A tumor of some kind seemed to be on one of his intestines and this was removed.  Infection developed and the case became very critical.  There have been four blood transfusions, it is understood, and their report yesterday was that he was showing some improvement.

 

OLD JAIL WAS SCENE OF TWO LYNCHINGS

             Last week we printed a story about the tearing down of the old county jail the two-story brick building back of the present jail.  This week we will tell about a lynching that occurred at this jail when L. F. Crain was sheriff and Will Painter was jailer.

             Painter and his family lived in the jail and Sheriff Crain and family lived in the house now owned by Sheriff I. J. Hudson on High Street.

             On the morning of July 4, 1883, the excursion train on the Wabash Railroad (now the Big Four) was crowded with people going to attend the celebration at Cairo.  About 6 o’clock in the evening the same people were returning to their homes and among this crowd was John Kane, a white man, living at Carmi, Ill., who was a bridge builder for the Wabash Road, and who was on his way home.  Nelson Howard, a negro, was also among the crowd.  Howard was a section hand on the road at Grand Chain, in this county, where he lived.  Kane and Howard were not acquainted, but as the train was pulling into the depot at Mound City, some rudeness on the part of Howard in passing Kane caused a quarrel to start between them.  Both men had been drinking and a scuffle ensued.  Kane drew a pistol and Howard quickly snatched the pistol from him.  Howard shot Kane through the head and body and from all indications Kane was fatally injured.  By this time the train had pulled into the depot and Howard made his getaway, pursued by Gibson, the conductor and others, but they failed to overtake him.  Kane was taken into the depot and upon examination it was discovered that he had been stabbed in the breast, supposedly before he had drawn his pistol.

             That night William Painter, jailer and deputy sheriff, and A. J. Ross, city marshal, left in pursuit of Howard.  On their way to Grand Chain they were joined by William Napier, G. F. Boren and Robert Summers.  Upon reaching the house they surrounded it and ordered Howard to make his appearance.  They captured him without any fuss and brought him to Mound City and placed him in the county jail.

             The inquest on Kane’s body was held the next day and the jury stated that he had come to his death by the hand of Nelson Howard.  No threats of lynching were made, but the residents of Mound City regretted the happening as neither Kane nor Howard were residents of the city.

             That night Jailer Painter retired at his usual hour, taking the necessary precautions to make sure that his prisoner was all right, and went to bed in the debtors’ room as he often did when having a dangerous criminal in his care.  From the debtors’ room, a door led into the iron cage where Howard was kept.

             About 1:30 the morning of the 6th, the jailer’s wife, Mrs. Painter, was awakened by loud knocking at the front door and upon going to the door she saw the yard and jail surrounded by men.  She roused her husband who got his revolver and went into the room where Howard was caged.  Upon looking out of the east window he saw seventy-five or one hundred armed men below.  The jailer told them that they could not get Howard and if they attempted to they would get hurt.  Someone said that the jailer might give them trouble, thereupon the leader whistled and the gate to the jail yard opened and about twenty or thirty more entered the yard.  During this commotion, Mrs. Painter had herded the children into the rear of the hall and with pillows all around them they sat in the corner of the hall, too scared to cry and too excited to even whisper.  Mrs. Painter acted as intermediary between the men and her husband and pleaded with the men to wait until the sheriff came.  The men wanted the keys to the jail and she had begged her husband to hand them over saying that it was useless for them to try to resist the men.  Mr. Painter started downstairs to give them the keys, but changed his mind and locked himself in the debtors’ room.

             The mob became more restless and finally started climbing in the windows and were soon at the debtors’ door.  They informed the jailer that they didn’t want to hurt him, but insisted that he let them have the prisoner.  When they demanded the keys to the cell, Painter said that he did not have them, Crain had them at his house.  During Mrs. Painter’s first talk with her husband, he had told her to have Joe S. Dille, who was stopping with them having come in from the country that day, slip out the back way and inform Crain of the happening.  When Dille was questioned as to why he hadn’t gone for Crain, he said that he had tried to get out, but had been threatened by the mob.  Mrs. Painter then decided that she would have to go and started for the front gate calling for Crain.  Two men caught her placing their hands over her mouth and a little man approached with a revolver pointed at her face and said he’d stop her.  Mrs. Painter knocked his arm down and another said that they did not want to hurt her, but she must not cry out.  In placing their hands over her mouth, one of the men got his finger in her mouth and it took considerable effort on his part to remove it.  Finally a large stout man put his arm across her throat, which stopped her from making any further noise.  Mrs. Painter begged for the negro man, saying that he ought to have a fair trial.

             During this time Mr. Painter was in the cell room and had told Howard to call for help, which he did.

             After the mob had taken the jailer downstairs they went to a bedroom and got a lamp that was burning and started upstairs to the cell room.  On the way up the stairs, they noticed the pile of pillows in the corner and one of the men took the lamp and peered over the top, finding only two frightened girls.

             With sledgehammers they pounded open the cell door. Howard, who was still calling for Crain, would stop holloaing when the pounding ceased.  Painter and Dille tried to escape through the back way, but were caught and guarded and told to keep their hands up.

             The men brought Howard downstairs and on the way out of the jail enclosure Mrs. Painter heard one of the men tell him to stand up and walk.  They took him to a huge tree near the jail, but Mrs. Painter begged them not to hang him on that tree, as that was the tree the children used to hang their swing and to play under, so they took him to a tree outside of the gate.  The tree died soon after.  After Howard was hung, three pistol shots were heard and the jailer saw four men march out of the jail yard.  Then all left, going south.

             No one had been notified of the danger of a mob hanging Howard, but four or five colored men went that night to guard the jail, but left with the exception of Pat Scott and a man by the name of Howard, no relation to the prisoner, however.  They were outside the gate at the time the mob came, Scott leaving over the levee and Howard remaining.  They had guns but made no effort to protect the prisoner.

             After the hanging, the fire bell was rung and the sheriff cut Howard down.

             At the inquest the next day, it was learned that the back of Howard’s skull had been fractured and it was thought to have been done when he was ordered to walk.

             No one was found guilty of the lynching, however, it was thought to have been done by employees of the Wabash Railroad.

             No blame could be placed on the sheriff or the jailer and the jailer did all he could, even to endangering his life and that of his family, to save the prisoner.

             Mrs. Painter was very courageous and did all she could to aid her husband.

             Much excitement prevailed in Mound City for several days afterwards.

             The lynchers all wore masks and had a captain who gave the orders which were readily obeyed, just as though it had been organized or planned.

             The second lynching was of a Villa Ridge man who killed his son-in-law.  Mrs. E. P. Easterday was at the jail when one of the lynchings took place.             She recalls the scene well.

 

We were sorry to learn of the sudden death of Mrs. Julia Rogers that occurred in Ullin Friday night after only a few hours illness.  (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 May 1939:

Mrs. Lizzie Silver Dies at Age of Eighty-Seven

             Mrs. Lizzie Silver died Tuesday morning, May 23, at her home three miles east of Pulaski, following a prolonged illness.  She was born and reared in Pulaski County and had lived on the same farm 51 years.  Her age at death was 87.

             She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Delia Powers of Villa Ridge; two nieces, Mrs. Grace Pavey of Cairo, and Mrs. George Sitter of Mounds.

             Mr. and Mrs. Sitter have been constant in their attendance upon Mrs. Silver for many months.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the James Funeral Home in Mounds with Rev. J. A. Tucker, pastor of the Union Church of Villa Ridge, officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (Her death certificate states that Lizzie Silver was born 22 Jan 1852, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Bert Wallace and Adeline Robinson, natives of North Carolina, died 23 May 1939, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Sol A. Silver, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  She was buried in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge.  Her marker there reads:  Sol Silver July 26, 1830 Nov. 18, 1900 Lizzie Silver Jan. 22, 1852 May 23, 1939—Darrel Dexter)

 

Prominent Contractor Dies Sunday at His Home Here

             Arthur Barter, age 70, for many years a prominent building contractor in Cairo, but who made his home in Spencer Heights in recent years, died Sunday morning, May 20, following a ten days’ illness.

             Mr. Barter was a native of Mt. Vernon, Indiana, from England in early pioneer days.  He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Idabelle Wilburn of Spencer Heights, Mounds; three brothers, John and Lester of California, and Festus Barter of Cairo; one sister, Miss Ella Barter of Mt. Vernon, Ind.; and several nieces and nephews.  Mrs. Barter died January 12, 1937, at their home in Spencer Heights.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock at the Berbling Funeral Home in Cairo with Rev. C. Robert Dunlap officiating.  Burial was made in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.  Casket bearers were James Walder, Michael Farrin, Eugene Marshall, Jerre Collins, Jr., Frank Walder, and Edward R. Dunn, all of Cairo.

             (His death certificate states that Arthur Barter, building contractor, was born 9 Jul 1868, in Mt. Vernon, Ind., the son of John H. Barter, a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Elizabeth DuPuent, died 21 May 1939, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Kate B. Barter, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  The marker there reads:  Arthur Barter 1868-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Christy Ann Wilson

             Mrs. Christy Ann Palmer Wilson died Friday morning, May 19, at the home of her brother, Sylvester Clanton in this city, where she had been ill many weeks.  Her age at death was 72 years.

             Surviving her mother are three sons, Ernest Palmer of Pulaski, Harvey Palmer of East St. Louis, and Charles Wilson of Hines, Calif.; two daughters, Mrs. G. S. Croxton (Neva Palmer Croxton) of Fayetteville, Miss., and Mrs. Roy Pierce (Agnes Wilson Pierce) of St. Louis; also one brother, Sylvester Clanton of Mounds; two sisters, Miss Norma Clanton and Mrs. William Gallion, both of Champaign, Ill.; 21 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock in the Mounds Congregational church with Rev. Charles Day assisted by Rev. S. C. Benninger, officiating. Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Casket bearers were grandsons, Marvin, Ernest, Earl, Gerald, Clifton and William Palmer.  Crain Funeral Service of Pulaski directed the funeral.

             Among those from out of town who attended the funeral services were:  Mr. and Mrs. William Gallion, Jr., and son Jean; Mr. and Mrs. William Gallion and daughter, Mary Ruth; Miss Norma Clanton and Miss Eula Clanton of Champaign; Mr. and Mrs. John O’Nielle, Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Montgomery and children, Mr. and Mrs. Russell McCullough and children, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Fravel and Mrs. Ida Clanton and daughter Zena of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pierce (Mary Agnes) of St. Louis; Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Palmer of East St. Louis, Mrs. Stella Clanton Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Johnson, Mrs. Fred Fox, Mrs. Edmo Shanahan and Mrs. Edmond Pierce of Cairo.

             (Pleas Palmer, Jr., married Christiana Clanton on 26 Aug 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Silvester Clanton married Rosa James on 22 Oct 1899, in Massac Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Christy Ann Palmer Wilson was born 31 Jan 1867, in Olmstead, Ill., the daughter of William Jackson Clanton and Henrietta Spence, natives of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 19 May 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)   

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 May 1939:

FUNERAL SERVICES OF MRS. SILVER YESTERDAY

             Funeral services for Mrs. Lizzie Silver, 87 years of age, who died Tuesday morning, were conducted at the James Funeral Home yesterday afternoon.  Mrs. Silver was the widow of the late Sol Silver, steamboat captain, and a lifelong resident of the county.

             She had been in good health until last winter and was up and about on her farm near Villa Ridge.

             A sister, Mrs. Delia Dowers and two nieces, Mrs. George Sitter and Mrs. Grace Pavey, survive.  Rev. James E. Tucker conducted the services and interment was in Thistlewood.

 

JAIL BUILT IN 1869

             With all written about the jail, The Enterprise has not fixed the date of its building.  E. P. Easterday comes forward with the date of 1869 in form of a letter which talks about the steamboats bringing iron for the railroad and that the jail is being built.  So it was built after the Civil War and in 1869.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Jun 1939:

Father of L. O. Trigg Dies May 24 at Son’s Home

             William Anderson Trigg of Ozark died May 24 at the home of his son, L. O. Trigg, publisher of the Eldorado Journal.  His age was 82 and he had been bedfast for almost a year.  His wife, an invalid, was with him, the aged couple having been taken to Eldorado about two weeks earlier.

             Mr. Trigg was born in Johnson County, Feb. 1, 1857.  Most of his life had been spent on a farm near Ozark, although he conducted one of the first stores established in Ozark.  He was active until eighty.

             (W. A. Trigg married Mary I. Laney on 12 Feb 1878, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Milton A. Trigg married Maryann Barnwell on 17 Dec 1850, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Anderson Trigg, merchant, of Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., was born 1 Feb 1857, in Simpson, Ill., son of Milton A. Trigg and Mary Barnwell, natives of North Carolina, died 23 May 1939, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., husband of Mary I. Trigg, and was buried in Simpson Township, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Gilead Cemetery in Simpson, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  W. Anderson Trigg 1857-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Dewey King Fatally Injured in Auto Crash

             All Mounds was shocked by the tragic death of Dewey King which occurred soon after 8 o’clock Saturday morning at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he had been taken following a head-on automobile collision on the new graveled road between U. S. highways 45 and 37 near Karnak.

             Mr. King had been to Metropolis to service the coin machines of the Hudson Novelty Co., of Mound City, which has machines all over Southern Illinois, and was returning home.  About two miles east of Karnak his car collided head-on with a car owned and driven by A. C. House of Vienna, a rural mail carrier.  It was raining at the time of the collision.  House and the two men riding with him escaped serious injury.  King was caught in his car and it took some time to extricate him.  He was given emergency treatment at Karnak and taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, by ambulance.

             Examination showed that his left leg had been shattered and driven into the lower part of his body.

             Mr. King and family have lived in Mounds for many years and, until recently, he had driven busses for the Tri-City Transportation Company, between Mounds, Mound City and Cairo.  He was widely known in earlier years as a wrestler.

             Surviving are his wife, Erma; two sons, Marshall and Herschel, all of Mounds; also a half-brother, Roy Cleek of Marion.

             Brief funeral services were held Monday morning at nine o’clock at the G. A. James Funeral Home, Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor of the Methodist Church officiating.  The funeral cortege then left for Friendship, Tenn., where services were held in the Bethesda Presbyterian Church with interment in the Bethesda Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, Dewey King, salesman, of Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 10 Apr 1900, in Friendship, Tenn., the son of William King and Miss Rooks, natives of Tennessee, died 27 May 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Irma King, and was buried near Friendship, Tenn.  His marker in Bethesda Cemetery in Friendship, Crockett Co., Tenn., reads:  E. Dewey King 1900-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Light Tender Visits Old Scenes

             A few weeks ago we published an article about “The Grand Chain of Rocks” in the Ohio River, at the point where Dam 53 is now located.  In the article was mentioned John Guy, the light tender at the Grand Chain.

             Mr. Guy, who now lives at Anniston, Mo., has been visiting his great-nephew, Alderman F. W. Hallerberg, and last Saturday made the Independent office a call.  From him we learned a number of interesting facts which we are pleased to share with our readers.

             Mr. Guy is an uncle of Mr. Hallerberg’s mother, the late Mrs. Frank Bour.  He is the son of Liza Bettice Guy who married for her second husband, Arthur Lockhart and was the “Grandma Lockhart” mentioned in the article on the Old town of Napoleon, published May 12.  Her father was James Bettice, a Revolutionary War solider, who is buried in Calvin Cemetery near Olmstead.  James Bettice was also the grandfather of the late Mrs. Tillie (Matilda) Scott.  Mrs. Lockhart, mother of Mr. Guy, lived to the age of 88 years.

             Mr. Guy told us that the “Grand Chain of Rocks” was a very dangerous place for steamboats.  He named a number of steamboats that were wrecked on the rocks, among them the James Pabasco, the Richmond, Suwanee, and the Granite State.  It was his duty to keep the warning lights burning.  There was no light house and the lights were attached to tall poles or, as was the case on the Kentucky bank, to a tall tree.  Sometimes these lights would go out and it was Mr. Guy’s duty to get in a row boat and cross the river to the light to find the trouble and correct it.

             Another steamboat tragedy occurred in 1902 when the steamer City of Pittsburg was wrecked on the rocks.  About 100 persons were drowned or burned, among the number two millionaires, passengers from near Johnstown, Pa.

             These rocks were removed from the surface of the river bed in a peculiar manner, according to Mr. Guy.  Before the building of Dam 53, great dredge boats were used to dredge large holes in the bed of the river and the rocks were lifted and rolled into these holes and buried.

              Where once danger threatened each passing steamer, boats now enter the locks of Dam 53 and pass through easily and safely.

             It is only through the eyes of the “old timer” or through the written and printed word that the younger generation may learn of the past and be able to compare it with the present.  We thank you Mr. Guy.

             (Arthur Lockhart married Eliza F. Guy on 5 Apr 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  There is no marker for James Bettice in Calvin Cemetery near Olmsted.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Artie Badgley

             Mrs. Ora Badgley, age 61, died at her home in Grand Chain Saturday, May 27.  Besides her husband, she is survived by four children:  Durard and Marion of Grand Chain, Mrs. Muriel Billingsly of Mount Carmel, and Lawrence of Grand Chain; and one brother, Ernest Pace of Greenville, Miss.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Ohio Chapel Church at Grand Chain, with Rev. S. A. Wright officiating.  Interment was made in the Ohio Chapel Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Home was in charge.

             (According to her death certificate, Ora Badgley was born 10 Jan 1887, in Kentucky, the daughter of Joe Pase, died 27 May 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Artie G. Badgley, and was buried in Ohio Chapel in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ora Badgley June 10, 1888 May 27, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Jun 1939:

FRED PFAFF

             On Wednesday, May 24, 1939, at _ _.m. the death angel claimed Fred Pfaff, aged 73 years, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Bon___ Kerr.

