Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

7 Jan. - 30 Dec. 1938

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Jan 1938:

MRS. MARTHA SMITH DIES AT HER HOME IN MOUNDS

             Mrs. Martha Smith, aged 70, died at her home on Spencer Heights north of Mounds Sunday morning.  She had resided in Mounds for the past twenty-three years.

             She leaves her husband, William H. Smith; two daughters, Pearl Smith of Mounds and Mrs. Ethel McConnell of Portland, Ore.; and two sons, Roy of Detroit and Claude of Mounds; besides a number of other relatives.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Joe Burgess of Carbondale at the G. A. James Funeral Home in Mound City, Tuesday afternoon.

             Casket bearers were John Goza, Dewey Mahoney, Seth Titus, Henry Titus, Clyde Titus, and Horace Hogendobler.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (According to her death certificate, Martha M. Smith was born 12 Feb 1867, in America, Ill., the daughter of Jacob Deahl, a native of Germany, and Sarah Jane Wilson, a native of America, Ill., died 2 Jan 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of William H. Smith, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PROF. BOOMER DIED MONDAY AT CARBONDALE

             Simeon E. Boomer, for 25 years head of the Physics and Astronomy Department at the Southern Illinois State Normal University, died last night of heart trouble following an illness of several months.  He was 63 years old.  He was well known throughout this area.

             Born and reared on a farm at Buncombe, Illinois, Mr. Boomer graduated from the Southern Illinois Normal University, married May Kaiser of Tonica, then took his A. B. and M. A. degrees at the University of Illinois.  Following two years of teaching in the rural schools of the state, eight years in the high schools, and two years at the University of Illinois Academy, Mr. Boomer came to S. I. N. U. in 1911 as head of the Mathematics Department, and was transferred two years later to the position of head of the Physics and Astronomy Department.

             Mr. Boomer was a member of the Illinois Education Association in which he held numerous offices, the Illinois Academy of Science, and was prominent in Presbyterian Church circles.  He was united with the Frist Presbyterian Church in Carbondale when a student at the Southern Illinois State Normal University.

             Renzo Muckelroy of the college faculty, who was one of a group of young professors who came to S. I. N. U. at the same time, stated of him, “I have known Mr. Boomer more than 30 years,  In school together we played the same games, we met many of the same class room problems, and in our life’s activities we shared each other’s confidence.  Mr. Boomer was a Christian from his youth.  He stood fearlessly for the things he believed to be right.  He was loyal and true to his friends.  He was a man who did his full share in building the character of the institution which he loved so well.

             “He leaves for us the duty to ‘carry on,’ and in his busy life we find a spirit and enthusiasm which will never fail.”

             Mr. Boomer is survived by his wife, a daughter, May Bernice, who is teaching in a teachers’ college in North Dakota; and a son, George, who is a student at S. I. N. U.

             (When he registered for the draft in World War I on 12 Sep 1918, he lived at 207 Harwood Ave., Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., and was a school teacher at S. I. N. U.    The registration card stated, “E is all middle name.”  His death certificate states that Simeon E. Boomer, teacher, was born 14 Oct 1874, in Buncombe, Ill., the son of George W. Boomer, a native of Indiana, and Martha Peterson, a native of Vienna, Ill.,  died 3 Jan 1938, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill. The husband of May Kaiser Boomer, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale.—Darrel Dexter)

 

EDITOR OF ANNA DEMOCRAT DIED AT HOME LAST THURSDAY

             J. L. Hammond, editor of the Anna Democrat for years and quite active in politics in earlier years, died at his home in Anna last Thursday at the age of 71.  He had been ill for the past year and confined to his home for the last four months.

             The funeral was held Sunday at Anna, attended by many of his acquaintances both near and far,

             He leaves his wife, one son, now in the newspaper; and a daughter.

             (Jackson L. Hammond, Jr., 28, bookkeeper in Anna, Ill., born in Washington Co., Md., the son of J. L. Hammond and Mary Summer, married Martha E. Aden, 21, born in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Simon Aden and Julia Thompson, on 11 Sep 1894, in Anna, Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Jackson L. Hammond, printer, was born 30 Nov 1865, in Hagerstown, Maryland, the son of Josiah Hammond, a native of Maryland, and Mary Sommers, a native of Pennsylvania, died 30 Dec 1937, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., husband of Martha Hammond. and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Jackson L. Hammond Nov. 30, 1865 Dec. 30, 1937 Martha A. Hammond Feb. 19, 1873 Dec. 29, 1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Roy Smith of Detroit was called to Mounds because of the death of his mother, Mrs. William Smith.

 

Mrs. Ethel McConnell of Portland, Ore., was called to Mounds because of the illness and death of her mother, Mrs. William Smith.

 

Rev. J. S. Dever of Christopher was here to assist Rev. P. R. Glotfelty at the funeral of Chris Bauer Saturday.

 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Atherton of Marion attended the funeral of Chris Bauer Saturday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Jan 1938:

Mrs. William H. Smith Dies Following Long Illness

             Mrs. Martha M. Smith, 70, wife of William H. Smith, passed away at her home in Spencer Heights Sunday morning, January 2, at 1:20 o’clock following an illness of several months.  She had resided in Mounds for the past twenty-three years.

             Surviving are her husband; two daughters, Miss Pearl Smith, manager of the local telephone office, and Mrs. Ethel McConnell of Portland, Oregon, who has been at her mother’s bedside the past week; two sons, Roy of Detroit and Claude of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held at the G.A. James Funeral Home in Mound City Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, the Rev. Joel Burgess of Carbondale officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             Pallbearers were John Goza, Dewey Mahoney, Seth Titus, Henry Titus, Clyde Titus and Horace Hogendobler.

 

George Fisher Dies at Home of Brother

             George Fisher, age 67 years, died at 10 o’clock a.m., January 3, at the home of his brother, Stone Fisher, where he had lived for the past seven years.  He had been ill for the past two weeks with pneumonia and complications.

             Mr. Fisher had never married.  He was called “Uncle George” by all who knew him and will be greatly missed by them.

             He was born July 25, 1870, and departed this life January 3, 1938.  Surviving are his brother, Stone Fisher; and three sisters, Mrs. J. S. Laurence of Barlow, Ky., Mrs. A. T. Owens, Wickliffe, Ky., and Mrs. Walter Dugan, Memphis, Tenn.

             Services were held at the Jones Funeral Home at Barlow, Jan. 4 at 1:30 p.m., Rev. J. T. Bagby officiating.  Interment was made in Barlow Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that George Fisher, farmer, was born 25 Jul 1870, in Bardwell, Ky., the son of James Fisher and Nannie Young, natives of Kentucky, died 3 Jan 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery in Bardwell, Carlisle Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Prof. S. E. Boomer of Carbondale Normal Dies

             Simeon E. Boomer, for 25 years head of the physics and astronomy department at the Southern Illinois State Normal University, died January 4th of heart trouble following an illness of several months.  He was 63 years old.

             Born and reared on a farm at Buncombe, Illinois, Mr. Boomer graduated from the Southern Illinois State Normal University, married Mary Kaiser of Tonica, then took his A. B. and M. A. degrees at the University of Illinois.  Following two years of teaching in the rural schools of the state, eight in high schools, and two years at the University of Illinois Academy, Mr. Boomer came to S. I. N. U. in 1911 as head of the mathematics department, and was transferred two years later to the position of head of the physics and astronomy department.

             Mr. Boomer was a member of the Illinois Education Association in which he held numerous offices, the Illinois Academy of Science, and was prominent in the Presbyterian Church circles.  He was united with the First Presbyterian Church in Carbondale when a student at the Southern Illinois Normal University.

             Renzo Muckelroy of the college faculty, who was one of a group of young professors who came to S. I. N. U. at the same time, stated of him, “I have known Mr. Boomer more than 30 years.  In school together we played the same games, we met many of the same classroom problems, and in our life’s activities, we shared each other’s confidence.  Mr. Boomer was a Christian from his youth.  He stood fearlessly for the things he believed to be right.  He was loyal and true to his friends.  He was a man who did his full share in building the character of the institution which he loved so well.

             “He leaves for us the duty to ‘carry on,’ and in his busy life we find a spirit and enthusiasm which will never fail.”

             Mr. Boomer is survived by his wife, a daughter, May Bernice, who is teaching in a teachers’ college in North Dakota, and a son, George, who is a student at S. I. N. U.

 

Editor of Anna Democrat Dies Thursday, Dec. 30

             J. L. Hammond, editor and publisher of the Anna Democrat, died at his home in Anna Thursday of last week.  He had been ill for a number of weeks.

             Mr. Hammond started his newspaper career with the Murphysboro Independent in 1891.  Later he was chief clerk at the Anna State Hospital.  In 1897 he joined the Anna Democrat staff.

             He spent four years in a clerical capacity in the office of the Secretary of State and in 1918 and 1930 he was elected to the State Legislature.

             Surviving are his wife; one daughter, Mrs. Gaylord C. Kent; and one son, Joe, assistant editor of the Democrat.

 

Many from a Distance Attend Funeral of Chris Bauer

             Among those from a distance attending the funeral of Chris Bauer, which was held from the M. E. church Saturday afternoon with burial in Thistlewood Cemetery, were:  Mr. and Mrs. Alsey Bauer and Mrs. Jack Algee of Paducah; Walter Bauer of Elizabeth City, N. C.; Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bauer, Mrs. Mary Bauer, and Leon Bauer of Golconda; Mrs. Mona Brown of St. Louis; Mr. and Mrs. Will Jenkins of East St. Louis; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Jenkins of Bridgeport; Mr. and Mrs. John Jenkins and Claude Jenkins of Carrier Mills; Mr. and Mrs. Jim Watson and Mrs. Clara Copeland of Golconda; Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Walters and Phil Walters of Anna; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. F. Doris and Mr. and Mrs. George Henley of Harrisburg; Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Webb of Carbondale.

 

E. P. Easterday of Mound City attended the funeral of Chris Bauer here Saturday afternoon.

 

B. A. Stalcup received word Tuesday of the death of a nephew, the only son of his brother, a resident of Michigan.

 

Mrs. Vernon Johnson and Miss Hazel Underwood who were here to attend the funeral of Mrs. Hattie Horner, have returned to their homes in Cuba, Mo.

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish to express our gratitude and thanks to all who in way assisted us during the recent illness and death of our beloved brother, George Fisher.

Mr. and Mrs. Stone Fisher and Family

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Jan 1938:

Mrs. Alice Mumford

             Mrs. Alice Mumford, age 77 years, died at her home near Ullin Tuesday morning at 4 o’clock, following an illness of three months.

             She is survived by her husband, George Mumford; three daughters, Mrs. Frank Dexter of Dongola, Mrs. W. A. Sharp of Santa Monica, Cal., and Mrs. James Walker of Ullin; one son, Hugh Mumford; sixteen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren; three sisters, Mrs. Laura Bankson, Mrs. Essie Reeves, and Mrs. Stella Lackey; and one brother, Glen Curry, all of Pulaski.

             Funeral services were held at the M. E. church in Ullin Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

             (George M. Mumford married Mrs. Alice Lentz on 30 May 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Peter Lentz married Nancy A. Curry on 28 Jan 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Abner C. Bankson married Laura B. Curry on 27 May 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  J. Edward Reeves, 20, farmer in Pulaski Co., Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the son of W. T. Reeves and Barbara Smoot, married Essie Curry, 21, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of James Curry and Miss Rodgers, on 6 Aug 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill. E. J. Lackey married Stella Curry on 5 Aug 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Nancy Alice Mumford was born 7 Sep 1860, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of James Curry, a native of Ohio, and Mary Moore, a native of Olmstead, Ill., died 11 Jan 1938, in Alexander Co., Ill., the wife of George Mumford.  Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Father George Mumford Nov. 22, 1858 May 16, 1942 Mother Alice Mumford Sept. 7, 1860 Jan. 11, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to extend our sincere and heartfelt thanks to our friends and neighbors for their kindness during the illness and following the death of our husband and father.  Especially do we thank our pastors, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty and Rev. J. S. Dever for their consoling words, the Gleaners Sunday School Class and the Masonic Lodge for their services, all who sent flowers, those who furnished cars, those who sang and all who in any way contributed their services at the time of our great bereavement.  Your kindness will not be forgotten.

Mrs. C. H. Bauer

Eleanor Bauer

Harry Bauer

            

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Jan 1938:

MRS. ALICE MUMFORD DIES NEAR ULLIN

             Mrs. Alice Mumford, wife of George Mumford, passed away Tuesday at 4 a.m., Jan. 11, at the home of her son, Hugh Mumford, near Beech Grove Church near Ullin.

             She suffered a stroke Sunday afternoon and never revived.

             She leaves to mourn her passing, her husband; one son, Hugh; and three daughters, Mrs. Myra Dexter of Dongola, Mrs. Grace Sharp of Santa Monica, Calif., Mrs. Alma Walker of Ullin.  Seventeen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren; three sisters, Mrs. Laura Bankson, Mrs. Estella Lackey and Mrs. Essie Reeves; and one brother, Ollen Curry, all of Pulaski, and a number of nieces and nephews, besides a host of friends.

             She was born Sept. 7, 1869, to James and Mary Curry near Pulaski.

             The casket bearers were her close friends and neighbors, Mrs. Ed Dexter, Mrs. Ben Dexter, Mrs. Arch Miller, Mrs. Ernest Mowery, and Mrs. Wayne Miller.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Ullin M. E. Church with Rev. Henderson officiating.  The Beech Grove quartet furnished music.

             Interment was in the Ullin Cemetery with W. H. Rhymer in charge.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Jan 1938:

TWO KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT AT ANNA

             Mrs. John Paul Davis, wife of the State’s Attorney of Union County, was killed instantly and Robert Shannon, son of Mayor Robert Shannon, was fatally injured in an auto accident at Anna Tuesday evening, Jan. 11.  Two other women were seriously injured while the driver, Winsted Tucker, escaped injury.

             Mrs. Davis, a bride of only a few months, was the former Miss Bit Winters.  She is survived by her husband and her mother, Mrs. Russel Dillow.

             Robert Shannon is survived by his parents.

             (Her death certificate states that Cornelia Agnes Davis was born 30 Dec 1916, in Memphis, Tenn., the daughter of Harold Winters, a native of Des Moines, Iowa, and Cornelia A. Norris, a native of Anna, Ill., died 11 Jan 1938, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., wife of John Paul Davis, and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Cornelia Winter Davis (Bit) Dec. 30, 1916 Jan. 11, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

S. A. NICHOLSON PASSES AWAY

             S. A. Nicholson, age 80, died at the home of his son, T. L. Nicholson, in Mounds, Saturday, Jan. 15th.  He leaves three sons, T. L. and D. E. Nicholson of Jackson, Mich.  Three daughters, Miss Virginia Nicholson and Mrs. H. Denton of Jackson, Mich., and Mrs. Charles Wolfe of Anderson, Ind.

             Funeral services were held at Oscar Baptist Church near Bandana, Ky., Sunday afternoon with Rev. Warford officiating.  J. T. Ryan directed the funeral.

             (His death certificate states that Samuel Alexander Nicholson, retired farmer, was born 9 Jun 1857, in Clarksville, Tenn., the son of David Nicholson, died 15 Jan 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Polly Nicholson, and was buried in Oscar Cemetery in Oscar, Ballard Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

This community (Beech Grove) was sorry to learn of the death of Mrs. Wesley Ledbetter of Ullin.  She was formerly of this place.

             (Her death certificate states that Emma L. Ledbetter was born 31 Oct 1883, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Charles Carmon and Laura Vader, died 16 Jan 1938, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Wesley Ledbetter, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Father Wesley A. Ledbetter 1880-1957 Mother Emma L. Ledbetter 1883-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Jan 1938:

Paul G. Pavey

             Paul G. Pavey, age 61 years, died very suddenly Sunday afternoon, January 16, at 5:30 o’clock, at his home, 2205 Washington, Avenue, Cairo.  He was conversing with a friend when he suddenly suffered a heart attack.

             Mr. Pavey was reared in Villa Ridge and had been a resident of Cairo for the past 30 years and a clothier for the past 18 years.  He was a member of the First Methodist Church of Cairo and was well known in both Alexander and Pulaski counties.

             He is survived by his widow; one sister, Mrs. Anna Laura Titus of this city; one brother, C. W. B. Pavey of Mt. Vernon, Ill., and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the First M. E. Church of Cairo, the Rev. W. P. McVay officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

             (George A. Pavey married Elmira J. Hoopaw on 2 Sep 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George E. Titus, 25, of Villa Ridge, Ill., married Anna Laura Pavey, 20, of Villa Ridge, Ill., on 28 Sep 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Paul George Pavey lived at 905 ½ Commercial Ave., in Cairo, Ill., and “walks with a slight limp,” when he registered for the draft in 1918.  According to his death certificate, Paul George Pavey, clothing merchant, was born 8 Aug 1876, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of George A. Pavey, a native of Buffalo, N.Y., and Elmyria J. Hoopaw, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 16 Jan 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Grayce D. Pavey, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Paul G. Pavey Aug. 8, 1876 16 Jan 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

S. A. Nicholson Dies at Home of His Son

             Samuel Alexander Nicholson, age 80 years, died Saturday morning, January 15, at the home of his son, T. L. Nicholson, on North Blanche Avenue.

             Surviving are three sons, T. L. and D. E. Nicholson of this city and Vernon Nicholson of Jackson, Mich.; three daughters, Miss Virginia Nicholson and Mrs. Herbert Denton of Jackson, Mich., and Mrs. Charles Wolfe of Anderson, Ind.

             Mr. Nicholson was born in Tennessee, but moved to Graves County, Ky., when a boy.  He came to Mounds in 1926 to make his home with his son.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Oscar Baptist Church near Bandana, Ky., the Rev. C. H. Warford officiating.  Burial was in charge of J. T. Ryan.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Jan 1938:

Mrs. O. O. Foster of Pulaski Died Saturday

             Mrs. Nora Foster, wife of O. O. Foster, a merchant of Pulaski, died Saturday morning at 8:45 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.  Her health had been failing for some time,

             Surviving are her husband; three sons, Don of Pulaski, Earl and Dallas of Chicago; one daughter, Mrs. Zelma Swanson; and a grandson, Kenneth Swanson of Chicago; one sister, Mrs. Ida Garner of Anna; two brothers, William Verble of Harlington, Texas, and Edward Verble of Dongola.

             Mrs. Foster had prepared her obituary and had planned her funeral which service was held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church of Dongola, Rev. Henry Karraker officiating.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.

             (Her death certificate records that Nora Foster was born 24 Jun 1938, in Anna, Ill., the daughter of Daniel Verble and Mary Williams, natives of Anna, Ill., died 22 Jan 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Otto O. Foster, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Nora Foster June 24, 1885 Jan. 22, 1938 Aged 52 Yrs. 6 Mos. 28 Ds.  Otto O. Foster Sept. 12, 1881 June 12, 1960 Aged 78 Yrs. 9 Mos.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Mary Graves

             Mrs. Mary Graves, age 76 years, died at her home three miles northwest of Mounds at 5:30 o’clock Saturday morning, January 22, following a long illness.  She had lived in this community all her life.

             Surviving is one son, Walter Graves, and a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Shiloh Church with Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Burial was in Shiloh Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Mary Graves was born 26 Feb 1861, in Villa Ridge, Ill., died 22 Jan 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of Albert Graves, and was buried at Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary E. Graves at Shiloh Church Monday afternoon.  She is the mother of Walter Graves.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Jan 1938:

TRANSIENT KILLED

             Raymond Castro, about 35 years of age, a transient, was almost instantly killed Sunday night about 8 o’clock near Future City when a truck driven by E. A. Butler of Mounds hit him.  Butler and Charles Price of Urbandale were in the truck going south when an oncoming car and two motorcycles tended to blind him.  It was a misty night.  He swerved his car to miss Castro, who was talking to two companions, and hit him with his right front fender.  Castro went into the air and his head struck the truck before coming to the ground.  His companions disappeared.

             (His death certificate states that Raymond Castro, of Chicago, Ill., was born about 1908, died 23 Jan 1938, at Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried at Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. GEORGE BROWN DIES

             Word was received Thursday of the death of Mrs. George Brown of Mounds.

             At press time, details were not fully learned.

             She was taken to Barnes Hospital last week to undergo an operation for tumor and died Thursday morning at 11 o’clock.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Feb 1938:

FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN PASSES AWAY

             Mrs. Stella Biggs passed away Thursday night at her home in Shaw, Miss., following a several months’ illness.

             Mrs. Biggs, who was about 53 years of age, was born and raised in Mound City, leaving here about ten years ago.  She was the daughter of the late W. L. and Annie Deahl.

             She is survived by her husband, H. A. Biggs; one daughter, Anna May; a son, Charles Harry, all of Shaw, Miss.; and a brother, Frank Deahl of Mound City; and a number of other relatives.

             The body was brought to the G. A. James Funeral Home in Mound City Saturday evening.  Services were held there Monday afternoon by Rev. A. L. Jones, pastor of the M. E. Church of Mound City.

             Interment was in the Deahl lot at Thistlewood Cemetery.

             Casket bearers were Ed Boren, Fred Boren, Claud Smith, T. S. Steers, Jesse Cunningham and Willis Edwards.

 

MRS. ELLIS BUCKLE DIES AT HER HOME NEAR VILLA RIDGE

             Tobatha Mae Buckle, 37, died at her home near Villa Ridge Thursday night.

             She and her family were residents of Mound City until the flood, when they moved to Villa Ridge.

             Surviving are her husband, Ellis; three daughters, Mrs. Geneva Buckle of Mound City and Martha Mae and Ethel Pauline of Villa Ridge; a son, Ellis, Jr., of Villa Ridge; a brother, Leon Fields, of Detroit, Mich.; one sister, Mattie Ricken of Tacoma, Wash.; and a half-sister, Maude Hicks of Benton, Ky.

             Services were at Shiloh Church Saturday morning with Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.

             The pall bearers were Charles Campbell, Walter Hooppaw, James Monan, Walter Woods, Charles Buckle, Jr., and ralph Keesee.

             Interment was in Shiloh Cemetery.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (Her death certificate states that Tobatha Mae Buckle was born 24 Mar 1900, in Marshall Co., Ky., the daughter of George Fields and Rebecca McBride, natives of Kentucky, died 28 Jan 1938, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Ellis Buckle, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. CLIDE BEATRICE BROWN PASSES AWAY AT MOUNDS

             Mrs. Clide Beatrice Brown, 27, died at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Thursday of last week, following an operation earlier in the week.

             She is survived by her husband, George; her parents, Mrs. Annie Johnson, of Granite City and Elbert Sheffer of Anna; four sisters, Mrs. Edith Hileman, Tamms, Mrs. Lucille Lessar, Johnston City, Mrs. Delores Dalhaus, Edwardsville, Mrs. Gladys Tucker, Granite City; and one brother, Lee Sheffer of Granite City.

             Mrs. Brown, a resident of Mounds for the past five years, was a devout member of the Methodist Church in Mounds.  She had many friends in Mounds and was loved by all who knew her.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon, with Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             G. A. James, Jr., was in charge.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward Eddleman of Carbondale, Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Sheffer of Anna, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sheffer of Granite City, and Mrs. Annie Johnson of Granite City attended the funeral of Mrs. George Brown at the M. E. church Sunday afternoon.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ulen and son, Fred M., and wife have returned from attending the funeral of Dan Ulen at Poplar Bluff, Mo.

             (His marker in Dexter Cemetery in Dexter, Stoddard Co., Mo., reads:  Dan Ulen Mar. 22, 1870 Jan. 25, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

This issue of the Pulaski Enterprise reprinted the obituary of Francis M. Rawlings that was copied from the 7, 14, or 21 Oct 1858, issue of The Emporium.

DEATH OF PROMINENT CITIZEN

             “Suddenly and unexpectedly Francis M. Rawlings has passed from our midst to that mysterious bourne from which no traveler returns.  His earthly pilgrimage has ended; his pulse stilled by the chilly touch of death.  We scarce can realize the solemn fact though we have stood beside and tearfully gazed upon his cold and lifeless form.  He died on Tuesday last, at 11 o’clock, a.m.

             “Mr. Rawlings was born in Shawneetown, in this state, in the year 1827, and was therefore, at the time of his death, scarcely in the prime of life.  At an early age he graduated at the Louisville Law College, and entered upon the practice of law in Southern Illinois.  This country has ever been the field of his action since he obtained the years of maturity, and in that field he readily built himself up a name both as a citizen and professional man, universally regarded as among the first.  He has occupied the position of editor, legislator, and state’s attorney—discharging the trusts of each position ably and satisfactorily, but his highest position has ever been in the affections of those who knew him.  Endowed with social qualities of the highest order, with liberality almost boundless—a soul full of the noblest emotions that could animate a human heart, none knew but to love and admire him.  We have ever been proud to recognize him as OUR friend and the ten years’ acquaintance we have enjoyed with him, has but proved that he was a friend indeed.  If the hate of one soul followed him to his death bed, we know it not.  Everywhere and by everybody he seemed loved—upon the affections of thousands he had a hold and in the memory of thousands, we can safely add, he will have a place through years and through ages.

             “A wife and little girl are left to feel most poignantly the great loss.  May heaven soften their sorrows and breathe peace and hope and joy into their now desolate and riven hearts.”

             Mr. Rawlings was one of the most prominent men of this town, and was referred to as the “founder” of the town.  Many of the older citizens of Mound City will recall the Casey Mansion and the building that was used for a school house.  Both of these he erected.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Feb 1938:

Young Matron Dies in St. Louis Hospital

             Mrs. Clide Bernice Brown, age 29 years, wife of George Brown, passed away Thursday, January 27, at Barnes Hospital, following an operation early in the week.

             She had resided in Mounds for the past five years and had been a devoted worker in the Methodist Church and Sunday school.  She will be greatly missed by her coworkers.

             Surviving are her husband, George Brown; her parents, Mrs. Anna Johnson of Anna and Elbert Sheffer of Granite City; four sisters, Mrs. Edith Hileman, Tamms; Mrs. Lucille Lessar, Johnston City; Mts. Delores Delhaus, Edwardsville; and Mrs. Gladys Tucker, Granite City; also one brother, Lee Sheffer of Granite City.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at two o’clock, conducted by the pastor, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Tobatha Mae Buckle

             Mrs. Tobatha Mae Buckle, age 37, died at her home in Villa Ridge Thursday night, January 27.  She had resided in Mound City until the flood and since that time had resided in Villa Ridge.

             Surviving are her husband, Ellis Buckle; one son, Ellis Junior; and two daughters, Martha Mae and Ethel Pauline, all of Villa Ridge and another daughter, Mrs. Geneva Buckle of Mound City; one brother, Leon Fields, Detroit, Mich.; one sister, Mrs. Mattie Ricken, Tacoma, Wash.; one half-sister, Mrs. Maude Hicks, Benton, Ky.

             Funeral services were conducted Saturday morning at 11 o’clock at Shiloh Church by Rev. W. J. Ward and interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Stella Biggs

             Mrs. Stella Biggs, age 53, died at her home in Shaw, Miss., Thursday morning, Jan. 27.  The body arrived at Cairo Saturday noon and was taken to the James Funeral Home in Mound City where the funeral was held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. A. L. Jones and interment made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             Mrs. Biggs was born in Mound City and moved with her husband to Shaw, Miss., about 10 years ago.  Besides her husband, Harry A. Biggs; she is survived by a daughter, Anna May; and a son, Charles Harry; both at home; and one brother, Frank Deahl of Mound City.

 

Interesting Interview with Pioneer Resident

             In an interview with W. J. Biggerstaff, pioneer resident of Pulaski County and the first mayor of the City of Mounds, we learned a number of interesting facts about the communities of Villa Ridge, Mound City, and Mounds.

             Mr. Biggerstaff was born September 2, 1858.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Biggerstaff, lived on a farm two and one-half miles west of Villa Ridge, which was then called Valley Forge.

             His father was a large stock grower and at the time the Illinois Central Railroad was built through the county, furnished meat for the camp.

             He recounted to us incidents that his mother had told him pertaining to the Illinois Central tracks.  The deep cut at Villa Ridge was dug by hand shovels and the dirt was moved by means of wheelbarrows. The men working on the road lived in a sort of commissary camp.  His father and mother were passengers on the first train that ran from Villa Ridge to Cairo.

             When W. J. was four years old, the family moved to Mound City.  That was in 1862.  His earliest recollection of this section of the country is that it was a “black oak swamp” populated with wild turkeys, also deer, coons and other animals sought by hunters.  He remembers that during the Civil War a building in Mound City was called the Stokes House, was made into a hospital.  Wounded soldiers were brought there by boat from battlefields in neighboring states and from those even more distant and there many of them breathed their last breath.  The dead were also brought to Mound City and both those who died on the field of battle and those who were wounded in battle and died in this hospital were hauled to the cemetery, now known as the National Cemetery, on old ice barges put on wheels.  The cabins of these barges were about 40 x 200 feet in size.

             Dirt was taken from an Indian mound in Mound City and used to make a mud bridge over a road that led to Cairo.  The road wound down to the mouth of Cache River, where Cache was crossed by ferry boat.

             The first settlement near what is now Mounds was called Beechwood and was located where the Illinois Central spur to Mound City branches off from the main line.  Beechwood became an incorporated village and Mr. Biggerstaff served on the village board and later on the council of the town of Mounds which was platted by Capt. N. B. Thistlewood, serving altogether for a term of about 20 years.  He became an assistant car foreman for the Illinois Central and was an employee of that Railroad during the time of its greatest activity at this place where the Mounds yards held fifty tracks busy with switching engines hauling trains.

             He was mayor when the Central Illinois Public Service Company was granted its first franchise.  He was also a member of the Mounds school board for a number of years.

             Mr. Biggerstaff tells us that forty years ago Mound City had twelve industries along its river front.  He has lived to see many changes take place, some for the better, others for the worse, he no doubt believes.

             On September 8, 1938, he will have rounded out 90 active, useful years.  He has retained his faculties, is hale and active and continues as always to look on the bright side of life.—a mighty fine view for us all to take.

             (His marker in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds reads:  William James Biggerstaff 1856-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Feb 1938:

Charles Droge Dies Early Monday Morning

             Charles Droge, age 78 years, son of Henry and Magdalena Droge, was born in Cairo, Ill., Feb. 21, 1860, and died February 7, 1938, at 3 a.m. at his home near Mounds.  In 1888 he was united in marriage to Miss Sahara Willard, this union being blessed with 2 sons, Ed, who has always resided with his parents, and Will, who lives west of Mounds.

             Jan. 4, 1928, the family was bereaved by the loss of their dear mother, who was bed stricken five and one-half years.

             Mr. Droge was a faithful servant unto his family, was of a quiet disposition, a hard-working citizen and a loving neighbor.  He had resided near here for 55 years.

             He leaves to mourn his loss two sons, three grandsons and one sister, Mrs. W. F. Gibson, of Cairo.

             Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with interment in the Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (Charles Droge married Sarah Willard on 24 Dec 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Charles Droge, farmer, was born 21 Feb 1860, in Cairo, Ill., the son of John Henry Droge, a native of Germany, and Magdalena Lehning, a native of France, died 7 Feb 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Sarah Droge, and was buried in Villa Ridge cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sim Moseby

             Sim Moseby (col.), who was born in New Madrid, Mo., July 27, 1887, passed away in Mounds, Jan. 29, 1938.  He professed a hope in Christ in 1920 during the pastorate of Rev. O. I. Banks and later joined the Missionary Baptist Church in Cache, Ill.

             He lived a Christian life and was loved by all who knew him.

             Surviving him are:  his widow, Mrs. Mary Moseby; a daughter, Mrs. Lula Brown; two sons, George and Richard; a brother, Mr. Elim Henderson; and a sister, Mrs. Alice Fields and many friends and relatives.

             His age was 51 years, 6 months and 2 days.

 

Mound City Sued by Administrator of Estate

             A $10,000 damage suit naming the city of Mound City as defendant is on file in the office of Circuit Clerk Kenneth Robinson at Mound City.  It is being brought by Virgil E. Chambliss, administrator of the estate of Roosevelt Simms, deceased, with Charles Rice, Cairo attorney, listed as legal counsel for the plaintiff, according to the Cairo Citizen.

             The suit is an attempt to recover from the city for the death of Simms, a negro, who along with several other negroes, was drowned on January 27, 1937, between Mound City and Mounds when their boat capsized.  Simms had been working on the Mound City levees during the high water and he and other negroes had taken to a boat when the fight to save Mound City was abandoned.

             In the complaint on file it is claimed that on January 26, 1937, the day prior to Mound City’s inundation, the city entered into a contract with Roosevelt Simms by which Simms was to work as an employee of the city on the levees surrounding and protecting Mound City from overflow of flood waters.  It is pointed out that the city was then endangered by water.

             It is further claimed that Simms lived at Mounds and it was necessary for him to travel to and from work by boat.  The city, according to the complaint, promised safe and adequate transportation to and from Mounds, Simms’ home, and his place of employment, Mound City.

             It is further stated that Simms was carried to Mound City on January 27 to work by “agents and servants of the city of Mound City.”  Later, it is claimed, on the return trip, the plaintiff city “negligently and wrongfully furnished and provided unsafe transportation.”  The boat was “overcrowded by other employees” and “improperly and unskillfully managed and handled by agents and servants of the defendant city.”  It is further claimed the boat overturned as a result of the overcrowding and unskilled handling with the result that Simms was thrown into the water and drowned.

             The complaint asserts that the deceased is survived by a father, mother, John and Fannie Simms, five brothers and four sisters.

             The sum of $10,000 is prayed for the reasons set out within the complaint.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Feb 1938:

CHARLES DROGE DIES

             Charles Droge, 78, died at his home four miles west of Mounds Monday morning following a short illness.

             He was born in Cairo, but had lived in Mounds for the past 55 years.

             He is survived by two sons, Edwin C. and William, both of Mounds; three grandsons; and one sister, Mrs. William Gibson of Cairo.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday at 2 p.m. at the residence.  Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiated.

             Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

Mrs. Ethel McConnell, who was called here by illness and death of her mother, Mrs. William Smith, has returned to her home at Portland, Oregon.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Feb 1938:

Births Exceeded Deaths in County 286 to 184

             The stork is more sociable and makes more visits in this county than does Old Father Time with his reaping stick.  Little bundles in swaddling clothes make their appearance more often in homes than does the funeral wreath that adorns the doorpost.

             There were 268 to arrive last year while 184 died in the county.  The year before, 1936, the score stood 315 births to 225 deaths.

             Mounds is the place where people are born—and where they also die.  There were 105 births in that town last year and 76 deaths.  The year before there were 86 births and 76 deaths, so that the flood, if it did nothing else, brought a pickup in the stork business in Mounds in 1937.

             The ratio of boys and girls is fairly equal, but the number of twins or triplets was not learned.

 

DIED AT FULTON

             Word has been received in Mounds of the death of Mrs. Tom Parham, who died at her home in Fulton, Ky., Tuesday of this week.

             Mrs. Parham was formerly of Mounds.

             (Her death certificate states that Mrs. T. A. Parham of 2185 Fulton, Fulton Co., Ky., was born 21 Sep 1885, in Ballard Co., Ky., the daughter of William Powell, a native of McCracken Co., Ky., and Sara A. Lynn, a native of Callerville, Tenn., died 15 Feb 1938, of metastatic carcinoma of breast, liver and lungs, and was buried in Jackson, Tenn.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch Miller attended the funeral of a relative in Dongola Sunday.  (Beech Grove)

 

Mrs. Claude Hubbard has returned to her home from Sandusky where she was called on account of her mother’s death. (Grand Chain)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Feb 1938:

Former Mounds Minister Dies in Cincinnati

             Friends in Mounds have received word of the death of Rev. John P. Galvin, a former pastor of the Mounds Congregational Church, which occurred February 2, at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he has resided for a number of years.  A letter from Mrs. Galvin to Mrs. R. W. Wiedenmann brought the news of his peaceful passing.  His body was cremated, the final rites being performed in Cincinnati. Mrs. Galvin is left quite alone, as her relatives reside in Switzerland.

             The Rev. Mr. Galvin was pastor here for some time.  He owned a home on South Delaware and for a short time had an interest in a newspaper here, the Mounds Leader.  During the flood of 1927 he took many flood pictures, a number of which were put on postcards and sent to many far places.  If we remember correctly, he and his wife left Mounds about the year 1928.

 

Mrs. Thomas Parham Dies at Home in Fulton

             Mrs. Geraldine Parham, wife of Thomas Parham, died Tuesday, February 15, at her home, 110 Jackson Street, Fulton, Ky.  She had been ill for some months and underwent an operation at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, Ky., about two months ago.  She was taken to her home from the hospital the Friday preceding her death.

             Surviving are her husband and five children, three sons and two daughters.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church at Fulton at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon, with the Ladies Auxiliary of the B. of R. T. conducting their ritual.  The cortege then left for Jackson, Tenn., where services were held at 3 o’clock Thursday afternoon at the Griffin Funeral Home, with burial in the Parham lots at Jackson.

             The Parham family formerly resided in Mounds, going from here to Jackson and then to Fulton.  Mrs. C. A. McAdoo, Mrs. J. H. Johnson and Mrs. I. E. Koonce attended the services at Fulton on Wednesday.

 

Brother Dies

             John McClellan has received word of the death of his brother, Gus McClellan, which occurred in Bellington, Wash., Monday, February 14.  Funeral services were held Wednesday with interment in Chebalis, Wash., where another brother, Fred, is buried.  The deceased is a former resident of this city.

             (John P. McClelland married Martha C. Priddy on 7 Sep 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Gus McClellan was born about 1871, the son of John McClellan and Martha Preddy, and died 14 Feb 1938, in Bellingham, Whatcom Co., Wash.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Feb 1938:

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Kennedy and family and Mr. and Mrs. E. Crain attended the funeral of the former’s aunt, Mrs. Maggie Copeland, at Dongola, Monday afternoon.  (Villa Ridge)

             (William Copelan married Maggie Gandy on 25 Jul 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Maggie Copeland was born 11 Feb 1860, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of James Gandy, a native of Alabama, and Catherine Cupp, a native of Tennessee, died 20 Feb 1938, in Carbondale Township, Jackson Co., Ill., the wife of William P. Copeland, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.  Her marker in the American Legion Cemetery reads:  Father William P. Copeland 1848-1901 Mother Maggie Copeland 1860-1938 Until the day break and the shadows flee away.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Feb 1938:

DIES OF INJURIES RECEIVED WHEN RUN OVER BY CAR

(Vienna Times)

             Robert Lee Davault, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Davault, living between Cypress and Belknap, died of injuries received when his father in turning his car around in the yard at their farm home Sunday, ran over his small son.  The accident occurred about 9:30 a.m. and death ended the little fellow’s suffering at ___0 in the afternoon.  The wheel of the car passed over the abdomen of the child.

             William Davault, the father, had driven his car into the yard and was turning it around.  He did not see his small son, who was near the ____.  He backed the machine and then went forward about two feet

When his son ran to the side of his car crying and said, “Daddy, you backed the car over me.”

             (His death certificate states that Robert Lee Davault was born 2 Dec 1931, in Cypress, Ill., the son of William Davault, a native of Belknap, Ill., and Eunice Fae Mathis, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 13 Feb 1938, in Cache Township, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in West Eden Cemetery in Cache Township, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FOUGHT WITH NAPOLEON; BURIED IN ILLINOIS

             Among ten tombstones with French inscriptions that are still standing in a little known century-old cemetery in Tazewell County is one marking the grave of Jean Pierre Mougeon, who died in 1852.  According to information gathered by research workers of the Federal Writers’ Project, WPA, Mougeon was a soldier in the ill-fated army of Napoleon that marched on Moscow in 1812.

             (Jean Pierre Mougeon was born 28 Sep 1782, in Taconville, Meurthe-et-Moselle, Lorraine, France, married Catherine Jacquot on 1 Jun 1829, in Taconville, France, and died 6 Sep 1852, in Groveland, Tazewell Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

            

ARNO BRATTEN, FORMER HEAD OF MARION H.S. KNOWN HERE

             Arno Bratten, former head of the Marion Township High School, who disappeared on Tuesday of last week and whose car was found in Carbondale, still continues to be the object of search.  The car had bloodstains, hence the idea that he might have been killed or injured.

             Bratten was candidate for county treasurer four years ago and missed election by about 150 votes.  He has held several small jobs since then and was thinking of entering the political field again.  Bratten was known to teachers of this county.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Mar 1938:

JOSEPH SCOTT McRAVEN DIES

             Joseph Scott McRaven died at his home in McClure Monday at 6:00 ___.  Funeral services were held at the family residence at 2:00 p.m. ___esday.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  The ___er officiating was W. P. Mc____, assisted by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, and the people of Mounds attended were Mrs. John Newell, Mrs. Eutha Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Lentz and son, and Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Fite.

             (J. S. McRaven married Susie I. Miller on 19 Nov 1882, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Pilgrim McRaven married Elizabeth Jane Phillips on 31 Jul 1851, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, J. S. McRaven, merchant and retired farmer, was born 16 Dec 1856, in McClure, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Pilgrim McRaven and Elizabeth Phillips, a native of McClure, Ill., died 28 Feb 1938, in McClure, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Susie McRaven, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  J. Scott McRaven 1856-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ANOTHER OF MOUNDS _____ PASSES AWAY IN ST. LOUIS

             ___Edgar Clanton died at his home in St. Louis Friday morning.  He leaves his wife, five daughters, three sisters, Mrs. William Gallion, Mrs. Christine Wilson and Miss Norma Clanton of Champaign; and a brother, Sylvester Clanton of Mounds.  The body was brought to Mounds and interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

MRS. W. W. PARKER PASSES AWAY IN ST. LOUIS

             Mrs. Mary Louisa Baker, age 67, of Pulaski, passed away Saturday in a hospital in St. Louis.  She had undergone an operation at the hospital.  She had been in ill health for some time and had been operated upon before.

             Mr. and Mrs. Baker lived near Villa Ridge until recently, when they moved to Pulaski.

             Mrs. Baker is survived by her husband, William W. Baker; three sons, Chester of Bluford, Noel of Villa Ridge and Norman of Pulaski; one daughter, Mrs. Mamie Modglin of Bluford; three sisters, Mrs. Ida Scott and Mrs. Lola Mounce, both of Creal Springs, and Mrs. Stella Whedlin of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; one brother, Lonnie McCowan of Villa Ridge; nineteen grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church with Rev. E. A. Thomas officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery with Crain Funeral Service in charge.

             The casket bearers were James Curry, Claud Kinslow, Loren Kennedy, James Hooppaw, Frank Aldred and Earl Smoot.

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Mrs. Alonzo Echols of Ullin last Tuesday p.m. (Too late for last week)

             (Alonzo Echols, 22, farmer at Ullin, Ill., born in Ullin, son of Augustus Echols and Louisa C. Nickens, married Julia A. Meisenheimer, 18, of Ullin, born in Alexander Co., Ill., daughter of Moses Meisenheimer and Eliza McMellon, on 26 Apr 1892, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill.  Moses Misenhimer married Eliza McMullen on 21 Aug 1873, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Julia Ann Echols was born 1 Feb 1874, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Moses Meisenheimer, a native of North Carolina, and Eliza McMilan, a native of Illinois, died 20 Feb 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Alonzo Echols, and was buried at New Hope Cemetery near Ullin.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. F. A. File was called to McClure Tuesday by the death of her uncle, Scott McRaven.

 

Misses Norma and Eula Clanton were here to attend the funeral of the former’s brother, Edgar Clanton.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Mar 1938:

Former Mounds Man Dies in St. Louis

             Charles Edgar Clanton passed away at his home in St. Louis Friday morning, February 25, at the age of 66 years, 6 months and 10 days.

             Mr. Clanton was born at Olmstead, Ill., July 26, 1871, the son of William Jackson and Henrietta Spence Clanton.  He was a resident of this community for many years, moving to St. Louis from Mounds.

             He leaves to mourn his passing, his widow, Ida Hogue Clanton; five daughters, Mrs. Ruby O’Neil, Mrs. Helen Fravel, Mrs. Blanche Montgomery, Mrs. Henrietta McCullough and Miss Zena Clanton, all of St. Louis.  Also five grandchildren.  One daughter, Minnie, preceded him in death.  Three sisters, Mrs. Christy Ann Wilson of Pulaski, Mrs. William Gallion and Miss Norma Clanton of Champaign; and one brother, Sylvester Clanton of Mounds; and a host of relatives and friends, both in Mounds and St. Louis.

             Mr. Clanton united with the First Baptist Church of Mounds under the pastorate of Brother Spencer, later uniting by letter with the Lafayette Park Baptist Church of St. Louis.  He was an ardent and faithful worker until the end.  He had been in failing health for several years and bore his affliction with admirable courage.

             Funeral services were held at the Mullen Mortuary in St. Louis on Sunday, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Kelley.  Short services were held at the grave in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, Monday at one p.m. by Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor of the Mounds Baptist Church.  A quartette composed of Misses Grace and Letha Palmer, Arthur Palmer and Ernest Parker, all of Pulaski, sang.

             Attending the funeral, besides his immediate family, were Miss Norma Clanton, Miss Eula Clanton and William Gallion of Champaign, Mr. and Mrs. Lum Jordon and daughter, and William Palmer of St. Louis, Henry Hogan and son of Oscar, Ky., and many others from nearby towns.

 

Pulaski County Pioneer Grants Editors Interview

             Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Scanlin of Ullin graciously received us at their home Sunday afternoon and Mr. Scanlin, assisted now and then by his wife, recounted many facts of interest in the 82 years he has lived, most of which have been spent in Pulaski County.

             Born near Harpers Ferry, Virginia, February 3, 1856, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Scanlin, he was brought from the east to St. Louis when about one year old.  His mother had later told Mrs. Scanlin, who before her marriage to Thomas in 1887 was Alice Vick of Ullin, of the long and tiresome journey evidently traveled in part by rail, as she spoke of the seats in the cars being of plain boards and affording an uncomfortable place for her and her baby.

             In the early 60s the family moved to Villa Ridge and a little later to Mound City, where Mr. Scanlin’s early boyhood was spent.  His father died in 1864.

             He recalls seeing the carloads of Union soldiers as they traveled from the northern part of Illinois to Cairo through what is now Mounds, but was then only the “Junction” where the Mound City branch of the Illinois Central diverges from the main line.  They rode in box cars with long seats built along the sides and square holes cut for windows.  There was a water tank here and the trains would stop for water.  With boyish curiosity Mr. Scanlin would watch the prankish soldier boys clumber on top of the cars while the train stopped.  On one occasion, he remembers seeing a flat car loaded with huge bales of hay, which had caught on fire.  The entire contents of the water tank were poured on the hay, but to no avail.  Cordwood, about two feet long, was used for fueling the engines and it was loaded on the tenders by man power.

             On the left side of the “Junction” near where the sugar house now stands, was a large two-story house owned and occupied by William Burke, whose sister, a Mrs. Dwyer was his housekeeper. She had three sons, John, Charlies and Tom Dwyer with whom young Thomas played as a boy.  There were a few smaller houses near that of Burke and the settlement was called “Burkeville.”  

             Like Mr. Biggerstaff whom we quoted in a recent issue, Mr. Scanlin remembers the hospital in Mound City, standing on the bank of the Ohio, part of which is still in use as a canning factory.  He is not quite clear as to whether this building, which was much larger then than it now is, was erected by the Emporium Company or by the Government.  He too recalls that at a later time a hotel called the “Stokes House” occupied this same building.

             William Burke had the contract to remove to the National Cemetery the remains of the soldiers, whom were killed on nearby battlefields and had hurriedly been buried in trenches or near where they fell.  The bones were located by the use of iron hooks as thick as a man’s thumb and from four to five feet long, which were thrust in the ground here and there until they came in contact with a hard substance when digging began.  Mr. Scanlin remembers having in his hands one such hook as its use was explained to the group of boys who were playmates.  This may account, at least partially, for the large number of unknown dead buried in this cemetery—over half of the more than 5,000 now resting there.

             After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Scanlin settled in Ullin, where their sons, Frank and John Scanlin, were born and reared.  Mr. Scanlin became a skilled sawyer and was in the employ of Bell’s Lumber Co. for more than 25 years.  At one time he held a position with a company in Mound City that manufactured wooden pumps for wells and cisterns.  This company is now known as the N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., of St. Louis.  Mound City at that time was a busy manufacturing town.  That part of the town where the courthouse now stands was called “Stumptown,” and the part where the Marine Ways is located was designated as “Sleepy Hollow.”

             When asked to account for the names of the two towns, Mr. Scanlin told us of the many Indian mounds that were in this section in the early years, most of them having been leveled since.  He recalls a large mound on what is now the Gardner farm south of Ullin, formerly called the Ben Anderson farm.  A space of about an acre in size had yielded many articles such as flint arrow heads, etc.  The supposition was that the depression containing the river Cache and the bottom land around it was the original bed of the Ohio River.  Along the banks of Cache, all the way between Ullin and the mouth of the river were numerous Indian Mounds, one or two of which were within the confines of Mound City and remnants of which may still be seen.

             The first Illinois Central agent at the Junction, whom he recalls, was Silas J. Moore, who later settled at Pulaski and whose descendants still live there.  The station was but a shack at the side of the track and stood near the Junction.

             Mr. and Mrs. Scanlin are comfortable and happy in their home at Ullin, with one son and his family living next door and the other living near Villa Ridge.  They are able to enjoy the fruits of their labors in earlier years and have the respect and friendship of the entire community.

             (Thomas Scanlin married Alice Vick on 25 May 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Dangerous Prisoner at Chester Commits Suicide

             Chester—One of the most brilliant and considered most dangerous for all inmates in Menard Prison voluntarily terminated his prison sentence last week by committing suicide.  The inmate was Harold St. Clair, 35, a chemical engineer serving a 39-year sentence for the murder in June 1934, of Dr. Homer L. Meyers, wealthy Eldorado, Ill., dentist.  St. Clair died in the prison hospital Wednesday afternoon , where he had been removed the previous day upon being found in a comatose condition.  It was apparent he had taken poison.  He never regained total consciousness, nor spoke.

             (His death certificate states that Harold St. Clair, druggist, was born 11 Dec 1903, in Nuidose, Texas, died 9 Feb 1938, in Randolph Co., Ill., divorced husband of Ethel Irene Polk, and was buried at Menard Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to extend our sincere thanks to the minister, the singers, to those who sent flowers and offered cars and to all the friends who assisted us in any way following the death of our loved one, Charles Edgar Clanton.  Your great kindness will long be remembered.

Mrs. Ida Clanton and Family

Mrs. C. A. Wilson

Mrs. William Gallion

Miss Norma Clanton

Sylvester Clanton

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Mar 1938:

OLIVER WALLACE KILLED BY FALL OF BARN DOOR

             Oliver Wallace, living east of Pulaski and a resident of this county since a small boy, was fatally injured on Wednesday afternoon about 5 o’clock when a large sliding barn door fell over on him.  He died early Thursday morning in St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo.

             Mr. Wallace, who is 76 years of age, was presumed to either be trying to get one end of the door back on the track or to close the large sliding door.  No one saw the accident, and the first to reach home a few moments later found him in a semi-conscious state.  He rallied from this at times, but on arriving at the hospital a few hours later, he sank into a coma from which he never rallied.

             An inquest was held Thursday morning under Dr. Dille, coroner, with a verdict of death by accident.

             Mr. Wallace is the father of Joe Wallace of Pulaski and William Wallace of Cairo.  There are other children.  Funeral arrangements were not learned.

             (W. O. Wallace married Adema Bour on 2 Oct 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Oliver Wallace, farmer, was born 4 Mar 1862, in Boonville, Miss., the son of Joe Wallace, a native of Mississippi, died 10 Mar 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Adena Wallace, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Adena F. Wallace 1867-1941 William Oliver Wallace 1862-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Mar 1938:

FORMER RESIDENT DIES IN CARBONDALE

             Eugene Yost, 66, passed away at his home in Carbondale Friday afternoon.  He had a stroke at Thanksgiving and his death was the result of several months’ illness.

             Mr. and Mrs. Yost were former residents of this city, and Mr. Yost was engaged in the insurance business while they lived here.  Mrs. Yost was the former Miss Lizzie Carver of this city.

             He is survived by his wife; a son, Orin, of Chicago; three daughters, Gail and Valada of Carbondale and Mrs. Eunice Mueller of Streator; and two sisters, Mrs. Lily Beaupre of Mound City and Mrs. F. B. Crain of St. Louis.  Miss Gail Yost taught for several years in the Mound City Community High School and they have many friends here.

             Mr. Yost was a devout member of the Presbyterian Church, where the funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. N. Sharpe.  Interment was in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale.

             (Eugene M. Yost, 26, of Mound City, Ill., married Lizzie H. Carver, 20, of Mound City, Ill., on 31 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Eugene Mullen Yost, insurance businessman, was born 8 Aug 1871, in St. Louis, Mo., the son of Isaac Smith Yost, a native of Warren, Ohio, and Miss Mullen, a native of Ohio, died 11 Mar 1938, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., husband of Elizabeth Yost, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GEORGE E. MARTIN ILL

             George E. Martin, dean of the lawyers of this county, is ill at his home.  The exact nature of his illness was not learned, only that he had improved and Wednesday suffered a chill and a backset and his case is serious.

 

MRS. PERRY KEEFE DIES

             Mrs. Perry Keefe died at the Anna hospital Tuesday, March 8, at 2:00 o’clock.  She is survived by her husband, Perry Keefe of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. Hattie Frazier and Mrs. Mack McLaughlin; and one brother, Charles Nice, all of Toledo, Ohio.  The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at the James Funeral Home in Mounds, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the M. E. Church, officiated.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Marguerite B. Keefe was born 24 Feb 1884, in Michigan, the daughter of T. N. Habirts and Aileen Mach, natives of Canada, died 8 Mar 1938, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., wife of Perry C. Keefe, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PAUL HONNARD DIES

             Word has been received by relatives in this county of the death of Paul Honnard, who died at his home at Riverside, Calif., the first of the month.  Mr. Honnard was formerly a resident of this county and was a brother-in-law of Mrs. Millie Honnard of Mounds.

             (Paul Honnard, 21, farmer from Jonesboro, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of George Honnard and Lizzie Lingle, married Mary Lackey, 21, from Jonesboro, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of George Lackey and Emma Essex, on 11 Dec 1900, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill.  George C. Honnard, 27, attendant at the asylum in Anna, born in Boston, Mass., son of Joseph Honnard and Miss Ernstine, married on 3 Oct 1878, at the house of Paul Lingle in Union Co., Ill., Lizzie Lingle, 20, from Cobden, Ill., born in Union co., Ill., daughter of Mr. Lingle and Miss Barringer.  The California Death Index states that Paul G. Honnard died 12 Feb 1938.  This may be the same person as Paul George Honnard, who lived at R. F. D. 3, Pine Bluff, Jefferson Co., Ark., when he registered for the draft during World War I.  He was born 8 Oct 1879 and his wife was May Honnard.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR W. O. WALLACE

             The funeral services of W. O. Wallace was held Sunday afternoon in the Christian church at Pulaski.  Rev. S. A. Burgess of Carbondale officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             Mrs. Wallace died at St. Mary Infirmary in Cairo Thursday from injuries he received when a barn door fell on him at his farm near Pulaski.

 

A TRIBUTE TO A FARMER

             Pope County lost one of its leading farmers when John L. Walther recently answered his last call.  Mr. Walther, or John L. as he was known to his friends, was a life-long resident of the county.  He commenced to farm as soon as he could follow a plow and continued to put in crops until 1934, when he was 82 years old.  He purchased the forty where his home was built, soon after his marriage.  He added other tracts from time to time, until he owned 319 acres.  Much of his land was in timber when purchased, but with untiring efforts, John L. changed the forest into a farm.  Mr. Walther was a firm believer in cooperation among farmers.  He became director of the Walthersburg Mutual Fire Insurance Co., soon after it was organized and continued to serve until the time of his death.  He was also interested in the organization of the Fruit Belt Service Co., and the Producers’ Creamery.  Mr. Walther was a charter member of the Pope County Farm Bureau, always a faithful ____ improvement of farm ___ this section.

             It is with deepest ____ must say goodbye to ___ friend, but we know he ___ continue his labors in _____.

Members of Pope County Farm Bureau

             (According to his death certificate, John Ludwig Walther, farmer, was born 10 Aug 1851, in Louisville, Ky., the son of Benjamin Walther, a native of Germany,  died 11 Feb 1938, in Pope Co., Ill., the husband of Emily Hertter, and was buried in Waltersburg M. E. Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill.  His marker in Waltersburgh Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill., reads John L. Walther Aug. 10, 1851 Feb. 11, 1938 Age 86 Ys. 6 Mo. 1 D. Absent in body, But present in spirit. Emily F. Walther his wife Feb. 27, 1855 Aug. 3, 1920 Age 65 Ys. 5 Mo. 6 D.  Her toils are past.  Her work is done.  She fought the fight—the victory won.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. William Bestgen attended the Wallace funeral at Pulaski on Sunday.

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Aunt Julia Meyers in Ullin last Friday.  She had a stroke and was never conscious again.  She had made her home with Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Hart in Ullin for several years.

             (Her death certificate states that Julia R. Myers was born 13 Dec 1847, in Cape Girardeau, Mo., the daughter of John Lawrence Wood, died 9 Mar 1938, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Thomas F. Myers Died Aug. 1, 1907 Aged 55 Yrs., 5 Mos., & 5 Ds. Julia R. Myers Dec. 13, 1847 March 9, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bour, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bour, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bour, Mrs. Lena Black, Mr. and Mrs. A. Decrow, Miss Sarah Struckmeyer and F. A. Fite of Mounds attended the funeral of W. O. Wallace at Pulaski Sunday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Mar 1938:

Clarence Darrow Dies

             Clarence Darrow, most famous “attorney for the defense,” died at his home in Chicago Monday, March 14, at the age of 80 years.  He leaves his wife, a son, Paul and a sister, Mrs. Jennie Darrow Moore.

             His outstanding legal cases were a defense of Eugene V. Debs, “Big Bill” Haywood, Loeb and Leopold and John T. Scopes.

 

Infant Buried

             A stillborn baby of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Boren of Mound City was buried Sunday, March 13, in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (According to the death certificate, the unnamed male infant was stillborn 13 Mar 1938, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Fred Boren, Jr., a native of Mound City, Ill., and Crystle Jones, a native of Wickliffe, Ky.,  and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Julia Meyers of Ullin Dies at Age of 90 Years

             Mrs. Julia R. Meyers died Wednesday evening, March 9 at the home of M. G. Hart of Ullin at the advanced age of 90 years, 2 months and 26 days.

             For many years she, with her husband Thomas Meyers, was engaged in the hotel and general merchandise business in Ullin.  Mr. Meyers died a number of years ago.  With the advance of the years, “Aunt Julia” as she was called, moved from her own home to the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Hart, very dear friends of hers who tenderly cared for her until her death.

             Relatives surviving are three nieces, Mrs. Taylor Ferguson of Harrisburg, Mrs. Edna Freeze, Ullin, and Mrs. Herbert Sullivan of Cairo; two nephews, W. E. Renfro of Herrin and E. C. Buchanan of Mounds; two cousins, Mrs. Hattie Spann of Anna and Mrs. Thomas Rickslaben of Jonesboro; a foster son, Frank Massingale now with the U. S. Navy; also relatives of Mr. Meyers.

             Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at the Ullin Methodist Church, Rev. James Henderson officiating.  Pallbearers were Harold Hart, Delbert Stoner, Glenn Needham, Paul Read, Gerald Walker, and Lewis Frechette.

             (Silas H. Spann, 64, married Mrs. Harriet Cox, 37, on 3 Oct 1875, in Union Co., Ill.  Thomas M. Cox married Harriet Rendleman on 6 Nov 1856, at the house of Henry Rendleman in Union Co., Ill.  Thomas Rixlaben, 28, druggist in Jonesboro, Ill., born in Jonesboro, son of Bruno Rixlaben and Mattie Hammonds, married on 10 Oct 1894, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., Marie Boettner, 20, from Jonesboro, born in Jonesboro, daughter of Julius Boettner and Julie Neubauer.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Buchanan and daughters, Misses Julia and Louise, Mrs. William Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Vic Beisswingert attended the funeral of Mrs. Julia Meyers at Ullin Thursday afternoon.

 

Pulaski Farmer Dies from Accidental Injuries

             William Oliver Wallace of Pulaski, who was fatally injured Wednesday evening, March 9, when a heavy barn door fell on him at his farm east of Pulaski, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, at 5:30 o’clock Thursday morning where he had been taken following the accident.

             An inquest was held by Coroner C. E. Dille, testimony showing that Mr. Wallace had been found injured and only partly conscious by a daughter at the barn.  The barn door had gotten partly out of position earlier in the day and it was thought Mr. Wallace had attempted to put it in place.

             Surviving are his wife, three sons, Joe and Anthony Wallace of Pulaski, William Wallace of Cairo; two daughters, Carrie Wallace of Pulaski and Louise Wallace of Cairo.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Pulaski Christian church, Rev. Joel Burgess of Carbondale officiating.  Casket bearers were all nephews of the deceased:  John, Joe and George Crain, Henry, Frank and Robert Bour.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Margaret B. Keefe

             Mrs. Margaret B. Keefe, age 54 years, died at the Anna State Hospital Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock.  She was born and reared in Toledo, Ohio, but had resided in Mounds for the past 14 years.

             She is survived by her husband, Perry Keefe; two sisters, Mrs. Hattie Frazier of Cleveland, Ohio, and Mrs. Mack McLoughlin of Toledo, Ohio; one brother, Charles Nice of Toledo, Ohio.

             Funeral services were conducted at the James Funeral Home in Mounds Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the First M. E. Church and interment made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Tornado Strikes

             Belleville was struck by a tornado Tuesday afternoon at 4:50 o’clock and seven persons were killed while many were injured, some seriously.  O’Fallon was also hit by the tornado, with one person reported killed and others injured.

             In Dunklin County, Missouri, eight were killed and more than 200 injured.  The tornado also hit a portion of Arkansas.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Simpson and daughter Miss Evelyn and Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Hatch were called to Paducah, Ky., on account of the death of Howard Rudd, who died there Tuesday.

             (According to his death certificate, Howard H. Rudd, of 2510 Kentucky Ave., Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., fireman for the Paducah Fire Department, was born 1 Apr 1907, in Paducah, Ky., the son of R. N. Rudd, a native of McCracken Co., Ky., and Ava Holt, a native of Ballard Co., Ky., died 14 Mar 1938, at Riverside Hospital in Paducah, Ky., of paralysis of respiratory center, and was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in Paducah, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Two Illinois Central Men Killed in Collision

             George Keller, 47, of Belleville, fireman on a northbound I. C. freight train, died instantly and C. E. Ruffing, 54, of East St. Louis, engineer on the same train, succumbed five hours after a head-on collision with a southbound train two miles north of Carbondale.  Eight freight cars were demolished.

             No one on the southbound train was injured.

             Officials are reported as saying that the signal was set for the southbound train and that the northbound train was traveling so rapidly it could not stop before entering the main track.

             (George Keller married Anna Hanft on 9 Nov 1882, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  The death certificate of George Keller, fireman for Illinois Central Railroad, states that he was born 29 Jan 1891, in New Athens, Ill., the son of George Keller and Annie Hanft, died 14 Mar 1938, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., the husband of Rose Keller, and was buried in New Athens Cemetery, Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill.  His application for a military marker states he enlisted 10 May 1918, as a private in Co. C, 35th Battalion, U.S. Guards and was honorably discharged 23 Dec 1918.  When Christopher Edward Ruffing registered for the draft during World War I in East St. Louis, Ill., he stated he was born 18 Jul 1878, lived at 1115 Gaty Ave., East St. Louis, Ill., and his wife’s name was Minnie Ruffing.  According to his death certificate, Christopher E. Ruffing, I. C. R. R. engineer, was born 18 Jul 1879, in Germany, the son of Carl Ruffing, a native of Germany,  died 14 Mar 1938, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., husband of Loretta Ruffing, and was buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Newt Shaffner Dies

             Newt Shaffner, well known colored resident of Mounds, died Monday night, March 7, in a Jackson, Tenn., hospital following a surgical operation.  He was employed as fireman by the Illinois Central Railroad.  His age was 54 years.  Surviving are a mother, two sisters and a brother in Tennessee.

             Funeral services were held the following Thursday afternoon at one o’clock at St. John’s Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. J. T. Dodson, pastor.

             (According to the Tennessee Death Index, Newt Shaffner was born about 1886 in Tennessee and died 7 Mar 1938, in Jackson, Tenn.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Mar 1938:

GEORGE MARTIN IS SERIOUSLY ILL—DEATH MAY BE NEAR

             George Martin, senior lawyer of this county and a resident here for years, is at death’s door at his home.  He became ill last week and his illness soon became very serious.  He has been conscious at times for the past few days and was, Thursday, in a coma.  His son, Russell Martin, is here from Chicago, and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Blankinship were here from Arkansas, Mrs. Blankenship remaining.

 

WILLIAM DAVID DROGE

             William David Droge, age 46, died at his home 3 miles west of Mounds Sunday night at 10 o’clock.  He was a World War veteran, a member of Louis Phares Post of the American Legion and a member of the First M. E. Church of Mounds.  He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Elsie Droge; a son, Billie Junior; and a brother, Edwin C. Droge, of near Mounds.

             Funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First M. E. Church at Mounds with Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the church officiating.  Members of Louis Phares Post were his casket bearers.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

             (According to his death certificate, William David Droge, office clerk, was born 16 Feb 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Charles Droge, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Sarah Willard, a native of Illinois, died 20 Mar 1938, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Elsie Droge, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  William D. Droge Illinois Pvt. 1 cl. 132 Inf. 33 Div. February 16, 1892 March 20, 1938.  The application for a military headstone stated that he enlisted 18 Sep 1918, and was honorably discharged 29 May 1919.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Word was received here (Beech Grove) of the death of Frank Sims.  He passed away at the home of his daughter in Chicago after several months of ill health.  He was buried Friday, March 18th. (Beech Grove)

             (According to the death certificate, W. Frank Sims was born about 1872, the son of Christopher Sims and Martha Teele, and died 14 Mar 1938, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the husband of Cora Sims.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ray Mowery and Wayne Millers received word Monday of the death of Mrs. Seth Sowers of Granite City.  (Beech Grove)

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) visited with Mrs. Sil Butler at Elco Sunday.  Mr. Butler had passed away after a long illness and was buried at Dongola Monday.

             (According to his death certificate, Ollie Sylvester Butler was born 26 Jul 1902, in Boyd, Ill., the son of James Butler, a native of Fayette Co., Ill., and Eva Smith, died 18 Mar 1938 in Road District 6, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Tilda Louise Butler, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Dongola.  His marker in the American Legion Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Father Ollie Sylvester Butler July 21, 1902 Mar. 18, 1938 Mother Tilda Louise Butler June 8, 1915 April 11, 1938 Blessed are the pure in heart, For they shall see God.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. William Earle, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Jim ___ and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Raub attended the funeral of R. C. Poole at Centralia Monday.

 

R. C. Poole of Centralia died at the hospital in Centralia Saturday ___ing.  Mr. Poole was a former resident of Mounds and was a brother of Mrs. William Earle of Mounds.  The funeral was held in Centralia Monday and interment was made near Centralia.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Mar 1938:

Former Mounds Resident Dies in Centralia Hospital

             Rannie C. Poole, brother of Mrs. William Earle of this city and a former resident here, died Saturday morning, March 19, in a Centralia, Ill., hospital at the age of 64 years.  He had been in failing health for a number of years.

             Surviving are one sister, Mrs. William Earle of Mounds; one brother, Louis of Centralia; several nieces and nephews and other relatives less near.  Mrs. Poole died only last year.

             For many years Mr. Poole was an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad and worked in the Mounds yards before going to Centralia, where later he retired from active service because of ill health.  He was an active member of the Methodist Church.

             Funeral services were conducted at the Gardiner Funeral Home in Centralia, Rev. M.C. Foltz officiating, assisted by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty of Mounds.  Burial was in the Centralia cemetery.

             Residents of Mounds who attended the funeral were:  Mr. and Mrs. William Earle, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Scott, Mrs. Fred Raub, Mrs. Lydia Jenkins, Rev. and Mrs. P. R. Glotfelty and Clarence Beedle.

             (According to his death certificate, Randolph C. Poole, railway switchman, was born 10 Aug 1872, in Patoka, Ill., the son of William H. Poole and Julia Mundy, died 19 Mar 1938, in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill., and was buried in Hillcrest Cemetery in Centralia, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William Droge Died Sunday Following Long Illness

             William David Droge, age 46 years, died Sunday night, March 20, at 10:15 o’clock at his home three miles west of Mounds, following an illness of many months.

             He is survived by his wife, Elsie Kekow Droge; and one son, William (Billy) Jr.  Also one brother, Edwin C. Droge of Mounds.  His father, Charles Droge, passed away on February 7 of this year.

             Mr. Droge was a member of the Methodist Church of Mounds and also held membership in the Louis Phares Post of the American Legion.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church with Rev. P. R. Glotfelty conducting.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, members of the American Legion acting as pallbearers.  James Funeral Home was in charge.

 

Mrs. Charles F. Stern Dies at Pulaski Tuesday Eve

             Mrs. Sarah Catherine Stern, wife of Charles F. Stern, died at her home one mile south of Pulaski at 7:30 o’clock Tuesday evening, March 22.  Her age was 55 years.  She had resided in Pulaski County for 35 years.

             She is survived by her husband, Charles F. Stern; and by eleven children:  Katie, Brena, Hazel, Gus and Herman Stern and Mrs. Clara Little of Pulaski, Mrs. Freda Roche and Carl Stern of Peoria; Mrs. Maggie Buckingham of Cairo, Mrs. Olga Carlock and Mrs. Elsie Backart of Milford, Mich.  Two sisters, Mrs. Esther Duckworth of Deer Creek, Okla., and Mrs. Ella Baker of Golden Town, Ky.; two brothers, John Shumaker of Grand Chain and Mark Shumaker of Birmingham, Ky., and several grandchildren also survive her.

             Funeral services were conducted Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Rose Hill Church in Pulaski by Rev. H. E. Dick, assisted by Rev. Wilbert V. Snider of Cairo.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

             G. A. James, funeral director, was in charge.

             (John Shoemaker married Maria Peeler on 30 Oct 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Sarah C. Shumaker married C. F. Stern on 30 Nov 1901, in McNairy Co., Tenn.  According to her death certificate, Sarah Catherine Stern was born 1 Jul 1882, in Kansas, the daughter of John Shumaker and Mariah Peeler, natives of Illinois, died 22 Mar 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Charles F. Stern, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Sarah C. Stern July 1, 1882 March 22, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Apr 1938:

WILLIAM R. ROBINSON

             William R. Robinson, age 60 years, suffered a heart attack Friday afternoon and passed away about 4 o’clock at his home in Mounds.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Division 24.  Mr. Robinson was born in Union County and was the son of the late Dr. Robinson of Ullin.  He is survived by his wife, Agnes; one son, Ernest (Jack); two sisters, Mrs. Ida George of Mounds and Mrs. Myrtle Rowe of Ullin; one brother, Ira Robinson of Mounds; a half-sister, Mrs. Naomi Carlock of Ullin; and a number of nephews and nieces.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the home in Mounds.  Rev. C. S. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational churches of Grand Chain and Mounds, officiated.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.

             J. T. Ryan directed the funeral.

             (Luther Robinson married Jane Chatham on 23 Aug 1874, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William R. Robinson, locomotive engineer, was born 21 Mar 1878, in Anna, Ill., the son of L. F. Robinson, a native of Charlotte, N.C., and Jane Chathan, a native of Ramsey, Ill., died 25 Mar 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Agnes Robinson, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  William R. Robinson 1878-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Dean of Bar of County Funeral Held Monday

             George E. Martin, who practiced law for 44 years in all in Mound City, died at his home early Saturday morning after an illness of some two weeks.  His sickness soon became serious and a week later became little less than a matter of time.

             Mr. Martin had a wide range of acquaintances in this county and in the counties of this senatorial district.  He was also acquainted at Urbana where he resided for a number of years.  Until the time he took to bed, he was quite active in law affairs and interested in things of this county and community.

             Mr. Martin was born July 7, 1865, in what is known as the Forks of the River in the edge of Franklin County, and grew up there.  He attended law school at Bloomington and passed the bar examination in 1893.  He came to Mound City in 1894 to practice law and save for the period when he was with the Federal Land Bank and was associated with the law firm of Green & Thomas at Urbana, he made this his home.

             He was twice state’s attorney of the county and spent one term in the state legislature.  He was quite active always in Republican politics and was quite loyal to this town and county.  He was a member of the Methodist Church of this city and took active part, a member of the K. of P. Lodge and was head of the Building and Loan.  By nature he was a genial man, friendly and courteous, with time to pass the day with everyone and a multitude of stories to tell.

             There survives him, his wife and one son, Russell, of Chicago; and one brother, John L., of Carbondale; and one sister, Mrs. Melvina Kirkpatrick of West Paducah, Ky.

             Funeral services were conducted here Monday afternoon at the Methodist church by Rev. Roy Kean of Granite City, a former pastor here, and Rev. A. L. Jones, assisting.  Interment was in Spencer Heights.

             Besides relatives and friends, members of the bar of both counties and a number of people from other counties were in attendance.  He leaves, besides these relatives, numerous friends who regret his passing.

             (George E. Martin, 29, of Mound City, Ill., married Ada L. Read, 22, of Mound City, Ill., on 24 Dec 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that George Ellsworth Martin, attorney, was born 7 Jul 1865, in Osage, Ill., the son of Stephen B. Martin, a native of Kentucky, and Narsissa Russell, died 26 Mar 1938, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ada L. Martin, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Apr 1938:

Attorney George E. Martin Dies at Mound City

Attorney George E. Martin died Saturday morning at his home in Mound City following a several weeks’ illness.  He was 72 years of age, having been born in Franklin County, July 7, 1865.

A graduate of Bloomington, Ill., Law School, he was admitted to the bar in 1893.  He settled in Mound City in 1894, where he has since resided with the exception of the ten years during which time he was connected with the Federal Land Bank in St. Louis and the law firm of Green and Thomas in Urbana.

Attorney Martin was a member of the Illinois State Bar Association, the Pulaski County Bar Association, Mound City Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 197 and the First M. E. Church of Mound City.  He served one term as state representative from this district; two terms as state’s attorney of Pulaski County, was recently elected to a second term as president of the Mound City Building and Loan Association, and was an assistant attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Ada Martin; one son, Russell R. Martin of Chicago; a brother, John L. Martin, of Carbondale; and one sister, Mrs. Melvina Kirkpatrick of West Paducah, Ky.

             Funeral services were held at the First M. E. Church in Mound City Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Roy N. Kean of Granite City, a former pastor of the church, assisted by Rev. A. L. Jones, the present pastor.  Interment was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             The casket bearers were Joe Lutz, Otto Betts, William Bestgen, Clyde Richey, George Eichhorn and Mike Winkler.

             A number of members of the Bar Association of Alexander and Pulaski County attended his funeral.

 

Grandmother of R. Throgmorton Dies in 89th Year

             Mrs. Margaret Murrie died Thursday, March 25, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Earl D. Veach of Vienna.  Had she lived until December 19th of this year, she would have reached her 89th birthday.  She was born in Johnson County, Dec. 19, 1849, and had spent her entire life there.  She was a member of the M. E. Casey Springs Church.

             Surviving are a son, Joe, of Florissant, Mo.; two daughters, Mrs. Veach and Mrs. Arthur Throgmorton of Carbondale, formerly of Mound City, where Mrs. Murrie often visited; several grandchildren, among them R. M. Throgmorton of Mounds, and seven great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the M. E. church of Vienna, conducted by Rev. H. G. Hurley.  Burial was in Casey Springs Cemetery, George C. Crain of Pulaski directing.

             (William F. Murry married Mary M. McFatridge on 13 Mar 1870, in Johnson Co., Ill.  P. W. McFatridge married Nicinda S. McCorkle on 1 Oct 1846, in Johnson Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Mary Margaret Murrie states that she was born 19 Dec 1849, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Preston McFatridge and Nicinda McCorkle, natives of Vienna, Ill., died 24 Mar 1938, the widow of Frank Murrie, and was buried in Casey Cemetery in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ethel Louise Clark

             Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clark of Grand Chain are mourning for their stillborn infant daughter, Ethel Louise, who was buried Friday afternoon at Ohio Chapel Cemetery near Grand Chain, with Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Ethel Louise Clark was stillborn 24 Mar 1938 in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Harry Edwin Clark and Ethel Eddleman, natives of Illinois, and was buried in Ohio Chapel Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Our Little Angel Ethel Louise Clark b & d Mar. 24, 1938 Dau. Of Harry & Ethel.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William R. Robinson Dies Suddenly, Sunday Afternoon

             William R. Robinson, age 60 years, died suddenly Friday afternoon, March 25, having suffered a heart attack shortly before his passing, which occurred at about 4 o’clock.

             Mr. Robinson, son of the late Dr. L. F. Robinson, of Ullin, was born in Union County.  He had been a resident of Mounds for 37 years having been employed during all that time by the Illinois Central Railroad Co.  He was an engineer and held membership in the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers Division 24.

             Surviving him are his wife, one son, Ernest (Jack); two sisters, Mrs. Ida George of Mounds and Myrtle Rowe of Ullin; one brother, Ira Robinson of Mounds; a half-sister, Mrs. Naomi Carlock of Ullin, and a number of other relatives, among them a nephew, Circuit Clerk K. F. Robinson.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the family residence on First Street at two o’clock, conducted by Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the Mounds Congregational Church.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Funeral Services for Mrs. Hugh Rhymer This Afternoon

             Funeral services for Mrs. Hugh L. Rhymer, a former Mounds resident, who died at 10 o’clock Wednesday in an East St. Louis hospital, will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Mounds M. E. church.

             Mrs. Rhymer is a sister of Arvle Sowers of this city.  She leaves her husband, one daughter and two sons, besides other relatives.

             (Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mother Bertha Rhymer Sept. 30, 1888 Mar. 30, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Infant Dies

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Calvin of Boston, Mass., who was born Friday, March 25, lived only four hours.  Mrs. Calvin before her marriage was Miss Edna Schuler.

 

Mrs. W. A. Hamilton visited her cousin, Mrs. Clara Bour and attended the funeral of William Robinson.

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of William Robinson Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. William Sexton of Kankakee, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Kuegler and Jack Kuegler of East St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bame of Carbondale, and Mrs. W. A. Hamilton of Gale.  There were also a number of Illinois Central engineers, old friends of Mr. Robinson.

 

Miss Ellen Sweet and Miss Wilda George returned to St. Louis Monday evening accompanied by Mrs. Maude Sweet, having come here (Ullin) to attend the funerals of William Robinson of Mounds and Attorney George Martin of Mound City.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Apr 1938:

FATHER OF MALCOLM LENTZ DIES  

             Harrison Lentz, age 47, died at his home in Coulterville, Ill., Saturday night at 11:30 o’clock after a short illness.  He is survived by his wife; three sons, Malcolm, an attorney at Mounds, Maurice and James of Coulterville; his mother, Mrs. John Newell of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Jesse Walker of East St. Louis; his father, Joe Lentz of Ullin; and five half-brothers also survive.

             The family moved from Mounds four years ago to Coulterville where Mr. Lentz was clerk for the Illinois Central Railroad.

             The body was brought to Mounds Monday and taken to the home of Malcolm Lentz and the funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the M. E. church.  Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             The casket bearers were former I. C. clerks.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

             (Joseph H. Lentz married Mary P. Whitaker on 18 Mar 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Benjamin Harrison Lentz, railroad clerk, was born 5 Oct 1888, in Elco, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Joe Lentz and Mary P. Whitaker, natives of Elco, Ill., died 2 Apr 1938, in Coulterville, Randolph Co., Ill., husband of Anna L. Lentz, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Benjamin H. Lentz 1888-1938 Anna L. Lentz 1890-1968.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT DIES

             Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Grace Perrine, which occurred on March 18th, at her home in Chicago.  Mrs. Perrine was formerly Miss Grace Kellogg of this city.  She is survived by two sons, and one daughter, Mrs. Adelaide Hoagland, who has visited here with her mother on several occasions.

 

Rev. H. B. Shoaff of Sparta was in Mounds Thursday to preach the funeral of Mrs. Hugh Rhymer.

 

A number from this place (Mounds) attended the funeral of William J. Hayden at Cairo, Saturday.

             (John Hayden married Fannie A. Paris on 3 Jun 1885, in Champaign Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William J. Hayden, railroad clerk, was born 10 Apr 1889, in Ogden, Ill., the son of John Hayden and Frances Parris, natives of Ogden, Ill., died 31 Mar 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., divorced husband of Wanda Whittenberg, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several relatives and friends from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Mrs. Hugh Rhymer of St. Louis in Mounds Friday.

 

A number from this place (Mounds) attended the funeral of Newton O’Dair at Anna Thursday.  Mr. O’Dair was a former resident of Mounds.

             (Newton J. O’Dair, 50, and Laura White, 47, both of Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., were married in June 1921 in Mississippi Co., Mo.  His death certificate states that Newton Jasper O’Dair, railroad switchman, was born 5 Jun 1869, in Council Bluffs, Iowa, the son of Mr. O’Dair and Nancy Lawson, natives of Ireland, died 29 Mar 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., divorced husband of Annie Jacobs, and was buried in Anna Cemetery in Anna, Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  N. J. ODair June 5, 1869 Mar. 29, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Apr 1938:

Funeral Services Held Tuesday for Harrison Lentz

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock at the Methodist church for Harrison Lentz, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with former Illinois Central clerks as pallbearers and G. A. James directing.

             Mr. Lentz with his family lived here for many years, the family home now being occupied by his son, Attorney Malcolm Lentz.  Some years ago the family moved in Coulterville where he was employed as clerk at the Illinois Central station.  His death occurred at his home in Coulterville Saturday night, April 2.  While he had not been in good health for some time, his last illness was short.  His age at death was 49 years.

             Surviving are his wife, three sons, Attorney Malcolm Lentz of this city, Maurice and James of Coulterville; his mother, Mrs. John Newell of this city; his father, Joe Lentz of Elco; a sister, Mrs. Jesse Walker of East St. Louis; and five half-brothers.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Apr 1938:

Charles A. Walker

             Charles A. Walker, 67, died Tuesday, April 12, at his home east of Pulaski following a long illness.  He had been a patient in a St. Louis hospital for some time, but was brought home seven weeks ago.

             At one time he had been a resident of Cairo and was a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge and the Lutheran church in that city.

             Surviving are his wife, a son, Hall Walker of Pulaski; a granddaughter; three sisters, Mrs. Hattie Hurst and Mrs. Susie Sutton of St. Louis and Mrs. Hiram Nelms of St. Petersburg, Fla.; and one brother, John Walker of Los Angeles, Calif.

             Funeral services were held at Center Church Thursday afternoon at two o’clock, the Rev. Mr. Thomas, pastor, officiating.  Burial was in Concord Cemetery.

             (Charles Walker, 26, of Olmsted, Ill., married Dazie Hileman, 19, of Olmsted, Ill., on 19 Jun 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Henry N. Walker married Jane A. Littleton on 9 Jul 1865, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Charlie Adams Walker, farmer, was born 21 Jul 1870, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Henry Walker, a native of North Carolina, and Jane Littleton, died 12 Apr 1938, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Daisy Walker, and was buried in Concord Cemetery near Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Apr 1938:

BRATTEN CASE INTERESTING

             The case of the murder of Arno Bratten, former head of the Marion schools, once president of the Rotary Club and prominent in the Southern Illinois Teachers’ Association, now the Educational Association of Southern Illinois, has grown increasingly more interesting and brutal as more details have come out.  Bratten recently traveled for a book concern.

             Bratten, who disappeared Feb. 14 and whose car, with bloody seats, was found in Carbondale, was found last week in Crab Orchard Creek west of Marion.  He had been beaten and killed, a broken jaw, broken nose, slashed throat, stabs in the chest and had been a victim of an operation for emasculation.

             Additional things coming to light include the story of a plan to go to Mexico where he would secure a divorce from his wife and the “woman” would also secure a divorce from her husband.  A Marion paper published this week, that a relative of Bratten, who had been interested in the case, had received warnings to cease his activities or severe penalties might be expected.

             (His World War I draft registration states that Arno Bratten was a teacher in Marion Township High School and lived at 527 E. Everett, Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., with his wife, Louella Bratten.  His death certificate states that Arno Bratten, salesman, was born 8 Jul 1879, in Creal Springs, Ill., the son of William Bratten, a native of Liberty, Tenn., and Susan Borum, a native of Creal Springs, Ill., died 14 Feb 1938, in Road District 9-3, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Louella Bratten, and was buried in Cana Cemetery in Creal Springs, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

S. J. MICHELSON DEAD

             S. J. Michelson, operator of a jeweler and merchandising store in Cairo and in Paducah, widely known, died in Paducah early Monday morning.  An infection of an old head injury received in an automobile wreck brought about his death.

             (His death certificate states that Simon J. Michelson, of Madison Apartments, was born 6 Feb 1879, in Louisville, Ky., died 11 Apr 1938, at the I. C. Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., of staphylococci septicemia abscess of scalp and was buried in Temple Israel Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

VIENNA MERCHANT DEAD

             David Rosenberg, lifelong resident of Vienna, and a follower in the footsteps of his father in the mercantile business, died last week in Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, according to the Vienna Times.  The paper further states that it is the wish of Rosenberg that his business be continued on until his boy, now 12 years of age, can take charge and continue it through to the third generation.  The funeral was Friday afternoon and was conducted by Rabbi Seinsilver, Rev. J. B. Jones and Rev. H. G. Hurley.  Interment was under Masonic rites at the Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (When he registered for the draft during World War I, David Rosenberg, a salesman for Fair Mercantile Co., in Vienna, Ill., stated he was born 26 Sep 1888, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill.  He said his mother was dependent on him for support, but the registrar wrote, “mother has ample property.”  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  David Rosenberg 1888-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TAVERN ROW IN CAIRO BRINGS DEATH TO ONE

             Fred Cross, 37, World War veteran, died early last Sunday morning as a result of injuries received in Cairo in a fight which seems to have most of its beginning in liquor from one of the taverns.  The man held for the killing is George Stout, 26, who said that he was attacked.  However, before the attack, it seems that Cross and Stout’s sister had had some words.  Stout maintained that Cross attacked him and that he was hit first.  Witnesses testified that Stout jumped upon the head of Cross when he was down and threatened to whip anyone who interfered.  Cross died an hour or so later.

             (His death certificate states that Fred George Cross, of Cairo, Ill., a Coca Cola bottler, was born 20 Mar 1899, in Barlow, Ky., the son of John S. Cross, a native of Pope Co., Ill., and Ione True, a native of Barlow, Ky., died 10 Apr 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Ione Bemis Cross, and was buried in Wickliffe, Ballard Co., Ky.  His marker there reads Fred G. Cross Mar. 20, 1899 Apr. 9, 1938 Ky. Pvt. 1 C 2 MG BN 1st Div.  The application for a military marker states he enlisted 24 Apr 1917, was honorably discharged 27 Sep 1919, and died 9 Apr 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Apr 1938:

Louis M. Cox Dies Thursday at Home of His Daughter

             Louis M. Cox, age 75 years, died Thursday afternoon, April 14, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wade E. Thomas, where he made his home for the past six years.

             Mr. Cox was born in Tennessee and was a member of the Christian Church in his early manhood.

             Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Thomas of this city, and Mrs. Lester Lewis of Jonesboro, Ark.; one son, Mose Cox of Jackson, Tenn.; one sister, Mrs. Cordie Hall of Almo, Tenn.; a half-brother, R. E. Burke of Almo, Tenn.; eight grandchildren and several great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services will be held at the Thomas residence on Delaware Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Burial will be in Thistlewood Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

             (L. M. Cox and G. M. Cates made a $500 bond on 7 Dec 1889, in Crockett Co., Tenn., so he could marry Bettie Midyett.  His death certificate states that Louis Marshall Cox, retired farmer, of Mounds, Ill., was born 3 Nov 1862, in Alamo, Tenn., the son of Moses P. Cox and Jane Cates, died 14 Apr 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., of apoplexy, husband of Elizabeth Cox, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Louis M. Cox 1872-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Charlie Walker passed away Tuesday morning at his home about two miles east of Pulaski after a long illness.  (Pulaski)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Apr 1938:

EDWARD BUTLER OF MOUNDS KILLED NEAR MATTOON

             Edward Butler, a well-known resident of Mounds, was killed Thursday night when his automobile crashed into a culvert six miles south of Mattoon.  Butler was identified by papers found on his person and Mounds was called in an effort to locate relatives.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the home of his late parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Butler, in Mounds, with Rev. Glotfelty, pastor of the M. E. church officiating.  Burial was made in the cemetery at Villa Ridge.

             Edward Butler was 38 years of age, born in Villa Ridge, and leaves a sister, Mrs. Paul T. Powell, of Vienna; and a brother, residing in New York.

 

J. R. BUFORD OF CYPRESS PASSED AWAY MONDAY

             Death came peacefully and unexpectedly to Mr. J. R. Buford at the home of his son, Prof. Lester Buford, and wife in Mt. Vernon at 12:05 o’clock Monday morning.  He had been sick for about five weeks having had an attack of pneumonia.

             He is survived by five sons, E. A. Buford and J. C. Buford, Chicago; _ R. Buford, Fairbury, Ill., O. R. Buford, Springfield, Mo., J. L. Buford, Mt. Vernon; and one daughter, Mrs. Walter George.

             Mr. Buford was the father of J. ___er Buford, twice the Republican nominee for Congress from this district.

             Funeral services were held at the Cypress Methodist church Tuesday afternoon, April 12, conducted by Rev. J. W. Cummins, Rev. Harry C. ___wn and Rev. Earl Myers with music by the Cypress quartet.  Interment was made in the Cypress cemetery.  Pallbearers were sons and a son-in-law of the deceased, E. A. Buford, R. E. Buford, O. R. Buford, __ Buford, J. L. Buford and W. George.—Vienna Times

             (John R. Buford, 24, farmer at Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of Ab Buford and Cath. Barton, married Susan Hartline, 19, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of Alex Hartline and Eliz Casper, on 2 Sep 1883, in Union Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that J. R. Buford, retired farmer, was born 4 Feb 1856, in Cypress, Ill., died 11 Apr 1938, in Mt. Vernon, Jefferson Co., Ill., widower of Susie Buford, and was buried at Cypress, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOUIS N. COX PASSES AWAY

             Louis N. Cox, age 76 years, passed away Thursday of last week at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wade Thomas, in Mounds.

             Mr. Cox is survived by three children, Mrs. Thomas of Mounds, Mrs. Lester Lewis of Jonesboro, Ark., and Moses H. Cox of Jackson, Tenn.; a sister, Mrs. Cordie Hall; and a half-brother, R. E. Burke, both of Alamo, Tenn.

             Funeral services were held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wade Thomas, of Mounds, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational Church, officiated.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  James T. Ryan was in charge.

 

TWO KILLED, ONE HURT EARLY SUNDAY MORNING

             Oscar Fleming of Buncombe and Fred Edwards of Belknap were instantly killed, while Edwards daughter, Lillian, was seriously injured in an auto wreck on Route 37 just south of Olmstead about midnight Saturday.  All three were sitting in the front seat with Edwards driving.  The car, going north, passed one car and side-swiped the car of Roscoe Corzine and went out of control, hitting a concrete abutment,  Both men were killed instantly, and Lillian Edwards was found in a semi-conscious condition and rushed to St. Mary Infirmary.  The men were taken to the James Funeral Home in Mound City.  Fleming suffered a crushed skull, a broken right thigh and other injuries. Edwards also suffered a skull fracture and other injuries.

             At the inquest, conducted at the funeral home Sunday morning, Corzine and his companion, Buster Hill, both of Karnak, and Robert Reichert, wife and daughter of Grand Chain, testified.