             He was a member of Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church since his youth.  He was united in marriage to ___de Axley who preceded him in death four years to the day, and to this union was born three daughters and two sons, Mrs. Linnie Lacer of Perks, Mrs. Leola Buie, Mrs. Bon___ Kerr, Carl and Herman Pfaff both of Dongola; and five grandchildren.

             He had a quiet but friendly disposition, never saying anything bad about anybody.

             Mr. Pfaff had made his home with his children after his health became poor, about three years ago.

             Funeral services were held in the Mt. Pisgah Church on Thursday at __ o’clock by Rev. Henry Karraker of Dongola.  Burial was made in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

             (Fred Pfaff, 32, farmer, of Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., born in Wetaug, Ill., son of Joseph Pfaff and Christina Croff, married on 23 Jun 1898, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., Carrie Axley, 25, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of George Axley and Catherine Wright.  Joseph Pfaff married Christina Croft on 3 Oct 1854, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Fredrick Pfaff, carpenter, was born 19 Sep 1865, in Illinois, the son of Joseph Pfaff, a native of Germany, and Christine Croft, died 24 May 1939, in Union Co., Ill., widower of Carrie Pfaff, and was buried in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Ill., reads:  Frederick M. Pfaff Sept. 19, 1865 May 24, 1939 Carrie M. Pfaff Dec. 17, 1872 May 24, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Fred Pfaff at Mt. Pisgah last Thursday.

 

TWO NEAR DEATH

             Word yesterday was that J. H. Harbison, 85, of Olmstead, for years village and road clerk and well known, was at the point of death.  He has been failing since about a month ago when a bunion or joint of his toe began to swell and to pain him.  The other is Joseph Young of Pulaski, who has cancer of the throat.  He is 80 years of age and in his younger days worked about the boats here at Mound City.

 

DEWEY KING DIED AS RESULT OF AUTO CRASH

             Dewey King, 39 years of age, bus driver for a number of years and an employee of the Hudson Novelty Supply, servicing music boxes and cigarette machines scattered over a number of counties, died last Saturday morning as the result of a crash last Friday night about 9 o’clock on the road east of Karnak leading to Route One that connects with Metropolis.

             King had a badly shattered left leg which was driven into his body and there must have been injuries about the chest.  The car with which he crashed, driven by A. C. House, rural mail carrier out of Vienna, was damaged and House and two other men with him escaped injury.  King was driving a light car, a Willy’s four and the cars lapped on their left side about 12 to 18 inches.  The heavier car drove farther into the lighter car and King was caught.  It was necessary to take the seat out to extricate him.

             Emergency treatment was given at Karnak and King was brought to Cairo in Wilson’s ambulance.  There he was thought at midnight to have chances of recovery, but toward morning grew worse and at 3 o’clock was dead.

             Funeral services were conducted at James Funeral Home at Mounds Monday morning and from there the funeral party went to Friendship, Tenn., for funeral services there at the Bethersday Presbyterian Church and interment in the cemetery nearby.

             Besides his wife, he is survived by two sons, Marshall and Herschel, of Mounds; and one half-brother, Roy Cleek, of Marion.

             King had driven busses for the Tri-City Transportation Co., for a number of years and in the last year or so had worked for I. J. Hudson, Jr., in the novelty business servicing the machines.  Earlier in life he had done considerable wrestling.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Jun 1939:

J. H. Young

             Joseph Hathway Young, age 81, passed away at his home near Pulaski, Ill., Friday afternoon, June 2, at 3:30 o’clock.  Surviving is one son, William Otto, of Pulaski.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Center Church near Olmsted, with Rev. Weiss officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of the funeral.

             (Joseph H. Young  married Katie Casper on 17 Aug 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Joseph Hathaway Young, night watchman, was born 3 Jul 1864, in Indiana, died 2 Jun 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Eva Young, and was buried at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Joseph Young July 2, 1853-.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Pulaski County Pioneer Dies at Age of 85

             James Heslip Harbison, age 35, passed away at his home in Olmstead at 6:30 o’clock Thursday evening, June 1, after an illness of two weeks.  He was a lifelong resident of the Olmstead community and was active in public life, serving as road clerk, justice of the peace, and village clerk. He was justice of the peace for 38 years.

             Surviving are three children, Mrs. Hattie Upchurch, of Pontiac, Mich., George of Karnak, and Carl of Bruceville, Ind.; two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Britt of Mounds and Mrs. Jessie Hale of Long Beach, Calif.; and a half-brother, Robert Sheehan of Long Beach, also survive.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon in the Methodist church of Olmstead, with Rev. Robert Shelton officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead.  Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (J. H. Harbison married Nancy L. Kraatz on 4 Feb 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, James Heslip Harbison, village clerk, of Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 5 Jun 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of William Harbison, a native of Ohio, and Harriet Upchurch, a native of Kings Harbor, Mich., died 1 Jun 1939, in Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Louise Kraatz Harbison, and was buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Jun 1939:

J. H. HARBISON DIED LAST WEEK AT OLMSTED

             J. H. Harbison, 85 years of age, a lifelong resident of Olmsted community and Justice of the Peace there for 35 years, city clerk and road clerk for many years, died on Thursday evening of last week shortly before 7 o’clock.  The infirmities of old age might be said to have caused his death.  A bunion or enlarged joint on his right foot caused him much pain and loss of sleep, and this soon wore down his vitality until a slight paralytic stroke appeared.

             He did not go to bed at first.  He stayed up, determined to stick it out.  At one time he said the bunion was “making him awful good.”  But his vitality waned and he began to sink, and the last week, he spent in bed wearing away.

             He was quite a character.  He was tremendously independent and a man of strong opinions and ideas, rigidly honest and with a sense of humor.  In religion he was decidedly inclined to doubt and on the wet and dry question, he was in later years the driest of the drys.  He said he knew all about it, having in earlier days dealt in the business, but in his latter days, he could say nothing too harsh about the business.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Olmsted on Saturday afternoon with Rev. Robert Shelton in charge.  Interment was in Olmsted in the Masonic Cemetery.

             Three children survive:  Mrs. Hattie Upchurch of Pontiac, Mich., George of Karnak, and Carl of Bruceville, Ind.  A half-brother, Robert Sheenan of Long Beach also survives.

             Harbison was one of the pioneers of the community.  He had followed the river when young; had engaged in threshing business, hotel and other things and was, all in all, a sturdy character.

 

We were very sorry to lose our dear friend and neighbor, Mrs. Artie Badgley.  She was laid to rest in the Ohio Chapel Cemetery May 29th with Rev. S. C. Wright officiating.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.  (Ohio Chapel)

 

Mr. Ernest Pase of Greenville, Miss., was called here (Ohio Chapel) last week due to the death of his sister, Mrs. A. J. Badgley.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Billingsley of Friendsville, Ill., were here (Ohio Chapel) last week for the funeral of Mrs. Billingsley’s mother, Mrs. Badgley.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Jun 1939:

Mrs. Charles Daniels

             Mrs. Lizzie Daniels, age 64, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Pearl Brown, in Mounds Friday morning at 9:30 o’clock.  She had been in failing health for some little time and had come to Mounds on Sunday preceding her death to visit her daughter.  After preparation for burial the body was removed to her home two miles west of Pulaski.

             She is survived by her husband, nine children—Mrs. Pearl Brown, Mrs. Juanita Penrod and Mrs. Erma Crow of Mounds, Mrs. Edith Coleman of Pulaski, Mrs. Augustine Palmer of Villa Ridge, John and Herman of Mounds, Floyd of Pulaski and Raymond of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Calori of San Francisco, Calif., and Mrs. Bertha Skyles of Mounds; two brothers, James and William Clanton of California.

             Several grandchildren and great-grandchildren also survive.

             Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church in Mounds by Rev. Earl Throgmorton and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (Charles Daniels, 23, married Lizzie Clanton, 17, on 20 Apr 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Lewis L. Clanton married Matilda Spence on 2 May 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Lizzie Daniel was born 13 Feb 1875, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Mr. Clanton and Matilda Spence, a native of Illinois, died 9 Jun 1939, in Mounds, Ill., wife of Charles Daniel, and was buried at Mounds.  His marker in Beech Grove Cemetery reads:  Charles Daniels 1869-1940 Lizzie Daniels 1875-1939 Cecil Daniels Ruby Daniels Eugene Daniels Roy Daniels Edward Daniels Andrew Daniels Charles C. Miller.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William T. Garrett

             William T. Garrett, age 76, passed away at his home in Mound City Saturday evening at 8:45 o’clock.  He had resided in Mound City for more than 50 years and followed the occupation of shoe repairman.  He is survived by his wife, Mary E. Garrett; three sons, Charles Donald and William James and Harold Eugene; one daughter, Virginia Sue; one stepdaughter, Velva Mahan.

             Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the First Baptist Church in Mound City at 2 o’clock by Rev. H. E. Lockhard and interment was made in the Cypress Cemetery, G. A. James in charge.

             (His death certificate states that William Thomas Garrett, shoe repairman, was born 10 Aug 1862, in Blandville, Ky., died 10 Jun 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mary E. Garrett, and was buried at Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

W. H. Smith

             W. H. Smith of Spencer Heights died suddenly Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at his home.  His age at death was 78 years.

             Born near Olmstead, Ill., in 1861, he came with his family from America to Spencer Heights in 1913 and has since resided here.

             He is survived by two daughters, Miss Pearl Smith, local manager of the Illinois Bell telephone office and Mrs. Ethel McConnell of Portland, Oregon; two sons, Roy and Claude of Spencer Heights.  Mrs. Smith passed away 18 months ago.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at the Congregational church, the pastor, Rev. S. C. Benninger, officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery by the side of the grave of his wife, with G. A. James directing.

             (Her death certificate states that William Henry Smith was born 12 Jul 1861, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of T. Smith, died 11 Jun 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widower of Martha Smith, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Well-known Resident Dies Suddenly at Home Here

             William L. Daniels passed away suddenly at his home on McKinley Ave., Thursday evening, June 8, at 8:30 o’clock, from a heart affection.  His age at death was 74 years, 60 of them having been spent in this locality.

             Surviving are his wife; three daughters, Mrs. F. E. Dycus of East St. Louis, Mrs. Verne Moore of Crown Point, Ind., and Mrs. John P. Licos of Carbondale; three sons, Elmer of Portageville, Mo., Lawrence and Richard of Cairo, Ill.  Also surviving are two brothers, Charles of Pulaski and James of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. Emma Bernard and Mrs. Sarah Arrington, both of San Francisco, Calif.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. J. Rue Reid, pastor officiating.  All of the children were here to attend the funeral.

             On the same day funeral services were held for a sister-in-law, Mrs. Charles Daniels.

             (His death certificate states that William Louis Daniel, carpenter, was born 30 Jun 1865, in Tennessee, and died 8 Jun 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., reads:  William L. Daniel June 30, 1865 June 8, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Archie Miller

             Mrs. Cora Miller, age 58, of Dixon, Ill., formerly of Karnak, passed away at her home in Dixon, Thursday morning, June 8.

             Surviving her are four children and three brothers.

             The body was removed to the home of her brother, William Peck, at Karnak, where it remained until 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon, when funeral services were held in the Salem Church with Rev. Robert Smith officiating.  Interment was made in Salem Cemetery.  Nephews of Mrs. Miller were the casket bearers.  Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (Henry H. Peck married Mary E. Douglas on 24 Mar 1872, in Massac Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Cora May Miller was born 20 Mar 1881, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry Peck, a native of Virginia, and Mary Douglas, died 8 Jun 1939, in Dixon, Lee Co., Ill., wife of Arch Miller, and was buried in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Jun 1939:

LONG COUNTY RESIDENT DIES

             Funeral services for W. H. Smith, who passed away at his home in Spencer Heights Sunday afternoon, were held Thursday afternoon in the Congregational church at Mounds with Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, beside the grave of his wife, who passed away __ months ago.

             Mr. Smith was 78 at the time of his death, has been a lifelong resident of this county, born in Olmsted in 1861.  The family later moved to America and in 1913 moved to Spencer Heights, where they have resided ever since.

             He is survived by two daughters, Miss Pearl Smith of Spencer Heights and Mrs. Ethel McConnell of Portland, Ore.; and two sons, Roy and ___ of Spencer Heights.

 

WILLIAM T. GARRETT

             William T. Garrett, age 76, passed away at his home in Mound City Saturday evening at 8:45 o’clock.  He had resided in Mound City for more than 50 years and followed the occupation of shoe repairman.

             He is survived by his wife, Mary E. Garrett; three sons, Charles Donald, William James, and Harold Eugene; one daughter, Virginia Sue; one step-daughter, Velva Mahan.

             Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the First Baptist Church in Mound City at 2 o’clock by Rev. H. E. Lockard and interment was made in the Cypress Cemetery.

             Casket bearers were:  George Eichhorn, George Gunn, Mark Capoot, George R. Martin, Mike Winkler and Tom Vines.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

            

OPEN VERDICT IS RETURNED IN CASE OF DEWEY KING

             An open verdict as the cause of death of Dewey King was returned by the coroner’s jury on Thursday night of last week at Cairo.  The accident happened on May 26, on the road east of Karnak.  Arl C. House of Vienna was driving the car, which collided with King and with him were Westerman Mathis and R. R. Evans, also of Vienna.  All the Vienna men were injured, but not seriously.

 

MRS. CHARLES DANIEL

             Mrs. Lizzie Daniel, age 64, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Pearl Brown in Mounds, Friday morning at 9:30 o’clock.  She had been in failing health for some little time and had come to Mounds on Sunday preceding her death to visit her daughter.

             After preparation for burial, the body was removed to her home 2 miles west of Pulaski.

             She is survived by her husband; nine children, Mrs. Pearl Brown, Mrs. Juanita Penrod and Mrs. Erma Crow of Mounds, Mrs. Edith Coleman of Pulaski, Mrs. Augustine Palmer of Villa Ridge, John and Herman of Mounds, Floyd of Pulaski, and Raymond of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Calori of San Francisco, Calif., and Mrs. Bertha Skyles of Mounds; two brothers, James and William Clanton of California.  Several grandchildren and great-grandchildren also survive.

             Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church in Mounds by Rev. Earl Throgmorton and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery. G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Jun 1939:

Deaths of the Week

Man Drowns Tuesday Morning near Easter’s Landing

             George Cuthbertson, age 43, of Johnston City, is reported to have met death by drowning at Mon Easter’s Landing, four miles from Dam 53, early Tuesday morning.  Cuthbertson, while fishing with his brother, John, fell out of the boat.

             Formerly a resident of Harrisburg, he was an outstanding track star and football player of Southern Illinois some 25 years ago.

             (His death certificate states that George Scott Cuthbertson, coal miner, of Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill., was born 16 Oct 1896, in Indiana, the son of John Cuthbertson, a native of Indiana, and Leona Antis, a native of Kentucky, died 20 Jun 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., divorced husband of Ruth Cuthbertson, and was buried at Lake Creek, Williamson Co., Ill.   He was buried in Lakeview Cemetery in Johnston City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Castle

             John Castle passed away at his home in Clebit, Okla., Friday morning, June 16.  He had been in failing health for some time.

             He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Freida and Marle, of Clebit; his mother, Mrs. Josephine Castle of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. Josephine Hanes of Mounds and Mrs. Fred James of Detroit, Mich.; four brothers, Dave, Ernest and Walter of Mounds and George of Pulaski.

             Two grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews also survive. 

             Funeral services were held Sunday at Clebit.

             (John Henry Castle, of Bismark, McCurtain Co., Okla., registered for the draft in 1918 and stated he was born 11 Mar 1877, and was a car repairer for the T. O. E. Railroad.  His nearest relative was Emma Castle.  He was buried in Wright City Cemetery in McCurtain Co., Okla.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Raymond Red Cloud

             Mrs. Delpha Red Cloud, age 33, passed away at her home in Perks, Thursday morning, June 15, at 9 o’clock.

             Besides her husband, Raymond Red Cloud, she is survived by a daughter, Bobby Jean; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Moak; and two sisters, Mrs. Bertha Churchill of Perks and Mrs. Gertrude Hope of St. Louis.  Five brothers also survive her, Andy and John of Cypress, Robert of Aurora, Will of Pinckneyville, and Claude of Carrier Mills.

             Funeral services were held in the Baptist church at Perks Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. A. M. Troutman officiating.  Interment was in the Lutheran Chapel Cemetery, with Wilson Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (James P. Moak married Ellen Sowers on 27 Nov 1890, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Delpha Moak Red Cloud was born 17 Feb 1901, in Cypress, Ill., the daughter of J. R. Moak, a native of Marion, Ill., and Ellen Sowers, a native of Illinois, died 15 Jun 1939, in Perks, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Raymond Red Cloud, and was buried in Luther Chapel in Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. L. H. Harris

             Word was received by Col. O. L. Bartlett of Cairo of the death of his daughter, Mrs. L. H. Harris of Greenville, S.C.  Mrs. Harris died in a hospital in Greenville Friday morning, June 16, after an illness of two weeks.

             Mrs. Harris was formerly Miss Lurlean Bartlett of Mound City and had many friends in the Tri-Cities—Mound City, Mounds, and Cairo.

             Besides her father, she is survived by two daughters, Lurlean Harris and Mrs. Susanne Lehning.  Mr. Harris died two years ago.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Jun 1939:

THREE KILLED IN WRECK

             Otto R. Thomas, Joe R. Hill and Ernest Loomas, all living at or in the vicinity of Simpson, Ill., were killed and Paul Trover, living near Ozark, was seriously injured Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock, when the car in which they were riding and driven by Trover, crashed into an earthen bank north of Vienna on U. S. Route 45.  Hill was killed instantly.  Thomas died while being taken from the wreckage of the car and Loomis died at the office of Dr. E. A. Veach in Vienna, a short time after being taken there.