             Corzine stated that Edwards tried to pass him and in so doing struck the rear of his car throwing Hill against the windshield.  The Edwards car had by this time, hit the abutment.  Corzine went to the wrecked car where he found Edwards dead behind the steering wheel, Fleming lying half in and half out of the car and Lillian Edwards lying across Flemings’ legs.  Corzine also testified that he had not been drinking and that his car was on the right side of the black line where it belonged.

             State Highway Patrolman Elmer Leidigh, who investigated the accident, and State’s Attorney Joseph O’Sullivan, attended the inquest.  The jury’s verdict was that Edwards and Fleming came to their death as the result of an accident.

             Fleming is survived by his grandmother, Marthenia Fleming of Vienna, and several relatives.  One cousin is Claude Fleming of Mounds.  Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion Tuesday morning with Rev. Hobert Peterson of Cape Girardeau officiating.  Interment was made in the Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna.

             Edwards is survived by his wife, Marie; two daughters by a former marriage, including the one injured, and several other relatives.

             Lillian Edwards remained in the hospital at Cairo until Monday, when she was taken to her home near Belknap.  A crushed jaw and bruises and cuts were the extent of her injuries.

             (His death certificate states that Oscar Newton Fleming, farmer, was born 22 Nov 1916, in Buncombe, Ill., the son of Oscar N. Fleming, a native of Vienna, Ill., and Ruby Stout, a native of Buncombe, Ill.,  died 17 Apr 1938, in Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to the death certificate of Fred Alva Edwards, laborer, he was born 10 Jun 1894, the son of Finis and Marie Edwards, died 17 Apr 1938, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery in Road District 3, Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in Masonic Cemetery at New Columbia, Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Fred A. Edwards 1894-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN LIPE OF GRAND CHAIN KILLED HIMSELF FRIDAY

             John Lipe of Grand Chain, 61 years of age and known in both Grand Chain and Karnak, shot himself about noon last Friday at Grand Chain and died about three hours later at the home of his son, Guy Lipe, in Karnak.

             It is presumed that Mr. Lipe became despondent and discouraged.  He had spoken to a boy a few moments before he fired a shot through his own head.  People who came loaded him into a truck and he was taken to Karnak, where he died soon after arriving.

             Three children, Guy of Karnak, Blanche of Grand Chain, and Mary of Brookport, survive.  There are three sisters, Mrs. Laura Bartleson of Grand Chain, Mrs. Nina Nickley of Hudson, Mich., and Mrs. Maud Mesther of Carlevoix, Mich.  There is one brother, Frank, of Grand Chain.     

             Funeral services were Sunday at the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.

             (Rufus C. Lipe married Eliza A. Moore on 10 Jul 1862, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  J. W. Bartleson married Laura Lipe on 9 Dec 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John Lipe, laborer, was born 22 Nov 1876, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of Rufus Lipe, a native of Grand Chain, and Eliza Lipe, died 15 Apr 1938, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Edith Lipe, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

News of the death of M. C. Mescher of Cypress was received here (Grand Chain)  Tuesday morning.  Mr. Mescher is the father of Mrs. Darrel Ferguson of this place.

             (Christian Mescher married Sophia Verbarg on 26 Oct 1876, in Massac Co., Ill.  The death certificate of John Charles Mescher, mail carrier, states that he was born 14 Sep 1878, at Round Knob, Ill., the son of Christian Mescher, a native of Round Knob, Ill., and Sofia Verharge, died 19 Apr 1938, in Cypress village, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Mary Mescher, and was buried at Cypress, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Apr 1938:

Auto Accident Tragedies Piling Up in This Section

             With two women killed and three others injured in an auto accident which occurred near McClure late Friday afternoon, April 15, and two men killed and a girl injured in another accident which occurred just after midnight Saturday night, on Route 37 one mile south of Olmstead, the death toll for this section is growing space.  These four deaths, coupled with death of Edward Butler from the same cause on Thursday night near Mattoon, are bringing home to the people in this section the horror of death by accident on the road.

             The dead in the McClure tragedy are Mrs. Clarence Baugher, 24, mother of two children, and Mrs. Harvey Pope, 35, both killed instantly when their car driven by Mrs. Pope, collided with a truck driven by Harvey Jones of Caruthersville, Mo., at the intersection of Route 3 (150) and the East Cape Girardeau road at McClure.  Mrs. John Glaub and her two children who were also in the car, were seriously injured.  The truck driver was absolved of blame as the coroner’s jury found that Mrs. Pope did not make the required boulevard stop.

             The fatalities in the Pulaski County accident occurred when a car driven by Fred Edwards, 43, of Belknap and also occupied by his daughter, Lillian, age 17, and Oscar Fleming, 21, of Buncombe, struck the rear end of another car while Edwards was trying to pass this car, driven by Roscoe Corzine of near Karnak.  Edwards sideswiped the Corzine car and then the Edwards car, while out of control, struck a concrete abutment, killing both Edwards and Fleming and seriously injuring Lillian Edwards.  The girl was rushed to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where she was found to be in a serious condition, but there is hope for her ultimate recovery.

             It is reported that Fleming, a cousin of Claude Fleming of this city, was at Clancy’s place and when Edwards and his daughter stopped there for refreshments, asked permission to ride north toward his home, with them.  A coincidence is that young Fleming’s father, Dr. O. N. Fleming, died in an auto accident 22 years ago, just a short time before Oscar was born.  His mother died soon after his birth and he was reared by his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Stout, who also have passed away.

             Edwards is survived by his wife and two daughters of a former marriage, one of whom is the injured girl.

             (The death certificate states that Lena Baugher was born 6 Apr 1912, in McClure, Ill., the daughter of Warren Hunsaker and Cora Bagsby, natives of Illinois, died 15 Apr 1938, in Road District 5, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Clarence Baugher, and was buried in Lindsey Cemetery at McClure, Ill.  The death certificate of Eula Popp states that she was born 9 Mar 1897, in Cape Girardeau Co., Mo., the daughter of Colbert Baugher, a native of Alexander Co., Ill., and Belle Owens, a native of Cape Girardeau Co., Mo.,  and died 15 Apr 1938, in Road District 5, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Harvey Popp, and was buried in Memorial Park in Cape Girardeau, Mo.   Her marker there reads:  Eula Maria Pope Mar. 9, 1897 Apr. 15, 1938 Things past belong to memory alone.  Things future are the property of hope.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Edward A. Butler Dies in Automobile Accident

             Edward A. Butler, age 38 years, was fatally injured Thursday night, April 14, six miles south of  Mattoon when his automobile crashed into a culvert.  First identification was made by papers on his person.

             Mr. Butler had only recently sold his insurance agency in this city.  He was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Butler.  His father passed away May 11, 1936 and his mother, March 20, 1937; thus the three have died in less than two years.  He was born in Villa Ridge, but moved to Mounds with his parents more than twenty years ago.

             Surviving are a daughter, Miss Winifred Butler of East St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Paul Powell of Vienna; and one brother, Glenn Butler of New York City.  He had been married three times, his daughter, Winifred, being the child of his first marriage.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Butler family residence where he made his home, the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.  Casket bearers were R. E. Smoot, Harry Windland, Mid Britt, Ernest L. Crain, Louie Graves and John Blancett.  Burial was in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

 

Friends here (Villa Ridge) were shocked sad the news of the sudden death of Edward Butler in an auto accident last Tuesday.  Mr. Butler was born and reared here.  The entire community extend their sympathy to his sister, Mrs. Paul Powell of Vienna and brother Glenn of New York.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Apr 1938:

BRATTEN CASE AT MARION COMES TO END OFFICALLY

             The Bratten murder, possibly kidnapping case, came to an end last Sunday in Marion, when a coroner’s jury returned a verdict that he came to his death at the hands of unknown party or parties.  The state, county and city had traced clues about and had run into stone walls of silence or blind alleys that led nowhere.

             This is the second recent murder in Marion that is unsolved.  The other took place when a cream station was held up and one of the employees was killed.  The Bratten case, which seemingly involved only those who could be jealous of his attentions to some woman or women failed to crack open easily.  A man from the state crime commission took a hand in it, but he got nowhere.  Reporters from city papers swarmed in, and they had to leave town with the case still an enigma.

             At the gathering of Republicans in that county to elect a chairman last Monday, Hosea Borum, former county commissioner and cousin of Bratten, declared the county needed a Republican sheriff and cited the two murders that are unsolved.

 

Mrs. Casey Jones of Jackson, Tenn., wife of Casey Jones, railroad engineer , who was killed several years ago in a wreck on the I. C. and for whom the famous Casey Jones song was composed, has been the guest of Mrs. Daisy Scott of Mounds.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Apr 1938:

Parthenia Ann Stevers

             Mrs. Parthenia Ann Stevers, 84 years old, died at her home near Grand Chain Thursday morning, April 21, at 2:30 o’clock.  She is well known in Pulaski County where she has spent the fifty-two years of her married life.

             Mrs. Stevers leaves an aged husband, David; one daughter, Minnie, a school teacher; one son, Mark, a World War veteran who belongs to Louis Phares Post No. 178 of the American Legion and is a state auditor.

             Services were held in the Christian church of Grand Chain Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. C. A. Underwood, of Carmi, officiating.  Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.

             Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (David E. Stevers married Parthenia Harris on 3 Jun 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Abijah Harris married Lucinda May on 21 Feb 1850, in Massac Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Parthenia Ann Stevers was born 22 Jul 1853, Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Abijah Harris, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Lucy May, a native of Tennessee, died 21 Apr 1938, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of David Stevers, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.  Her marker there reads:  Mother Parthenia Ann Stevers 1853-1938 Father David Edgar Stevers 1852-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friends have received word of the death of Mrs. Anna B. Roche at her home in Elmira, N.Y., at the age of 8_ years.  She was ill only a few days with pneumonia.  Mrs. Roche will be remembered by her many friends as the wife of the late Richard Roche and lived here until the death of her husband several years ago, going to New York at that time to make her home with relatives.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 May 1938:

DAVID MONROE EDDLEMAN

             David Monroe Eddleman, 57 years of age, who died suddenly at his home in Grand Chain last Saturday, had been a resident of the Grand Chain community for 35 years.  He had been active in community affairs and his death was a shock.

             Funeral services were held Monday at the Ohio Chapel, conducted by Rev. H. L. Metcalf of Karnak and Rev. Appey of Jonesboro.  Interment was in Ohio Chapel.

             A wife, one son, Norman of Karnak; and two daughters, Mrs. Lulu Spindler of Karnak and Inez Greer of Grand Chain, survive.  There are five sisters:  Mrs. Fannie Goins, Mrs. Effie Hayes and Mrs. Cora Easter, all of Grand Chain; Mrs. Ola Hight of Olmstead and Mrs. Della Abbott of Lepanto, Ark.

             (David Eddleman married Eve Rose Ann Eller on 5 Jan 1871, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that David Monroe Eddleman, farmer, was born 22 Nov 1880, in Illinois, the son of David Eddleman and Eva Rose Eller, died 30 Apr 1938, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Allie Mae Eddleman, and was buried in Ohio Chapel Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLED IN FALL FROM AUTO

             Robert Hall of DuQuoin was instantly killed Sunday morning when he was dashed to the pavement from a car driven by Bernard Schneider, also of DuQuoin.

             In crossing the Illinois Central tracks, the driver momentarily lost control of the car and hit a road marker.  The car door evidently opened while Schneider was trying to right the car and Hall was then thrown to the pavement.  The other fellows, Richard Philbrick and Schneider, were badly shaken up, but were not injured.

             (The death certificate states that Robert E. Hall, general laborer, of 334 E. South St., DuQuoin, Ill., was born 5 Aug 1917, in DuQuoin, Ill., the son of Philip C. Hall, a native of Benton, Ill., and Mary Sitkoski, a native of Perry Co., Ill., died 1 May 1938, in DuQuoin, Perry Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in DuQuoin.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. SUSAN ING PASSES AWAY NEAR VILLA RIDGE

             Mrs. Susan Ing, 76 years old, died Wednesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lula Fernside, west of Villa Ridge.  She had been in ill health since a stroke last December.

             Mrs. Ing is one of the oldest residents of Pulaski County, having lived most of her life in the Villa Ridge vicinity.

             At press time the funeral arrangements had not been learned, but the services will be held this afternoon.

             Besides Mrs. Fernside, she leaves another daughter, Mrs. Daisy Wilkerson, also of Villa Ridge; and a son, Alfred, of Cypress; and other relatives and a host of friends.

             (According to her death certificate, Susan Ing was born 20 Nov 1858, in Nashville, Tenn., the daughter of James Smith and Parthenia Menel, died 4 May 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Dempsey Ing, and was buried in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Susan Ing 1858-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LAURA VICTOR WORTHINGTON

             Funeral services were held Friday afternoon for Mrs. Laura Victor Worthington at her home at New Caledonia near Olmstead.  Rev. Kazee, pastor of the M. E. Church South, officiated.  Interment was made in a private cemetery near her home.  G. A. James was in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Laura Victoria Worthington was born 16 Jan 1862, in Olmstead, Ill., the daughter of Isaac H. Worthington and Clara Latta, natives of Ohio, died 27 Apr 1938, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried near Olmstead, Ill.  She was probably buried in Old Caledonia Cemetery, also known as Worthington Cemetery, where the only remaining markers are for her parents, Isaac and Clarrisa J. Worthington, and her brother, Louis H. Worthington.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Our community (Ohio Chapel) lost another dear friend, neighbor and Christian last Saturday morning.  Mr. Dave Eddleman died suddenly at his home of heart trouble.

             Funeral services were held at Chapel.  Eighty-seven cars were present.

 

Mrs. Dell Ablett of Arkansas attended the funeral of her brother, David M. Eddleman, Monday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 May 1938:

Mrs. Susan Ing

             Mrs. Susan Ing, aged 79 years, died Wednesday morning, May 4, at _:30 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. E. Fearnside ______ of Villa Ridge, where she has been living for the past five years.  Her illness had been long.

             She leaves another daughter, Mrs. _____ Wilkinson, of Villa Ridge, and a son, Alfred Ing, of Cypress; __en grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services will be held ____ afternoon at 2 o’clock in the ___n church of Villa Ridge, with ___ Tucker, pastor, officiating.

             Burial will be made in the Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James officiating.

 

David Monroe Eddleman

             David Monroe Eddleman, age 57, died suddenly Saturday, April 30, at his home in Grand Chain.  Mr. Eddleman lived in the Grand Chain community for 35 years and was active in community affairs.  His sudden death was a shock to the community.

             Surviving are his wife, one son, Norman, of Karnak; two daughters, Mrs. Lulu Spindler of Karnak and Mrs. Inez Greer of Grand Chain; five sisters, Mrs. Fannie Goins, Mrs. Effie Hayes and Mrs. Cora Easter of Grand Chain, Mrs. Ola Hight of Olmstead and Mrs. Della Abbott of Lepanto, Ark.

             Funeral services were held Monday at two o’clock at Ohio Chapel with Rev. Appey of Jonesboro and Rev. H. L. Metcalf of Karnak officiating.  Burial was made in Ohio Chapel Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

Two Burn to Death at Their Home in Future City

             The smoke from flames awoke James Hobbs, age 13, young negro who was sleeping in the home of his grandfather, George Tandy of Future City, early last Saturday.  Hastily awakening his uncle, Leroy Tandy, with whom he was sleeping, the boy shouted to the others in the house and ran outside.  Leroy, in his effort to rescue his father, George Tandy, 62, his mother and his niece, Rosa Hobbs, age 12, crashed in an intervening door with an axe.  He succeeded in pulling his mother out of the room, but could not reach his father and niece who perished in the flames.

             The Hobbs children have relatives in North Mounds.

             (According to his death certificate, George W. Tandy, W. P. A. worker, was born 8 Feb 1886, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of John and Clara Tandy, died 30 Apr 1938, in Road District 2, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Nora Tandy, and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  The niece mentioned was Rosa Ann Hobbs, of Future City, Alexander Co., Ill., who was born 27 Apr 1926, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Clarence Hobbs, a native of Mounds, Ill., and Clara Tandy, a native of Grand Chain, Ill., died 30 Apr 1938, in Road District 2, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery, Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William Fearnside of Chicago spent a few days this week with his mother, Mrs. Charles Fearnside, and grandmother, Susan Ing.  (Villa Ridge)

 

Mrs. Susan Ing passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Fearnside, Wednesday morning at 9:15.  She leaves to mourn her loss, besides her daughter, with whom she made her home, another daughter, Mrs. Daisy Wilkerson and a son, Alfred, several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 May 1938:

MAN ARRESTED AT ANNA WANTED IN EAST FOR MURDER

             Citizens of Union County got some news last week when Calvin Kyson, 31 years of age, picked up for some minor trouble in Missouri, turned out to be a man wanted in Baltimore for the slaying of a jailer.  Kyson had been employed about Anna at a hotel and was known and even trusted.  Fingerprints proved the case.  Kyson went under the name of Jimmy Wilson at Anna.

 

OSCAR HERBERT DIES

             Oscar Herbert, one of Cairo’s men of affairs, died at his home last Monday morning at the age of 61 of heart trouble.  He managed much of the Herbert estate holdings and other properties.  He is the owner of property in Mound City.  The Gem Theatre in Cairo is one of the more prominent pieces of real estate managed by him.

             Herbert was trained for a lawyer, but never practiced law.  He devoted his life to business.  His wife, a daughter and son survive him.

             (His death certificate states that Oscar L. Herbert, financier and capitalist, of 2606 Washington Ave., Cairo, Ill., was born 10 Nov 1876, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Louis Herbert and Elsie Ebert, natives of Bavaria, Germany, died 9 May 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Alberta Herbert, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery in Villa Ridge reads:  Oscar Louis Herbert 1876-1938.  His son, Donald Louis Herbert’s, application for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution states that Oscar Louis Herbert married on 23 Apr 1902, in St. Louis, Mo., Alberta Marie Bradford, who was born 13 Jun 1877, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Charles Marratt Bradford and Belle Clement Fravel.  Charles M. Bradford was the son of Silas Bradford and Sally Ann Wash Boynton.  Sally Ann Bradford was the daughter of Martin Wash and Sarah Ann Perkins.  Sarah Ann Wash was the daughter of Joseph Perkins  and Elizabeth Price.  Joseph Perkins was the son of Stephen Perkins and Miss Johnson.  Stephen Perkins was the son of Constantine Perkins and Anne Pollard.  The Revolutionary War soldier was Joseph Perkins who served in the 1st Virginia Regulars in the Continental Line and was honorably discharged 28 Jun 1783.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 May 1938:

Mrs. Sophia Woodson

             Mrs. Sophia Woodson, colored, wife of Oliver Woodson, died at her home in North Mounds Saturday night, May 7, age about 68 years.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday at the Mounds Freewill Baptist Church, Rev. L. McCauley officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Sophie Woodson was born 15 Oct 1871, in Nashville, Tenn., the daughter of Albert Bert Russel, died 7 May 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Oliver Woodson, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

O. L. Herbert Dies Monday at His Home in Cairo

             Oscar L. Herbert, prominent businessman of Cairo, died Monday morning, May 9, at his home, 2606 Washington Avenue, due to a heart disorder that had afflicted him for more than a year.  He had been a patient in a St. Louis hospital for months, but had been brought to his home some time ago, his nurse accompanying him and caring for him in addition to the devoted attendance of his family.  His age at death was 61 years.

             At 30 years of age, upon the death of his father, he assumed the management of the Louis Herbert Estate which meant a heavy burden on account of its vastness and complexity.  He had completed a course in law after graduating from college with an A. B. degree and this knowledge was invaluable to him.

             He leaves his wife, Mrs. Alberta Bradford Herbert; a daughter, Miss Virginia Herbert; a son, Donald L. Herbert, of Cairo; and one brother, Byron L. Herbert of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock, at St. Patrick’s Church, Rev. Father Pender officiating.  Burial was in the Villa Ridge cemetery.


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 May 1938:

FATHER AND SON KILLED IN CRASH ON ROUTE 145

(Golconda Herald-Enterprise)

             A double killing occurred on Route 145 a short distance out of Metropolis Tuesday when two cars collided on the highway.

             The victims were Fred Melcher, age 35, and his 8-year-old son, _____.  Their car collided with one driven by Robert A. Wilson, a salesman out of St. Louis.

             The impact knocked the Melcher car down an embankment, and when the victims were removed from the wreckage, it was found that the lad’s neck was broken and the father’s skull was crushed.

             It is reported that the accident took place at an intersection.

             The bodies were taken to Metropolis and there Coroner W. P. Baynes held an inquest, the verdict of which was not learned.

             (August Melcher married Minnie Krueger on 2 Feb 1888, in Massac Co., Ill.  Fred George Melcher registered for the draft in 1918, when he was working on the farm of August Melcher at Metropolis, Ill.  According to his death certificate, Fred Melcher, W. P. A. road worker, was born 10 Jun 1900, in Illinois, the son of August Melcher, a native of Illinois, and Minnie Kruger, a native of Germany,  died 9 May 1938, in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill., the divorced husband of Leora Reed, and was buried in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill.  The son was George Melcher, whose death certificate states was born 28 Feb 1930, in Illinois, the son of Fred Melcher and Leora Reed, natives of Illinois, died 9 May 1938, in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DIES

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Titus, born Thursday morning, May 12, died at birth.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Mrs. Titus before her marriage was Miss LaVerne Aldrich of Villa Ridge.

             (The unnamed infant was born 12 May 1938, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Robert Titus, a native of Flora, Ill., and Laverne Aldrich, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died the same day, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CHILD HURT IN FALL DIES

             A very serious accident happened at the new bridge Saturday evening.  Lawrence Melvin Bellemy, the twelve-year-old son of Mrs. Marie Bellemey, fell 53 feet from the bridge and was fatally injured.  He was rushed to the hospital at Metropolis, where he died a few hours later.  Funeral services were held at Ohio Chapel Monday afternoon at two o’clock with Rev. H. L. Metcalf officiating and Akins’ Funeral Service of Metropolis in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Lawrence Melvin Bellemey was born 1 Oct 1925, in Illinois, the son of Raymond and Marie Bellemey, natives of Illinois, died 14 May 1938, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AGED WOMAN CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY

             Mrs. Nancy Copeland of Ozark, Ill., recently celebrated her birthday.  Mrs. Copeland is in the nineties and is very much alive.  Her hobbies are piecing quilts and crocheting rugs.  She smokes a pipe, reads the Globe-Democrat and votes the Republican ticket.  Her favorite radio stars are Amos and Andy.

 

JAMES LOCKE FREED ON KILLING CONSTABLE CHARGE

             James Irwin Locke, a CCC enrollee at Eddyville Camp, 22 years of age, returned to his Eddyville Camp late Friday after a Pope County jury returned a verdict of not guilty in circuit court here.  The youth had been charged with murder of William Thomas Rogers, a well-known deputy sheriff and constable of this county.

             Locke had been held in jail at Golconda where he had remained until freed Friday.

             Rogers died on the night of New Year’s Eve after clearing a danced tavern near Golconda of its patrons.  At the trial it was revealed that Rogers had acted without authority and attacked several CCC enrollees in an attempt to drive them down the road by the tavern by knocking them in the head with a pistol.  Some of them received painful injuries from which they suffered and were treated by physicians for some time thereafter.  Scars resulting from the wounds were especially noticeable at the trial on two or three of them.  It was shown by a number of witnesses that Rogers drank alcoholic liquids excessively that night and had apparently become intoxicated.  Undertaker G. T. Lee of Golconda, who is a mortician and also a licensed embalmer, testified for the defendant that he found only slight wounds about the face of the deceased, such as would be expected where a man falls upon his face, as Rogers was seen to have fallen on New Year’s night.  Rogers was immediately picked up and carried into the tavern, where he was found to be dead.  The undertaker found that the left plural cavity of the body was well filled with blood, which could only be accounted for by a rupture of the aorta ____ disease of the heart called ____ that when aneurism _____ the blood immediately _____ of the heart into the p____ and caused instant death ____ deceased had told a number ____ during the past several ____ he was suffering from ____ the heart and that he could be found dead at any time and that would die with his boots on.—Golconda Herald-Enterprise

             (His death certificate states that William Thomas Rodgers, deputy sheriff, was born 25 Mar 1878, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of William Jefferson Rodgers, a native of Tennessee, and Margery Sistler, a native of Illinois, died 1 Jan 1938, in Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Wm. Thomas Rodgers 1878-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 May 1938:

Mrs. Lulu Cruse

             Mrs. Lulu Cruse, age 64 years, died Wednesday, May 11, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mabel Lovellette in Evansville, Ind.  The body was brought here Thursday afternoon to the home of her son, Ralph Cruse.

             Mrs. Cruse was born in Mill Creek, but had lived in Pulaski County the greater part of her life.  She is survived by her husband, Henry Cruse; four sons, Walter Cruse of Hazel Park, Mich., Dewey of Flint, Mich., Ralph of Mounds, and Ray of Pulaski; four daughters, Mrs. Marie Day of Flint, Mich., Mrs. Mabel Lovellette of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. Helen Williamson of Peoria, Ill., and Mrs. Edith Junkerman of Mounds; also a number of grandchildren and a brother, James Reed of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, May 14, at the Christian Church of Pulaski.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

             (Henry S. Cruse, 20, a farmer from Mill Creek Precinct, Union Co., Ill., born in Mill Creek Precinct, son of John Cruse and Mariah Smith, married Lula Reed, 17, from Mill Creek, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Daniel Reed and Miss McCune, on 1 Sep 1889, at James Littleton’s in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Henry S. Cruse 1869-1938 Loula J. Cruse  1873-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lovellette of Evansville, Ind., were here Thursday and Friday, having accompanied the body of Mrs. Lovellette’s mother, Mrs. Lulu Cruse, who died while visiting at their home.

 

INFANT DIES

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Titus, born Thursday morning, May 12, died at birth.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery at 3 o’clock that afternoon, G. A. James in charge.  Mrs. Titus is the former Miss LaVerne Aldrich of Villa Ridge.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 May 1938:

FORMER RESIDENT DIES IN ST. LOUIS

             Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Minnie B. Crain at her home in St. Louis.  Mrs. Crain the former Miss Minnie Yost was a resident of this city and manty friends will feel sad at this news.  She is the sister of Mrs. Lily Beaupre of this city and the late Eugene Yost of Carbondale.

             (Henry S. Beaupre married Lillie V. Yost on 8 Nov 1885, in Massac Co., Ill.  Eugene M. Yost, 26, from Mound City, Ill., married Lizzie H. Carver, 20, from Mound City, Ill., on 31 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TOWER A. THOMASSON

             Tower A. Thomasson, 69, passed away at his home west of Mounds Monday afternoon after a brief illness.  He was a former Illinois Central switchman, having retired in 1920.

             Mr. Thomasson is survived by his wife, Mrs. Alice Thomasson; one son, T. B. Thomasson; two daughters, Mrs. Sadie Quarles of Mounds and Mrs. Lelia Mattson of Springfield; a brother, E. M. Thomasson of Denver, Colo.; and three grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational church, Rev. S. C. Benninger officiated.  Interment was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Nephews of the deceased served as casket bearers.

             (His death certificate states that Tower A. Thomasson, retired railroad switchman, was born 17 Jan 1869, in Jonesboro, Ill., the son of Theo. Thomasson, a native of Pennsylvania, died 23 May 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Alice Thomasson, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Tower Thomasson Jan. 17, 1869 May 23, 1938 Allie Thomasson Jan. 21, 1870 Feb. 11, 1965.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friends and relatives from here (Beech Grove) attended the funerals of Mrs. Ellen Barnhardt and Mrs. Vina Ferguson at St. John’s Sunday and Monday.

             (Joseph N. Barnhart, 26, farmer, born in Union Co., Ill., the son of Jacob Barnhart and Mary Lentz, married Ellen A. Heilig, 25, from Springville, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Crawford Heilig and Julia A. Fisher, on 1 Aug 1886, in Springville, Union Co., Ill.  George C. Heilig married Julia Ann Fisher on 19 Mar 1857, at the house of Mrs. Fisher in Union Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Ellen Barnhart was born 3 Sep 1860, in Mill Creek, Ill., the daughter of George Crawford Heilig, a native of North Carolina, and Miss Rhymer, died 21 May 1938, in Union Co., Ill., the widow of Joseph Barnhart, and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ellen A. Barnhart Sept. 3, 1860 May 21, 1938 Joseph N. Barnhart Dec. 30, 1859 June 7, 1920.  According to the death certificate, Louvina Ferguson was born 21 Sep 1866, in Jonesboro, Ill., the daughter of Peter Dillow and Mary S. Poole, natives of Illinois, died 21 May 1938, in Union Co., Ill., the widow of Samuel L. Ferguson, and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

EX-SENATOR D. W. HELM ANSWERS FINAL CALL

(Golconda Herald-Enterprise)

             Former State Senator D. W. Helm, 77, died last Sunday at his home in Metropolis.

             His death, which followed ___ decline of several months, ___ one of the best known ___ highly respected citizens ___ neighboring city.

             He represented this, the ___ senatorial district, for three consecutive terms from 1902 to 1914 in the Senate.

             During Governor Tanner’s Administration, Mr. Helm served on the Committee of the Illinois Normal ___ and under Gov. Yates he was a member of the State ___ on Claims.

             Senator Helms had been practicing law since 1883.

             The funeral held Tuesday was one of the largest ever held in Metropolis.  A number of  ____ friends attended the rites.

             (Douglas W. Helm married Mary Howell on 13 Apr 1884, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Robert A. Helm married M. J. Rice on 6 Dec 1856, in Johnson Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Douglas Wymore Helm, attorney at law, states that he was born 23 Jul 1860, in Illinois, the son of Robert Helm and Mary Rice, natives of Tennessee, died 15 May 1938, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., the husband of Mary Howell Helm, and was buried in Road District 6, Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Chosen Friends Cemetery in Metropolis, Ill., reads:   Father Douglas Wymore Helm July 23,1860 May 15, 1938 Mother Mary Howell Helm Feb. 17, 1863 Apr. 6, 1949.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Armon Brown were called to Charleston, Mo., Saturday because of the death of the former’s grandmother, Mrs. Annabelle Webster.  They returned home Sunday night and Tuesday Mrs. Jesse Richardson accompanied them to Charleston to attend the services.  Funeral services were also given at Hickman, Mrs. Webster’s home town, and burial was also at that place.  Mr. and Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Richardson returned home late Tuesday night.

             (This may be the same person as Thursie Arabelle Webster, who was born 15 Jan 1858, in Brookport, Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Ancil Pierce, and died 22 May 1938, in Charleston, Mississippi Co., Mo., widow of Alvin Monroe Webster.  She was buried in Brownsville Cemetery, two miles southeast of Hickman, Fulton Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

R. L. Scott who suffered from a heart ailment for some time, died at his home in Mounds, Saturday.  The funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Father Gilmartin officiated.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan was in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Robert Lee Scott, retired railroad conductor, was born 2 Mar 1869, in Trenton, Tenn., died 21 May 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Daisy Scott, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Robert Lee Scott 1869-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 May 1938:

T. A. Thomasson Dies Following Brief Illness

             Tower A. Thomasson died at 4 o’clock Monday afternoon, May 23, 1938, at his home west of Mounds after a short illness, age 69 years.

             In his earlier life he was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad as switchman, retiring in 1920.

             Surviving are wife, Alice Thomasson; a son, Tower B. Thomasson of Mounds; two daughters, Mrs. Sadie Quarles of Mounds and Mrs. Lelia Mattson of Springfield; a brother, E. M. Thomasson of Denver, Col.; and three grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational church, Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Nephews of Mr. Thomasson served as casket bearers.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

R. L. Scott Dies Saturday

             Robert Lee Scott, age 79 years, died at his home here Saturday, May 21, at 1:50 o’clock after an illness of several weeks.

             Mr. Scott had been a railroad employee for 45 years, on the Mobile and Ohio, the Gulf and Ship Island and the Illinois Central.  He was a conductor on the I. C. when he retired from service.

             He leaves his wife, Mrs. Daisy Lonergan Scott; one daughter, Mrs. Lucille Griezzard of Memphis, Tenn.; two stepsons, William Lonergan of Mounds; and a sister, Mrs. Mamie Schneider of Jackson, Tenn.

 

Richard Stevens

             Richard Stevens of Karnak died at his home Saturday afternoon, May 21, at the advanced age of 97 years.  He had been ill for the past year.

             He is survived by six children:  Mrs. Stella Roome, Mattoon, Mrs. P. E. Smith, Ninnekah, Okla., Mrs. Ruth Goins, Karnak, Fred, Richard and Marion Stevens, all of Karnak.  One sister, Mrs. Laurette Beavers of Arcola; and one brother, Marcus Stevens, of Mattoon, also survive.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church in Karnak, Rev. Monroe Osborne of Cairo officiating.  Burial was on Ohio Chapel Cemetery.  Six grandsons served as casket bearers.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

             (Benjamin F. Beavers married Lauretta A. Stevens on 29 Dec 1871, in Coles Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Arion Richard Stevens, common laborer, was born 22 Sep 1841, in Dayton, Ohio, the son of William Stevens and Victoria Kohn, natives of Dayton, Ohio, died 21 May 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Margaret Ann Stevens, and was buried in Ohio Chapel Cemetery in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Simmons were called to Eldorado Saturday on account of the death of the former’s mother, Mrs. Ellen Simmons.

             (Her death certificate states that Ellen Simmons was born 1 Jan 1855, in Shawneetown, Ill., the daughter of John Wales in Indiana, died 20 May 1938, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., the widow of Elijah Simmons, and was buried in Wolf Creek, Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friends have received word of the death of Mrs. Brust, mother of Charles Brust of Grand Tower, formerly of Mounds.  Mrs. Brust’s death occurred in the Murphysboro hospital and burial was at Murphysboro.

             (Her death certificate states that Frances Jeanette Brust was born 26 Aug 1854, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Ferdnand Sundmacher and Mary Bodiker, natives of Germany, died 22 May 1938, in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill.,  the widow of George Brust, and was buried in Tower Grove Cemetery in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mother Frances J. Brust 1854-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Jun 1938:

Shock by Water Heater Fatal to Mrs. H. J. Elkins

             An electric shock from an electric water heater is thought to have brought death to Mrs. H. J. Elkins, a prominent woman of Mounds and wife of Dr. Elkins, about 9 o’clock __esday night.  Every possible ___ was made to restore life by artificial respiration, by powerful __ stimulants, by use of the pulmotor and by use of oxygen.  Every effort failed, and about midnight physicians who had come to assist Dr. Elkins gave up the battle.  Mrs. Elkins had gone to the bathroom to take a bath.  Miss Ro___ Elkins and Miss Evelyn Mae ___ester were in the house and heard her cry out and a moment later moan or groan.  The bathroom door was locked and they could not enter, so they telephoned Dr. Elkins, who arrived and entered the bathroom by the window, __ wife was in the tub with her ___ on one side and lifeless, so ___ could be determined.  The ___ water heater was attached ___ plug and on.
             ___ was hastily summoned.  First ___ Dr. Otis Hudson and then ___ R. Wesenberg and came two physicians from Cairo with oxygen ___.  From Mound City the fire department came with the pulmotor.  The doctors worked valiantly hoping to bring back life, but ___t avain.

             The news of the tragedy spread through town and quite a crowd gathered at the home.  Mrs. Elkins was __ well known and she and her ___ and well liked.  She had plan___ in leaving yesterday morning for Indiana to visit a cousin ___ __me town and later attend a ___ reunion at her school.

             Mrs. Elkins was formerly Miss ____ Dwyer and taught school at ___s about 1921.  She was 40 years of age and had been married to Mr. Elkins about eight years.  Her ___ was in Lawrenceburg, Ind., and her father was a physician.  Funeral services had not been complete at press time, but will be ____ with burial at Lawrenceburg.  There will be a funeral service at Mounds, but the hour had not been determined.

             Besides her husband, a cousin in ____ survives.  There are many ___ who will mourn her death ___ some of them it is very real ___ not long ago, the discussion ___ water heaters brought out the ____ of them.  Mrs. Elkins thought ___ very fine and insisted her ____ buy one—and death came ___ from the thing she did not _____.

             ___ water heater in particular ___ oval shaped affair that is ___d into a pan or tub.  When ___ in the insulation develop, ___n very easily become danger___ ___d with water pipes to com___ the electric circuit, serious accident may happen.  This is pre___ to have happened in this instance.

 

Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Bayless, Mr. and Mrs. Rollie Bayless and family were called to Carbondale Sunday by the death of an uncle.  (Ohio Chapel)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Jun 1938:

Mrs. H. J. Elkins Accidentally Electrocuted Wednesday Night

             The entire community was saddened by the death of Mrs. Ruth Dwyer Elkins, wife of Dr. H. J. Elkins, which occurred Wednesday night at about 9 o’clock at her home under tragic circumstances.

             Mrs. Elkins and her stepdaughter, Robby Elkins, were preparing to leave by motor car for Indianapolis, Ind., early the following morning and while Bobby was doing some last minute preparation of wearing apparel, Mrs. Elkins went to the bathroom for a bath.  Soon, Bobby and a friend, Miss Evelyn Mae Winchester, who was at the Elkins home, heard a scream from the bathroom, then another.  Finding the door locked, Miss Elkins telephoned for her father at his office.  Rushing home, Dr. Elkins gained entrance to the bathroom through the window by means of a stepladder.  Mrs. Elkins was reclining in the tub, seemingly lifeless and when his trousers brushed against the tub he received a shock.  An electric water heater was still connected to the socket and Dr. Elkins, warned by the shock, disconnected it before lifting the inert body of his wife from the tub.  Dr. O. T. Hudson of this city, Dr. W. R. Wesenberg of Mound City and Dr. J. J. Rendleman of Cairo, were called and every known resuscitation method including a pulmotor and oxygen tank was used, the doctors and neighbors working for nearly three hours before hope was entirely abandoned.  It seemed incredible that one who had been so full of life, health and energy one instant should be lifeless the next.

             While the exact circumstances of her death will never be known, it was evident that it was accidental electrocution.  Her age was 41.

             Mrs. Elkins as Ruth Dwyer of Lawrenceburg, Ind., taught English in Mounds Township High School in the early 1920s.  She was the only child of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Harry Dwyer.  Later, she returned to Mounds as the wife of Dr. Elkins.  Gifted as a singer, she was active in the work of the Baptist Church, both in the choir and in the Sunday school, where she taught the class, “Daughters of Ruth.”  She was vice president of the Mounds Woman’s Club and prominent in the civic and social life of the community.  Her abiding interest, however, was in her homemaking.

             Her nearest living blood relative is a cousin, Mrs. Roy Corwin of near Indianapolis, Ind., who was called here by her death.

             Her expressed wish to be buried by the side of her parents at her old home will be granted.

             Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock at the Baptist church, Rev. Earle Throgmorton, pastor, officiating at the service and J. T. Ryan directing.  From the church the funeral cortege will leave for Indiana, where on Sunday another service will be held in the Lawrenceburg Baptist Church.  This church was washed away in the flood of 1937, but a new edifice has been built and Mrs. Elkins had planned to attend the dedication there on Sunday.

             (Her death certificate states that Ruth Dwyer Elkins was born about 1898, the daughter of John Dwyer, and died 1 Jun 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Homer J. Elkins.  Her marker in Greendale Cemetery in Greendale, Dearborn Co., Ind., reads:  Ruth Dwyer Elkins 1896-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

George Sitter was taken to St. Louis the first of the week where he entered the Barnard Hospital for treatment for a persistent skin trouble.  He was accompanied by Mrs. Sitter.

 

Mrs. Roy Corwin and son, Chester, of Indianapolis, Ind., were called here Thursday by the sudden death of Mrs. Corwin’s cousin, Mrs. H. J. Elkins.

 

Mrs. Alice Holcomb

             Mrs. Alice Holcomb of Ullin died Wednesday morning, June 1, at 4:30 o’clock, at her home following an illness of about three months.

             She is survived by two sons, E. C. and Russell Holcomb of Ullin; one sister, whose home is in Brockton and three grandchildren.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at the Ullin M. E. Church at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. Elmer Smith officiating, assisted by Rev. James Henderson.

             Burial will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, W. J. Rhymer directing.

             (Frank H. Holcomb married Alice Gobert on 21 Sep 1887, in Coles Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Alice Holcomb was born about 1863, the daughter of Mr. Gobert, died 1 Jun 1938, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Alice Holcomb 1862-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Frank Holcomb, who suffered a hemorrhage of the brain over a week ago, passed away at her home in Ullin early Wednesday morning.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Jun 1938:

OLMSTEAD WOMAN DIES

             Mrs. Frederick Dick, 19 years old, of Olmstead, died at the St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo early Monday morning following an operation.  A small child, a little over a year of age, her husband, her father, John Ervin, and stepmother, and five sisters, all of Olmstead, Mrs. Ethel Rude, Mrs. Mae Goins, Mrs. Agatha Atherton, Mrs. Dorothy Calvin and Mrs. Anna Luton, survive.

             Funeral services were Wednesday at the Methodist church with Rev. Kazee officiating and burial was at the Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin.

             (Her death certificate states that Mamie Daisy Dick was born 10 Sep 1918, in Olmsted, Ill., the daughter of John Ervin and Belle Corzine, natives of Illinois, died 6 Jun 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of Frederick Dick, and was buried at Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Mayme Ervin Dick 1918-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. LOUISA SCHULER DIED SUDDENLY MONDAY AT HER HOME

             Mrs. Louisa Schuler, wife of the late John Schuler, died suddenly at her home in Mound City at 10:15 o’clock Monday morning of heart trouble.  She was ill only a few hours and the end came as a shock to the community.

             Mrs. Schuler was the daughter of William Schneider and was born in Baden, Germany, coming to this country at an early age.  They settled at Hamilton, Ohio, and later came to this town when she was about 16 years of age.  It was while living here that she met and married John Schuler, who died in 1925 at the age of 85.  Mrs. Schuler would have celebrated her 82nd birthday next month.

             To them were born sixteen children, one dying early in life, and of the fifteen living, ten are daughters five are sons, most of whom are married and living at near or far distant points.  There are 21 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.  All of the children and fourteen grandchildren were to be home for the funeral services, which were held yesterday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Methodist church, conducted by Rev. A. L. Jones.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             Mrs. Schuler had enjoyed remarkable strength and health up until the very last.  Members of the family were home Sunday, as is often the custom, and all seemed well.  The attack, which came early Monday morning, did not cease until death had come.

             During her long life in Mound City, 66 years, Mrs. Schuler was well known and liked.  She possessed many of the old fashioned sturdy qualities that endeared her to those who knew her.  She is one of the older residents who has joined the ranks of those who travel on.

             The children surviving her are:  daughters, Mrs. Minnie McNeil, Mrs. Mary Parker, and Miss Bertha Schuler of Mound City, Mrs. Agnes Crippen and Mrs. Jessie Hess of Mounds, Mrs. Anna Hibbs of Cape Girardeau, Mrs. Elsie Gill of Indianapolis, Ind., Mrs. Alma McCabe of Chicago, Mrs. Musetta Richards of St. Louis, and Mrs. Lenora Burkle of Stuttgart, Ark.; five sons, Everett E. of Mound City, Walter of Tulsa, Okla., Robert of Flint, Mich., Charles of Bakersfield, Calif., and John of Cape Girardeau.

             (Her death certificate states that Christine Louisa Schuler was born about 1857, the daughter of William Schneider, and died 6 Jun 1938, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of John Schuler.  Her marker in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Louisa Schuler 1856-1938 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. H. J. ELKINS

             Funeral services for Mrs. H. J. Elkins, who was accidentally electrocuted in her home in Mounds Wednesday night of last week, were held Friday morning in the Baptist church in Mounds, Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor of the church, officiating.  Immediately after the services, the cortege left for Lawrenceburg, Ind., where interment was made Monday morning.  The casket bearers were:  Harold Young, W. L. Tobin, R. E. Smoot, Ed Adams, Sam Shifley and Wave Wingo.  J. T. Ryan was in charge.

 

OBITUARY

             Mrs. Edith Goines passed away at her home in Balcom Sunday morning, June 5, at the age of 36 years, after two years of suffering.  She professed faith in her Savior 14 years ago.

             She is survived by her husband, Elmer Goines; and one daughter, Margie Lucille; and one sister, Agnes Emery of Sennett, Mo.; one half-sister, Mrs. Emma Burns of ___, Ark.; and a number of other relatives and friends that mourn her early departure.

             Rev. Christie of Balcom officiated.  Burial was made in Ohio ___el beside her two sons, who ___ away a few years ago.

             Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Dora Edith Goines was born 7 Mar 1902, in Arkansas, the daughter of Will Thrasher, a native of Karnak, Ill., died 5 Jun 1938, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., wife of Elmer Goines, and was buried in Christian Chapel Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. George Sitter is quite low in the Jewish Hospital in St. Louis and his wife was called to his bedside earlier this week.

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Mrs. Elmer Goines in Balcom, Monday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Jun 1938:

Mrs. John Schuler

             Mrs. John Schuler, age 82 years, died very suddenly Monday morning, June 6, at 10:25 o’clock.  Mrs. Schuler, only the day before, had entertained a large number of her relatives with a dinner at her home in Mound City.

             Mrs. Schuler is survived by ten daughters, Mrs. Minnie McNeil, Mrs. Mary Parker and Miss Bertha Schuler of Mound City, Mrs. Jessie Hess and Mrs. Agnes Crippen of Mounds, Mrs. Anna Hibbs of Cape Girardeau, Mo., Mrs. Elsie Gill of Indianapolis, Ind., Mrs. Alma McCabe of Chicago, Mrs. Musetta Richards of St. Louis, and Mrs. Lenora Burkle of Stuttgart, Ark.; five sons, Everett E. of Mound City, Walter of Tulsa, Okla., Robert of Flint, Mich., Charles of Bakersfield, Calif., and John of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; also twenty-one grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

             Born in Baden, Germany, Mrs. Schuler was brought to Hamilton, Ohio, when one year old.  When 18 she moved to Mound City, which has since been her home.

             Funeral services were held at the M. E. church in Mound City Thursday afternoon with all her children present and Rev. A. L. Jones officiating.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Frederick Dick

             Mrs. Maude Daisy Dick, 19, wife of Frederick Dick of Olmstead, died at St. Mary’s Hospital Cairo, Monday morning, June 6, at 2:35 o’clock following a surgical operation.

             Surviving are her husband, a twenty-month old daughter, Delois Jean; her father and stepmother, Mr. and Mrs. John Ervin of Ullin; also five sisters, Mrs. Ethel Rude, Mrs. Mae Goins, Mrs. Agathel Atherton, Mrs. Dorothy Calvin and Mrs. Anna Luton, all of Olmstead.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon at the Olmstead M. E. Church South, Rev. Mr. Kazee officiating.  Burial was made in Cache Chapel Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Jun 1938:

DIES IN ST. LOUIS

             Word has been received of the death of Henry Sohm, Sr., at St. Louis, Tuesday, June 7.

             Mr. Sohm will be remembered by the old timers in town, as he worked in the National Pump Works with Otto Betts, George Betts and John Read and many others in the late 1890s.

 

AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND VIENNA

             There have been quite a few accidents in the Vienna locality the past two weeks, according to the Vienna Times.

             Elzie L. Griffitt of Grantsburg, was fatally injured in an auto accident Friday afternoon, June 3, ten miles west of Carlinville, when the new Willys car in which he was driving was struck head-on by a 1925 Dodge driven by Alma Roy Dawson of Springfield, Ill.  Dawson is being held in the Macoupin County jail as a result of the accident.

             Charlie Wallace was killed instantly Thursday, June 2, when a tractor he was driving in a corn field came too close to the edge of a creek, turned over, throwing Wallace into the water and falling on top of him.  He died of a fractured skull.  He was plowing corn for Colmore Upton just east of Vienna.

             A truck and an automobile, the latter being driven by Arthur Truitt of Vienna collided head-on on a narrow bridge north of Dixon Springs at the Resettlement Experimental Station Friday morning.  Both of the drivers thought that he had sufficient time to cross the bridge before the other got to it, and when it was realized that they were going to meet, it was too late to check their machines enough to avoid the collision.  Both the truck and the car were pretty badly damaged, but no one was injured.

             A Chevrolet sedan driven by James Smith of Harrisburg was badly damaged in a crash north of Vienna Monday morning.  Smith was driving south around a curve.  A state truck pulling a mower was mowing the right-of-way.  Smith tried to avoid striking the truck and in turning his steering wheel so short, his car turned over and fell against the state truck.  The truck was not damaged to any great extent and both of the drivers were uninjured.

             Paul Rusher of Vienna and Willis Mathis, formerly of Vienna, escaped death Wednesday night when the car in which they were riding at a high rate of speed, careened off the curve on U. S. 45 2 ½ miles south of Vienna.  The car was a total wreck, having turned over three times, but the boys escaped with minor bruises as a result of their fearful experience.

             (Alonzo Griffit married Innie M. Howard on 30 Mar 1893, in Pope Co., Ill.  The application for a military headstone shows Elza enlisted on 16 Sep 1929, and was honorably discharged on 7 Nov 1930.  “The Marine Corps records fail to show that he ever served as Griffith, but as Griffitt.”  The death certificate states that Elzie Lee Griffith, of Troy, Ill., was born 16 Apr 1904, in Dixon Springs, Ill., the son of Alonzo Griffiths and Ennie Howard, a native of Golconda, Ill., died 4 Jun 1938, in Carlinville, Macoupin Co., Ill., and was buried in Hazel Cemetery in Dixon Springs.  His marker reads:  Elza Griffitt Illinois Sgt. U. S. Marine Corps June 4, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL OF JUDGE HARTWELL

             Funeral services for E. E. Hartwell, long and well-known citizen of Marion, who died Wednesday afternoon, were held at the Cash Funeral Home at Marion Friday afternoon.  Rev. Warner Muir officiated and interment was at the Maplewood Cemetery at Marion.

             Judge Hartwell was well known in Pulaski County having presided here in circuit court.

             At one time he delivered the commencement address to the Mound City Community High School graduating class.

             M. F. Browner of Mound City attended the funeral at Marion.

             (Edward E. Hartwell married Myrtle Howard on 20 Jun 1897, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Lorenzo D. Hartwell married Eolia Calvert on 30 Apr 1871, in Williamson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Edward E. Hartwell, clerk, was born 13 Jan 1872, in Marion, Ill., the son of L. D. Hartwell, a native of Illinois, and Ola Calvert, a native of Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., died 7 Jun 1938, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., the husband of Myrtle Hartwell, and was buried in Maplewood Cemetery in Marion.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Two Mounds Boys Drown Tuesday

             One of the most tragic accidents in Pulaski County occurred Tuesday afternoon about 3:30 when Robert Foss, Jr., 11, and Hugh Shaw, 13, both of Mounds, were drowned in the pond on the W. I. Connell farm located on the black-top northeast of Mounds.

             The two boys along with Bobby Stout and Ralph Daniels also of Mounds were supposedly fishing in the pond and had rowed to the north end which is about 8 or 10 feet deep.  Foss and Shaw got out of the boat and had dropped into the water, when suddenly Foss, who was unable to swim, lost his hold on the boat and was unable to catch hold again.  Shaw could not swim either, but tried to save Foss and in so doing was pulled under too.

             Neither Stout nor Daniels could swim and so they rowed the boat to the shore leaving Foss and Shaw in the water.  Stout ran to the farm house and got Mrs. Albert Connell, who was just leaving for town, and Mrs. Connell had the presence of mind to call Dr. Elkins at Mounds.

             By the time Dr. Elkins had arrived quite a crowd had gathered but no one was able to dive down and bring the boys up.  The doctor then suggested that Mrs. Connell call the Country Club and get someone from there to come and help him get the boys out.  After the boys had been in the water some 20 or 30 minutes, Edwin Davis, who was at the Club, arrived and got them out.

             Dr. Wesenberg of Mound City had been called and was asked to bring the pulmotor, but it was no use.  The boys had been in the water so long and their lungs were so full of water that the pulmotor could not help them.

             Robert Foss is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Foss, and Hugh Shaw lived with his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kline.

             Albert Connell, who with his wife and two sons live on the farm, has repeatedly told boys who have come to the pond to fish that it was a very dangerous place.  Although the south end is not very deep and is mostly used for a duck pond and water hole for the pigs, the north end which is near the levee, is quite deep and dangerous.

             Funeral services for the two boys were held Thursday afternoon.  The services for Foss were at the Assembly of God Church in Mounds with Rev. Ray B. Hall officiating. Burial was made at Mounds.

             Rev. S. C. Benninger officiated at the services for Shaw at the Congregational church in Mounds.  Burial was in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Robert Edgar Foss, Jr., was born about 1927, the son of Robert E. Foss and Anna E. Cowan, died 14 Jun 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Robert Foss, Jr., Son 1927-1938 Edith M. Foss 1935-1938 Dau.   The death certificate of Hugh Ellsworth Shaw states that he was born about 1926, the daughter of Fred J. Shaw and Metta May Stady, died 14 Jun 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  Hugh E. Shaw Dec. 13, 1925 June 14, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Jun 1938:

Two Young Boys Drown in Farm-Home Pond

             Tragedy stalked through two homes in Mounds when Hugh Shaw, 13, nephew of Mr. and Mrs. J. Martin Kline, and Robert Foss, Jr., 11, were drowned Tuesday afternoon in a small pond on W. I. Connell’s farm on the black-top road.

             Four young boys, who were supposed to be playing at the school grounds, wandered up the hill and to the Connell pond, although it seems they had been warned against doing so.  No grown person was nearer than the Connell home and no one there knew of the tragedy until the two other boys, Bobby Stout and Ralph Daniels, went to the house for help.

             It developed, as near as the two frightened young survivors of the tragedy could tell, that Hugh Shaw lost his life in an attempt to save Robert Foss, Jr., who, after hanging onto a small boat in the pond, tried to “get bottom.”  The other three boys had evidently been in the pond, but had gone ashore.

             The pond, while small, is said to be about nine feet deep.  When both young Foss and Shaw began to sink, Bobby Stout went in and tried to save them, but failed in his attempt.

             A telephone call from the farm brought Doctors Otis T. Hudson, H. J. Elkins and also Dr. W. R. Wesenberg of Mound City, who brought a pulmotor.

             Young Edwin Davis, a diver from the Egyptian Golf Club, recovered the bodies of the young boys and the doctors tried every known method available for resuscitation, but to no avail.

             That evening, Dr. O. T. Hudson, coroner, held an inquest and a verdict of accidental death by drowning was returned.

             Funeral services for Robert Foss, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Foss, were held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Assembly of God church with Rev. Ray B. Hall officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with G. A. James directing.

             At this writing funeral arrangements for the burial of Hugh Shaw have not been completed, awaiting the arrival of his father, Fred Shaw from Denver, Colorado.  The boy and his twin sister, Betty, have made their home with Mrs. Kline for years.  J. T. Ryan will have charge.

 

A. C. Burr Retires from Illinois Central Service

             Archie C. Burr of this city has recently retired from service as an engineer on the Illinois Central Railroad, having been employed on this system since 1896.

             Mr. Burr started as a very young man, as a freight brakeman on the Lehigh Valley Railroad, Sayre, Pa., in April, 1883.  He was promoted to fireman in February, 1886.  Another promotion came to him on June 1, 1889, when he was made engineer.  In October, 1889, he went to work for the Santa Fe at Topeka, Kan.  Another change was made by Mr. Burr, when in October 1891 he entered the service of the Chicago & Alton at Bloomington, Ill.

             Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia & Reading railroads claimed his service from March 1892, to November 1893.  He made yet another change in March of 1894, when he went to work for Atlantic & Pacific at Williams, Arizona.

             His service with the Illinois Central began in the Chicago Division in October 1896.  He was transferred to the Miss. Division Jan. 1, 1897, and retired May 14, 1938.

             Mr. Burr was born in Meshoppen, Pa., August 7, 1866.  He was married to Miss Minnie Hugg in 1892 at Waverly, N.Y.  Coming to Mounds in 1904, Mr. and Mrs. Burr have since made their home here.  They have one daughter, Mrs. Laurence Schneider.  It will please their many friends to be assured that they expect to remain in Mounds.

             (His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Archie C. Burr 1865-1951.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Henry Sherman Cruse

             Henry Sherman Cruse, age 69 years, died Wednesday morning, June 15, at the home of his son, Ray Cruse in Pulaski.  His wife, Mrs. Lulu Cruse died May 11, at the home of a daughter in Evansville, Ind.

             Mr. Cruse is survived by eight children, Mrs. Edith Junkerman and Ralph Cruse of Mounds, Walter Cruse of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Marie Day and Dewey Cruse of Flint, Mich., Mrs. Mabel Lovelette of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. Helen Williamson of Peoria, and Ray Cruse of Pulaski.

             Funeral services will be held at 2 o’clock this afternoon in the Christian church at Pulaski.  Rev. Glotfelty will officiate and interment will be made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  The casket bearers will be Rex Baker, W. H. Aldred, W. A. Reeves, Henry Verble, Loren Kennedy and Henry Bowles.  Wilson Funeral Service will direct.

             (His death certificate states that Henry Sherman Cruse was born about 1869, the son of John Cruse, and died 15 Jun 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the widower of Lula Cruse.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Hugh Shaw

             Funeral services for Hugh Shaw, who was drowned in a pond on the W. I. Connell farm northeast of Mounds Tuesday afternoon, will be held this afternoon at 3 o’clock in the Congregational church, Rev. C. S. Benninger officiating.

 

Mr. George Braddy and Mr. Pete Harmon remain quite ill at their homes here.  Mrs. L. H. Needham is also on the sick list.  (Ullin)

 

Appreciation

             We take this opportunity to extend our thanks and appreciation to those who so greatly assisted us during our sorrow in the tragic death and loss of our dear one.  Especially do we thank the doctors who worked so long and faithfully to restore life, the minister, the choir, the Daughters of Ruth Sunday School Class, the donors of the beautiful flowers, the cards and words of sympathy.  We will always feel grateful.

Dr. H. J. Elkins and

Daughter Bobbie

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jun 1938: 

MRS. HARRY HAMER DIES

             The funeral services for Mrs. Harry Hamer were held yesterday afternoon at the G. A. James Funeral Home in Mounds.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor of the Baptist Church of Mounds, officiated.

             The body was interred in the Beechwood Cemetery.

             Mrs. Hamer was a sister of Leon___ Armstrong of Mounds.  Much of her earlier life was spent in this city.  She died at her home in ___is, June 20.  Harry Hamer, her husband, accompanied the body to Mounds.

             The casket bearers were George ____, August Crosson, William To___, Otto Pletchers, John Simmons and Clyde Titus.

 

MRS. GEORGE KELLER SUCCUMBS TO HEART TROUBLE

             Mrs. Ella Cole Keller, a longtime resident of Mound City, died at her home in St. Louis Monday evening after an illness of a few hours.

             Mrs. Keller was born in Mound City and resided here until about 10 years ago, when she and her husband moved to St. Louis, where they have lived ever since.

             The body arrived in Mound City Wednesday and was taken to the James Funeral Home, but was later removed to the home of her son, C. C. Keller.  The funeral services were held in the Pilgrim Congregational Church Thursday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. Fix, of Cairo.

             Mrs. Keller is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Evelyn Mulcohy and Mrs. Elizabeth Hironimus of St. Louis and Mrs. Emma Margaret Thomasson of Mounds; one son, C. C. Keller of Mound City; and five grandchildren.

             Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

MRS. IDA MARIE HELMAN DIES NEAR VILLA RIDGE

             Funeral services for Aunt Ida Helman, as she was known to the entire community, were held Sunday afternoon at the Union Church at Villa Ridge by Rev. S. C. Benninger of Mounds and Grand Chain.

             Mrs. Helman has been a lifelong resident of the Fruitville community.  She lived among friends of her school days and endeared herself to all by her kind deeds and cheerful disposition.

             She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Alcie Thomasson of Mounds and a number of nieces and nephews, three of whom she was a mother as well as an aunt.  The three were left orphans in their tender years by the death of their parents.  They are Mrs. Glen Aldrich, Mrs. Ray Palmer and Earl Helman.

             Her nephews who served as pallbearers were:  Clarence, Edward, Ralph, Loren and Ivan Koonce, and Earl Helman.

             Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

             G. A. James directed the funeral.

             (M. L. Helman married Ida Koonce on 22 Jun 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Nicholas N. Koonce married Margaret A. Phillips on 21 Nov 1854, in Bond Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Ida Marie Koonce Helman was born about 1861, the daughter of Nicholas Koonce and Margaret Philips, and died 17 Jun 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of M. L. Helman.  There is a marker for her husband, Maris L. Helman in Cairo City Cemetery at Mounds, but not for Ida.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CAIRO ROAD TERMED “DEATH AVENUE”

             U.S. Route 51 south of Cache Bridge has well been termed “Death Avenue.”  Following a serious accident the Enterprise stated “this is just another wreck on this highway which looks so pretty in the summer, but which, for motorists is literally an ‘Avenue of Death.’”

             Ray Palmer of Mounds was a victim of this wreck and died a week later from injuries received.  An editorial from the Enterprise of May 1, 1936, is repeated here:

A MONUMENT

             “Now that Ray Palmer of Mounds is dead, we suggest that the state highway department erect a white cross at the scene of the accident down on the Avenue of Death leading into Cairo.  In fact, crosses should be erected for all the people who died as a result of those stately beautiful and majestic trees.

             “Perhaps someday, when sense instead of sentiment, rules us, those trees will become a WPA project and be grubbed out.  There is no more dangerous drive in Southern Illinois than down Death Avenue, that shady road leading into Cairo.”