             The coroner’s jury found that all came to their death as the result of an automobile accident and did not place responsibility for the accident on anyone.  Testimony showed the men had been drinking.—Vienna Times.

             (John L. Thomas married Nancy E. Rainbolt on 6 Jun 1885, in Johnson Co., Ill.  When he registered for the draft during World War I, he lived in Ozark, Ill., and stated he was born 29 Apr 1893, in Simpson, Ill., and had a wife and two children.  His death certificate states that Otto R. Thomas, farmer, of Simpson, Ill., was born 25 Apr 1895, in Simpson, Ill., the son of J. L. Thomas and Nannie Rainbolt, natives of Simpson, Ill., died 13 Jun 1939, in Road District 5, Johnson Co., Ill., widower, and was buried in Road District 8, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Gilead Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Mother & Father Floy E. Thomas 1892-1935 Otto R. Thomas 1893-1939 With Christ in Heaven.  Thomas Hill married Mariah I. Stoneman on 14 May 1897, in Union Co., Ill.  According to the death certificate of Joseph R. Hill, farmer, of Bloomfield, Johnson Co., Ill., he was born 7 Mar 1884, the son of Thomas Hill, a native of Tennessee, and Belle Stonun, a native of Illinois, died 13 Jun 1939, in Road District 5, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Mary Hill, and was buried in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill.  He was buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery.  The death certificate of Ernest M. Lomas, laborer, of Simpson, Ill., states that he was born 7 May 1894, in Bennington, Ill., the son of William S. Lomas, a native of Bennington, Ill., and Elizabeth A. Marlen, a native of Davisville, Ill., died 13 Jun 1939, in District 5, Johnson Co., Ill., the husband of Lyda Lomas, and was buried at Simpson, Ill.  When he registered for the World War I draft in 1917, he signed his name as Ernest Mikel Lomas and stated he was born 9 May 1894, in White Co., Ill.  William S. Lomas married Elizabeth A. Marler on 21 Aug 1889, in White Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLED IN FLORIDA

             A telegram here Wednesday told of the death of Bobby Carey, grandson of Mrs. W. T. Kennedy.  The boy, about three years of age, ran out in the street and was run over by a bus at West Palm Beach, Wednesday.

             (The Florida Death Index states that Robert Eugene Carey died in 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BODY FOUND HERE

             Fishermen early yesterday morning found the body of George Cuthertson, 46 years of age, who drowned Tuesday morning about 6 o’clock about 4 miles above Dam 53.  It was near the shipyards and was soon identified.  Cuthertson was from Johnston City and drowned when he fell out of a boat and his brother, fishing with him, could not reach him.  The body was taken to the James Funeral Home and from there to Johnston City after the coroner’s inquest.

 

TOM MASSIE, COLORED, IS HELD ON MURDER CHARGE

             Tom Massie, colored, of Ullin, is held in the county jail on the charge of murder, following the killing of William Miles, also colored, on the streets of Ullin about 4:30 Wednesday afternoon.

             Massie and Miles are said to have had a dispute on Sunday while in a crap game over one dollar.  Wednesday, the differences flared into the open again when Massie wanted some cakes from Miles and told him he could apply it on the dollar he owed him, and Miles refused.  They were working with the same gang at the time.

             Massie, upon reaching Ullin, and he is reported to have been drinking, apparently went home, secured a single barrel shotgun and took a short cut to waylay Miles.  As Miles went along the street running west in Ullin and not far from a foot bridge, Massie came out and pointed his gun at him.

             Considerable talk ensued in which Jim Eanes, stepfather of Miles, and living across and up the road, called to Massie not to shoot.  Witnesses said that Massie stepped back a way and shot.  There were children near and Miles had previously laid down packages, presumably some groceries.  Miles did not fall at the shot and Massie, witnesses say, advanced upon him to strike him with the gun which Miles first warded off, but the second attempt, he was hit and went down.  He was struck again.  How a man stood up after receiving a full charge in his chest is hard for anyone to understand.  Miles was dead a few moments later.

             The coroner’s jury recommended holding Massie.  This makes four or five killings among colored folks in the last year.  Miles is 26 and Massie married with a number of children.

             (According to his death certificate, Willie Miles, laborer, was born 28 Jun 1912, in Brinkley, Ark., the son of C. Miles and Cora Harris, natives of Arkansas, died 21 Jun 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ida May Miles, and was buried in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill.   Tommie Massie is in the 1920 census of Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill.  He was born about 1898 in Illinois and his wife, Lydia Massie, was born about 1900 in Illinois.  They are also in the 1930 census of Ullin and Thomas then worked at the box factory.  Their children were:  Arnold, Leonard, Venecia, Clifford, David, Edith, and Veria Massie.–Darrel Dexter)

 

LOVE TRIANGLE FATAL

             The old love triangle broke forth in Alexander County late Monday night when Everett Meisenheimer, 23, of Olive Branch, shot, with a 22 rifle, Edna Mae Peeler, 19, mother of two children and separated from her husband, and seriously wounded her.  The shooting was at the home of Mrs. William Berry, mother of Mrs. Peeler near Frog City.  Next morning the body of Meisenheimer was found in a cornfield with a bullet through the head.  It is presumed that he killed himself after shooting Mrs. Peeler.  The row was over a second man.

             (The death certificate states that Edna Mae Peeler was born 26 Feb 1920, in Tamms, Ill., the daughter of William H. Berry, a native of West Frankfort, Ill., and Luella Smith, a native of Rochester, Ky., died 2 Aug 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Charles Peeler, and was buried in Provo Cemetery near Tamms, Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

McCLURE WOMAN WHO DROWNED KNOWN HERE

             Miss Margaret Johnson, 22-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Johnson of McClure, who was drowned in Black River near Poplar Bluff, Mo., last Sunday morning while wading, is known here and is a cousin of Mrs. Willis Edwards and almost like a sister.  Mrs. Edwards’ sister was entirely raised by the Johnson family.

             Miss Johnson, in company with Gerald Wayne Mosby of Pennsylvania and Dewey Cameron of Thebes, left early to spend the day at Current River Beach in Arkansas.  They stopped on the Black River to swim.  Miss Johnson could not swim and she either lost her footing or stepped in a hole and was carried downstream.  Her body came up once and then went down and lodged under a rock.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at McClure in the high school gymnasium. A vast number of people attended, for she was well known and had worked in several towns as a beauty operator.  Besides her parents, three brothers and a sister survive.

 

SLOWLY IMPROVING

             C. S. Miller, who lingered around very close to death’s door after an operation, is slowly mending.  His strength is returning and he is becoming more cheerful.  He is still unable to read or to have company, but he is definitely mending,  Possibly a couple more weeks will see a very marked improvement and Judge Miller will begin to enjoy visits and to spin a few yarns or set a few fires under the New Deal et al.

 

EDWARD OGDON

             Funeral services for Edward Ogdon, 59 years old, who died Wednesday, June 14, at his home in Metropolis, were held Friday afternoon at the Baynes Chapel in that city, with Rev. Osborne of Cairo officiating.

             He is survived by his wife, Esther; four sons, Edward, William, Doris and Roy; three daughters, Mrs. Kathleen Miller, Mrs. Thelma Nefteger and Miss Dorothy Ogdon; two sisters, Mrs. Frank Deahl of Mound City and Mrs. Julia Timmons of Shuttuc, Ill.

             (Lafayette Ogden married Eliza Ann Reagan on 12 Apr 1863, in Pope Co., Ill.  When Edward Ogden registered for the draft in 1918, he stated he was born 30 Apr 1881, and was a blacksmith for J. T. Polk Co., in Mound City, Ill.  He made his mark instead of signing his name.  The application of Edd Young Ogden for a Social Security claim in December 1936 states he was born 30 Apr 1880, in Ozark, Ill., the son of Lafette Ogden and Lizzie A. Reigan. The death certificate of Edd Y. Ogden, blacksmith, states he was born 30 Apr 1880, in Illinois, the son of Fate Ogden and Eliza Ann Ragen, natives of Illinois, died 14 Jun 1939, in Massac Co., Ill., husband of Esther Ogden, and was  buried in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Jun 1939:

Edward Arthur Nelson Dies after Brief Illness

             Edward Arthur Nelson died at his home on South Delaware Avenue Sunday morning, June 25, at 5:00 o’clock following a brief illness.  His age was 44 years.

             Mr. Nelson was born in Baldwin, Illinois and had lived in this state throughout his life.  For the last eleven years he had been station agent for the Illinois Central Railroad until a short time ago when his house and contents were burned.  Thus, within a short period this family had gone through both flood, and fire, sustaining losses in both disasters.

             He is survived by his wife and two daughters, Betty and Pollyanna; also two brothers, John of Pinckneyville and F. M. Nelson of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held in the First Methodist Church of Mound City Tuesday afternoon at 4 o’clock with Rev. James Henderson, pastor, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             Among those from out of town who attended the funeral were his two brothers and their wives and three sisters of Mrs. Nelson, who live at Mattoon.

             (His death certificate states that Edward Arthur Nelson, railroad agent, was born 19 Jul 1893, in Baldwin, Ill., the son of W. R. Nelson, died 25 Jun 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Peggy Nelson, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Highland Memorial Park Cemetery in Mount Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill., reads:  Peggy Anna Nelson Aug. 1976 E. Arthur Nelson June 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Roy Turner

             Funeral services for Roy Turner, age 32, who was fatally injured in an auto accident Wednesday, June 21, were held at the Pentecostal church in Cypress Saturday morning at 11:00 o’clock.  Rev. Will Henry officiated.

             Interment was made in the Lutheran Chapel Cemetery.  Fellow W. P. A. workers served as casket bearers.

             Mr. Turner is survived by his wife, Myrtle; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Turner; a sister, Mrs. Edith Greer of Vienna; and three brothers, Harry and Audy of Cypress and Jake of Detroit.

             Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (His death certificate states that Roy Turner, laborer, was born 10 May 1907, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of George Turner and Lilly Farr, natives of Johnson Co., Ill., died 22 Jun 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Myrtle Turner, and was buried in Road District 10, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Luther Chapel Cemetery in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Roy Turner 1907-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Body of Drowned Man Found at Mound City

             The body of George Cuthbertson, 41 years old, Johnston City miner, who drowned at Mon Easter’s Landing above Dam 53 Tuesday morning, was found Thursday morning near the Mound City shipyards by Harry Winters and Elias Buckles at about 5:30 o’clock.  The body, clad only in trousers, remained unidentified until Joe O’Sullivan, state’s attorney, telephoned his description to Johnston City police, who verified the identification.

             The body was taken by relatives to Johnston City for burial.

 

Mrs. Lula Hoffner Ward

             Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, June 30, at the Ryan Funeral Home for Mrs. Lulu Hoffner Ward, who died in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday, June 28.  Burial was in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug.

             Mrs. Ward was first married to Earl Hoffner, brother of Mrs. S. R. Shifley of Mounds.  Mr. Hoffner died in 1918.  She is survived by four children:  Mrs. Delbert Spangle, Orville, Vernon and Eugene Hoffner, all of Flint, Mich.

 

U. G. Meneley

             U. G. Meneley of Champaign, husband of Rosella Morrow Meneley, formerly of Mounds, died Wednesday of last week.  Burial was in Champaign.

             Surviving are his wife, two daughters by a former marriage, two brothers and two sisters.

             (The death certificate of Ulysses Grant Meneley, farmer, of Park Ridge, Ill., states he was born 29 Aug 1867, in Illinois, died 18 Jun 1939, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the husband of Lula May Meneley, and was buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Champaign, Champaign Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

I. A. Beegle

             Isaac A. Beegle, age 82 years, died Thursday morning, June 29, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. E. Price west of Mounds.  He has been a resident of this community for 33 years.

             He is survived by six children, three daughters, Mrs. H. L. McElligott of Cairo, Mrs. J. E. Price, and Mrs. Clara Hudgins of Benton Harbor, Mich.; three sons, R. L. Beegle, Henry and Homer Beegle, all of Mounds; and other relatives less near.

             Funeral services were held at Shiloh Church Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Burial was made in Shiloh Cemetery with J. T. Ryan conducting.

             (His death certificate states that I. A. Beegle, retired farmer, was born 8 Nov 1857, in Tennessee, died 29 Jun 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., divorced husband of Elizabeth Yoder, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Shiloh Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  Isaac A. Beegle 1857-1939 Sarah E. Beegle 1855-1942.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Keele of Centralia were here to attend the funeral of Mrs. Lulu Hoffner Ward.

 

A. J. Jaeckel

             Funeral services were held Thursday of last week for A. J. Jaeckel, 77, of Illmo, Mo., in Illmo.

             Mr. Jaeckel was well known here, having been employed by the Illinois Central Railroad Company for many years.  He was a native of Cairo.

             Surviving are his wife and one daughter.

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish to express our sincere appreciation for the love and sympathy extended us during the short illness and death of our dear husband, daddy and brother, E. A. Nelson.  Especially do we thank Rev. Henderson and Rev. Reid for their consoling words, the ones who sent flowers, furnished cars, the choir, the pallbearers and everyone who helped in any way.  Your kindness will always be appreciated.

Mrs. E. A. Nelson

Betty M. and Pollyanna Nelson

John W. Nelson

F. M. Nelson

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Jun 1939:

E. A. NELSON DIED SUNDAY MORNING AT HIS HOME

             Arthur Nelson, for 11 years Illinois Central agent here, baseball and basketball fan, died at his home in Mounds Sunday morning about 5 o’clock after an illness that extends, in reality, back for some time.  He became very weak last week, not being able to be around, and then took to bed and the weakness increased until he was in a dying state.  Literally, he appeared to wear out.

             After his long illness in the hospital at Paducah, he never regained his health.  The upheaval on the Illinois Central that cost him his job over bills of lading further set him backward.  Of these forged bills of lading, Nelson in person told The Enterprise they were clear forgeries and only last week, the Illinois Central is said to have re-employed him.  Mr. Nelson, however, was too ill to be able to work, but did realize that he was re-instated.

             There survives his wife and two children, Betty and Pollyanna; and two brothers, John of Pinckneyville and F. M. of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held in Mound City at the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon with Rev. James Henderson in charge.  Interment was in the Mounds cemetery.

             Mr. Nelson was born in Baldwin, Ill., and was 44 years of age at the time of his death.

 

There were 12 murder cases in ten years according to Joseph O’Sullivan, state’s attorney; of this number 10 are negroes and two are whites.  There are now 7 murder cases pending, all negroes.

 

ESTATE OF NETTIE PERKS SEEMS TO BE WELL TANGLED

             The estate of Nettie B. Perks, widow of the late Leslie Perks, a partner of the firm of Perks & Higgins, apparently is growing more complicated as time goes on.  Its halt in court for the past few months has largely been due to the illness of C. S. Miller, attorney for George Schuler of Mounds, executor of the estate.

             But the estate is complicated in that there is argument relative to the meaning of the will of the late Leslie Perks and what property it does or does not bequeath and while the will of Mrs. Perks in itself is not so difficult, the property she wills seems to be depending on the property she had the right and title to.  Judging by the motions back and forth, there is not complete harmony on this.

             There are motions requiring the executor, George Schuler, to file a complete inventory of all property.  There is the motion directed towards Harry Perks, one of the heirs, asking him to surrender certain things and to account for others.  There is also a motion asking for property from Schuler that Perks says is his own personal property.

             The back and forth motions are between Schuler as executor on one side and Harry and Tom Perks as major contestants on the other, may have just started.  There was a time when a change of venue out from Judge Boyd was in progress or had been granted, and the case now may be back with Judge Crain.

             The estate lists quite a bit of real estate in this state and some in Kentucky and a whole long list of loans after which is written “doubtful” or some similar term.  There is no addition to values and no one probably knows, since taxes are a matter to be considered.

             Against the estate are a number of claims and recently there has been filed by Harry Perks a claim for $9,907.34 for personal services between 1931 and 1937.  This is divided into two accounts of $6,707.34 and $3,200 and a third bill for $412 for insurance fees due the Perks & Schuler insurance agency or a total of $10,319.34.

             There are several notes against the estate, most of these secured by real estate and there are a number of open accounts.

             The court will doubtless, in time, hear accounting of property from two sides; proof and adjustment of

claims and then the final manner in which the estate will be distributed.  It has become already quite a tangled affair that has the possibility of weeks in court and not in probate or county court alone, but also in circuit court.

 

ROBERT EUGENE CAREY

             Funeral services for Robert Eugene Carey were held Sunday afternoon in the Baptist church in this city, Rev. H. E. Lockard, pastor, officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             Robert Carey, 3-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Carey of West Palm Beach, Florida, was fatally injured when hit by a bus near his home.  He is the grandson of Mrs. W. T. Kennedy of this city.

 

BROOKPORT WOMAN DIES OF BURNS

             Mrs. Hattie Gibson, 48, of Brookport, suffered fatal burns early Sunday morning when she threw coal oil on a fire she was building and the resulting explosion ignited her clothing.

             The accident occurred on the John Davis farm about three miles from Brookport where the Gibson family made their home.  Mr. Gibson suffered minor burns in extinguishing his wife’s burning clothing.  The home caught fire and burned to the ground.

             Mrs. Gibson was rushed to the Fisher Hospital in Metropolis and died Sunday afternoon.

             She is survived by her husband, several children, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Reynolds and many other relatives and is a cousin of Rev. Earl Throgmorton of Mounds.  Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon.

             (According to her death certificate, Hattie M. Gibson was born 6 Dec 1890, in Illinois, the daughter of George W. Reynolds and Julia Harmon, natives of Illinois, died 18 Jun 1939, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., wife of George E. Gibson, and was buried in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Jul 1939:

Mrs. G. A. James, who has been a patient in St. Mary’s Hospital for the past week or so, was removed last week, by ambulance to the bedside of her mother, Mrs. Zuber at Vincennes, Ind., having been called there by her sudden relapse, Mrs. Zuber having been in failing health for some time.  Mrs. James was driven by her son and his wife, who has been her attendant during her illness.  Sunday she was taken to the hospital in Cairo, where she remained until Tuesday, when she was brought to her home in this city.

 

J. B. SHEERER

             John Brown Sheerer, aged 76 years, passed away at his home in this city, Wednesday evening.  He had been in ill health for about a year.  Born in Johnson County, Bud Sheerer, as he was more popularly known, has resided in Mound City for 44 years.

             He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. Ruth Kennedy; one son, Gilbert; and a grandson, Paul Louis Kennedy, who resided with him.  He is also survived by a brother, W. E. Sheerer, of this city; a half-brother, Grover Rebmen of Wyoming; a half-sister, Mrs. Gussie Greer of Anna; a granddaughter, Miss Lucille Seibert and other cousins, relatives and friends.

             The funeral will be held this afternoon at 3:30 at the James Funeral Home in this city with Rev. Joseph Fix of Cairo officiating.  Rev. H. E. Lockard, of the Baptist Church in this city, will assist Rev. Fix.

             Interment will be made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with G. A. James in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, John Brown Sheerer was  born 6 Jan 1863, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Perry Sheerer, a native of Germany, and Margaret S. Mathis, a native of Kentucky,  died 5 Jul 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widower of Ida Sheerer, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HARRY BARBER DIES AFTER 3 MONTHS ILLNESS

             Harry Barber, 50 years of age, passed away at his home in Grand Chain, Monday, July 3.  He had been ill for the past three months.

             Left to mourn his passing are his wife, five children, Charles, Flora and James of Grand Chain, Allen of Metropolis and Mrs. Lucy White of Harlem, Mont.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Congregational church at Grand Chain, with Rev. Benninger officiating.  Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (According to his death certificate, Harry Robert Barber, carpenter, of Grand Chain, Ill., was born 22 Dec 1879, in Ohio Chapel, Ill., the son of John Barber, died 3 Jul 1939, in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Emma Barber, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Harry Barber 1879-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to express our appreciation for the love and sympathy extended to us during the illness and death of our husband, daddy and brother, E. A. Nelson.

             Especially do we thank Rev. Henderson and Rev. Reid for their consoling words, the ones who sent flowers, furnished cars, the pallbearers, and everyone who helped in any way.

             Your kindness will always be remembered.

Mrs. E. A. Nelson

Betty M. and Pollyanna Nelson

John W. Nelson

F. M. Nelson

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Jul 1939:

Judge Carl S. Miller Dies Following Nine Weeks’ Illness

             Attorney Carl S. Miller, age 60 years, a practicing lawyer in Pulaski County for 29 years, died Saturday night, July 8, in the Illinois Central Hospital, Chicago, where he had been taken a few days previous.  He had been a patient at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, for nine weeks following a surgical operation.

             During 29 years of practice as a lawyer in this county Attorney Miller had served three terms as state’s attorney and two terms as county judge.  Before beginning his work here he had practiced six years with a large law firm in Chicago, thus laying the foundation on which he later built a most successful public career.

             Born two miles east of Villa Ridge on a farm, Mr. Miller decided early in life to study law and worked his way through John Marshall Law College, graduating in 1902.  From 1908 until the flood of 1937, he lived and practiced in Mound City.  Following this disaster he moved to Cairo, where he has since remained, taking over the offices of the late Attorney Reed Green and forming a partnership with his son, Donald Miller, who moved to Cairo from Chicago to enter the firm to be known as Miller and Miller.

             Judge Miller made many contacts during his long career in the courtroom and on the bench.  He was a natural orator and was called on as a speaker on many public occasions, ably responding at a moment’s notice.  He was a member of the State Bar Association and the Pulaski County and Alexander County Bar Association.  At the time of his death he was attorney for the Illinois Central, the Big Four and the C. & E. I. railroads and other corporations.  He was also city attorney for Mounds and Mound City.

             In politics he was a Republican and was a party leader for many years.

             For many years he was director in the First State Bank of Mounds and was the bank’s attorney; he was president of the First State Bank of Olmsted.

             He was a Thirty-second degree Mason and was a member of Trinity Lodge No. 563 A. F. & A. M.

             Attorney Miller was also prominent in the work of the church for almost 20 years he was superintendent of the Sunday school of the Pilgrim Congregational Church of Mound City and was a teacher of the adult class.  He had high ideals and tried to realize them in his daily living.  His death is a loss not only to his family but to this section of Illinois.

             Surviving are his wife, Lottie Austin Miller; four daughters, Mrs. Donald Auble of Bartlett, Ill., Miss Marguerite Miller and Miss Eleanor Miller, both of Cairo, and Miss Ethel Miller of Mounds; one son, Donald Miller of Cairo; five grandsons; one sister, Mrs. Ida Forsythe of Tamms; and one brother, Jasper Miller of San Antonio, Texas.

             Funeral services were held at the Pilgrim Congregational Church in Mound City Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock with a large concourse of people assembled to pay their last mark of respect.  Rev. Joseph W. Fix of the Presbyterian church of Cairo officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James directing.

             Pallbearers were E. C. Hogendobler and Jesse Rutherman of Olmsted, O. B. Archibald and John Dewey of Cairo, C. E. Richey and C. F. Bode of Mound City.

             (George H. Forsyth, 23, farmer, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Villa Ridge, son of Charles Forsyth and Jane Parker, married Ida Miller, 19, born in Villa Ridge, Ill., daughter of J. N. Miller and Margaret Albin, on 7 Apr 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Joseph Newton Miller, 22, farmer, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Villa Ridge, son of Jasper Newton Miller and Margaret Alben, married on 22 Jul 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Lulu Stringer, 20, born in Pulaski, Ill., daughter of William Stringer and Mary Kelley.  According to his death certificate, Charles Sumner Miller, attorney, of Chicago, Ill., was born 6 Oct 1878, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of Joseph N. Miller and Margaret Albin, natives of New Corbite, Ohio, died 8 Jul 1939, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., husband of Lottie Miller, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Billie Jean Baccus

             Billie Jean, 6 months old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baccus of Mound City, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital Sunday night, July 9, at 9:30 o’clock.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by one sister, Doris Anne; a half-sister, Anita Sue; and a half-brother, Freddie of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the home of her parents with Rev. James Henderson, pastor of the First Methodist Church, Mound City, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James Funeral Service directing.

             (The death certificate of Billie Jean Baccus states she was born 17 Jan 1939, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Charles Baccus, a native of Neeleyville, Mo., and Ludene Lingle, a native of Dongola, Ill., died 9 Jul 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Daughter Billie Jean Baccus Jan. 17, 1939 July 9, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. A. D. McCown Dies in Mound City

             Mrs. Blanche McCown, age 76, died Monday morning, July 10, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. I. J. Hudson, Jr., in Mound City, following an illness of several months.

             Mrs. McCown had lived in Mound City for the past 26 years.  She was a member of the Pilgrim Congregational Church and had many friends who still miss her presence.

             Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. I. J. Hudson, Jr., of Mound City, and Mrs. Blanche Lentz of Cairo; two sons, Foster of California and Cecil of East Alton, Ill.  Her husband, A. D. McCown, died four years ago.

             Funeral services were held at the Pilgrim Congregational Church, Mound City, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, the Rev. Joseph W. Fix of Cairo officiating. Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James in charge.

             (A. B. McCowan married O. C. Hartley on 7 Nov 1885, in Weakley Co., Tenn.  Her death certificate states that Blanche McCown was born 20 Mar 1863, in Nashville, Tenn., the daughter of Napoleon Hartley and Mary Wilson, natives of Tennessee, died 10 Jul 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of A. B. McCown, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Blanche McCown Mar. 20, 1863 July 10, 1939 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Samuel Price

             Mrs. Maebelle Price, 71 years of age, died at her home in Grand Chain Saturday afternoon, July 8, at 3:15 o’clock.  Besides her husband, Samuel Price, she is survived by a sister, Mrs. Hortense Woelfle, widow of the late Dr. J. E. Woelfle of Cairo; and three nieces, Mrs. Mary Newman of St. Louis, Mrs. Hortense Hatch and Mrs. Albert Rust of Carbondale.

             Funeral services were held in the Congregational church in Grand Chain Monday morning at 10:30 o’clock with Rev. S. E. Benninger, officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.  Pallbearers were William Victor, Joseph Gaunt, Dr. James Turner, Guy Harris, Norman Boyd and Calvin Wilmouth.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (Thomas B. Echols married Ammon Brown on 1 Dec 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mabelle E. Price was born 29 Nov 1867, in Olmstead, Ill., the daughter of Thomas B. Echols and Arminda B. Brown, natives of Olmstead, Ill., died 8 Jul 1939, in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Samuel Price, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mabelle Price 1865-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. John Henderson and their guests, Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Bland and Mrs. S. Decker of Tulsa, Okla., were called to Jonesboro, Ark., by the death of a sister of Mrs. Henderson and Mrs. Bland.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Jul 1939:

Carl S. Miller Died Saturday in Chicago

             Carl S. Miller, better known as Judge Miller, three times state’s attorney for this county and twice county judge, a veteran of many legal battles, widely known and a lawyer of unusual prominence , died in the Illinois Central Hospital in Chicago last Saturday night.  He had been removed from the Cairo hospital Thursday in this last effort to save him after an illness that had lasted for nine weeks.

             Operated upon for appendicitis at Cairo, infection developed and it was necessary to open the wound.  Blood transfusions were given and for several days Judge Miller wavered between life and death.  He then appeared to mend and there were strong hopes that in time he would recover.  But the struggle and suffering, perhaps the long and hard legal battle here at the election contest case, had worn him down and he began after nearly nine weeks to grow worse.  In a desperate attempt he was moved to Chicago where death came to ease his sufferings and bring to an end one of the bar’s strongest characters.

             Judge Miller spent almost his entire life of 60 years in this county.  He grew up on the farm near Villa Ridge, attending the common schools of that section.  He attended Albion College and then the John Marshall Law School.  For a few years he remained in Chicago with a law firm and in 1906 came to Mound City to practice, opening up in the office of L. M. Bradley.

             Five times elected to public office, he proved himself to be aggressive and a persistent fighter in the courtroom.  No witness who wavered in testimony escaped when cross examination time came; no point was too small to see and no argument advanced but what he countered or offered rebuttal.  In the court room he was in his domain and few lawyers were his match.

             Out of his profession, he was an energetic citizen loyal to his community and interested in the better things.  A church worker, a man devoted to education and good schools and a man with high civic mind, Carl Miller was always at the front.

             In the political field, he dropped the suave, hand-shaking, baby-kissing methods of patting everyone on the back or working into clever schemes.  No one ever fronted for the Republican Party like he did in this county and he laid on blow for blow and did not spare words.  His aggressive and challenging attitude brought him many friends and much admiration. It also created enemies.

             He moved to Cairo after the flood of 1937 and into the offices of the late Reed Green.  Here he and his son were carrying on a law partnership that was growing and flourishing.

             Judge Miller is survived by his wife and five children, Mrs. Donald Auble of Bartlett, Ill., Miss Margaret, Miss Ethel and Miss Eleanor Miller and one son, Donald, and five grandchildren.  A sister, Mrs. Ida Forsythe, of Tamms; and one brother, Jasper, of San Antonio, Texas, also survive.

             Funeral services were held here Tuesday. The body was brought to the G. A. James Funeral Home and at 10 o’clock was placed in state at the Congregational church where, for some 20 years he was superintendent of Sunday school and where for years upon years he attended services with remarkable regularity.

             That afternoon, the services were conducted by Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Cairo and music was by the Presbyterian choir.  The church was filled and many were outside.  Members of the bar from a number of counties attended.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             From friends of long standing were chosen pallbearers.  They were:  E. C. Hogendobler and J. A. Rutherman of Olmstead, O. B. Archibald and John Dewey of Cairo, and C. E. Ritchey and C. F. Bode of Mound City.

 

MRS. BLANCHE McCOWAN

             Mrs. Blanche McCowan, 76, passed away Monday morning following several months’ illness at the home of her daughter, Mrs. I. J. Hudson, Jr.

             Mrs. McCowan had been a resident of Mound City for 26 years and was a devout member of the Pilgrim Congregational Church.

             She is survived by two daughters, the above named Mrs. Hudson, Jr., and Mrs. Blanche Lentz of Cairo; two sons, Foster of California and Cecil of East Alton, Ill.  Twelve grandchildren and five great-grandchildren also survive her.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Pilgrim Congregational Church with Rev. J. W. Fix officiating.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery beside the grave of her husband, A. D. McCowan, who preceded her in death four years ago.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             The casket bearers were:  M. L. Capoot, E. E. Schuler, George R. Martin, C. F. Bode, George Gunn and A. J. Ridings.   

 

BILLIE JEAN BACCUS

             Funeral services for Billie Jean Baccus, 6 months old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baccus of Mound City, were held Monday afternoon at the home of her parents, with Rev. James Henderson, pastor of the M. E. Church, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             Besides her parents, she is survived by one sister, Doris Anne, a ____ sister, Anita Sue; and a half-brother, Freddie of St. Louis.

             The baby passed away Sunday ____ at St. Mary’s Hospital, where she had received treatment for an ____ due to a recent operation.

             G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

BUTLER’S MOTHER DIED SUNDAY

             Mrs. Emma Butler, 89, died Sunday at the home of her son, George Butler, near Levings, Ill.

             At the age of 14, she and her mother, Millie Kirkpatrick came to Mound City from Greenville, Miss., and have resided in Pulaski County for the past 75 years.

             The shock of the tragic death of her son, Tom, brought on the illness from which she never recovered.

             She leaves two sons, Honora and George; one daughter, Mrs. Ada Burwell and many other relatives.

             Services were held Wednesday afternoon and burial was made in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Olmstead.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Emma Butler was born 15 May 1852, in Greenville, Miss., died 9 Jul 1939, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of John Butler, and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker reads:  Grandmother Emma Butler 1852-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. SAMUEL PRICE

             Mrs. Maebelle Price, 71, passed away at her home in Grand Chain Saturday afternoon.

             Besides her husband, Samuel Price, she is survived by a sister, Mrs. Hortense Woelfle; and three nieces, Mrs. Mary Newman of St. Louis, Mrs. Hortense Harch and Mrs. Albert Rust of Carbondale.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning in the Congregational church in Grand Chain with Rev. S. E. Benninger, officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.

             Casket bearers were William Victor, Joseph Gaunt, Dr. James Turner, Guy Harris, Norman Boyd and Calvin Wilmouth.

 

Mrs. M. L. McConnell, who was called here by the death of her father, W. Smith, will leave Wednesday for her home in Portland, Ore.

 

C. S. MILLER

             We chronicle on another page the death of Carl Miller.  But we do not feel that a mere news story should carry the only message, but that a few words of tribute are due this unusual character, this citizen and this lawyer.

             In our time, now nearly nine years, we came to know Judge Miller quite well.  We have met few who had the fearlessness that he had, possessed the aggressive nature and who stood plainly for what he considered the right and proper things.

             With all his legal talent, his aggressive ways and with his legal knowledge, he possessed a very kindly side.  He was a family man, devoted to them and on him they can look with pride.  He was a religious man, deeply so, and practiced it when softer and more enticing things called.  He was a man for civic affairs and for education and to this he gave both time and energy and money, too, if need be.

             He had a strong sense of honest and fair play and to trivial cases he gave his best as well as to those cases more in public eye and in prominence.  He had aspirations for high political honors after winning some of the lesser, and we have seen him in the hour of defeat, like a man and soldier, bear his defeat, and whatever the wounds were, they were not paraded to the public.

             There was a grimness to his soul, a tenacity to his spirit and a moving energy that made him live more and feel more in this sixty years than most men do in a longer span of life.  We do not think he feared in the least as death approached.  Regrets he would have, but his eager spirit was ever ready for a new adventure and his faith quite strong.

             We recall that in years past while sick in a hospital and hearing church bells ring he wrote lines that are fitting now.  It may well close this little composition of a man we were proud to know.  Here is the poem:

Oh, the little brick church in the home of my youth,

             Built by love for the teaching of truth.

How many times on God’s holy day

             My youthful footsteps have turned thy way.

There would we sing the songs of old,

             There for us the story was told

For us there angels fain would sing

             As Christmas bells their joy would bring.

Oh carry me back to the church of my youth

             Teach me again God’s holy truth.

The love of God, the Savior dear,

             Who took from death its sting of fear.

Singing the songs that will never grow old

             Clasping hands that never are cold

By its altar may we gather too

             In that church built for me and you.

And when our time on earth is done,

             And life’s brief sands fore’er have run

How happy this spirit of mine shall be

             If friends shall gather at that church with me,

To read a bit from God’s holy word

             To sing the songs the angels have heard

To feel the spirit of God come down

             In that little church in our home town.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Jul 1939:

Mrs. Hazel Casper

             Mrs. Hazel Casper, 24, died at her home in Anna at 5:30 o’clock Saturday morning, July 15, after an illness of one week of heart trouble.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ketchie of Dongola and attended the Dongola High School from which she graduated in 1933.  She was married in 1934 to Alfonzo Casper and moved to Anna, where they have resided since.  She was employed at the International Shoe Company factory.