             The foregoing quotation, although applied to Ray Palmer of Mounds is also applicable to Floyd Talley of our own city.

 

MRS. ESSIE GRAY BOLAR

             Mrs. Essie Gray Bolar passed away suddenly of a heart attack Tuesday evening at her home in Mound City.  She had been in ill health for some time and the shock of the accident involving her son’s friends, disturbed her serious condition.

             Mrs. Bolar has been a resident of Mound City for many years.  She is survived by her husband, Martin Bolar; two sons, Hubert, who is employed by the Cairo Motor Sales and Jim, who is in the U. S. Navy; one daughter, Mrs. Charles Wesenberg, who was with her at the time of her death.

             Mr. Bolar had recently gone to San Pedro, Calif., on business and Jim sailed Monday from San Pedro for Alaska.

             Funeral arrangements are waiting word from Mr. Bolar and Jim.

             G. A. James is in charge of arrangements.

             (Robert Gray married Mintie Carpenter on 4 Sep 1886, in Franklin Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Essie May Bolar was born about 1890, the daughter of Robert Gray and Mintie Carpenter, and died 21 Jun 1938, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Martin R. Bolar.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. CASSIE TRAVERS DIES

             Mrs. Cassie Travers, a highly esteemed and long-time resident of Mounds, died at her home on N. Delaware, last Sunday morning after a short illness.

             She is survived by two children, Mrs. Ed Raub and Mr. John R. Travers, both of Mounds; and twelve grandchildren.  Mrs. Walter Waite one of the grandchildren, had been raised by Mrs. Travers since infancy.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at St. Raphael’s Church in Mounds, Rev. Gilmartin reading the mass.  Burial was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

             J. T. Ryan conducted the funeral.
             (Her death certificate states that Catherine Travers was born about 1870, the daughter of Patrick Molley and Katherine Brice, and died 19 Jun 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of John Travers.  Her marker in St. Mary’s Cemetery reads:  Cassie Travers 1867-1938 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

One Death; Four Hurt in Auto Wreck

             “Death Avenue” claimed another victim Sunday night when Floyd Wesley Talley, 1938 graduate of the Mound City Community High School was fatally injured in an auto accident.  Floyd, a youth of 17, succumbed to his injuries at St. Mary’s Infirmary Monday morning at ___ 0’clock.

             The other occupants of the car, ____an Boren driving, were Arlie ___e, son of Mr. and Mrs. George ____e; Freddie Winkler, son of ___erk and Mrs. Mike Winkler of Mound City; and George Ed ____ of South Bend, Ind.  George ___ was visiting his aunts, Mrs. George ____ and Mrs. Lewis Braswell of Mound City.  Boren and Rutledge were removed to their home in Mound City on Monday.  Winkler and ___yne were retained at the hospital for further treatments.

             Winkler suffered a fractured pelvis and internal injuries.  His ___on was very serious, having ___d an operation and two blood transfusions, one from his father and the other from a Mr. Gray, an employee of the Illinois Iowa Power ___ Cairo office.

             He remains in the hospital with a fractured ankle.

             ___ and Rutledge received injuries of a minor nature.

             The accident occurred Sunday evening at 10:30 when the youths were returning from the show in Cairo.  ___ car drew near the artesian well on Route 51 Boren suddenly lost control of the car when he was ­­­ to apply his brakes suddenly ___ wet pavement, causing the automobile to crash into a large tree ___ one foot from the pavement.  The injured youths were taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary in an ambulance and by Hubert Bolar, Mound City, who was immediately ahead of the Boren car before it crashed.  ___ passing the car containing the ___ Bolar took place in front of the Boren car.  Because of a dim taillight of the car preceding Bolar had not noticed that the ___ was so close.  The glaring headlight of an oncoming car caused obstructed vision.  In order to ___ crashing into the car ahead ___ Bolar was forced to apply his brakes, which he did gradually when he saw that it was necessary to use more force.  This action necessitated Boren’s suddenly applying the brakes of his own car, resulting in the fatal crash.

             Floyd Talley had been employed as a carrier boy in Mound City for the Cairo Evening Citizen.  He was ___ known with his pleasing personality making him beloved to all who knew him.  He was a member of the Mound City Championship ____ball team this year and had been planning to attend S. I. N. U. at Carbondale next year.  It was with deep regret that the community received news of the death of the youth.

             _____ Talley, Floyd’s father, and ____ Wilburn, his brother, survive, ___ numerous other relatives.

             At his mother’s death, 13 years ago, Floyd and his brother have been cared for in the home of the aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Henry ____ of Mound City, who have shared the parental duties with Mr. Talley.

             The funeral services were held ___nday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Congregational church in Mound City, Rev. Fix of Cairo, pastor of the church, officiating.

             The graduating class attended in _____.

             The casket bearers were George T. ___y, Paul Moallankamp, John ____, Lawrence Edwards, Wayne ____ and Glenn Gustafson,

             Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.

             (His death certificate states that Floyd Wesley Talley, laborer and school boy, was born 29 Jun 1920, in Cairo, Ill., the son of James Noah Talley, a native of Grand Chain, Ill., and Hallie Carson, a native of Metropolis, Ill., died 20 Jun 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Son Floyd W. Talley June 29, 1920 June 19, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIES IN CHICAGO

             Mrs. Margaret Sweeney, who had spent her early years in Mound City, passed away last Sunday morning at her home in Chicago at the ripe old age of 86.

             Mrs. Sweeney had enjoyed good health until within the last year and had often made visits to her daughter, Mrs. Joe Westerman and son George, of Mound City.  Another daughter, Mrs. Mary Norman of Chicago survives her.

             Of a large family of brothers and sisters there remains three brothers, Dan, Will and Jim O’Sullivan all of Mound City.  She leaves nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

             The remains were accompanied to Mound City by her daughter, Mrs. Norman, and son Norwood, of Chicago.

             (Her death certificate states that Margaret Sweeney was born 2 Jul 1853, in Columbus, Ky., the daughter of Patrick O’Sullivan, a native of County Cork, Ireland, and Mary O’Shay, a native of Ireland, died 19 Jun 1938, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., widow of Joseph Sweeney, and was buried at Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

COLORADO MAN IDENTIFIED

             Clyde Lentz of Colorado, formerly of Mounds, sent a newspaper from Colorado to Morgan Holden of Mounds.  The paper contained the picture and announcement of death of a man who was found killed near a railroad track in Colorado.

             Mr. Lentz thought the picture resembled Harry Coleman of Mounds and Mrs. Bill Kakos, sister of Coleman, and several others of Mounds identified the picture as that of Coleman.  He had been gone from Mounds about nine years.

 

WE MOURN

             Much sadness has overspread Mound City this week.  Four funerals, told elsewhere in these columns, were held within the past week.  They were those of Mrs. Sweeney, Mrs. George Keller, Mrs. Martin Bolar and Floyd Talley.

             The sudden and tragic death of Floyd Talley gave special gloom to the community.  Floyd was in an automobile with four other boys returning about 10:30 to their home from Cairo where they had attended the picture show.  Others in the car were Ivan Boren, driver; Arlie Rutledge; Fred Winkler; and George E. Payne.

             These five young men are of splendid caliber and right principles.  It should be a comfort to the parents that the accident did not occur as a result of drinking or unapproved carousing.

 

Mrs. Cora O’Hare of Brown’s Business College of Marion, attended the funeral of Mrs. Sweeney Wednesday.

 

Mr. Norman, who came to Mound City for the burial of his granddaughter, Mrs. Margaret Sweeney, has returned to his home in Chicago.  His mother, Mrs. Norman, remained for a short stay with her sister, Mrs. Joe Westerman and brother ____ Sweeney.

 

Fred Shaw of Denver, Colo., was here to attend the funeral of his son, Hugh Shaw, who was drowned.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Jun 1938: 

Mrs. Ida Marie Helman

             Mrs. Ida Marie Koonce Helman, age 77 years, died Friday morning, June 17, at 7:30 o’clock at her home east of Villa Ridge.  She had been ill for some time.  Mrs. Helman was a sister of the late Elmer J. Koonce and for many years made her home with him and his family.  Since his death she had continued to live there with a nephew and family.  She is survived by her nephews and nieces and one sister, Mrs. Alice Thomasson, of this city.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at Union Church, Villa Ridge, Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Nephews of the deceased served as casket bearers.  Burial was in Villa Ridge cemetery with G. A. James directing.

 

Sister of L. B. Armstrong Dies Monday in St. Louis

             Mrs. Grace Hamer, age 55 years, wife of Harry Hamer, died Monday night, June 20, at her home in St. Louis.  She had been in poor health for several years.

             Surviving are her husband, her mother, Mrs. Edith Armstrong Patton, of Quincy, Ill.; one brother, L. B. Armstrong of Mounds; and a nephew, John Armstrong of Chester.

             The body was brought to Mounds and taken to the James Funeral Home where funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at one o’clock, the Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor of the Baptist church, officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, August Crosson, William Tobin, George Green, Otto Pletscher, John Simmons and Clyde Titus, serving as casket bearers and G. A. James directing.

 

“Death Avenue” of Trees Claims another Victim

             Floyd Wesley Talley, 17, of Mound City, was fatally injured, Mike Winkler, Jr., son of City Clerk Mike Winkler of Mound City, now lies at the point of death, and three other boys were injured when their skidding car struck one of the famous avenue of trees in the drainage district north of Cairo on Route 51 at about 10:30 o’clock Sunday night.

             The injured boys were rushed to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, by passing motorists.  Young Talley breathed his last at 2 a.m. Monday morning.  Young Winkler, who suffered a broken pelvis and other injuries in that region of the body, has been given several blood transfusions and the doctors now give him a fighting chance.  Ivan Boren, son of Supt. Fred Boren of the Swisshelm Veneer Co. of Mound City, was cut across the right side of his head; Arlie Rutledge, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Rutledge of Mound City was hurt about the right side of the jaw; and George Ed Payne of South Bend, Ind., nephew of Mrs. George Gunn of Mound City, suffered an injured right ankle.

             According to accounts of the accident, the car driven by Young Boren and traveling north was passed by a car driven by Hubert Bolar of Mound City also going north, who found it necessary to apply his brakes after passing because of another northbound car that he had failed to see before passing the Boren car, due to a dim tail light, and the headlights of an approaching car from the north.  It is presumed that Boren suddenly saw he would have to apply his brakes and in doing so his car was caused to leave the concrete where it slipped along the shoulder hitting a tree.

             Floyd Talley, age 17 years, 11 months and 20 days, was a member of the class of 1938, graduating class of Mound City Community High school.  He is survived by his father, Noah Talley, of Mound City and a brother, Lee Wilbur Talley, also of Mound City.  He made his home with his aunt, Mrs. Henry Hall for the past 13 years, since the death of his mother.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, at 3 o’clock at the Pilgrim Congregational Church, Mound City, the Rev. Joseph Fix of the Cairo Presbyterian Church officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Martin Bolar

             Mrs. Essie Bolar of Mound City died suddenly at about 6 o’clock Tuesday evening, June 21, following a heart attack.

             She is survived by her husband, Martin Bolar, who is in San Pedro, Calif., on business; two sons, James Bolar, who is in the United States Navy, sailing Monday for Alaska, Hubert Bolar, of Mound City; one daughter, Mrs. Charles Wesenberg, also of Mound City.

             Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

 

Mrs. Catherine Travers

             Mrs. Catherine Travers, widow of the late John Travers, died Sunday morning, June 19, at 1:40 o’clock at her home in this city at the age of 69 years.  Mrs. Travers had been ill from colitis the past two weeks; nevertheless her death came as a surprise and a shock to the members of her family and to her many friends.

             Catherine Malley (familiarly called Cassie) was born in June 1869, in the County of Donegal, Ireland, the daughter of Patrick and Kate Malley.  Coming to this country at the age of 16 years, she remained in New York about three years then came to Cairo.  She was married in Cairo in 1886 to John Travers who also was born in Donegal County, Ireland, but whom she had never met until after coming to the United States.  The couple became pioneer settlers of Mounds and to this union four children were born; three daughters, Mrs. Edna Schueing and Mrs. Cassie Dansker, both of whom preceded her in death, and Mrs. Edward of Mounds; one son, John B. Travers of Mounds; also twelve grandchildren; Mrs. Walter Waite (the former Rosyln Schueing) whom she reared from infancy; Louise Rosemary and Edward Raub, William, James, Katherine, Edward, George, Mary Ann, Sarah Jane and Charles Travers, all of Mounds.  Her husband died ten years ago.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Mounds, the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery with H. C. Fellenstein, F. L. Graves, Charles Raub, William Tobin, L. B. Armstrong and S. A. Shifley serving as casket bearers.  J. T. Ryan directed the funeral.

 

Louie Schueing of Chicago was here Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Cassie Travers.

 

Mrs. George McKenna and little daughter, Jane, of St. Louis, were called to Mounds Monday on account of the death of Mrs. Cassie Travers.

 

Appreciation

             We gratefully acknowledge the kind thoughts and expressions of sympathy of our friends during our recent sorrow.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kline

Betty Shaw

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of Hugh Shaw here Friday were his father, Fred Shaw of Colorado Springs; Mrs. S. D. Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. Egbert Gelvin and daughters of Columbia City, Ind.; Mrs. John R. Hinch, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Butterfield, Mr. and Mrs. William C. Stady, Miss Muriel Stady and Page Stady of Marseilles, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. William C. Stady, Jr. and son of Danville, Ill.; Miss Virginia Thorzen of Leland, Ill.; Mrs. J. P. Brandon and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mason of Essex, Mo.

 

Mrs. George Keller

             Mrs. Ella Cole Keller, wife of George Keller, died suddenly June 30 at 6:30 p.m. at their home in Maplewood, Mo., due to a heart attack.

             Mrs. Keller, until eleven years ago a resident of Mound City, was the daughter of Elizabeth and J. W. Cole, early pioneers.  She was a charter member of the Pilgrim Congregational Church of Mound City.  Her age was 68 years.

             Surviving are her husband, one son, C. C. Keller of Mound City; three daughters, Mrs. Teenie Thomasson of Mounds, Mrs. George Hieronimus and Mrs. Evelyn Mulcahy of Maplewood, Mo.; a sister, Mrs. William Pease of Bloomington; a half-brother, W. J. Biggerstaff of Mounds; six grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Pilgrim Congregational Church, Mound City.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery, G.A. James directing.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Jul 1938: 

BOLAR FUNERAL

             Funeral services for Mrs. Essie Bolar, who passed away very suddenly at her home here last week were held Saturday afternoon at the M. E. church with Rev. A. L. ____ officiating.  The casket bearers were Ralph Kessee, Robert Mur___, Paul Stout, Willis Edwards, ___Cull, and George Cowles, Jr.

             Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead.

             G. A. James directed the funeral.

 

SAID TO HAVE SHOT MAN THEN FOUND HIM DEAD

             From out of the office of the sheriff and state’s attorney comes a story this week of Martin McKee, colored, who is charged with killing Ray Davis, colored, at Olmstead last Sunday night and then discovered his body.

             Jim Wilson, deputy, tells how it all worked out after he went with Sheriff McIntire to the scene Sunday night and found Davis dead in an alley, having been shot twice with a 20 gauge shotgun.  One arm was badly shattered and into the chest went the other shot, fired at close quarters.

             Inquiry revealed that McKee owned a 20 gauge shotgun, double-barreled and search found the gun, recently fired, and shells whose wads were similar.  Further inquiry revealed that there were four together and that they had been in Grand Chain that afternoon eating fish and that Davis had drawn a knife and threatened to cut one of the men.

             Finally, it drifted around that George Moss was with them and a man named Shaw and the story then came out and was pieced together.  McKee is said to have admitted the killing, driving up near his home, going in the house and getting his shotgun.  Shaw fled and Moss was leaving about that time when Davis was killed.

             Later McKee drove away, returning that night to find Davis dead where he had fallen, knife in hand, and he spread the alarm that there was a dead man in his alley.  His car is said to have blood spattered on it.

             (The death certificate states that Roy G. Davis was born about 1906, the son of Grant and Sarah Davis, and died 26 Jun 1938, in Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Artie Davis.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT DIES IN DETROIT

W. T. Parker passed away following a heart attack about noon Sunday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Schneider in Detroit, Mich.

Mr. Parker, who at the time of his death had reached the age of 81, had resided in Mound City until the death of his wife, June 28, 1936, at which time he went to Cleveland to reside with his daughter, who later moved to Detroit.  While a resident of Mound City, Mr. Parker was employed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., but was pensioned several years ago.  While in their employ he made many friends throughout the county and many were sorry to hear of his death.

He is survived by his daughter; a son, Arthur Parker of Centralia; one brother, Dyas Parker, of Cairo; and several grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in the M. E. church at Mound City, with Rev. A. L. Jones officiating.  Sons and nephews of the deceased served as pallbearers.  Interment was in the Beech Grove Cemetery.

G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

 

A number of friends from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Mr. Pete Harman at his home in Ullin last Thursday.

             (His death certificate states that Peter Harmon was born about 1866, the son of Matthew Harmon, and died 22 Jun 1938, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ella Ruah Harmon.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Pete Harmon 1865-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Frey and family have returned to Lebanon where they are spending the summer.  They were in Mound City the past week to attend the funeral of Floyd Talley and for business reasons.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Jul 1938: 

Former Mound City Resident Dies Sunday in Detroit

             W. T. Parker, age 81 years, died Sunday, June 26, following a heart attack at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Schneider in Detroit, Mich.

             Mr. Parker for many years a resident of Mound City, was also for years employed as a Metropolitan Life Insurance agent, having been pensioned by that company a number of years ago.  He was known and liked by a large circle of friends.

             Surviving are his daughter, Mrs. Schneider; a son, Arthur Parker of Centralia; one brother, Dyas Parker of Cairo; also several grandchildren, nieces and nephews.  His wife preceded him in death on June 28, 1936.

             Funeral services were held in Mound City at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, Rev. A. L. Jones, pastor, officiating.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

To My Mother

Dedicated to the memory of Sarah C. Stern, whose birthday is July 1.  Born 1882 died March 22, 1938.

             Just a year ago, dear mother,

You were with us for your birthday.

             Since that time you’ve gone to Heaven,

Where you’ll never older grow.

Loving Angela came and took you

             Carried you on wings of love;

To the portals opened wide

             Where you’ll never older grow.

Tears and sorrow, gone forever;

             Night will never round you fall,

For your soul, dear mother, dwells

             Where you’ll never older grow.

We are bowed in grief and sorrow,’

             And we yearn for you, today,

But some day we’ll meet you there,

             Where you’ll never older grow.

—Brema

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Jul 1938: 

Mrs. Gladys Prim Slaughter

             Mrs. Gladys Prim Slaughter died Wednesday morning, July 6, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Prim, one-half mile west of Mounds, at the age of 34 years.  She had been ill many months.

             Surviving are one son, Paul Edward Slaughter; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Prim; three sisters, Mrs. Gwendolyn McClure and Misses Maxine and Lucille Prim; two brothers, Von and Harold Prim, all of Mounds.  Her husband, Charles Slaughter, died from an accident ten years ago.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Congregational church, Rev. S. C. Benninger, officiating.  Burial will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             (John Prim married Gertrude B. Williams on 6 Aug 1902, in Pope Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Gladys Prim Slaughter was born 5 Jun 1904, in Atwood, Ill., the daughter of John Prim and Gertrude Williams, natives of Union Co., Ill., died 6 Jul 1938, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Charles E. Slaughter, and was buried at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Gladys Prim Slaughter June 5, 1904 July 6, 1938 In Loving Memory.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Jul 1938: 

FILED WILL

             The will of the late Mrs. H. J. Elkins of Mounds has been filed and aside from bequests amounting to $10,000, all goes to her husband, Dr. Elkins.

             Mrs. Elkins made the will about two years ago and it is short and concise.  It gives $2,000 to each of two cousins named, $1,000 to a Baptist Church in Indiana and $5,000 to a college in Indiana of which she was a graduate.  All the remainder of the estate is to Dr. Elkins who is named as executor to serve without bond.

             Mrs. Elkins met a tragic and untimely death about six weeks ago when she was electrocuted in the bathroom of her home.  She was a woman of considerable business interests.

 

REV. J. H. MORPHIS PASSED AWAY WEDNESDAY

             Rev. John Henry Morphis, 86, a retired Presbyterian minister, passed away at his home in Creal Springs, Ill., on Wednesday, July 6th.  He had been in failing health for a number of months.

             Rev. Morphis has long been a familiar and loved figure in the ministry in Johnson County.  He had been active in the ministry for 63 years, devoting most of his time to churches in Southern Illinois and in evangelistic work elsewhere.

             This veteran minister of the Gospel was born in Jeffersonville, Ind., Aug. 10, 1852.  He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Morphis; and son, Roland Morphis, both of Creal Springs.—Vienna Times

             Rev. Morphis is widely known in Presbyterian circles.  He held important pastorates in cities like Danville, Ill., and Bowling Green, Mo.  He numbered among his friends several men of national prominence, including the late Uncle Joe Cannon of Danville and Champ Clark of Missouri.

             No task was too large or too small for this Gospel messenger, nor could it be too humble.  Long after he was retired, he would preach wherever he could find a little flock to hear his words.  His restless feet continued to carry the Gospel until death overtook him.

             Funeral services were last Saturday at the Gilead Church north of Simpson amid the hills that he rode in the early days of his ministry.  Rev. John Thomas of Springfield, Ill., conducted the services and interment was in the cemetery nearby.

             (John H, Morphis married Mary R. Thomas on 30 Dec 1875, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Henry Morphis was born 10 Aug 1851, in Jeffersonville, Ind., the son of James A. Morphis, died 6 Jul 1938, in Creal Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Gilead Cemetery near Simpson, Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Mary R. Morphis 1856-1946 Rev. John H. Morphis 1851-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Word has been received at his place (Mounds) of the death of Lee Nourse, an I. C. conductor, who dropped dead in Memphis, Thursday.  Mr. Nourse was a former resident of this place.

             (His draft registration in 1917 states Horace Lee Nourse, Illinois Central Railroad conductor, was born 29 Dec 1888, in Jackson, Tenn., and had a wife and two children.  His death certificate states that Horace Lee Nourse, railroad conductor, of 1037 S. Third St., Memphis, Tenn., was born 29 Dec 1888, in Tennessee, the son of William H. Nourse, a native of Kentucky, and Georgia Lou Underhill, a native of Mississippi, died 7 Jul 1938, in St. Joseph Hospital in Memphis, Shelby Co., Tenn., of cirrhosis of the liver and cardio-renal disease, and was buried in Jackson, Tenn.  He was buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Jackson, Madison Co., Tenn.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Funeral services were held for Mrs. Gladys Slaughter, Friday afternoon, at the Congregational church.  Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, officiated.  G. A. James was the funeral director and interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Jul 1938: 

Rev. and Mrs. P. R. Glotfelty were in DuQuoin Tuesday attending the funeral of Mr. Corydon McElvaine, a Civil War veteran.  He returned on Wednesday from the Gettysburg Reunion and died on Friday.  He was a cousin of Mrs. Glotfelty.

             (Corydon P. McElvain married Lourinda Reid on 24 Oct 1872, in Perry Co., Ill.  Joseph Harvey McIlvain married Esther Lipe on 26 Nov 1835, in Perry Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Corydon McElvain, retired miner, was born 12 Feb 1846, in DuQuoin, Ill., the son of Joseph Harvey McElvain, a native of Pennsylvania, and Esther Lipe, died 9 Jul 1938, in DuQuoin, Perry Co., Ill., husband of Lurinda McElvain.  The application for a military headstone states that Corydon McElvain enlisted 1 Aug 1862, and was discharged 25 May 1865, as a private in Co. A, 81st Illinois Infantry, died 9 July 1938, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at DuQuoin.  He was captured at Guntown, Miss., on 11 Jun 1864 and not heard from since, supposed to be at Andersonville Prison, according to the Adjutant General’s Report.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Lee Nourse

             Lee Nourse, freight engineer, Illinois Central Railroad, Memphis ____, died April 7, in Memphis, Tenn., of heart ailment.  Mr. Nourse formerly lived in Mounds and was ___ liked.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Jul 1938: 

JOSEPH R. FULLERTON DEAD

             Joseph Fullerton well known in Mound City, died at the home of his niece, Mrs. Charles Griffith Thursday about noon.  He was 86 years of age.

             Mr. Fullerton has been ill for a number of years and resided in the Knights of Pythias Home at Decatur until 1937 when he was brought to Mounds soon after the flood.  He resided there until his death.

             The funeral will probably be at 3 p.m. Saturday.

             His nearest relatives are his daughter, Miss Cora Fullerton and the niece with whom he lived.

             (According to his death certificate, Joseph Riley Fullerton was born 7 Jan 1852, in Bloomington, Ind., the son of Thomas Fullerton and Maria Bunger, died 21 Jul 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER OPERATOR OF RED FRONT BURIED YESTERDAY

             William H. French, one of the operators of the Red Front in days gone by as a saloon and later as a pool room, was buried yesterday at the Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.  He died Tuesday morning at his home in Villa Ridge.  The funeral was at St. Raphael Church with Rev. Father Gilmartin in charge.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

             He is survived by his wife, Ella; two brothers, Winnie and Webbie, both of Villa Ridge; two sisters, Mrs. Lulu Kinzey of Evans, Colo., and Miss Fannie French of Villa Ridge.

             (His death certificate states that William Henry French, farmer, was born 27 Jan 1870, in Colesburg, Ky., the son of Lloyd G. French and Mary E. Johnson, natives of Kentucky, and died 19 Jul 1938, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ella C. French.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Jul 1938: 

William Henry French

             William Henry French, age 68, passed away at his home in Villa Ridge Tuesday morning at 1 o’clock following an illness of about one month.  His passing was rather unexpected as it was thought he was making improvement.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Ella C. French; two sisters, Mrs. Lulu Kinsey of Evans, Colo., and Miss Fannie French of Villa Ridge; two brothers, W. L. French and W. G. French of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were conducted from St. Raphael’s Church in Mounds on Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Father Gilmartin and interment was made in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, G. A. James directing.

 

Harry Churchill

             Harry Churchill, age 47 years, died about 1:40 o’clock Friday afternoon, July 15, at his home in Perks, Ill., following a three weeks’ illness of typhoid fever.

             Mr. Churchill is survived by his wife, Bertha; four children, Forrest, Cletis, Leta and Donald, all of Perks; his mother, Mrs. Emma Meak of Perks; four sisters, Mrs. Ada Martin of West Frankfort and Mrs. Lola Davis, Mrs. Golda Davis and Mrs. Vera Isom of Perks; three brothers, Henry Churchill of St. Marie, Ill., and Ray and Lin Churchill of Perks.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon in the Pentecostal church at Perks, Rev. Mrs. Corda Evans officiating.  Interment was made in Mt. Olive Cemetery.  The casket bearers were Walter Herren, George Herren, Roscoe Herren, David Rose, Earl Robinson and Henry Casper.

             Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (According to his death certificate, Harry Churchill, farmer, was born 18 May 1891, in St. Maris, Ill., the son of William Churchill, a native of Marshall, Ill., and Emma Whitman, a native of Terre Haute, Ind., died 15 Jul 1938, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Bertha Churchill, and was buried in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Meisenheimer Schoolhouse Cemetery reads:  Harry Churchill 1891-1938 Bertha Churchill 1891-1971.)

 

Mrs. D. S. Kimzey has arrived from Evans, Colo., called here by the illness and death of her brother, Will French.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Jul 1938: 

PROBE DEATH OF BOY

             The drowning of William Overton, 12-year-old colored boy of Cairo on Monday, whose companions came out of the water and did not miss him, is being probed in Cairo.  There had been horse play before he perished and some think they held him under too long.  The discovery of his death was not made until a man saw the clothes, did not see the swimmer and spread the alarm.  His body was recovered several hours later.  His companions, the story goes, had not missed him when they left the water, a story that does not meet with complete belief.

 

JOSEPH R. FULLERTON

             Funeral services for Joseph R. Fullerton, who died in Mounds Thursday, July 21, were held Saturday afternoon at the Pilgrim Congregational Church in Mound City.  Rev. Joseph W. Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo, officiated.  The rites at the cemetery were conducted by the Mound City Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 197, and the casket bearers were George Eichhorn, John Trampert, George R. Martin, John Read, G. A. James and M. L. Capoot, all members of the Order.  The flower girls were members of the Fidelis Class of the church:  Mrs. M. C. Hunt, Mrs. I. J. Hudson, Jr., Mrs. C. C. Keller, Mrs. E. E. Schuler, Mrs. C. G. McIntire and Miss Grace Moyers.

             Interment was in the family lot at the Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

             Crain Funeral Service of Pulaski was in charge of arrangement.

 

HARRY VIRGIL CHURCHILL

             Harry Virgil Churchill, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Churchill, was born at Ste. Marie, Illinois, on May 15, 1891, and departed this life on July 15, 1938, at the age of 47 years and two months.  He was united in marriage to Bertha Moake on March 15, 1913.  To this union were born four children, Forest, Leta, Cleta and Donald.

             He leaves to mourn his death his wife, four children, a loving mother, Emma Moake; three brothers, Henry of Ste. Marie, Illinois, Roy and Len of Perks; four sisters, Ada Martin of West Frankfort, Lola Davis, Golda Davis and Vera Isom all of Perks; one aunt, Florence McGinnis of Mattoon; and a host of relatives and friends.

             He was converted in the Baptist church some twenty-four years ago, later he rededicated his life to God and received a wonderful experience in God.  He did it whole heartedly, but the cares of this life pressed him sorely during his period of his returning to God, which had the influence of turning him back from God.  But who knew his heart but God?  He, who meant to serve God right or serve Him not at all?

             In his quiet nature we feel assured God met him on his bed and Harry departed this life willingly and unafraid to meet his Savior.

             You suffered days, yes days of pain

And waited for a cure, but all in vain.

             Till God alone knew what was best

And took you away to peace and rest.

             Not dead to us who love him.  No!

Not lost but gone on before.

             He lives with us in memory

And will forevermore.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Jul 1938: 

Pulaski County Pioneer Dies at Age of 86 Years

             Joseph R. Fullerton, age 86 years, died Thursday, July 21, at the home of his niece, Mrs. Charles Griffith, following an illness of several months.

             Surviving are a daughter, Miss Cora Fullerton, who makes her home with Mrs. Griffith, one brother, Thomas Fullerton of Bloomington, Ind.; one niece, Mrs. Griffith, who was reared by the Fullerton family; also several other nieces and nephews.

             Mr. Fullerton, familiarly known as “Uncle Joe,” was born January 7, 1852, near Bloomington, Ind.  In 1883, when G. F. Meyer purchased the Ellis Bros. furniture factory at Spencer, Ind., and moved it to Mound City, Mr. Fullerton and his family moved with the factory.  He was the last of the grown-ups who moved to Mound City at that time and continued to live there.  Except for a number of years spent in the Knights of Pythias Home at Decatur and the period spent at the Griffith home here, his home has been in Mound City since 1883.