             Funeral services were held at Mt. Olive Baptist Church near Dongola at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. J. Ward. Burial was in Friendship Cemetery.

             Surviving Mrs. Casper are her husband, her father, four sisters and four brothers, Mrs. Carrie Hinkle of Dongola, Mrs. Lela Casper and Miss Alta Ketchie of Anna and Mrs. Bertha Hartley of Cairo; David Ketchie of Mounds, Stephen of Wolf Lake, Willie of Woodriver and Irvin of Dongola.

             (Her death certificate states that Hazel Lowanda Casper, shoe factory worker, was born 23 Oct 1914, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry L. Ketchie, a native of North Carolina, and Ida E. Head, a native of Illinois, died 15 Jul 1939, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the wife of Alfonzo Casper, and was buried in Friendship Cemetery in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Hazel Casper 1915-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Kate Moll

              Word has been received by friends here of the death of Mrs. Kate Sair Moll, age 31, who passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Frankie Jackson, in Glendale, California, Thursday, July 13, following a heart attack.

             She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Jackson of Glendale and Mrs. Jessie Ivy of Birmingham, Ala., and several nieces and nephews.

             Mrs. Moll was the last of the Sair family, one of the oldest and most respected families in Mound City.  Her father was a contractor.

            

Mrs. Leonard Gray of Webster Groves, Mo., Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Britton of Chicago, Miss Grace Gaunt and Mr. and Mrs. Winkleman of Champaign were in this city Tuesday to attend the funeral of their uncle, Carl S. Miller.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Jul 1939:

MRS. KATE MOLL

             Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Kate Moll, 81, who passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Frankie Jackson, in Glendale, Calif., Thursday, July 13, following a heart attack.

             Mrs. Moll is survived by two daughters, the above mentioned Mrs. Jackson and Mrs. Bessie Ivy of Birmingham, Ala., also several nieces and nephews.

             Mrs. Moll is the last of the Fair family, one of the oldest and most respected families in this city.  She was also a sister of the late Mrs. L. F. Stophlet of this city.

             ((Louis J. Moll married Kate Fair on 7 Jan 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Loren Stophlet married Annie Fair on 28 May 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The California Death Index states that Kate Moll was born about 1858 and died 12 Jul 1939, in Los Angeles Co., N.C.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ARTHUR MEREIDETH

             Arthur Mereideth, 57, passed away at his home in this city Monday morning following several months’ illness.

             He is survived by his wife, Edith, six children, two by a former marriage, and his father and stepmother, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Mereideth.  A half-brother and five half-sisters also survive him.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the residence in this city, Rev. Burgess of Blandville, Ky., officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, Arthur Meredith, laborer, was born 12 Jul 1882, in Baltimore, Ky., the son of J. K. Meredith and Lizzie Herndon, natives of Kentucky, died 17 Jul 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Edith Meredith, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Arthur Meriedeth 1882-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 


The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Jul 1939:

Mrs. Newton Riddle

             Mrs. Elizabeth Riddle, age 81 years, died at her home in Cairo Sunday night, July 23, following a four weeks’ sickness.

             Mrs. Riddle was the mother of the late Fred Little, a resident of this community for a number of years.

             Surviving her are three daughters, Mrs. Nona Hill and Miss Anna Louise Riddle of St. Louis and Miss Mayme Riddle of Cairo; a daughter-in-law, Mrs. Grace Riddle McClellan of Mounds; one sister, Mrs. Albert Cooper of Los Angeles, Calif.; and three brothers, Labon and Robert Culbertson of Dexter, Mo., and Eddie Culbertson of Bloomfield, Mo.  Her husband, Newton Riddle died in 1934,  The family has lived in Cairo for thirty years.

             (The death certificate of Elizabeth Riddle, of Cairo, Ill., states that she was born 25 Jan 1857, in Dexter, Mo., the daughter of Eli Culbertson, a native of North Carolina, died 23 Jul 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Newton Riddle, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Elizabeth Riddle 1857-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Eugie Lee Grief

             Eugie Lee Grief was born July 12, 1939 and died July 26.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carnie Grief of Kevil, Ky.  Mrs. Grief is the sister of Mrs. J. T. Thompson of Mounds.

             The baby was taken to Riverside Hospital in Paducah, Ky., and given two blood transfusions is an effort to save her life, but to no avail.

             Surviving are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carnie Grief; one sister, Garnetta; one brother, Louis Earle; and a grandmother.

             Funeral services were held at Newton Creek Baptist Church near Raglan, Ky., at 3:30 p.m. July 26.

             (Her death certificate states that Eugie Lee Grief of R. F. D. 3, Kevil, Ky., was born 12 Jul 1939, in Ballard Co., Ky., the daughter of Carnie Grief and Ella O’Donley, natives of Kentucky, died 26 Jul 1939, in Riverside Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., and was buried in Newton Creek Cemetery by the family.  Her marker in Newton Creek Baptist Church Cemetery reads:  Eugie Lee dau. of Carnie & Ella Grief July 12, 1939 July 26, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Foster Mother of Mrs. G. A. James Dies Saturday

             Mrs. J. B. Zuber of Vincennes, Ind., foster mother of Mrs. G. A. James of Mound City, died Saturday morning, July 22, at 8:30 o’clock at her home in Vincennes, Ind., following a long illness.  Her age was 82 years.

             Mrs. James and her son, G. A. James, Jr., and wife were with Mrs. Zuber at the time of her death.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning at 8 o’clock with interment in the Vincennes Cemetery.

             (Elvira Zuber died 24 Jul 1939, and was buried in Vincennes City Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Lucille J. Young

             Mrs. Lucille J. Young, 77, well known and highly respected colored resident of Mounds, died at the home of her daughter, Miss Calva Young Tuesday night, July 25, at 8:30 o’clock following a long illness.

             The body was taken to the Ruffin Funeral Home in Cairo and returned to the home Thursday evening.  Funeral services will be held today (Friday) at one o’clock at St. Paul’s A. M. E. Church.  Burial will be in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             Mrs. Young was born in Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 1861, and was brought by her parents to Pulaski County in 1862.  Her maiden name was Lucille J. Williams.

             Her husband, Calvin Young died in 1915.  Surviving are ten of their eleven children, namely:  Seth Young, Cairo; Edward Young, Mounds; Clem Young, Salt Lake City, Utah; Mrs. Annie Phillips, St. Louis, Mo.; Harry Young, Los Angeles, Calif.; Calva Young, Mounds; Mrs. Ada Jones, Gary, Ind.; Hugh Young, Grand Chain; Cecil Young, Grand Chain; and Ernestine Tabor, Chicago; also two grandchildren, Laverne Davis, St. Louis, and Seth Young, Jr., Chicago.

             (Cal Young married Lucy Jane Williams on 22 Mar 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Lucy Jane Young was born 1 Nov 1861, in Nashville, Tenn., the daughter of Nelson Williams and Sarrah Mitchell, natives of Nashville, Tenn., died 25 Jul 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Calvan Young, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Jul 1939:

Criminal Cases before Judge Bradley in Court

             Judge Loyd Bradley, holding his ___ term of court in this county, ___eted with a barrage of murder cases Tuesday morning and the ___ are still in progress.

             ___tin Henderson, colored, who ___ Ray Davis, also colored, at Olmsted on June 19 of last year, came to trial Wednesday morning and after the evidence and instructing the jury, the case resulted in a hung jury, 10 to 2 for conviction.

             The jury was left with the case ___sday evening and remained at the courthouse all night, sleeping in the court room on benches and ___.  Aside from the hardness of the benches and the mosquitoes, the night was not so bad.

             ___ie Meals, the colored woman, who shot her husband while he was in a drunken condition and  then walked some distance to surrender herself, was brought into court yesterday shortly before noon.  ___ must have been hungry, for she carried a lunch in a bucket, ___ she ate in the court room ____ things moved about to determine what should be done with her.  Testimony was heard by Judge ___y and while not learned at ____ time, it was expected to be a sentence to the woman’s prison ____ight.

             ____ Massie, colored of Ullin, was ___rt and while in a plea of guilty was expected of him, it did not develop that way.  Massie was the negro who shot down a man in Ullin not long ago and when the man did not fall, clubbed him over the head with a gun.  Massie was drinking at the time.  The case was set ___ this morning, and unless he enters a plea, the trial will probably consume the remainder of the week.  

 

STAY OUT OF COUNTY

             The feud between Stevens and Casper, two fishermen who had a fight last week, came into county court last Friday and Stevens was given a 6 months sentence at Vandalia and this suspended to stay out of the county.  The background lay in the girl, a daughter of Stevens by a previous marriage.  When the child’s mother died, he gave her to Casper.  Stevens remarried, sought his daughter back.  She did not want to come back nor did Casper want her to go back.  Under the ruling, Stevens will have to leave this community and unless some legal proceedings are brought, will have to leave his child where she is and where she wants to stay.

 

MRS. JAMES’ MOTHER DIES

             Mrs. J. B. Zuber, foster mother of Mrs. G. A. James of this city, passed away at her home in Vincennes, Ind., Saturday morning.  Mrs. Zuber was 82 years old and had been ill for several months.  Mrs. James and Mr. and Mrs. G. A. James, Jr., have been with her for the past week.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning and interment was made in a cemetery at Vincennes.

             Mrs. Zuber has many friends in this city who will be sorry to hear of her death.

 

Ida Bell Allen, colored, was indicted for the killing of Tom Butler, colored.

 

Tom Massie, colored, was indicted for the killing of a colored man at Ullin not long ago.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Aug 1939:

TWENTY YEARS FOR NEGRO FOR KILLING

             Tom Massey, colored, who shot and killed William Miles, colored, of Ullin, after a dispute over one dollar that was owed him and over five cents, in particular, was given 20 years in the penitentiary in circuit court last Friday.  Massey made his own worst witness and undoubtedly told the straight story of their previous differences, the quarrel in the tavern when he took a cake from Miles and said that Miles could apply that five cents on the dollar owed.  Miles spilled out Massey’s liquor and the two started to fight when the tavern operator separated them.  They went out together and walked part of the way together.  Massey declared Miles abused him, threatened him and so on, and he then went home, got his shotgun, met Miles and shot him.

             It was said that 14 years had been rather agreed upon for the term, but that when Judge Bradley heard the testimony, he did not think 14 years was sufficient.  The sentence of 20 years was then given.

 

MAN ELECTROCUTED SURVEYING LINES FOR R. E. A.

             When he threw a supposedly cloth tape over a C. I. P. S. electric line to measure clearance, Robert Lafferty, age 23, Caruthersville, Mo., was electrocuted Friday morning.  He was working near the McCormick farm, about two miles west of Olmsted, as he surveyed lines for the Rural Electrification Administration.

             When the tape, which was only cloth bound, hit the line, a flame ran from the point of contact to a transformer where it grounded.  Co-workers immediately gave Lafferty artificial respiration, but could not revive him.

             A coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death.  Surviving Lafferty are his parents, five brothers and two sisters, all of Caruthersville.

             (According to his death certificate, Robert Lafferty, surveyor, was born 12 Jul 1918, in Missouri, the daughter of Grover Lafferty and Dixie McCarry, natives of Missouri,  died 28 Jul 1939, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Pemiscott, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BULLET WOUND IS FATAL TO WOMAN

             Six weeks after she was shot by her lover, Mrs. Eda Mae Peeler, 19 years of age, of Frog City, died in the hospital in Cairo.  Meningitis resulted from the wound and brought death, it is reported.

             Her lover, Everett Meisenheimer, whose body was found after he had shot Mrs. Peeler, is presumed to have killed himself.

             The wound which killed Mrs. Peeler was that of a .22 caliber.  It entered the forehead and glancing from the skull, took a course down and around the left eye lodging near the surface.  She improved rapidly in the hospital, was dismissed and returned later when it became serious and was never able to leave.

 

MONETARY DIFFICULTIES LEAD TO SHOOTING BRAWL

             “Soot” Henderson and Henry Parrish, both negroes, engaged in a dispute over the ownership of a small sum of money late Wednesday afternoon, the outcome of which was the shooting of Parrish by Henderson.

             The trouble began in Roy’s tavern on Main Street, with the shooting at the rear of the tavern in the alley.  Parrish was hit in the groin by two bullets, but is not believed to be seriously hurt.

             Immediately after the altercation Henderson left town, but returned later in the evening and surrendered to officials and was lodged in the county jail.

             Henderson accidentally shot and killed his son a few years ago as he scuffled with another negro for the possession of a revolver.

             About 12 years ago, Henderson, in self-defense, killed a white man, after the latter had cut him with a pocket knife.  A jury acquitted him.

 

F. W. WILSON DIES

             Funeral services for Fred William Wilson, age 58, who passed away at his home in Mounds Wednesday night following an illness of two months, were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Friday afternoon.

             Surviving relatives include his wife, Lula; a sister, Mrs. Iona Burgress of Phoenix, Ariz.

             Rev. Earl Harp officiated at the services, with burial being made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             (His World War I draft registration states that his nearest relative was his sister, Iona Burgess of Dewater (?), Neb., and he was disqualified for service because of his left leg.  According to his death certificate, Fred William Wilson, W. P. A. carpenter, was born 4 Feb 1881, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Louis Wilson and Margret Hatfield, died 26 Jul 1939, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Lula Wilson, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FRANK FITZGERALD DIED SUDDENLY SUNDAY EVENING

             Frank J. Fitzgerald, age 63, died suddenly Sunday evening in his automobile while en route home from a picnic at Dixon Springs with Mrs. Fitzgerald and a party of friends.

             Mr. Fitzgerald was one of Alexander County’s best known road builders and also had done much levee construction.

             One of the leading Democrats of Cairo and Alexander County, Mr. Fitzgerald served on precinct committee most of the time during the last quarter of a century, and was committeeman in the Seventh Precinct at the time of his death.  He also served as city election commissioner.

             He was born in Cairo, March 25, 1876, and spent his entire life there, being educated at St. Patrick’s School there and Christian Brothers College in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

             Besides his wife, he is survived by one son, Frank, Jr., of Springfield, Ill.; a sister, Mrs. Mayme Owery of Cairo, and a brother, Ed Fitzgerald of Hartford, Conn.

             Funeral services were held at St. Patrick’s Church Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock with Rev. Bernard Pender officiating.  Burial was made in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.

             (When Frank John Fitzgerald, a farmer, registered for the draft during World War I, he lived at 2200 Pine St., Cairo, Ill., and stated he was born 25 Mar 1875.  His application for a Social Security claim has the same birthdate and lists his parents as Patrick Fitzgerald and Katherine Caraher.  According to his death certificate, Frank Fitzgerald, Sr., superintendent of W. P. A. road project, was born 25 Mar 1876, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Patrick Fitzgerald, died 30 Jul 1939, in Grantsburg, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Rose Fitzgerald, and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  Frank Fitzgerald March 25, 1875 July 30, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT DIES

             Mrs. Walter B. Huette, former resident of this city, died suddenly at her summer home in Bay View, Mich., Sunday.  Mr. Huette is ill in a hospital.

             Funeral services were held in St. Louis Wednesday morning and burial was made in St. Louis.

             (Her death certificate states that Margaret B. Huette was born 24 Jan 1861, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Patrick Smith and Bridget Mahoney, natives of Ireland, died 30 Jul 1939, in Bear Creek Township, Bay View, Emmet Co., Mich., wife of Walter B. Huette, and was buried at St. Louis, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. ROSETTA S. CONANT DIES

             T. P. Conant of Villa Ridge received word Monday of the death of his mother, Mrs. Rosetta S. Conant, in Costa Mesa, Calif.  She had been ill over a year and was 92 years of age at her death.  Mrs. Conant was a resident of Villa Ridge for many years.

             Three sons in this vicinity survive, T. P. of Villa Ridge,  Edward of Tamms and Gordon of Grand Chain.  A number of grandchildren including Miss Alice Conant of Cairo and Mrs. Whayne Durbin of Villa Ridge and one great-grandchild also survive her.

             (The California Death Index states that Rosetta S. Conant was born about 1848 and died 31 Jul 1939, in Orange Co., Calif.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CHARLIE ROSE DIES IN PERKS

             Charlie Rose, age 80 years, 8 months and five days, passed away at his home in Perks Thursday morning.  He was the son of Henry and Elizabeth Rose, born in Hardin County, Illinois, on November 22, 1858.

             He was united in marriage to Grace Ellis on May 16, 1888, at Golconda, Illinois, and she preceded him in death on October 24, 1936.  To this union three children were born, John and Katie having preceded him in death a number of years ago, and David, who resided in Perks, Illinois.  He also leaves a niece, Mrs. Lula Churchill of Perks, who was reared in his home as a daughter; three grandchildren, Carl, Flora Belle and Glenda Sue, all of Perks; one brother, George of Salmon City, Idaho; one sister, Mrs. John Coker of Harrisburg, Illinois, and a host of other relatives and friends.

             Mr. Rose had been a resident of Perks for thirty-six years and made many friends while engaged in the mercantile business there.  Mr. Rose served one term as county commissioner.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with burial in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Golconda.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiated.

             (Charles C. Rose married Grace Ellis on 16 May 1888, in Pope Co., Ill.  John W. Coker married H. Addie Rose on 1 Oct 1885, in Hardin Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Charles Rose, retired merchant, of Perks, Ill., was born 22 Nov 1858, in Elizabethtown, Ill., the son of Henry Rose, a native of Elizabethtown, Ill., and Elizabeth Whiteside, a native of Illinois, died 27 Jul 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Grace Rose, and was buried in I. O. O. F. cemetery in Golconda, Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Funeral services were held for Fred Wilson, who died Thursday at his home in Mounds, at the Ryan Funeral Home Saturday.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Aug 1939:

F. W. Wilson

             Fred William Wilson, age 58, passed away at his home here July 26, at 10:45 o’clock following a long illness.

             Surviving are his wife, Lulu; and one sister, Mrs. Iona Burgess of Phoenix, Ariz.

             Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with Rev. Earl Harp officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with J. T. Ryan Funeral Service in charge.

 

John Fellnagel

             Funeral services for John Fellnagel, who passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Friday, was held at Karcher’s Funeral Home Sunday afternoon with Rev. J. W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, officiating.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.  Casket bearers were Fred Brinkmeyer, Leonard Brinkmeyer, George Becker, Paul Carey, Otto Serbian, and Jake Steger.  Karcher’s Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (John Fellnagel married Alice Barton on 19 Apr 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Fellnagel was born 10 Aug 1866, in Cairo, Ill., died 28 Jul 1939, in Cairo, Ill., widower of Alice Fellnagel, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Uncle John Fellnagel 1866-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Rosetta S. Conant

             Mrs. Rosetta S. Conant passed away at the home of her daughter, Miss Sarah Conant, in Costa Mesa, Calif.  She had been confined to her bed since February 7, 1938.

             Mrs. Conant was born October 10, 1847, in Barre, N.Y.  On January 29, 1870, she was married to John Haywood Conant, who passed away in March 1917.  Mr. and Mrs. Conant were residents in Villa Ridge for a good many years.

             Besides her daughter, Miss Sarah, are four other daughters, Lyda and Edith, who were with her when she died, Grace and Mrs. Leslie Etter of Corning, Calif., who, with her husband, are visiting relatives in Villa Ridge; and three sons, T. P. of Villa Ridge, Edward of Tamms, and Gordon of Grand Chain.  A number of grandchildren including Miss Alice Conant of Cairo, Mrs. Whayne Durbin of Villa Ridge and Miss Flora Conant of Mounds, and one great-grandchild.

             At this writing, funeral arrangements have not been made.

 

Charles Rose

             Charles Rose, age 80, passed away at his home in Perks, July 27.

             He is survived by a son, David Rose of Perks; a sister, Mrs. John Coker of Harrisburg; and a brother, George Rose of Salmon, Idaho.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the family residence, Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Casket bearers were Henry Casper, Sylvester Davis, Alfred Davis, Pope Isom, Clarence Christian, and Aaron Casper.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Golconda.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             Mr. Rose was formerly county commissioner and was well known in Pulaski County, having lived in this vicinity for thirty-six years.

 

Caruthersville Man Accidentally Killed Friday Morning

             Robert Lafferty, age 22, of Caruthersville, Mo., was electrocuted last Friday morning near the McCormick farm, about two miles west of Olmsted, while surveying electric lines for the R. E. A.

             The accident occurred when Lafferty threw a supposedly cloth tape over the C. I. P. S. electric lines to measure the necessary clearance that would be required when the R. E. A. line crossed those of the C. I. P. S.  The tape was a new metallic type, which was cloth in appearance, but had a thin strand of wire woven into the cloth.  His coworker said he had seen Lafferty throw the tape over the wire many times, but he hadn’t noticed the type of tape that he was using.

             Witnesses and other workers said that when the tape hit the wire that flames ran from the transformer approximately one-half mile away, where it grounded.  They gave Lafferty artificial respiration, working on him for about thirty minutes, but to no avail.

             It was learned at the inquest, held by Coroner Otis Hudson at the scene of the accident, that his death was accidental and that he was employed by A. Y. Taylor & Co., who have the contract for installing the R. E. A. lines.  Lafferty had been employed by this company for eight months.

             Lafferty was born in Caruthersville, July 17, 1917.  He is survived by his parents, five brothers and two sisters, all of Caruthersville.

            

Word has been received here by Mr. and Mrs. John Hayden that their son-in-law, Mr. Heep had been killed in an auto accident Friday night.  Mrs. Heep will be remembered as Miss Maude Hayden.  Her many friends extend their sympathy in this loss.

             (This is likely Arthur C. Heap.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Aug 1939:

INFANT DIES

             Relatives in this city have received word of the death of an infant born July 23 to Mr. and Mrs. ___n Blake of Dayton, Ohio.  The baby died August 4, having been ill since birth.  Mrs. Blake is granddaughter of Mrs. Dora Coonrod of this city and spent many of her childhood days in Mound City.

 

BITE OF FIELD MOUSE FATAL

             Dale Jessing, 10 years old, living near Metropolis, died following an illness supposedly caused by the bite of a field mouse, and which was diagnosed by physicians as rabies.

             The youth was bitten by the mouse about two weeks before becoming ill and was rushed to a hospital in Paducah, where he died, following convulsions characteristic of rabies.

             (According to his death certificate, Albert Dale Jessing was born 24 Oct 1928, in Massac Co., Ill., the son of Albert Jessing, a native of Arkansas, and Emma Cozart, a native of Massac Co., Ill., died 30 Jul 1939, in Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., of hydrophobia, and was buried at Metropolis, Ill.  His brain was removed and sent to a laboratory in Illinois.  His marker in Round Spring Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Dale Jessing 1928-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GIRL DROWNS WHILE WADING IN RIVER

             Floretta Staten, age 12, drowned in the Ohio River Sunday afternoon when she stepped in a hole while wading and was swept away.  The body was recovered Monday night by Hake Knight, approximately fifty feet from where she was reported to have been seen last.

             Floretta was wading with Maxine Carter and Harry Sheppard of Mound City on Bar Beach, two miles north of Mound City, Sheppard was able to rescue the Carter girl when the trio stepped into a hole, but when he had struggled with her to shore it was too late to reach the Staten girl before she was pulled under by swift current at that point in the river.

             Dragging parties searched for the body Sunday evening and Monday until Mr. Knight found the body at 8:15 that night.  A diver, Vernon Parker, was called to the scene Monday and searched for three hours without success.  Parker declined payment, expressing a wish that the money be spent for flowers for the victim.

             The body was removed to the James Funeral Home and at the inquest a verdict of accidental death by drowning, while wading in the Ohio River, was returned by the coroner’s jury.

             Floretta was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mid Staten of Mound City, and besides her parents, she is survived by two brothers, Roy and Henry.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon with Rev. Earl Harp of Mound City officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, with G. A. James in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Floretta Staten was born 27 Feb 1927, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Mid Staten, a native of Illinois, and Eula Mae Starborn, a native of Kentucky, died 6 Aug 1939, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. Gordon Conant and family attended a memorial service funeral at Villa Ridge Monday in honor of his mother, who died in California last Tuesday, July 31. (Ohio Chapel)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Aug 1939:

Mrs. Edna Mae Peeler

             Funeral services were held at the Tamms Baptist Church Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock for Mrs. Edna Mae Peeler, who passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Wednesday morning.  Rev. Harley Vick officiated.

             Interment was made in Provo Cemetery.  Pallbearers were James Hethman, Joe Tucker, James Adams, David Smith, James Ward and James Downing.  Karcher’s Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Mound City Girl Drowns Sunday in Ohio River

             Floretta Staten, age 12 years, of Mound City, was drowned in the Ohio River Sunday afternoon, August 4, when she stepped into a hole while wading on Bar Beach, two miles north of Mound City.  Her companions were Maxine Carter and Harry Sheppard, also of Mound City.  Sheppard stated that the three of them while wading suddenly stepped into water over their heads.  Able to swim, he grasped the Carter girl who was nearest to him and struggled with her to shore.  Floretta Staten was then no longer in sight, having been drawn under by the strong current.

             Searching parties were organized but it was not until Monday night at 8:15 o’clock that Jake Knight located the body with a spike pole only about fifty feet from where the girl was last seen.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Staten residence at 4 o’clock, Rev. Earl Harp of Mound City officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Aug 1939:

MRS. MARY ROGERS DIES

             Mrs. Mary Rogers, age 76, passed away at the home of her son, Charles Rogers, in Mound City last Friday evening.

             She had been making her home with her various children for a number of years, but for the past eight months had been living in Mound City with her son.

             Surviving are three sons, Charles of Mound City, Clarence of Pekin and Louis of Quincy; a daughter, Mrs. Stella Weare of Naunie also survives her, besides numerous grandchildren and other relatives.

             The funeral was held Sunday morning in the Azotus Church located 15 miles north of Brookport in Pope County.  Interment was made in a cemetery there, with G. A. James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Philip H. Rogers married Mary Oswald on 9 Dec 1882, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary Rogers was born 7 Dec 1862, in Indiana, the daughter of Peter Oswald, a native of Switzerland, died 11 Aug 1939, in Mound City, Ill., the wife of P. H. Rogers, and was buried in Azotus Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DIES IN AUTO CRASH

             Arthur C. Heape, son-in-law of J. T. Hayden, who resides at the intersection of the blacktop and Meridian roads north of Mound City was killed in an automobile crash near East Whittier, Calif., about two weeks ago.  Mr. Heape married Miss Maude Hayden, a daughter of J. T. Hayden, about twelve years ago and has resided in the west since that time.

             Heape is survived by his widow and two small children, Edward and Beverly.

             (The California Death Index states that Arthur C. Heape was born about 1900 and died 27 Jul 1939, in Los Angeles Co., Calif.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOCAL WOMAN’S BROTHER KILLED IN TRAIN WRECK

             William Burton, negro waiter on the crack streamliner, City of San Francisco, wrecked in Nevada last Saturday night, was a brother of Mrs. Mary Johnson, negro, of this city.

             Approximately 24 were killed in the train wreck, reported to have been caused by vandals.

             The body was shipped to the home of his father in Holly Springs, Miss.  Burton had been with the Southern Pacific Railroad for about 23 years, having started as a section hand thirteen years of age.  Surviving him are his wife, a stepdaughter, father, five sisters and two brothers.

 

ATTENDS FUNERAL

             Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Schuler and daughter Roberta; Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Parker attended the funeral of Mr. Schuler’s and Mrs. Parker’s niece, Mrs. Ruth Schuler in Evansville, Ind.  The deceased was the wife of Wilburn Schuler.  Robert Schuler, Flint, Mich., a brother of Mr. Schuler and Mrs. Parker was also in Evansville to attend the funeral of Mrs. Ruth Schuler, who was his daughter-in-law.  Robert Schuler returned to this city for a visit.

 

IN MEMORIAM

             In memory of Marjorie Jones, who passed away August 20th, 1938.

The month of August again is here

             To us the saddest of the year.

It was a bitter parting, a shock severe—

             To part with one we loved so dear

God took her home.  It was his will

             But in our heart she’s with us still.

Mother, Lydia Jones

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Aug 1939:

Mrs. E. L. Peeler

             Mrs. Josephine Wood Peeler, age 47, passed away at her home in Karnak, Ill., Tuesday night at 9:20 o’clock.

             Mrs. Parker had made many friends throughout southern Illinois, having been employed at the Wilson Mercantile Store in Karnak for the past twelve years.

             Besides her husband, E. L. Peeler, she is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Wood of Karnak; a daughter, Mrs. Helen Albright of Marion, Ill.; three sisters, Ethel Madden of Seattle, Wash., Dora Peck of Karnak, and Hazel Wilson of Karnak.  Four brothers, Charles Wood of Ventura, Calif., Harry Wood and Ray Wood of Karnak, and Earl Wood of Seattle, also survive her.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Karnak Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Wright officiating.  Casket bearers were Vance Wilson, Lee Wilson, Ray Hutton, Leslie Barnett, Gilbert Heale, and Earl Throgmorton.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

 

Son-in-law of J. T. Hayden Killed in Auto Accident

             J. T. Hayden of Valley Recluse has recently received word of the death by auto accident of his son-in-law, Arthur C. Heape, age 37, of La Habra, Calif., which occurred about two weeks ago, at East Whittier, near his home.

             Mr. Heape’s wife is the former Mayde Hayden who left Southern Illinois about twelve years ago to make her home in California.  He was employed by the Standard Oil Company as a steam shovel operator and in 15 years’ service had traveled extensively.

             Mrs. Heape and two small children, Beverly and Edward, survive.

 

Mrs. Walter Ray of Anna died of a heart attack in her apartment Friday, Aug. 11.  It was believed she had been dead about two hours before she was found.  Mr. and Mrs. Ray were former residents of Mounds.

             (Her death certificate states that Viola Jane Turner Ray, practical nurse, was born 4 Aug 1909, in Ware Station, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Louie E. Turner, a native of Oakville, Ill., and Lillie Reed, a native of Cobden, Ill., died 11 Aug 1939, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., wife of Walter Ray, and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Lillie wife of Louie Turner 1894-1912 Viola wife of Walter Ray 1909-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Aug 1939:

JOHN EDWARD LEVITT SUCCUMBS TO INJURIES

             Funeral services for John Edward Levitt, age 19, who passed away at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Mary Graves, near Villa Ridge, Sunday morning were held at St. Mary’s Church in Mound City Tuesday morning and were largely attended.

             He had been severely injured June 11, in a motorcycle crash in Indio, Calif., and since being removed to Villa Ridge had been confined in bed.

             The requiem high mass was sung by Rev. C. M. Taylor, assisted by Leon and Raymond Levitt, brothers of the deceased.  Rev. Lawrence Gilmartin delivered the sermon.

             The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

             John Ed was the son of the late P. J. Levitt of Cairo.  Surviving are his mother, Mrs. Rosanna Levitt, postmaster of Villa Ridge; a sister, Rosemary; and two brothers, Leon and Raymond, all of Villa Ridge.  His grandmother, Mrs. Mary E. Graves, with whom he made his home, and many other relatives also survive him.

             Casket bearers were Charles Walder, Jack Gibson, Harold Schaffer, J. J. Travers, Carl Hunsacker and Edward Pawlisch.

             Interment was made in the family lot at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge.  Ryan Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to the death certificate, John Edward Levitt, motor truck operator, was born 16 Mar 1920, in Cairo, Ill., the son of P. J. Levitt, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Rosanna Graves, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill.,  died 20 Aug 1939, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  John E. Levitt 1920-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Ray Mowery was called to Cypress on Tuesday night to the bedside of her nephew’s wife, Mrs. Lolo Peeler, who passed away.  (Beech Grove)

             (Her marker in Cypress Masonic Cemetery reads:  Josephine Peeler Aug. 27, 1891 Aug. 15, 1939.  Her Social Security application gives her name as Josephine Wood Peeler.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Aug 1939:

John Edward Levitt

             John Edward Levitt, age 19, died at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Mary Graves, east of Villa Ridge, Sunday morning, August 20, as the result of injuries received in Indio, Calif., June 11, 1939.  He had lived in Indio for the past three years.

             John Edward was the son of the late P. J. Levitt of Cairo.  Surviving are his mother, Mrs. Rosanna Levitt, postmaster of Villa Ridge; a sister, Rosemary; and two brothers, Leon and Raymond, all of Villa Ridge; his grandmother, Mrs. Mary E. Graves, with whom he made his home; and many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock in St. Mary’s Church at Mound City, with Father Lawrence Gilmartin officiating.  Casket bearers were Charles Walder, Jack Gibson, Harold Shaffer, J. J. Travers, Carl Hunsaker, and Edward Pawlisch.  Interment was made in the family lot at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, Villa Ridge.  Ryan Funeral Service directed the funeral.

 

Walter Adams Dies Friday after Lingering Illness

             Walter Adams, well-known barber of Mounds, who had been sick for many months, died at his home on Oak Street Friday afternoon at the age of 56 years.

             Mr. Adams was born in Anna but had resided here for 31 years, having practiced the barber’s trade for 35 years.

             He is survived by his wife and three brothers, Curtis and Oscar Adams of Dongola and Ed of this city.

             Funeral services were held at the Mounds Baptist Church Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock with the pastor, Rev. Earl Throgmorton, officiating.  Interment was made in the Anna Cemetery, with Masonic rites at the grave.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

             Members of the Sunday school class of which Mrs. Adams was a member, served as flower bearers.

             He was a member of Trinity Lodge No. 562 A. F. & A. M. and of the Modern Woodmen of America.

 

Friends were greatly grieved Sunday at the news of the death of John Ed Levitt, who has suffered so intensely the past thirteen weeks since being injured in an accident while on a motorcycle in Indio, Calif.  He was removed here by his mother, Mrs. Rosanna Levitt, soon after the accident.  The many friends extend deep sympathy to the family.

 

Mrs. Sara Talbots of Freeman’s Spur, Ill., spent Monday and Tuesday at the home of Mrs. Mary Graves, called here by the death of John Ed Levitt.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Sep 1939:

I. J. RUDE DIES

             Israel Joseph Rude, age 84, passed away at his home in Grand Chain Sunday night at 11 o’clock after an illness of two weeks.

             Surviving are his wife Catherine; three children, Myrtle Watson of Davenport, Ia., Israel Rude, Jr., of Olmsted, and Leo Rude of Grand Chain.

             Mr. Rude had been a farmer in the vicinity of grand Chain all his life and a resident of Grand Chain for the past two years.  He was well known in Pulaski County.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock at St. Catherine’s Church in Grand Chain.  Burial was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Israel Joseph Rude, farmer, was born 4 Jul 1855, in Clay Co., Ill., died 27 Aug 1939, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Katherine Rude, and was buried at Grand Chain, Ill.  His marker in St. Catherine Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Israel Rhude 1855-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Sep 1939:

I. J. Rude

             Israel Joseph Rude, age 84, passed away at his home in Grand Chain Sunday night, August 27, at 11 o’clock after an illness of two weeks.