             He was a charter member of the Mound City Lodge No. 197 of the Knights of Pythias and was active in the work of the lodge and of his church, the Pilgrim Congregational, as long as he was able.

             Funeral services were held at 3 o’clock Saturday afternoon at the Pilgrim Congregational Church in Mound City, the Rev. Joseph Fix, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo officiating.  His Knights of Pythias lodge brothers conducted the rites at the graveside in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, the Crain Funeral Service of Pulaski directing.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Aug 1938: 

INFANT DIES

             Little Richard Lee Cochran, 2 weeks old, died Thursday morning from gland infection.  He is the only child of Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Cochran of Mounds.  He is mourned by his parents and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Stone Fisher.

             Funeral services will be held at the home this morning (Friday) with Rev. Glotfelty of the Mounds M. E. Church, officiating.

             Burial will be made in Spencer Heights.  James Ryan is in charge.

             (The death certificate states that Richard Lee Cochran was born 18 Jul 1938, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Barney Lee Cochran, a native of Oakton, Ky., and Janette Fisher, a native of Jackson, Mich., died 4 Aug 1938, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

            

MRS. FLOSSIE ALLIE

             Mrs. Flossie Allie, aged 40 years, died at her home in Mound City Saturday morning at 8 o’clock following an illness of several months.

             She is survived by her husband, George V. Allie, three daughters, three brothers, and one sister.

             Funeral services were conducted from the Pentecost church in Mound City Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock by the pastor, Rev. Fred Harp, and interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             G. A. James was in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Flossie Anna Lee Allie was born 28 Aug 1898, in Marmaduke, Ark., the daughter of George C. Meredith and Dora Wiliford, natives of Marmaduke, Ark., died 30 Jul 1938, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of George Allie, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Flossie Allie  Aug. 28, 1898 July 30, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ANOTHER DEATH IN ROBERT FOSS FAMILY

             It seems Mr. and Mrs. Robert Foss of Mounds are having their share of trouble.  Saturday afternoon the death angel visited their home and took away their three-year-old daughter, Edith Marie.  Another child, Norman, is seriously ill and on June 14th, their little son, Robert, was drowned in a pond on the W. I. Connell farm near Mounds.

             Funeral services for the little girl were held Monday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at the Pentecost church.  Rev. Hall of Olive Branch officiated.  Interment was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (According to her death certificate, Edith Marie Foss was born 26 Aug 1935, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Robert E. Foss, a native of Ballard Co., Ky., and Anna Cowan, a native of Henderson Co., Ky., died 30 Jul 1938, and was buried at Mounds.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Son Robert Foss Jr., 1927-1938 Dau. Edith M. Foss 1935-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SLEW HUSBAND WHILE HE LAY UPON BED DRUNK

             Bessie Meals, about 21, colored, shot and killed her husband, Antonio Marcio Meals, 38 years of age, as he lay drunk at their home near Ullin Tuesday afternoon about three o’clock. She then walked in to Ullin          Tuesday afternoon about three o’clock.  She then walked in to Ullin, more than two miles, carrying her baby, about a month old, and gave herself up, telling the story quite frankly.

             Antonio Marcio Meals is the son of a veteran of the Spanish American War.  His father, returning from Cuba or the Philippines, bestowed the name upon his son, and his son has come in contact with the law several times, once early in life and again a few years ago.  He was acquainted with Pontiac and St. Charles.

             He had been married about a year or year and a half.  Bessie had one child when they were married, now 14 months old, and this is the second child.  In her life with him, she had stood some abuse and when he came home drunk Tuesday and said they were going to move out of the home of the relatives where they were staying, she began to prepare to move, cooping up a duck and chicken and gathering up a few belongings.  Perhaps there was a quarrel and threats and abuse.

             Antonio lay down in his drunkenness and she seized the Owlhead and fired three times, one bullet going through the head and bringing instant death.  Coroner’s jury recommended that she be held and she and the last baby are in jail.  She did not vary her story that she deliberately shot him.  Officials say she is hardly normal mentally.

             (James Meals, 23, laborer in Ullin, Ill., born in Huntington, Tenn., son of Peter Meals and Harriet Williams, married Hattie Bailey, 15, of Ullin, Ill., born in Tennessee, daughter of Henry Bailey and Caledonia Zurdyne, on 6 Oct 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James served as a private in Co. L, 8th Illinois Infantry during the Spanish American War and filed for an invalid pension in 1901 in Tennessee.  Hattie filed for a widow’s pension in 1918 in Illinois.  The death certificate of Antonia Meals, laborer, states he was born 12 Sep 1902, in Illinois, the son of James Meals and Hattie Bailey, natives of Tennessee, died 2 Aug 1938, in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DIES

             Funeral services for Shirley Ann Dalton, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Dalton of Mounds, was held Saturday morning in the Baptist church.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor of the church, officiated.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  J. T. Ryan directed the funeral.

             (Her death certificate states that Shirley Ann Dalton was born 16 May 1938, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of William Dalton, a native of Cairo, Ill., and Hazel Butler, a native of Mounds, Ill.,  died 28 Jul 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Aug 1938: 

Shirley Ann Dalton

             Shirley Ann Dalton, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Dalton, died Thursday, July 28, at the family home following a three-week’s illness.

             Surviving are her parents, her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Dalton and Mr. and Mrs. Harley Butler; and a great-grandmother, Mrs. Mary Levell, all of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock in the Baptist church, the Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Mrs. Clara Housewright Dies at Her Home in Karnak

             Mrs. Clara Housewright, wife of Charles Housewright, died at her home in Karnak Saturday evening, July 30, age 40 years.

             Surviving are her husband, seven children, Adeline, Wilson, Loudena, Charles, Paulin and Vernon of Karnak, and Delbert of Selfridge Field, Mich.; her father, Richard Campbell; a half-sister, Mrs. Cora Bellamy of Karnak; a brother, Leonard Campbell of Aurora; two half-brothers, Luther Leek and Orlie Lee of Aurora.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock in the Karnak Methodist church, Rev. H. Metcalf officiating, assisted by Rev. Browning.  Burial was in the Masonic Cemetery at Cypress, Wilson Funeral Service directing.

             (Her death certificate states that Clara Housewright was born 12 Sep 1897, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Richard Campbell and Alice Finley, died 30 Jul 1938, in Karnak, Ill., wife of Charles Housewright, and was buried in Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill.  She was buried in Cypress Masonic Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Infant Buried

             The stillborn infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Martin, born Thursday, July 28, was buried Friday afternoon in Shiloh Cemetery with J. T. Ryan in charge.  Mrs. Martin is the former Edna Marie Crow.

             (According to his death certificate, an unnamed infant son of Vernon Martin and Edna Marie Crow, natives of Mounds, Ill., was stillborn 28 Jul 1938, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Edith Marie Foss

             Edith Marie Foss, age three years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Foss, died Saturday, July 30, at 12:40 o’clock at the home of her parents on Blanche Avenue.  She had been ill almost two weeks.

             Surviving are her parents, a sister, Helen Eriene; and a brother, Clarence Norman.  Another brother, Robert E. Foss, Jr., was drowned June 14.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Assembly Church, G. A. James directing.

 

Baby Dies

             Richard Lee, 17-day-old son of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Cochran of Mounds, passed away Thursday morning at 10 o’clock.  Mrs. Cochran was the former Miss Jeanette Fisher of Mounds.

             Funeral services will be conducted this morning at 10:30 at the Fisher home, northwest of Mounds.  In addition to its parents, the deceased is survived by its maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Stone Fisher; and its paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Cochran.

             The Ryan Funeral Service will be in charge.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Aug 1938: 

RELEASED FROM JAIL

             Bessie Meals, colored, who shot her husband last week, was released from county jail this week under a $200 bond.  There seems to be no particular desire of anyone to prosecute her since her husband is presumed to have abused her.  With two small children, one about two months old now and the other about 14 or 15 months, there was no fear that she would run away should she be tried for murder or manslaughter.

 

THREE KILLED IN ____ SUNDAY MORNING WRECK

             Marvin Watson, Earl C. Porter and Noyl Boone Rogers were instantly killed when the car in which they were riding collided with a truck loaded with ten and a half tons of rice near Grand Chain, Sunday morning about 11:30 o’clock.  The driver of the truck, John McGowan of Jonesboro, Ark., escaped serious injury, and his companion, Jesse Thomas, also of Jonesboro, was only badly shaken.

             Watson, 25, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Watson of Cairo and grandson of Al Watson of this city.  He was associated with his father in Watson’s Confectionery in Cairo.

             Earl C. Porter, 25, was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thomas Porter, also of Cairo.  He was employed by the Barrow-Agee factory.

             Noyl B. Rogers, 41, was the son of the late Dr. and Mrs. N. L. Rogers of Wickliffe.  He was a well-known lawyer and commonwealth attorney in Ballard County, Ky.

             According to evidence at the inquest, the passenger car, owned by Rogers, but driven by Watson, was _____bound on the wrong side of the road and traveling at a speed ___en 35 and 50 miles per hour and had just ___ed the hill, moving up the ____ in high gear.

             McGowan, driver of the truck believed he did all he could to avoid the collision, applying the air brakes and trying to swerve his truck to the opposite side of the ____.

             The collision of the two machines was so great that the passenger ___ was telescoped and the truck ___n out of line.  The car was so badly damaged that great difficulty was met in taking the boys from the car.  Porter and Rogers are said to have been dead at the time they were removed and Watson was in a dying condition.

             The coroner’s jury, after hearing the available evidence, returned a verdict of “unavoidable accident” and said that McGowan, driver of the truck should be exonerated of _____.

             No explanation could be made for why the car was on the wrong side unless the driver was napping at the wheel.

             A double funeral was held for Watson and Porter, having been the best of friends since their school days together.  The services were conducted at the First M. E. Church in Cairo Tuesday afternoon by Rev. W. P. MacVey, pastor, assisted by Rev. Wesley P. Pearce, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church.  They were both buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             Services for Rogers were held at Wickliffe, Tuesday afternoon by Rev. John B. Porter, pastor of the Christian Church.  Burial was made in the family lot in the Wickliffe Cemetery.

             (The death certificate of Marvin Burnell Watson, mercantile clerk, of Cairo, Ill., was born 23 Dec 1912, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Clyde Lovelace Watson, a native of Kansas, and Lora Williford, a native of Illinois, died 5 Aug 1938, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Rayette Watson, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  A marker in St. Joseph Memorial Park in Saint Joseph, Buchanan Co., Mo., reads:  Marvin B. Watson Dec. 23, 1912 Aug. 7, 1938.  The death certificate of Earl Clifton Parker, clerk, states he was born 30 Jun 1913, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Charles Thomas Porter and Laura Frances Crepps, natives of Bardwell, Ky.,  died 7 Aug 1938, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Earl C. Porter 1913-1938.  When Noyl B. Rogers registered for the draft in World War I in Wickliffe, Ky., he stated he was born 22 Nov 1896, worked for DuPoint Powder Works in Nashville, Tenn., and that his father was born in Linton, Ky.  According to his death certificate, Noyl Boone Rogers, lawyer, was born 23 Nov 1896, in Wickliffe, Ky., the son of Nathaniel L. Rogers, a native of Cadiz, Ky., and Catherine L. Thomas, a native of Carlisle Co., Ky., died 7 Aug 1938, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Wickliffe Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Noyl Boone Rogers 1896-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FREDDIE WINKLER HOME

             Freddie Winkler was brought home Sunday from St. Mary’s Hospital where he has been a patient for nearly two months.

             Freddie was badly hurt in the wreck that occurred on the highway between Mound City and Cairo and in which one was killed and three others injured.

             Although still confined to his bed, he is doing as well as can be expected considering his serious condition. 

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Aug 1938: 

Life or Death

             ___ in which three men lost ____ last Sunday on highway ___ south of Grand Chain was ___ in to Prindle’s garage and became an object of interest to ____ passerby.  Hundreds of ___s stood in silence before ____ mass of iron and steel. ____d that no human could ___ death in such wreckage even with the added protection of the ____ all steel car body.  Those ___ anxious to secure for themselves and for others on the highway its highest degree of safety ___ as drivers the greatest ___ of care and good judgment.

 

Former Gov. Joseph Fifer Dies Saturday at 97

Former Governor Joseph W. Fifer died Saturday at Bloomington at the advanced age of 97 years.

“Uncle Joe” served under Gen. Grant at the Siege of Vicksburg and soon afterward was shot in the right lung and liver.  He was ____ killed and his military career ____ attempted, but he later returned to service as a guard on a ship ____ing Confederate soldiers.

After the war, Fifer worked his way through Illinois Wesleyan College and became a lawyer and served a term in the state senate.  He was nominated for Governor of Illinois at the 1888 Republican convention and his election was a landslide.   A ____ again in 1892, he was defeated by John P. Altgeld, Democratic candidate.

His daughter, Mrs. Florence Fifer ______ was the first woman to serve as a member of the state legislature.

 

Three Killed in Highway Collision Sunday Morning

             Two Cairo young men, Marvin Watson and Earl C. Porter, each 25, and Noyl Boone Rogers, 41, of Wickliffe, Ky., were killed when their Ford car collided with a truck from Jonesboro, Ark., on Route 37 about one mile south of Grand Chain Sunday morning at 11:30 o’clock.  The three had just left Spur Inn at the Karnak “Y.”

             John McGowan, driver of the truck which was loaded with ten and a half tons of rice, was cut and bruised about the legs.  His companion, Jesse Thomas, also of Jonesboro, Ark., was uninjured except for a severe jolting and bruises.

             The fatal accident happened on a slight curve just after the truck, which was going north, has ascended a hill and had started downgrade.  The car containing the young men and driven by Porter, was traveling south and was in the east or northbound traffic lane, according to the testimony of witnesses.

             The terrific impact left the truck and the car entwined in a mass of twisted debris at the left side of the highway.  Porter, riding in the front seat with Watson, and Rogers, the owner of the car, who was riding alone in the back seat, were killed instantly.  Watson was unconscious and dying when extricated from the wreck.

             The bodies were taken to the James Funeral Home in Mound City and the wreck of the car was brought to Prindle’s garage here in Mounds.  The engine was driven back into the car and it is not difficult for those who see it to understand that no one in the car could escape alive.

             The coroner’s jury rendered a verdict of “unavoidable accident” and recommended that the driver of the truck be exonerated from blame.

             Marvin Watson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Watson of Cairo.  He was married and his wife is the former Rayette Seifert.  He was associated with his father in the Watson Confectionery on Eighth Street.

             Earl Clifton Porter was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thomas Porter of Cairo.  Both he and young Watson were graduates of the Cairo High School class of 1931 and had been lifelong friends.

             Noyl B. Rogers, 41, and a bachelor was a well-known lawyer and county attorney of Ballard County, Kentucky.  He was the son of the late Dr. and Mrs. N. L. Rogers of Wickliffe.

             A double funeral service was held at the Cairo Methodist Church for the two Cairo young men Tuesday afternoon.  The Rogers funeral was held at Wickliffe at the same hour.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Aug 1938: 

MOUNDS WOMAN REPORTED AS SUICIDE FROM POISON

             Mrs. Edward Smith, Jr., 29 years of age, died Wednesday morning in Mounds about 11 o’clock from the effects of 10 grains of strychnine, said to have been self-administered.  The details and background were not learned.

             She is survived by her husband; one son, Charles; and her mother, Mrs. Sloan of Paducah, Ky.

             Funeral services are this afternoon at the Ryan Funeral Home in charge of Rev. P. R. Glotfelty with interment in Spencer Heights.

             (The death certificate of Erin Lee Smith states that she was born 17 Dec 1908, in Paducah, Ky., the daughter of Harry L. Jones and Sallie Thomas, a native of Kentucky, died 17 Aug 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Edward Smith, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Erin L. Smith 1908-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Aug 1938: 

Ex-Senator Walter Warder Dies at Home in Cairo

             Ex-Senator Walter Warder died at his home in Cairo Wednesday, August 17, at the age of 87 years.

             Attorney Warder had served in both branches of the Illinois General Assembly and was for many years prominent in Republican politics.  He was elected state representative in 1890 and again in 1892.  He was made state senator in 1896 and served as president pro-tem during the Forty-first General Assembly.  He served as acting governor during July 1899 to August 1900.

             In Alexander County Circuit Court he served as master in chancery for 45 years from 1885 to 1930 inclusive.

             In his declining days, Attorney Warder wrote a history of the Warder family.  He was much interested in genealogy.

             Surviving are his widow and one son, Walter B. Warder. A daughter, Winifred Fairfax Warder, died in France in 1918.

             (His death certificate states that Walter Warder, retired lawyer, of 2315 Holbrook Ave., Cairo, Ill., was born 7 Apr 1851, in Maysville, Ky., the son of Joseph Warder, a native of Mays Lick, Ky., and Anna Kirkham, a native of Woodsville, Miss., died 17 Aug 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Dora Warder, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Marion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Edward E. Smith Succumbs Wednesday Morning

             Mrs. Edward E. Smith passed away Wednesday morning at eleven o’clock, almost 23 hours after she had taken a dose of strychnine, purchased ostensibly to use on rats.

             Mrs. Smith had been in poor health for some time and had suffered from despondency at intervals, causing temporary mental derangement.  She and her husband and son had been living in Cairo but had given up their apartment there and were at the home of Mr. Smith’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Smith, until the Smith property next door could be redecorated for their occupancy.

             The poison was taken at 12:20 Tuesday and a moment later Mrs. Smith entered a room where other members of the family were and said, “I have done it.”  Walking unsteadily, she went to a bedroom and lay down.  Her sister-in-law, Haroldine Smith, followed her into the bedroom and heard her pray a very beautiful prayer—her last conscious words.

             Erin Sloan Smith, age 29 years, was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Sloan of Paducah, Ky.  She leaves her husband, Edward E. Smith; a 12-year-old son, Charles Lee; her parents; three brothers, Earl, Burnett and Sam Sloan, Jr.; two sisters, Marguerite and Virginia, all of Paducah, Ky.; a grandmother, Mrs. Otie Thomas; two uncles, H. M. and Harvey Thomas; and an aunt, Mrs. Lloyd Bloomfield of Detroit, Mich.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Ryan Funeral home.  Burial will be made in Spencer heights Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Mrs. Maggie Cummins

             Mrs. Maggie Cummins, age 63 years, died at her home in Karnak, Sunday night following a two years’ illness of heart trouble.  Her husband, Amos L. Cummins, died four years ago.

             Mrs. Cummins is survived by her children:  Russell, Val, Curtis, Cletis, Aldrich, and Mrs. Beatrice Young of Chicago, Mrs. Helen Holt of Metropolis; three stepchildren, Mrs. May Shirk and Louis Cummins of Karnak and Alva Cummins of Metropolis; two sisters, Mrs. Mattie Clark of Karnak and Mrs. Magenta Eller of Grand Chain; two brothers, D. B. Loven and W. N. Loven of Karnak,.

             Funeral services were held in the Anderson Church east of Karnak Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Interment was made in the Anderson Cemetery, Wilson Funeral Service directing.

             (Amos L. Cummins married Maggie Loven on 25 Jan 1897, in Massac Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Maggie Cummins was born 4 Dec 1875, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Carroll Loven and Martha Weathers, died 14 Aug 1938, in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill., the widow of Amos L. Cummins, and was buried in Anderson Cemetery in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Aug 1938: 

D. E. STEVERS, LIFELONG RESIDENT DIES AT GRAND CHAIN

             David Edgar Stevers, 86 years of age, died at his home in Grand Chain early Wednesday morning.  He is the father of Miss Minnie Stevers, teacher at Karnak, and Mark Stevers, an accountant, of this county.

             He was a lifelong resident of this county.  His wife preceded him in death on April 21, and Mr. Stevers has been in failing health.

             Funeral services will be held this afternoon at the Christian Church at Grand Chain at 2:30 o’clock and burial will be in the Masonic Cemetery.  With the passing of “Uncle Dave,” another of those who remember when times were different and whose eyes have seen countless changes, answers his last roll call.

             (David E. Stevers married Parthenia Harris on 3 Jun 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that David Edgar Stevers, farmer, was born 24 Feb 1852, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of George Stevers, died 24 Aug 1938, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Parthenia Harris Stevers, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Mother Parthenia Ann Stevers 1853-1938 Father David Edgar Stevers 1852-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Girl Drops Dead as Fight Starts at Dance

             Miss Marjorie Jones, 18 years of age, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Jones, dropped dead on the floor of the dance hall at Clancy’s Place north of this city last Saturday night as two men began to fight.  Not concerned in any way in the disorder or trouble, the sight of the two men fighting when her dance partner, Dewey King, left her to intervene, seems to have been such a shock as to precipitate death.

             What the row was or who the two men who began to fight, is not mentioned.  Miss Jones had gone to the place in company with Shirley Corzine and Miss Corzine’s parents, intending to spend the night with them.  The row began and King, with whom she was dancing, left her and went to separate the men, one of whom, it is said, had been hit over the head with a beer bottle.

             Suddenly Miss Jones collapsed to the floor.  Effort to revive her was useless and she was brought to Dr. H. J. Elkins at Mounds, who said that she had been dead about 20 minutes.  The shock of seeing the men fighting and the sight of blood must have brought acute heart trouble.

             Miss Jones was a sophomore last year in high school and a well-liked young lady.  Her death was a terrible shock to the family and friends.

             Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Monday in charge of Red Conover of Cobden with G. A. James as undertaker.  Pallbearers were from among her friends and school mates and included Charles and Chapman McIntire, Carl Layton, Ralph and Johnnie Keesee and Roderick Capoot.  Interment was in Spencer Heights.

             Besides her parents, there survives four sisters:  Mrs. Lucille Hart of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. Katherine Waite and Margaret Lou and Norma Jean.

             (Her death certificate states that Marjorie Laverne Jones was born 25 Jun 1920, in New Madrid Co., Mo., the daughter of Earl Jones, a native of Grayville, Ill., and Lydia Barth, a native of Carmi, Ill., died 20 Aug 1938, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Marjorie L. Jones 1920-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Taylor and family attended the funeral of J. M. Taylor of Cobb, Ky., last week.  (Grand Chain—too late for last week)

             (The death certificate of Joseph M. Taylor, night watchman, states he was born in Illinois, the son of John Taylor, a native of Illinois, died 9 Aug 1938, in Cobb, Caldwell Co., Ky., of myocarditis, at the age of 61 years, 4 months and 4 days, and was buried in Millwood Cemetery in Princeton, Ky.  His marker there reads:  Joseph M. Taylor Apr. 5, 1876 Aug. 9, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several relatives and friends attended the funeral of Dr. George Heiligh in Anna, Thursday afternoon.  (Beech Grove)

             (When George Nelson Heilig registered for the draft in Union Co., Ill., in 1918, he stated he was born 1 Sep 1876, and was a farmer and physician.  He died 16 Aug 1938, in Cape Girardeau, Mo.  His marker in Anna Cemetery reads:  George N. Heilig (M.D.) 1877-1938 Pearl A. Heilig 1881-1967.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Aug 1938: 

Young Girl Dies in Faint When Frightened by Fight

             Miss Marjorie Jones, 18, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Jones of Mound City, fell in a faint Saturday night at Clancy’s Place on Route 37 and despite all efforts, could not be revived.

             Miss Jones who had gone to the Clancy Inn with a girlfriend, Miss Shirley Corzine and Miss Corzine’s father and mother, was dancing with Dewey King of this city, an employee of the Tri-City Transportation Company.  When a fight started between two men, dancing stopped and King went to separate the men.  One of the fighters, according to report struck the other with a bottle causing his head to bleed profusely.  It is thought the sight of blood caused the young girl to faint.

             She was brought here to the home of Dr. H. J. Elkins, where she was pronounced dead and at the inquest held there by Coroner O. T. Hudson, death was ascribed to natural causes.

             Miss Jones, who was a sophomore in Mound City Community High School last year and a beautiful young girl, is survived by her parents and four sisters:  Mrs. Lucille Hart and Mrs. Katherine Waite of Evansville, Ind., Margaret Lou and Norma Jean of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Congregational church in Mound City, the Rev. Conover of Cobden officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.  Casket bearers were Carl Layton, Charles and Chapman McIntire, Ralph and Johnnie Kesee and Hubert Bolar.

 

Mrs. Raymond Sanders Dies Wednesday Afternoon

             Mrs. Mary Sue Sanders died Wednesday afternoon, August 24, at her home here after a long illness.  Her age was 41 years.

             She is survived by her husband, Street Superintendent Raymond Sanders; a daughter, Velma, age 12, and a son, Charles, age 17 months.  Also surviving her are two sisters, Mrs. Harrison Lentz and Miss Inez Lutz of this city; and a brother, Sam Lutz of Elco.

             Funeral services will be held at 10 o’clock this morning in the Methodist church, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.  The funeral cortege will leave immediately following the services for Mt. Vernon, Ind., where interment will be made in Bellefontaine Cemetery.  Nephews of Mrs. Sanders will serve as casket bearers.  J. T. Ryan will direct the funeral.

             (Her death certificate states that Marie Sue Sanders was born 12 Dec 1896, in Mt. Vernon, Posey Co., Ind., the son of George Lutz, a native of Evansville, Ind., and Georgia Anna Williamson, native of Anderson, Ky., died 24 Aug 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Raymond Sanders, and was buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery in Mt. Vernon, Ind.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Second Death Results from Mt. Pleasant Accident

             Funeral services for Raymond W. Campbell, 29, son of President James A. Campbell of Knox College, who died at 3:30 o’clock Saturday afternoon at the Anna hospital from injuries in an automobile accident on Thursday of last week on Route 146 near Mt. Pleasant were held Wednesday at his home in Galesburg.

             Mr. Campbell, who was riding in a car driven by his fiancée, Miss Rachael Graves, of Herrin, was the second victim of the automobile tragedy.  Miss Ruth Stevenson, 25, of Carbondale, friend of Campbell and Miss Graves, who was also in the car, died a few hours after the accident.

             Concussion of the brain was the cause of Campbell’s death.  His mother, Mrs. James A. Campbell, who had been called from Galesburg after the accident, and his fiancée Miss Graves were at his bedside when he passed away.  His father was in Old Mexico and the funeral had been held up until his arrival in Galesburg.

             (According to the death certificate of Raymond Warner Campbell, a teacher at the University of Montana, he was born 7 Oct 1909, in Lawrence, Kan., the son of James A. Campbell, a native of Ann Harbor, Mich., and Martha Warner, a native of Ypsilanti, Mich., died 20 Aug 1938, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Memorial Park Cemetery, Galesburg, Knox Co., Ill. –Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Sep 1938: 

BILL PERKS’ BODY MOVED TO NATIONAL CEMETERY

             The body of Bill Perks, which was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds at the time of his death in March 1929, was removed to the National Cemetery Thursday.  At the time of his death, he was honored with military salute, but the reburial was a very quiet affair with only his son, Oren; his aunt, Mrs. Nannie Higgins, who made all the necessary arrangements; and Father Gilmartin present.

 

Funeral services were held Friday morning at the M. E. church for Mrs. Raymond Sanders, who died at her home in Mounds, Wednesday, after a lingering illness.  Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the church, officiated.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Mt. Vernon, Ind.  G. A. James was in charge.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Lentz of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. James Lentz of Coulterville, Mrs. J. E. Whitaker of Miller City, Mrs. Bill Smoot of Simpson, Mrs. Norma Taylor, Mrs. Jeffries and Miss Opal Tripp of Vienna attended the funeral of Mrs. R. Sanders Thursday.

 

Mrs. H. E. Lockard attended the funeral of Mrs. C. C. Shreader at Mulberry Grove Sunday.

             (The death certificate of Frances Hellen Shrader states she was born 10 Aug 1881, in North Bend, Ohio, the daughter of William Hayes and Harriet Guard, natives of North Bend, Ohio, died 27 Aug 1938, in Mulberry Grove, Bond Co., Ill., the wife of Charles C. Shrader, and was buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Greenville, Bond Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Sep 1938: 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to express our sincere thanks to our friends and neighbors and to all who so kindly assisted us in any way during the long illness and following the death of our loved one.  Especially do we thank the minister, the choir, the donors of the beautiful flowers and those who offered the use of their cars.  All kindnesses will long be remembered with deep gratitude.

Raymond Sanders and Family

Inez Lutz

Anna Lentz

Sam Lutz

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Sep 1938: 

COLORED WOMAN DIES

             Funeral services were held Sunday for Mrs. Ann Rucker, 95, a very highly respected colored woman, formerly of Mound City.  She is the grandmother of Mrs. Ann Humble with whom she has resided in Mounds since the flood.  She was a member of the A. M. E. Church for some 75 years.

             (Her death certificate states that Annie Rucker was born about 1841 in Louisiana, died 31 Aug 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Ben Rucker, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Death Interferes with Oil Well Prospect

             Death has interfered with the prospects of sinking an oil well in this county, it is learned.  One of the persons whose finances were to back up the drilling, has passed away.  That removes the promise of finance from a man whose word and shoe finances were both good and leaves the thing in an uncertain state.

             Preparations are continuing on the F. L. Graves farm at Villa Ridge, but the certainty with which the drilling was planned a month or two ago is lacking now.  It is thought that it will continue, but there is some chance that it may not.

 

JAMES MAHONEY

             James Mahoney passed away at his home in Valley Recluse, near Mounds, Tuesday morning. He was 75 years of age.  He is survived by his wife, Cicely; three sons, Ray and Dewey of Mounds and William, who resided with his parents; two granddaughters, Daisy Rae and Mary Ann Mahoney; a sister, Mrs. Catherine Stout of Cairo; and a brother, John Mahoney, of Cleveland, Ohio.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the residence, Rev. Tucker, pastor of the Union Church at Villa Ridge, officiating.  Interment was made in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery.  The casket bearers were Forrest Nixon, Henry Hendricks, Loal Hargan, John Crain, Henry Parker and Dr. W. E. Schumaker.

             (James Mahoney married Cicely Sexton on 10 Jul 1890, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Claude Stout, 22, farmer at Valley Recluse, Ill., son of Henry Stout, married Katie Mahonie, 23, of Valley Recluse, daughter of T. C. Mahoney, on 24 Nov 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Timothy Mahoney married Ellen Armstrong on 31 Oct 1862, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, James Mahoney, farmer, was born 7 Apr 1863, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Timothy Mahoney and Ellen Armstrong, natives of County Cork, Ireland, died 6 Sep 1938, in District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Cicely Mahoney, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for their many expressions of sympathy, for their flowers and for cars and for their kind words, during the sad hours of the death of our daughter and sister.

Mrs. Jones and Family

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Sep 1938: 

Edward Marsh Dies in Florida after Lingering Illness

             Edward Marsh, for many years a resident of Mounds, died at his home in St. Cloud, Florida, Thursday, September 1, after a lingering illness.  An Illinois Central engineer, he and Mrs. Marsh also operated the Marsh Hotel on Oak Street for some time.  They moved from here to DuQuoin when Mr. Marsh’s run was transferred to the north end of the line.  He had been ill for four years and the family moved to Florida two years ago for the benefit of his health.