             Surviving are his wife, Catherine; three children, Myrtle Watson of Davenport, Iowa, Israel Rude, Jr., of Olmsted, and Leo Rude of Grand Chain.

             Mr. Rude had been a farmer in the vicinity of Grand Chain all his life and a resident of Grand Chain for the past two years.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock at St. Catherine’s Church in Grand Chain.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service conducting.

 

Widow of Civil War Veteran Dies at Age of 92 Years

             Mrs. Alpha Dumas, age 92 years and colored, died Sunday morning at her home in Cairo. She was born in Ballard, Ky., and was an eye witness to some of the battles of the Civil War.  She left Kentucky for Cairo at the time General Grant’s headquarters were established there.

             She was the mother of 12 children, eleven of whom are dead.  Her one surviving child, a daughter, Mrs. Azalea Dumas-Cook is principal of the Garrison Public School in Cairo.

             She was buried in the National Cemetery, two of her former pastors in the Cairo Ward Chapel A. M. E. Church, one from Baltimore, Md., the other from Peoria, assisting the present pastor in the ceremonies.

             (According to her death certificate, Alpha Dumas was born 4 Jan 1847, in Kentucky, the daughter of Jacob Rud and Sylvia Willingham, natives of Kentucky, died 31 Aug 1939, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of David Dumas, and was buried in U.S. National Cemetery at Mound City, Ill.  The interment record states she was the widow of David Dumas, private, Co. C, U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, who was buried in the cemetery 7 Nov 1895.  The interment record lists her death as 27 Aug 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Georgia Carnes

             Mrs. Georgia Carnes of Cairo, age 74, died Thursday, August 24, at an Anna hospital.

             Mrs. Carnes was the widow of the late George T. Carnes, owner of the dry goods store of that name which was located at 700 Commercial, Cairo, for many years.

             Funeral services were held in Ashley Saturday afternoon, with burial in Ashley Cemetery at the side of her husband.

             (Her death certificate states that Georgia Carnes was born 30 Dec 1864, in Ashley, Ill., daughter of George White, a native of Richview, Ill., and Mary Gore, a native of Ashley, Ill., died 24 Aug 1939, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., widow of George Carnes, and was buried at Ashley, Washington Co., Ill.

Her marker in Ashley Cemetery reads:  Georgia Carnes 1865-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Jackie Dale McClellan

             Jackie Dale, 20 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis McClellan, passed away Thursday, August 24, at the home of his parents after a short illness.

             He is survived by his parents, one brother, G. D.; his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. James Dale and Mr. and Mrs. George McClellan; and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Sunday at the Baptist church with Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with J. T. Ryan’s Funeral Service in charge.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Sep 1939:

GIRL REMAINS IN SERIOUS CONDITION

             Virginia Shelton, 19, of Cairo, remains in a serious condition in St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo, suffering from a broken pelvis, spine injuries, and other injuries of an internal nature.  Miss Shelton was injured early Sunday morning when the auto in which she was riding struck a truck being pushed along the highway near Tri-City.  Operations have been performed and blood transfusions have been given Miss Shelton.

             Edgar “Cap” Stevens, owner and driver of the car, was badly shaken up and bruised, but was able to leave the hospital after minor treatments.

             The left side of the cab of Stevens’ car, a coupe, was crashed back over the seat where Miss Shelton was sitting, when Stevens attempted to avoid the crash.  He blamed poor vision because of an approaching car, and the fact that the truck straddled the black line, for the wreck.

             The owner of the truck, Milton Wienecke, also of Cairo, denied that the truck was over the black line.  He and Eugene Deweese of Cairo were pushing the truck to Urbandale to obtain gasoline.

 

MRS. MARYANN JERDON DIES

             Mrs. Maryann Jerdon, age 65, passed away at the home of her son, William Jerdon in Karnak, last Thursday evening.

             Surviving are two sons, Cleatis of Joppa and William of Karnak; a sister, Mrs. Martha Painter, of Springfield; and a brother, John William Elon also of Springfield.

             Funeral services were held at the Wilson Funeral Home in Karnak Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Earl Throgmorton of Mounds officiating.  Burial was made in the Grand Chain cemetery with Wilson in charge.

             (W. M. Jordan married Mary Ann Elam on 12 Aug 1894, in Saline Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Mary Ann Jerdon states she was born 6 Feb 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Bolon A. Elam, a native of Boone Co., Ill., and Mary Ann Davis, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 31 Aug 1939, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of William Jerdon, and was buried at Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Mary Ann Jerdon 1874-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Sep 1939:

Brother of Luther Hodge Dies Saturday in Chicago

             Harry Hodge, brother of Luther Hodge of this city, died on Saturday, September 2, at his home in Chicago.  He had been seriously ill for some months and Mr. Hodge had visited him a number of times during his illness.

             Mr. and Mrs. Hodge drove to Anna Tuesday where they met Mr. Hodge’s sister-in-law, wife of the deceased and from there they went to Metropolis, the old home of the Hodge family, where the funeral was held.  Burial was in the Odd Fellows Cemetery near Metropolis, with nephews acting as casket bearers.

             Surviving are his wife and a number of brothers and sisters, all of whom were present at the funeral except one brother living in Colorado.

             (When he registered for the draft in World War I, he lived at 518 Metropolis St., Metropolis, Ill., and was a grocery clerk for Consumer Supply Co., on Market St. in Metropolis.  According to his death certificate, Harry Orlando Hodge, cosmetics salesman, was born 21 Feb 1877, in Pope Co., Ill., son of John Hodge, a native of Pope Co., Ill., and Sarah Bishop, a native of Kentucky, died 3 Sep 1939, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., husband of Ella Hodge, and was buried in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill.  A social Security claim filed in his name lists his parents as John Hodge and Sarah I. Bishop.  John Hodge married Sarah Isabel Bishop on 5 Nov 1865, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Paul R. Colp Dies at Home in Marion

             Friends of Mrs. Paul R. Colp, prominent clubwoman of the 25th District Federation, will be grieved to hear that her husband died at their home last Sunday afternoon of a heart ailment.  He had been confined to the home for several weeks.

             Mr. Colp was engaged in the lumber business in Marion, Johnston City and Pittsburg, Ill.  He is survived by Mrs. Colp, one sister, Mary Colp Milford of Carterville and five brothers.

             (When he registered for the draft in 1918, he lived at 903 N. Monroe, Marion, Ill., and was a mine manager for Johnston City and Deckard Land Co., of Marion, Ill.  His death certificate states that Paul R. Colp, lumber merchant, of Marion, Ill., was born 25 Jan 1879, in Carterville, Ill., the son of John Colp, a native of Franklin Co., Ill., and Dora North, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., died 3 Sep 1939, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Estelle B. Colp, and was buried in Old Rose Hill Cemetery in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Sep 1939:

JOHN UNDERWOOD DEAD

             John Underwood, who was one of the operators of the Casino some time ago and later went to McClure, died last week in St. Louis of cancer.  His funeral last week was at Carterville and burial was there.  Underwood worked in a coal mine, then operated a pool room, and then went into the wholesale business in which he went bankrupt, and later operated road houses.  He was about 50 years of age.  A grandson survives.

             (Daniel Underwood married Elizabeth Bradley on 15 Oct 1871, in Williamson Co., Ill.  This may be the same person as John W. Underwood, hotel operator at Herrin, Ill., whose death certificate states was born 13 Dec 1885, in Williamson Co., Ill., the son of Daniel Underwood and Elizabeth Bradley, natives of Tennessee, died 6 Sep 1939, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Carterville Cemetery in Williamson Co., Ill.  His marker in Oakwood Cemetery at Carterville reads:  John W. Underwood 1885-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

            

CAIRO MAN KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT

             John J. Dean, 45, salesman for the Illinois Lumber Yards, was killed Sunday morning when the car in which he was riding skidded on the curve north of Cache Village near the Mobile & Ohio railroad crossing, and after hitting the guard fence turned over, completely wrecking the car.

             Mrs. Dorothea Trainor, of Chicago, formerly of Cairo, the other occupant in the car, was bruised and cut and severely shaken up.  She was able to leave St. Mary’s Hospital Monday.

             (His Social Security application states that John Joseph Dean was born 29 Oct 1893, and died 10 Sep 1939.  William Dean married Elizabeth O’Loughlin on 27 Jan 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.  The death certificate of John J. Dean, traveling salesman, of Cairo, Ill., states he was born 29 Oct 1893, in Cairo, Ill., the son of William Dean and Eliza O’Loughlin, natives of Cairo, Ill., died 10 Sep 1939, in Cache, Alexander Co., Ill., divorced husband of Ruth Arey, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  John J. Dean Oct. 29, 1893 Sept. 10, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. T. ARMSTRONG, FORMER RESIDENT, CRITICALLY ILL

             J. T. Armstrong, a lifelong resident of Mound City until about 20 years ago when he and his family moved to Carterville, is critically ill at his home in that city.  He was stricken Tuesday evening with a paralytic stroke which had, by Wednesday morning, nearly paralyzed the entire left side. His speech, by that time, had become very thick.  He was reported Wednesday afternoon to be in a coma from which there was little chance of him rousing, the report said.

             Mr. Armstrong worked for years in the shipyard and then later had a jewelry store.  All of his family, Harry, Miss LaVern, and Ray and Tom, were born here and attended school here.  His son, Ray, who is a doctor, was to arrive Wednesday at his bedside and the other children probably came in yesterday.  Mr. Armstrong sold his jewelry store and stock about six months ago.  He was about all the time and the afternoon he was stricken he had been driving his car.

            

G. V. LANE DIES

             G. V. Lane, a well-known colored resident of Mound City, passed away at 9:15 o’clock Thursday, September 7, at his home in this city.  He has been in failing health for several years.  He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Etta Lane, three daughters and one son.

             Mr. Lane was 80 years of age and had been a resident of Mound City for more than 60 years.  He served as Captain of Co. L, 8th Illinois Volunteer Regiment in the Spanish American War.  For many years he was very active in Republican politics among the colored race.  He was county commissioner for three years and had taught in the schools of the county under the superintendency of Hester M. Smith.

             Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the A. M. E. Church in Mound City by the pastor, Rev. C. Wesley Stratton and interment was made in the National Cemetery at Mound City.  The Negro Masonic Lodge, of which he was a member, conducted their services at the grave side after which taps were sounded by Rudolphus Pryor.

             G. A. James was in charge of the arrangements.

             (George V. Lane married Laura J. Riley on 30 Mar 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate of George V. Lane states that he was born 4 May 1859, in Giles Co., Tenn., died 7 Sep 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Etta Lane, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His widow’s application for a military headstone states he was a captain in Co. L, 8th Illinois Volunteers, enlisted 28 Jun 1898, was discharged 3 Apr 1899, and was buried in Mound City National Cemetery. —Darrel Dexter)

 

HENRY ULRICH DIES AT WHEEL WHILE DRIVING CAR

             Henry Ulrich, age 49, Grand Chain farmer, died Saturday night of heart attack while driving his car from Mounds toward Mound City.

             Ulrich and two friends, Theodore Ruether and Tom Gore, both of Grand Chain, had motored to Mounds Saturday night to the Carnival.  While the three men were walking around the carnival grounds, Lewis Easter, another from Grand Chain, joined the group.  Easter said he was going to Cairo, and planned to catch the bus, but Ulrich offered to take Easter as he said he wanted to go to Cairo himself.

             Ruether, Gore, and Easter got into Ulrich’s car with Ruether in the front seat by Ulrich.  The men said Ulrich had driven about a mile when they noticed he had slumped over the wheel with one hand resting near the floor.

             Ulrich’s car began to edge over the black line.  Ruether noticed a car approaching from the south.  The driver of the oncoming car, aware that Ulrich’s car was in his lane, blew the horn.  Ruether grabbed the wheel and pulled the car back out of danger.  As he did so, Ulrich’s body fell across his lap.  Ruether turned off the ignition and let the car coast to a stop near the old road to Mounds.  The men lifted Ulrich from the car out into the air where they hoped to revive him, but to no avail.

             Ulrich’s body was taken to James Funeral Home in Mounds, where Otis Hudson held an inquest, pronouncing heart disease the cause of the death.

             Henry Ulrich was a resident of Pulaski County for many years and was a World War veteran with an outstanding record.  He had made many friends in Pulaski County.

             He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Ulrich of Grand Chain, with whom he resided; three brothers, Edward of Minckley, Ill., Lex of Grand Chain, and Mike of Ullin; four sisters, Mrs. Rose Wilmer of Cincinnati, Ohio, Mrs. Lean Schoenborn of Grand Chain, Mrs. Germain Dezonia of Dallas, Tex., and Mrs. Rella Coory also of Cincinnati.

             Funeral services were held at St. Catherine’s Church in Grand Chain Tuesday morning at 10:00 o’clock, conducted by Father Joseph Peco.

             Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery with the James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

             (Michael Ulrich married Mary Agner on 8 Mar 1886, in Jasper Co., Ill.  When he applied for the draft in 1917, Henry stated he was born 24 Oct 1890, in Boos, Ill., was a farmer at Grand Chain, Ill., and claimed exemption from service because he could “do more good on farm.”  According to his death certificate, Henry William Ulrich, farmer, was born 24 Oct 1889, in Jasper Co., Ill., the son of Michael Ulrich, a native of Jasper Co., Ill., and Mary Egner, a native of Kentucky, died 9 Sep 1939, in Road District 7, Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.  The application for a military headstone in St. Catherine Cemetery at Grand Chain states he was a private in Co. G, 119th Infantry, 30th Division, enlisting 22 Feb 1918, and was honorably discharged 14 Apr 1919.—Darrel Dexter)

 

S. A. Bankson passed away at the home of his son, Everette Bankson, Tuesday evening at 6 o’clock.  (Bryan)

             (According to his death certificate, Samuel Alonzo Bankson, invalid, was born 24 Sep 1858, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of George W. Bankson and Sarah Kennedy, died 12 Sep 1939, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Joyce Bankson, and was buried in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  Samuel Alonzo Bankson Sept. 2, 1859 Sept. 12, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ben McRaven and son Fred were killed Monday afternoon when Mr. McRaven was learning to drive and missed a bridge and had about a fourteen foot drop into a ditch of four feet of water near Mill Creek.  (Beech Grove)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Sep 1939:

Indicted

             George Gore, Jr., of Cape Girardeau, Mo., indicted recently by a grand jury investigating the death of his stepmother, Mrs. Nancy Gore of Benton, has repudiated the purported confession which he gave officers when he was held in jail.  Gore is held in the Benton jail without bond.

 

Grand Chain Farmer Dies While Driving Car

(Contributed)

             Henry “Harry” Ulrich, age 49, Grand Chain farmer, died suddenly of a heart attack Saturday night about 8:30 while driving his car from Mounds en route to Cairo.

             Ulrich and two friends, Theodore Ruether and Tom Gore, both from Grand Chain, had driven to Mounds Saturday night to attend the carnival.  While they were walking around the grounds, Lewis Easter, also of Grand Chain, joined the group.  Easter told his friends that he had started to Cairo and would have to catch a bus, but Ulrich said that he would take Easter, because Ulrich wanted to go to Cairo.

             The men got into Ulrich’s car with Ruether sitting beside Ulrich in the front seat.  After they had gone about a mile Ruether noticed that Ulrich was lying over the steering wheel with his hand resting near the floor, but he supposed that he was fixing something under the dashboard so he didn’t pay particular attention until he saw a car approaching from the south.

             During this interval Ulrich’s automobile had begun to edge over the black line and the driver of the oncoming car, aware that a crash was inevitable unless Ulrich’s auto got back into its own lane, blew the horn as he approached.  The men in the car now thoroughly aware that something was wrong told Ulrich to pull back into his lane, but they got no response, so Ruether grabbed the wheel and pulled the car back out of danger.  As he did so, Ulrich’s body fell across his lap, making it impossible to place his foot on the brake, so Ruether turned off the ignition and let the car coast to a stop near the old road to Mounds.  They immediately got Ulrich out into the air, but to no avail.

             The body was taken to James’ Funeral Home in Mounds where Coroner Otis Hudson held an inquiry pronouncing the cause of death as heart disease.

             Ulrich, a World War veteran with an outstanding record, has many friends in Pulaski County and the surrounding territory.

             He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Ulrich of Grand Chain, with whom he resided; three brothers, Edward of Minckley, Lex of Grand Chain and Mike of Ullin; four sisters, Mrs. Rose Wilmer of Cincinnati, Ohio, Mrs. Lean Schoenborn of Grand Chain, Mrs. Germain Dezonia of Dallas, Texas, and Mrs. Rella Coory also of Cincinnati.

             Funeral services were held at St. Catherine Church in Grand Chain, Tuesday morning at 120:00 o’clock.  They were conducted by Father Joseph Peco.

             Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery with the James Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

 

Marion Editor Dies

             Samuel Knox Casey, 74, editor of the Marion Evening Post and assistant secretary of the Illinois State Teachers’ Pension Fund, died Sept. 12.

             Editor Casey was stricken with an attack of heart disease about two weeks ago at Springfield and returned to his home in Marion Sept. 10.  A second, fatal attack occurred Tuesday.

             He became affiliated with the Egyptian Press, a weekly paper, in Marion in 1895, and was one of the founders of the Evening Post, a daily, in 1905.

             Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Laura Belle Skaggs, of Marion, and two grandchildren.

             (Samuel Knox Casey married Anna B. Stilley on 16 Feb 1887, in Williamson Co., Ill.  According to the death certificate of Samuel Knox Casey, newspaper editor, of Marion, Ill., he was born 6 Mar 1865, in Lake Creek, Ill., the son of Jesse m. Casey and Cynthia Binkley, natives of Lake Creek, Ill., died 12 Sep 1939, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Annie Belle Stilley Casey, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Marion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sister of Mrs. W. L. Toler Dies at Home of Daughter

             Mrs. Mary Ada Whitney, widow of Manley L. Whitney of Grayville, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Andrus, in Mt. Carmel early Monday morning, Sept. 11.  Some ten years ago she fell on an icy street and broke her hip.  Since that time she had been unable to walk and had spent her days in a wheel chair.  Her fortitude was great; she met life and even death with a smile and without complaint.

             She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. James W. Andrus of Mt. Carmel, Mrs. Clarence Lee Nancy of Grayville and Mrs. LeRoy Brown of Deming, New Mexico; two sons, Wallace Whitney of Crawleyville, Ind., James Whitney of Grayville, and seven grandchildren; also one sister, Mrs. W. L. Toler of Mounds, who is the last remaining member of a family of seven whose parents were Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Henry Blood of Grayville.

             Funeral services were held in Grayville Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with burial in Oak Grove Cemetery.

             (Manley L. Whitney married Mary A. Blood on 28 Mar 1883, in Edwards Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Mary A. Whitney states she was born 18 Aug 1862, in Grayville, Ill., daughter of Sylvester H. Blood and Prudence J. Hicks, natives of New York, died 11 Sep 1939, in Mount Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill., widow of Manley L. Whitney, and was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in Grayville, Edwards Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mary Ada Whitney 1862-1939 Manley L. Whitney 1860-1928.—Darrel Dexter)

 

S. A. Bankson

             S. A. Bankson, age 81, died Tuesday evening, Sept. 12, at the home of his son near Olmsted.  Mr. Bankson had been an invalid for a number of years.

             Surviving are one son, N. E. Bankson of Olmsted; a daughter, Mrs. Muriel Bunch of Cairo; and a sister, Mrs. Jane Royall of Villa Ridge; also seven grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held in the Christian church at Pulaski Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Norris officiating.  Interment was made in Liberty Cemetery with George Crain Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

 

Capt. G. V. Lane

             Capt. G. V. Lane (Colored) died at his home in Mound City Thursday night at 9 o’clock at the age of 80 years.  He had been a resident of Mound City for more than 60 years.  He served as captain of Co. K, 8th Illinois Volunteer Regiment in the Spanish-American War, and was very active in Republican politics among the colored race.

             Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the A. M. E. church in Mound City by the pastor, Rev. C. Wesley Stratton and interment was made in the National Cemetery.  The colored Masonic Lodge of which he was a member conducted their services at the grave side after taps were sounded by a bugler.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Titus, Mrs. G. E. Chance, Mrs. Seth Titus and Mrs. Dewey Mahoney were called to Fulton, Ky., Thursday on account of the death of a Mr. Milster, who formerly lived on Spencer Heights.  Death was due to injuries sustained at Reel Foot Lake Sunday, Sept. 3.

             (According to his death certificate, Delbert M. Milster, messenger for United Fruit Dispatch, of 509 Eddings St., Fulton, Ky., was born 5 Jan 1900, in Perry Co., Mo., son of Leonard Milster and Elizabeth Zykiksi, natives of Missouri, died 6 Sep 1939, in Fulton Hospital in Fulton Co., Ky., of fracture of 4th and 5th cervical vertebrae, while diving struck his head at a public swimming beach in Lake Co., Tenn., husband of Anna Spring, and was buried at Cape Girardeau, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Sep 1939:

J. T. ARMSTRONG DIES

             J. T. Armstrong, age 71, passed away at his home in Carterville Sunday night after a short illness following a stroke of paralysis.

             Mr. Armstrong was a resident of Mound City until about 17 years ago when he and his family moved to Carterville.  He worked for years in the shipyard in Mound City and later established a jewelry store.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Dora Hunter Armstrong; three sons Harry, an optometrist in Champaign, Ray, a physician in Champaign, and Tom, an attorney in Decatur, Ill.; one daughter, Miss LaVern, an instructor in the commercial department of the Carterville High School; a sister, Mrs. G. William of Pasadena, Calif.; and one brother, Charlie, of Peoria; besides three children.

             Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday at 2:00 o’clock.  Interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds, at 4:00 o’clock.

             After leaving Mound City, where both he and his wife were born, Mr. Armstrong conducted a jewelry store in Carterville and continued this until some six months ago when he retired.  His health had been failing for a number of years and he had suffered several light strokes before the final one fell on Tuesday of last week.

             The Armstrong family kept up their friendships here in Mound City after leaving here.  At the cemetery friends of the family and relatives from Charleston and Memphis gathered to pay their respects.

             This is the first death in the Armstrong family and had he lived until Dec. 30 of this year, they could have celebrated their golden wedding.

            

The remains of Paul Burgess, 19, were brought here from Vienna September 16, and interred in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  Paul was born and raised here (Wetaug).  He was killed by falling rock at a quarry near Vienna.

             (A death certificate states that Paul Sissom Burgess, common laborer, was born 7 Jun 1915, in Illinois, the son of Charles Francis Burgess and Myrtle Sissom, natives of Illinois, died 14 Sep 1939, in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 10, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

There were more than 600 attended a double funeral of Ben and son, Fred, McRaven, who were killed on Monday of last week on the Elco and Mill Creek Road.  The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon in the Methodist church in Elco.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Mumford, George Mumford and Mrs. Frank Dexter attended the funeral of S. A. Bankson in Pulaski, Thursday afternoon.

 

WILBUR JACKSON

             Wilbur Jackson, age 28, passed away at his home in Mound City Thursday night at 10:30 o’clock following a prolonged illness.

             Mr. Jackson was born and reared here and received his education in Mound City.  He was a valuable member of the Crain Manufacturing Co. in this city for some time.  He was later connected with the Tri-City Transportation Co., but for the past few years his health has kept him from his duties.

             Surviving are his wife, Mildred; a daughter, Marilyn Ruth; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Horace Jackson; and three sisters, Mrs. Helen Painter of Conchas Dam, New Mexico, Mrs. Bertha Crain of Mound City, and Mrs. Lottie Bright of Rising Sun, Ind.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church in Mound City Sunday afternoon at 2:00 with the pastor, Rev. J. W. Henderson, officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             The following served as casket bearers:  Ray Jackson, Walter E. Schnaare, Glenn Jackson, Carl Layton Harry Layton and Lawrence Paul.  G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, Wilbur Jackson, laborer, was born 7 Sep 1911, in America, Ill., the son of Horace Jackson and Minnie Britt, natives of America, Ill., died 14 Sep 1939, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mildred Jackson, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. ADDIE GREER

             Mrs. Addie Greer, age 72, passed away at her home in Karnak, Friday afternoon after an illness of three months.  Mrs. Greer had made her home in Karnak for the past 50 years.

             Surviving are two nephews, S. E. Culver and Roy Culver, of Metropolis; and two nieces, Mrs. N. T. House of Grand Chain, and Mrs. William Halstonberg of Karnak.

             Funeral services were held at the Karnak Methodist church Sunday morning at 10:00 o’clock with Rev. S. E. Wright officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Belknap.  Pallbearers were Fred Reed, O. A. Davis, Owen Kean, J. T. Roller, Ambrose Keistler and Louis Johnson.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

             (T. A. Greer married Adda Culver on 1 Mar 1888, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Addie Greer was born 8 Sep 1867, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of John Culver, a native of Kentucky, died 15 Sep 1939, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of F. A. Greer, and was buried in Road District 10, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Belknap Masonic Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Wife Addie Greer 1868-19  Husb’d Asberry Greer 1860-1933 Gone, but not forgotten.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Sep 1939:

Wilbur Jackson

             Wilbur Jackson, age 28 years, died Thursday night, Sept. 14, at his home in Mound City after a long illness.

             He is survived by his wife, Mildred; a daughter, Marilyn Ruth; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Horace Jackson; and three sisters, Mrs. Helen Painter of Canchas, Dam, New Mexico, Mrs. Bertha Crain of Mound City, and Mrs. Lottie Bright of Rising Sun, Ind.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church, Mound City, Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. James Henderson, pastor, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, with G. A. James directing.  Casket bearers were Ray Jackson, Walter E. Schnaare, Glenn Jackson, Carl Layton, Lawrence Paul and Harry Layton.        

 

Mrs. Addie Greer

             Mrs. Addie Greer, age 72, passed away at her home in Karnak Friday afternoon, Sept. 15, after an illness of three months.  Mrs. Greer had made her home in Karnak for the past 50 years.  She spent the last four winters at her home in Florida.

             Surviving are two nephews, S. E. Culver and Roy Culver, of Metropolis; and two nieces, Mrs. N. T. House of Grand Chain and Mrs. William Halstenberg of Karnak.  Gene McGill made his home with family during their stay at Karnak.

             Funeral services were held at the Karnak Methodist Church Sunday afternoon at 10 o’clock with Rev. S. E. Wright officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Belknap.  Pallbearers were Fred Reed, O. A. Davis, Owen Kean, J. T. Roller, Ambrose Keistler and Louis Johnson.  Wilson Funeral Service had charge of arrangements.

 

J. J. Shafter

             Funeral services for J. J. Shafter, 42, formerly of Cairo, who died Tuesday at Eldorado as the result of injuries received while he was working with switching crew for the Illinois Central Railroad there, were held Friday at East St. Louis and were largely attended.  High Mass was conducted at St. Patrick’s Church by Fr. Peter Byrns, assisted by Fr. John Hays of Cairo and Fr. George Lally, formerly of Cairo.  Fr. Bernard Pender of Cairo preached the sermon.  Burial was in Mt. Carmel Cemetery at East St. Louis.

             The pallbearers were his fellow railroad workers and the floral offerings were many and beautiful, being sent from Cairo, Carbondale, East St. Louis, Benton and Eldorado.  His aged father, J. J. Shafter, Sr., and his sister, Mrs. Frances Hogancamp, returned to Cairo today.  His son, Joe Jim Shafter, Cairo High School student, who broke his shoulder Monday, was unable to attend.—Cairo Evening Citizen

             (Jacob Shafter married Mary Grant on 8 Feb 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Joseph J. Shafter, veteran and brakeman, of East St. Louis, Ill., was born 5 Oct 1897, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Jacob J. Shafter, a native of Illinois, and Mary A. Grant, a native of Ireland, died 12 Sep 1939, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., husband of Clara Shafter, and was buried in Mt. Carmel Cemetery, at East St. Louis, St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Sep 1939:

CARL CHOSSIER KILLED

             Carl Choisser, former state representative from this district, an attorney and publisher of the Benton Evening News at Benton, was shot and killed by his uncle, Dr. Gore Monday morning at Benton.  Choisser was the attorney for Dr. Gore’s son, who is charged with killing Dr. Gore’s wife and his stepmother.  Choisser was a nephew of Dr. Gore’s first wife.  The killing is said to have been due to a difference of opinions between Choisser and Dr. Gore on the defense of the son.  Dr. Gore is said to have objected and refused to pay and Choisser is said to have intended to conduct the defense as he saw it.

             Dr. Gore came from behind an automobile and fired five times, inflicting wounds which brought Choisser’s death a few hours later.  Now both father and son are in jail, the father for killing his nephew and attorney of his son and the son in jail for killing his stepmother, the wife of his father.

             (His World War I draft registration in 1917 states he was born 10 Jul 1894, in Ozark, Ill., and was a farmer at Newton, Ill. A Social Security application states that William Carl Choisser was born 10 Jul 1894, and died 25 Sep 1939.  Nancy Gore, the second wife of Dr. George Gore, was shot to death 23 Jul 1939, while sleeping on her porch.  Her stepson, George W. Gore, Jr., aged 32 years, confessed to the murder.)   

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Sep 1939:

William Calvin Wilson

             William Calvin Wilson, age 70 years, died Sunday morning, Sept. 24, at his home in the Drainage District, following an illness of several months.  He had been night watchman for the Bruce Lumber Company for the past 15 years.

             Surviving are his wife, Eva L. Wilson; four children, Mrs. Bryan Roberts of Cairo, Oscar Wilson of Cairo, Mrs. Arthur Tucker of Mounds, and Mrs. Frank Lowery, of Evansville, Ind.; two brothers, Newton Wilson of Tyler, Texas, and Jerry Wilson of Billings, Okla.; nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

             Funeral services were held at the Karcher Funeral Home in Cairo Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Wyley Lankston, pastor of the Assembly of God Church of Perks, officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds.

 

S. M. Campbell

             S. M. Campbell, age 80 years, died Saturday, Sept. 16, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Earl Walker in Murphysboro.

             Mr. Campbell, a former resident of Mounds, is survived by five sons, Oscar and E. E. Campbell of Arlington, Ky., John of Delta, Ill., Clyde of Mounds, and Sid Campbell of Olive Branch; also two daughters, Mrs. Grace Gammon of Mounds and Mrs. Earl Walker of Murphysboro; thirty-nine grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Monday following at the First Baptist Church at Delta with burial in the Delta Cemetery.

 

T. J. Lackey of Ullin Dies in Hospital Sunday

             T. J. Lackey of Ullin, age 66 years, died Sunday afternoon, Sept. 24, at the Hale-Willard Hospital in Anna.  He had been in failing health for more than a year.

             Mr. Lackey was born near Ullin and had lived in that vicinity all his life.

             He is survived by his wife, Helen Hess Lackey; one brother, W. P. Lackey of Ullin; and one sister, Mrs. Ora Wright of Crescent City, Ill.

             Funeral services were held at the family residence in Ullin Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock, the Rev. R. J. Weiss of the Ullin Methodist Church officiating, assisted by the Rev. Wilbert V. Snider of Pulaski.  Interment was made in the Jonesboro Cemetery.

             (William M. Lackey married Mary J. Palmer on 26 May 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Thomas Jefferson Lackey, farmer, of Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born 2 Feb 1873, in Ullin, Ill., the son of William Lackey and Mary Palmer, natives of Mounds, Ill., died 24 Sep 1939, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Helen Lackey, and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Thomas J. Lackey Feb. 2, 1873 Sept. 24, 1939 Helen I. Lackey April 25, 1885 Oct. 29, 1972.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Oct 1939:

DEATH CLAIMS J. A. CONNELL

             James A. Connell, age 65, passed away in a hospital in Tampa, Fla., Thursday, September 28.

             Mr. Connell was born in Marion, Ill., from there he moved to Mound City.  Here his father edited the Pulaski Enterprise from 1878 to 1903.  It was Mr. Connell’s father that gave the paper the name that it now has, The Pulaski Enterprise.

             He discontinued his schooling at an early age and entered into the newspaper business with his father in this city, and learned the newspaper business by actual experience.  Later he obtained a position with the Batton Publishing House in New York, where he did newspaper work for several years.  While in New York he was married to Bessie Hogg of Vienna, Ill., who passed away in 1926.

             In 1936 Mr. Connell moved to Mounds with his wife whom he had married in New York in 1929.  Here he resided for several years.  Later he moved to Tampa, Fla., where he made his home until death.

             Besides his wife, Oliver, and his granddaughter, Alice Stout, who were with him at the time of his death, he is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Paul Stout of Mound City; three brothers, Dana of Miami, Fla., W. I. and Roy of Mounds; one sister, Mrs. V. F. Reader of San Antonio, Texas; and a stepmother, Mrs. Mary Dishinger of Mounds, and a great aunt, Mrs. Alice Connell Barton of Chicago.

             Mr. Connell was a member of the Paramount Lodge No. 1015 A. F. & A. M., Royal Arch Masons, Order of the Eastern Star, and a member of the International Typographical Union, Local No. 16, Chicago.

             Funeral services were held at the Bay Shore Methodist Church in Tampa, Fla., at 3:00 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  Interment was made at the Orange Hill Cemetery by the Masonic Order.

             Pallbearers were from a local typographical union.

 

ALDRICH NOT INJURED

             Carl Aldrich escaped any serious injuries last Thursday when the truck which he was driving collided with another car near Memphis, Tenn., killing four Annapolis cadets.

             The word received here is that Mr. Aldrich was not blamed for the wreck, but was exonerated by the coroner’s jury.

CAIRO BANKER DIES

             Herbert C. Steinel, 54, assistant cashier at the First Bank and Trust Company of Cairo, died suddenly Monday, October 2, of a heart attack at noon.  In 1906, he was given employment at the old City National Bank and in 1907, when that institution and the Enterprise Savings Bank were merged with the First Bank and Trust Company, he accepted a position with that bank, remaining 32 years.  He was active in work in the Cairo Baptist Church.  He was a member of the Elks and Masonic lodges.  He is survived by his widow and a daughter, Mrs. H. R. Stone.

             (His World War I draft registration states that Herbert Carl Steinel, of 2607 Elm, Cairo, Ill., bank teller at First Bank & Trust Co., at 8th & Washington, Cairo, Ill., was born 20 Sep 1885.  A Social Security death claim states he died 2 Oct 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

WILLIAM A. SCHNEIDER DIES

             William A. Schneider, age 42, passed away suddenly at his home in Detroit, Mich., this morning at 4:30 o’clock following a heart attack.

             Mr. Schneider was born and reared in Mound City and received his education in the Mound City schools.  He obtained a position after graduation in the office of the New York Central in Cairo.  He was transferred in 1919 by the New York Central to Cleveland, where he continued in the service of the company.  Two years ago he was again transferred this time to Detroit, where he resided at death.

             He is survived by his wife, Beulah Parker, formerly of this city; one daughter, Miss Merita of Detroit; his mother, Mrs. Mary Schneider of Mound City; a sister, Mrs. John Starks of Cairo; and a brother, Charles of Cleveland.

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church in Mound City Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  Burial was made in Mounds cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (An application for a military headstone for Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds states William A.