             Mr. Marsh was a Spanish American War veteran.  He was a member of the Baptist Church and of the B. L. F. and E.

             Surviving are his wife, a daughter, Regina, and a son, Edward.

             (The application for a military headstone states he enlisted 23 Jun 1899, as a private in Co. G, 11th U.S. Infantry, was honorably discharged 3 Sep 1902, died 1 Sep 1938, and was buried in Mt. Peace Cemetery in St. Cloud, Fla.  His marker there reads:  Edward Marsh West Virginia Pvt. 11 U.S. Inf. September 1, 1938 Apr 1880-Sept. 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Pioneer Resident of Pulaski County Dies

             James Mahoney, age 75 years and long a resident of Pulaski County, died Tuesday morning, September 6, at his home in Valley Recluse.  He had been in declining health for some time, but his last illness was brief.  He was a successful farmer and had many friends.

             Mr. Mahoney was the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Mahoney.  His father came to this section in 1857 with a company, mostly artisans, who came down the Ohio River from Cincinnati on a fleet of three flatboats for the purpose of erecting buildings in Mound City, the venture being financed by the Emporium Company.

             Surviving are his wife, the former Miss Cicely Sexton, whom he married in 1890; three sons, Ray and Dewey of Mounds and William of Valley Recluse; also two granddaughters, Marianne and Daisy Rae Mahoney; a sister, Mrs. Catherine Stout of Cairo; a brother, John Mahoney of Cleveland, Ohio; and a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence, Rev. J. E. Tucker of the Villa Ridge Union Church officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery directed by George C. Crain.  Casketbearers were Forest Nixon, Henry Hendricks, Loal Hargan, John Crain, Henry Parker and Dr. W. E. Shumaker, all neighbors.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Sep 1938: 

Oldest Man in County Died Monday at Anna

             Simpson S. Manis, oldest man of this county, and one, who at 95 cut his third set of teeth, died at the state hospital at Anna Monday evening at the age of 101 years.  He had been ill for nearly a year and in the state hospital about that length of time.  Always up until near the last, he was an interesting character, a link with the past and with the days long gone.  He knew days before the Civil War and reached back to the Mexican War.  He had seen many things, witnessed more than is allotted most men and up until the last few years, had remarkable health and strength.  At 95 he chopped his own stove wood.

             Born in Atlanta, Ga., on December 17, 1836, he has lived in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee, but has spent most of his 101 years in this county and over half that period in the vicinity of the present site of Perks.

             He has lived a very full life, having cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln and also hearing his address at Murphysboro, Ill.  He accompanied Gen. John A. Logan on a forage at one time during the Civil War and witnessed the laying of the C. & E. I. Railroad through this part of the country.

             The father of 23 children, one by his first marriage and twenty-two by his second, is the last of the Manis family.  The name died with the death of his son, John, several years ago.

             One daughter, Mrs. Homer Beaver, with whom he resided until taken to the Anna Hospital, her two children, and their two children are the only relatives to mourn his death.

             The greater part of his life was spent farming.  For some time he served as squire and became known as Squire Manis.  There are probably many couples living happily together today that were married by him.

             The only school education he received was three weeks in a subscription school when a lad.  In his early life it was practically the only school and was rather select because of the tuition charged.  But in the 101 years of his life he received an education that cannot be obtained from books.

             Services were conducted Wednesday afternoon at the Pentecostal church at Perks with Rev. Lankston officiating.  Interment was made in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

             The following is a poem that Mr. Manis quoted to a reporter of the Enterprise a number of years ago.  We reprint it in his memory:

Long to live and well to do

             And after death be happy too.

You must not throw upon the floor

             The crumbs you cannot eat,

For many a little hungry child

             Would think it quite a treat.

For willful waste will make woeful want,

             And you may live to say,

“Oh, how I wish I had the crumbs

             That once I threw away.”

             (His death certificate states Simpson S. Manis, common laborer, of Perks, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born about 1838, died 12 Sep 1938, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Simpson Manis Dec. 17, 1836 Sept. 12, 1938 John Manis Jan. 18, 1868 June 17, 1928.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JAMES SHELTON EXONERATED BY CORONER’S JURY AT ANNA

             James Shelton, son of Prof. and Mrs. Roy Shelton of Anna, was not held criminally liable by a coroner’s jury at Anna Friday morning.  Shelton was driving an automobile which skidded on a slippery pavement and which crashed into another car causing the death of Mrs. Boda Hall and her 4-month-old baby. Mrs. Hall and baby were riding with Hal Finley, who was also injured in the wreck.  William Eldon Burris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Burris, was severely injured in the same wreck.  He was riding with Shelton when the accident occurred.  He received a deep and painful scalp wound.  Shelton’s arm was broken and he suffered lacerations about the body.—Vienna Times

             (The death certificate of Donald Ray Hall states he was born 30 Apr 1938, in Cobden, Ill., the son of Elmer Hall, a native of Jonesboro, Ill., and Beulah Wright, a native of Cobden, Ill., died 29 Aug 1938, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.   The death certificate of Beulah Wright Hall states she was born 17 Apr 1917, in Cobden, Ill., the daughter of Fred Wright, a native of Versailles, Ill., and Mary A. Pratt, a native of Fall City, Neb., died 29 Aug 1938, in Union Co., Ill., the wife of Elmer Hall, and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Beulah W. Hall April 17, 1917 Aug. 29, 1938 Donnie Hall April 30, 1938 Aug. 29, 1938 Son.–Darrel Dexter)

 

BABY KILLED AND OTHERS INJURED ON DEATH AVENUE

             That narrow strip of road that leads into Cairo amid the beautiful trees whose trunks are whitewashed to hide the scars, was a scene of another fatal accident Sunday afternoon and this time the trees seem to bear no blame.  One driver must have crossed into the lane of traffic of the other.

             The dead is an infant, seven weeks old, Waylond Sherril Stocke of Enfield.  The injured are his parents and sister, Barbara Ann.  The others injured are Clint Hamilton, colored, and others.

             The story given is that the Hamilton car turned across the lane of traffic of the other car and the crash ensued wrecked both cars and scattered people about on the pavement.

             (His marker in Maple Ridge Cemetery in Carmi, White Co., Ill., reads:  Wayland S. Stocke July 25, 1938 Sept. 11, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Swartz arrived here Tuesday night to attend the funeral of his sister, Lavern, which was held here Wednesday.  They will return to Chicago soon.  (Grand Chain)

             (The death certificate of Ruth Laverne Schwartz states she was born 18 Jul 1928, in Grand Chain, Ill., the daughter of W. D. Schwartz, a native of Colombia, Ill., and Angie Rifner, a native of Cairo, Ill.,  died 12 Sep 1938, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Hobbs returned Saturday from Murphysboro, where they were called by illness of Mrs. Hobbs’ sister.  Her sister died and was buried Wednesday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Sep 1938: 

Infant Killed and Seven Injured Sunday near Cairo

             Wayland Sherill Stocke, seven weeks old infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Stocke, of Enfield, was killed and seven others were injured in a head-on collision opposite the artesian well three miles north of Cairo on Highway 51 at three o’clock Sunday afternoon.

             The Stocke car was traveling north occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Stocke, their five-year-old daughter, Barbara, and their infant son.  The other car, driven by Clint Hamilton, negro of Cairo, was occupied by Hamilton, his wife and by Walker Brooks and his wife, all negroes of Cairo, and was going south.

             All but two of the seven injured had broken bones.  The exact cause of the accident cannot be determined until the injured are improved.

 

Ruth LaVerne Schwartz

             Ruth LaVerne Schwartz, ten-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Schwartz of Grand Chain, died at the home of her parents, Monday morning, Sept. 12.

Surviving are her parents, three sisters, Mrs. Eva Helmig of Karnak, Mrs. Wanda Fields and Clara Schwartz of Grand Chain; two brothers, Allen of Grand Chain and Norman of Chicago.

             Funeral services were held at the Grand Chain Congregational church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by the pastor, Rev. S. C. Benninger.  Interment was made in Grand Chain Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

Simpson Manis Dies at Age of 102 Years

             Simpson S. Manis, for many years a resident of Perks, died in the state hospital at Anna Monday, Sept. 12, at the advanced age of 102 years.  He had been ill for four years.

             Mr. Manis was a farmer, having come to this country when he was a young man.  His wife and all his children save one had long since passed on.  One daughter, Mrs. Manda Beaver, of Perks, and two grandchildren are his surviving relatives.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Pentecostal church at Perks, the Rev. Mr. Lankston officiating.  Burial was in Mt. Olive Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our friends and neighbors who contributed to our comfort during the illness and after the death of our loved one, James Mahoney.  We especially thank the minister, the choir, those who offered special music, those who sent the beautiful flowers, and those who offered their cars.  Your kindness will never be forgotten. 

Mrs. Cicely Mahoney and sons

Mrs. Claude Stout

John Mahoney

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Sep 1938: 

JOHN R. WALLS

             John R. Walls, 54 years of age, died at his home in Spencer Heights north of Mounds, Thursday morning at 12:05 o’clock.  He was a former resident of this city, having lived here for 24 years previous to the Flood of ’37, at which time he moved to Mounds.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mollie Walls; one daughter, Mrs. Marie Curtds; two sons, James and John D.; and one brother, Charles Walls of America.  All the children were home at the time of his death.

             Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church in Mounds.  Rev. Throgmorton will officiate.

             G. A. James is in charge of arrangements.

             (According to his death certificate, John R. Walls, machinist, was born 15 Sep 1884, in Lexington, Ky., the son of Henry Walls and Frankie Back, died 22 Sep 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mollie Walls, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mary C. Walls 1894-1943 John R. Walls 1884-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MARY HOGAN MAGILL DIED AT HER HOME IN MIAMI

             Mrs. Mary Hogan Magill, of Miami, Fla., and sister of the late Major Daniel Hogan, died on Aug. 14, at Miami, Fla.  She will be recalled among the older people of this county as a former teacher in the public schools and late in the University of Porto Rico and in the high schools of Miami and Key West.

             The information of the death of this former resident comes from Mrs. Dora Hogan of Los Angeles, Calif., who, although away from this town, is one of the most interested readers that this paper has.  She maintains unusual attention on public affairs and tendencies of the time and never a letter comes from her to this paper, but what it does not commend the editor of this sheet for standing for individualism and what she terms American principals of self-government and self-determination.

             She is still a newspaper woman, very much so.

 

Miss Grace Roberts has returned from St. Louis where she attended the funeral of her mother’s aunt, Mrs. Maggie Reichert. (Ohio Chapel)

             (According to the death certificate of Margaretha Reichert, she was born 20 Feb 1868, in Millstadt, St. Clair Co., Ill., the daughter of George Wiesenborn, a native of Germany, and Margaretha Schmidt, a native of Louisiana, died 14 Sep 1938, in Millstadt, Ill., wife of Anton Reichert, and was buried in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery in Millstadt.  Her marker there reads:  Margaretha Reichert 1868-1938 Anton W. Reichert 1871-1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Sep 1938: 

Mother of Mrs. B. A. Stalcup Dies Tuesday

             Mrs. B. C. Braden, mother of Mrs. B. A. Stalcup, died Tuesday, Sept. 20, at noon, at her home in Morton, Ill., near Peoria.  Mrs. Stalcup was with her at the time of her death.

             Mr. Stalcup and C. Ray Scott left Wednesday for Morton to attend the funeral which was held Thursday afternoon.

             (Her death certificate states that Vioma Grant Braden was born 13 Sep 1864, in Farmer City, Ill., the daughter of Isaac J. Van Note, a native of Monmouth Co., N.J., and Catherine I. Morgan, a native of Harden Co., Ky., died 20 Sep 1938, in Morton, Tazewell Co., Ill., the wife of Byron C. Braden, and was buried in Robert Cemetery in Morton.  Her marker there reads:  Bion C. Braden 1857-1953 Vioma G. Braden 1864-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Rev. Omer Morrison

             Rev. Omer Morrison of Louisville, Ky., only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Blue, well-known colored couple of South Mounds, died Sunday, Sept. 11, at his home in Louisville.  His body was brought to Mounds, where on Wednesday, Sept. 14, funeral services were held at St. John’s Baptist Church.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             Surviving are his parents, his wife, three step-children and other relatives.

             (According to his death certificate, Omer Morrison, fireman at the ice plant, of 1663 St. Catherine, Louisville, Ky., was born 28 Dec 1887, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Kate Blue, died 11 Sep 1938, in Louisville, Ky., of coronary occlusion, husband of Ella Belle Morrison, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GOLF CHAMPION DIES

             E. E. Mitchell, retired Carbondale banker, age almost 80, died suddenly Monday night in Carbondale, following a heart attack.  Mr. Mitchell on Saturday at the Egyptian Golf Club here was the winner of the title of “super champion” in the I. W. Rogers Veterans’ Tourney.

             (Edward E. Mitchell married Annie Harrison on 30 Jun 1888, in Williamson Co., Ill.  William N. Mitchel married Rachel C. Roberts on 6 Apr 1847, in Williamson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Edward Everett Mitchell, banker, was born 11 Nov 1858, in Corinth, Williamson Co., Ill., the son of William Nazareth Mitchell, a native of Wilson Co., Tenn., and Rachael O. Roberts, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., died 19 Sep 1938, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., the husband of Annabelle Harrison, and was buried at Carbondale.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness shown following the death of our loved one, Rev. Omer Morrison.  We especially thank the minister, the choir, those who offered special music, those who sent the beautiful flowers and those who offered their cars.  Your kindness will never be forgotten.

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Blue

Mrs. E. B. Morrison and Children

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Sep 1938: 

RICHARD JOHNSON DIES

             Richard Johnson, aged 60 years, a resident of near Villa Ridge, passed away at St. Mary Infirmary Saturday morning at 2:30 o’clock.  He had been a patient at St. Mary’s for the past five weeks.

             He is survived by three sons, Ervin and Samuel of Villa Ridge and Robert of Tamms; two daughters, Mrs. Alice Elders of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Ruth Robinson of Perks; two sisters, Mrs. W. M. Tapley of Cairo and Mrs. Sarah Wamack of Anna; five brothers, Robert of Sparta, Edgar of Elco, James of Unity, Elza of Dongola and Samuel of Jonesboro.

             Funeral services were conducted from the Gospel Tabernacle at Cairo Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. Osbone and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by the side of his wife who proceeded him in death 15 years ago.

             G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that Richard Johnson, farmer, was born 13 Apr 1878, in Saline Co., Ill., the son of Irvin Johnson and Minnie Gibbs, died 24 Sep 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Daisy Johnson, and was buried at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. E. L. Johnson attended the funeral of his brother, Dick Johnson, in Mounds Sunday.  (Swan Pond)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Sep 1938: 

John R. Walls

             John R. Walls, age 54 years, died at his home in Spencer Heights Wednesday night, Sept. 21, at 1_ o’clock.  He had been in failing health for many months.  A resident of Mound City for 25 years, he has been living here since the 1937 flood.

             Surviving are his wife, Mollie; a daughter, Mrs. Marie Curtis; two sons, James and John D. Walls; also a brother, Charles Walls of America.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church Friday afternoon, the pastor Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Casket bearers were William Hawf, George R. Martin, Bob Wadington, Walter Egner, Horace Hogendobler and Harry Wright.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Brother of L. H. Halstenberg Dies at Little Rock, Ark.

             L. H. Halstenberg left Thursday morning for Little Rock, Ark., called by the death of his brother, Henry Halstenberg, who died at 10:40 o’clock Wednesday morning from injuries received in a wreck at Little Rock.

             Henry Halstenberg was an engineer for the Missouri Pacific Railroad and formerly lived in Mounds.  He is survived by his wife, a daughter and five grandchildren; also his brother, L. H. Halstenberg of Mounds; and a sister, Mrs. Minnie Rick of Cairo.

             Funeral services will be held in Little Rock today (Friday) at two o’clock in the afternoon.

 

Richard Johnson

             Richard Johnson, age 60 years, a resident of near Villa Ridge, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary Saturday morning at 2:30 o’clock.  He had been a patient at St. Mary’s for the past five weeks.

             He is survived by three sons, Ervin and Samuel of Villa Ridge, and Robert of Tamms; two daughters, Mrs. Alice Elders of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Ruth Robinson of Perks; two sisters, Mrs. W. M. Tapley of Cairo and Mrs. Sarah Wamack of Anna; five brothers, Robert of Sparta, Edgar of Elco, James of Unity, Elze of Dongola and Samuel of Jonesboro.

             Funeral services were conducted from the Gospel Tabernacle at Cairo Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. Osborne and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by the side of his wife, who preceded him in death 15 years ago.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Oct 1938: 

Miss May Hawkins Died Monday at Carbondale

             Miss May Hawkins, county superintendent of schools of this county for twenty years, a teacher in public schools and a retired member of the faculty of Carbondale Normal, passed away Monday morning in Holden Hospital at Carbondale after a lingering illness with the ___on unusual disease which effected the spleen.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at the First Methodist Church at Carbondale with Dr. ___n Harmon and Rev. Carle____ officiating.  Members of the _____ of S. I. N. U. headed by ____ Pulliam, president, served as pallbearers.

             Following the services, the body was brought to Mounds at the Methodist church, where it lay in state for two hours and from thence the cortege moved to the family lot in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             Miss May S. Hawkins was ____ in Mounds in 1876 and ___ the greater part of her life in Pulaski County.  After completing the grade school of Pulaski County, she continued her education at Southern Illinois Normal University graduating from there in ___.  She began teaching at an early age without much professional training, as was the practice in the county at that time.

             She taught in the rural schools of Pulaski County and attended ____ at the Southern Illinois Normal University during the vacation months.  After her graduation at Carbondale, she taught two years at Golconda High School and ___ed there to come back to Pulaski County to become a candidate for the office of county superintendent of schools of Pulaski County, of which office she was elected ____.  She was re-elected for four consecutive terms and remained in office for twenty years.

             Under her regime the schools of Pulaski County kept well apace with the rapidly increasing strides of educational progress of the state.  She ___he instigation or recognition ___e five high schools of the county; the standardization of ___ of the rural schools; and was ___ in promoting the high standard of teacher qualification.

             At the close of her work as county superintendent, she accepted an appointment in the Training School at the Teachers’ College at Carbondale.  Her many years as county superintendent of schools had well prepared her for this position.  ___ served the college as critic ___er in the rural schools for two ____ and was then asked to accept the position as supervisor of social science in the high school of the college.  She held this position until her health failed last spring.

             She was well known in educational organizations and held positions, honorary and compensative, ___ate sections, state and national associations.  For many years she was secretary of the Southern Illinois Teachers’ Association and ___ served the National Educational Association as a delegate ___ Illinois.

             Throughout her teaching career she continued her education, receiving a bachelor of education degree at the Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondale, in ___ and was granted a master’s degree in the University of Chicago in 1934.

             Although Mrs. Hawkins was a very busy woman, she found time to write.  Besides contributing to educational journals, she published one ___ school history textbook, ___ers in American History.  Her second book, a history text book for ___ schools, “The economic, Political and Social Development of the American Nation,” was almost ready for publication.  She was writing ___ from her class work of the ___ two years.  Although the book ___ed finished, she said she still ___ some work to do in perfecting it.

             May S. Hawkins in early life became a professed Christian and united with the First Baptist Church in Carbondale.  Later in life, she ___ated with the Methodist Episcopal Church in Mound City.  Upon ___cation in Carbondale, she moved her membership to the First Methodist Church of that city, and has been active there in church and Sunday school work.

             Miss Hawkins was a woman of sterling qualities, pleasing personality and upright character.  Her many years in contact with youth have made for her a vast circle of friends who sorrow at her passing.  She is survived by four sisters:  Mrs. Warren Crain of Villa Ridge, Mrs. M. M. Shifley and Mrs. P. A. Simmons of Mounds, and Mrs. A. T. Carson of Centralia; one brother, Louie Hawkins and his son, John, who constituted her household at the time of her death and ten other nephews and nieces and ten great-nephews and nieces.

             Miss Hawkins was overcome by fatal illness last May.  Although she had sought the best medical aid, there seemed to be no relief for her until death came to her peacefully, October 3 and found her comforted by the word of the poet:

So live that when the summons comes to join

             The innumerable caravan that moves

To that mysterious realm where each shall take

             His chamber in the silent halls of death

Thou go not, like a quarry slave at night

             Scourged to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed

By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave

Like one who wraps the draperies of his couch

About him and lies down to pleasant dreams

May S. Hawkins has gone to her reward.  May her soul rest in Peace.

             (Her death certificate states that May Strong Hawkins, teacher, was born 4 Nov 1876, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Louis A. Hawkins, a native of Germany, and Sally E. Walbridge, a native of Vergennes, Ill., died 1 Oct 1938, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DELIVERS MEMORIAL ADDRESS

             Miss Mary Roberson is in Carbondale this morning where, at the chapel hour, she will deliver the memorial address for Miss May Hawkins, former county superintendent of this county and a member of the S. I. N. U. faculty. Miss Hawkins and Miss Roberson were friends of long standing, and the obituary that Miss Roberson wrote and which appears in this paper, was the cause of her being asked by Roscoe Pulliam, president of S. I. N. U. to speak this morning at chapel.

 

WEBB BOY VERY LOW

             Vernon “Buddy” Webb, son of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Webb, is very low at their home.  Medical aid gave him up when at Barnes Hospital about a month ago.  The disease, which is located in the marrow of the bone, discharges into the blood stream white corpuscles before they are mature.  The hospital gave to the Webbs no hope whatever—only that they must stand by to watch until the end.  The boy has become weaker and weaker until it has been thought the end must be very close.

 

COLORED WOMAN DIES AT HER HOME IN THIS CITY

             Miss Ona Watts, colored, passed away at her home in this city Tuesday morning at 7:45 o’clock following a lingering illness.  She was about 52 years of age.  She had been employed for several years in Jim Wilson’s store on Main street, but for the past year has been unable to attend to her duties regularly.  She was a sister of John Watts, who formerly carried mail in the north part of town, but who is now employed in Springfield.  She also leaves her sister, her father and other relatives.

             She was a very prominent colored woman and had many friends among both the white and colored population.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the A. M. E. Church in this city and interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery.

             (According to her death certificate, Ona Watts, salesman, was born 12 Aug 1889, in Arlington, Ky., the daughter of Pete Watts and Nancy Bryant, natives of Clinton Co., Ky., died 2 Oct 1938, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  She had lived in Mound City for 43 years.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. LAURA PARKER

             Mrs. Laura Parker died early Sunday morning at her home near Mounds.  She leaves four sons, Carman, Claude, Ralph and Clyde of Mounds; three daughters, Mrs. Leatha Echols of Mounds and Mrs. Etta Varner of Mounds and Mrs. Mattie Essex of Villa Ridge; two sisters, Mrs. Amanda Evers of Kansas and Mrs. Mary Shaffer of Mounds; one brother, Grant Jaynes of Parma, Mo.; two half-sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Peeler and Mrs. Delia Meyers of Chicago; 27 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.  The funeral was conducted at Anderson Church near Boaz, Tuesday afternoon.  Interment was made in Anderson Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Laura May Parker was born 24 Mar 1868, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Valentine Jaynes and Caroline Phillips, died 2 Oct 1938, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of W. C. Parker, and was buried in Anderson Cemetery at Boaz, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OREN CRAWFORD

             Oren Crawford, 70, died at his home in Mounds Tuesday evening after a long illness.  He was an engineer for the Illinois Central for many years, but retired a year ago this past September.  He was also affiliated with the Masonic Lodge.

             Surviving are his wife, Amanda; two daughters, Mary and Martha; one sister, Mrs. George Heyduck of Yakima, Wash.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Talbart, one of Jehovah’s Witness of East St. Louis, Thursday afternoon at the Ryan Funeral Home in Mounds.  Interment was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.

             (His death certificate states that Oren Crawford, locomotive engineer, was born 18 Sep 1868, in Centralia, Ill., the son of Arthur and Manda Crawford, died 4 Oct 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights, Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Oren Crawford Sept. 18, 1868 Oct. 4, 1938 Amanda Crawford Jan. 24, 1880 Oct. 31, 1971.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TOM MARTIN

             Tom Martin died Sunday, Oct. 2, at the Veterans’ Hospital at Outwood, Kentucky.  The body was taken to St. Louis, where funeral services were held Tuesday.  Interment was made in a cemetery in St. Louis.  He leaves his wife and one daughter, Pauline of East St. Louis; two brothers, James of Mounds and Frank of Bonne Terre, Mo.; a half-brother, Claude Martin of Mounds; and a sister, Mrs. Fred Raub of Mounds.  He was formerly a resident of Mounds.

             (His death certificate states that Thomas G. Martin, laborer, of 431 N. Locust St., Centralia, Ill., a veteran of the Philippine Insurrection, was born 4 Jan 1878, in Illinois, the son of William G. Martin, a native of Illinois, and Mary Davis, a native of Tennessee, died 2 Oct 1938, at the V. A. Hospital in Outwood, Christian Co., Ky., of pulmonary hemorrhage and chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, husband of Mae Martin, and was buried at East St. Louis, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PAUL BRITT

             Paul Britt, 30 years of age, died September 27, at Ocala, Fla.  He is survived by his wife, Pansy; three sisters, Mrs. Helen Parker and Subbeen Britt of Mound City and Mrs. Stella Hiatt of Ullin; five brothers, Clyde of America, Charles of St. Marie, Idaho, and Jackie, Leonard and Johnny of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Sunday at the Baptist church in Mound City of which he was a member for several years, Rev. H. E. Lockard officiated.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery near Olmstead.  The casket bearers were his cousins Frank, Homer, Russell and Earl Britt and Keith and Gerald Walker.

             (Paul Arbidine Britt died in 1938 in Marion Co., Fla.  The application for a military headstone states Paul Britt  enlisted 23 Apr 1930, and was honorably discharged 31 Nov 1931 from the U.S. Marines.  His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted, Ill., reads:  Paul Britt Illinois Pvt. U.S. Marine Corps September 27, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Barton Smithey passed away at their home Monday, Oct. 3.  Mrs. Smithey was formerly Miss Grace Cline.

             (The death certificate states that an unnamed male infant of Barton Smithey, a native of Elco, Ill., and Grace Cline, a native of Ullin, Ill., was stillborn 3 Oct 1938, in Elco, Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Oct 1938: 

Brother of James Martin Dies Sunday Afternoon

             Tom Martin, 61, brother of James Martin of Spencer Heights, died Sunday afternoon, October 2, at 2:30 o’clock at the Veterans’ hospital at Outwood, Ky., where he had been a patient for several years.  The body was taken to his home in St. Louis, where funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock.  Burial was made in St. Louis.

             He leaves his wife and one daughter, Pauline, of East St. Louis; two brothers, James of Mounds and Frank of Bonne Terre, Mo.; one sister, Mrs. Fred Raub of Mounds; a half-brother, Claude Martin, of Cairo; and other relatives.

 

Retired Illinois Central Engineer Dies Tuesday Evening

             Oran Crawford, age 71, and for many years an engineer on the Illinois Central Railroad, died at his home here Tuesday evening, October 4, at about eight o’clock.  While he had been in poor health for the last four years or more he was confined to his bed during his last illness only a few days and many of his friends did not know of his serious condition until the day of his death.

             Mr. Crawford had been retired from service on the Illinois Central on September 30, 1937.  He was a member of the Masonic Lodge.

             Surviving him are his wife, Amanda Fulkerson Crawford; two daughters, Misses Mary and Martha Crawford; one sister, Mrs. George Heyduck of Yakima, Washington; also some nieces residing in Centralia.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at the Ryan Funeral Home, Mr. Talbort of East St. Louis conducting the service.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Mrs. Laura May Parker

             Mrs. Laura May Parker, age 70, died at her home four miles west of here Sunday morning, October 2, at 3 o’clock, following a week’s illness.  She had been a resident of this vicinity for 28 years.

             Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Etta Varner, Mrs. Leatha Echols of Mounds, Mrs. Mattie Essex of Villa Ridge; four sons, Claude, Carman, Ralph and Clyde of Mounds; 27 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Shaffer of Mounds, Mrs. Amanda Evers of Hutchinson, Kan.; one brother, Grant Jaynes of Parma, Mo.; two half-sisters, Mrs. Della Meyers and Mrs. Myrtle Peeler, both of Chicago.

             Funeral services were held at the Anderson Church near Boaz, Ill., Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, followed by burial in Anderson Cemetery.  The funeral cortege was made up of a large number of the family and friends.

             G. A. James directed the funeral.

 

Prominent Southern Illinois Educator Called by Death

Miss May S. Hawkins of S. I. N. U. Faculty Dies at Carbondale Monday Morning

             Miss May S. Hawkins of Carbondale, who has been very ill for several months, died Monday morning, October 3, at her home in Carbondale.  Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church of Carbondale Wednesday morning, Rev. Cameron Harmon, pastor officiating.  Members of the faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University were honorary pall bearers.  Her body was then brought to the Mounds Methodist Church where it lay in state from twelve until two o’clock when a short prayer service was held.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by the side of her parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hawkins, pioneers of this section.  The Rev. Mr. Carrollton of the Missionary Baptist Church of Carbondale read the burial service.

             The following obituary was written by Miss Hawkins’ life-long friend, Miss Mary Roberson of Mound City.

             May S. Hawkins was born at Mounds, Illinois, 1876—died at Carbondale, 1938.

             She was reared in Mounds and spent the greater part of her life in Pulaski County.  After completing the grade school of Pulaski County, she continued her education at the Southern Illinois Normal University, graduating from there in 1904.  She began teaching at an early age without much professional training as was the practice in this county at that time.

             She taught in the rural schools of Pulaski County and attended school at the Southern Illinois Normal University during the vacation months.  After her graduation at Carbondale she taught two years in the Golconda High School and resigned there to come back to Pulaski County to become a candidate for the office of county superintendent of schools of Pulaski County, to which office she was elected in 1906.  She was re-elected for four successive terms and remained in office for twenty years.

             Under her regime the schools of the county kept well apace with the rapidly increasing stride of educational progress of the state.  She saw the introduction or organization of the five high schools of the county; the standardization of many of the rural schools; and was active in promoting the high standard of teacher qualification.

             At the close of her work as county superintendent she accepted an appointment in the Training School of the Teachers’ College at Carbondale.  Her many years as county superintendent of schools had well prepared her for this position.  She served the college as critic teacher in the rural schools for two years and was then asked to accept the position as supervisor of social sciences in the high school of the college.  She held this position until her health failed last spring.

             She was well known in educational organizations and held positions, honorary and compensative, in state sections, state and national associations.  For many years she r was secretary of the Southern Illinois Teachers’ Association and once served the National Educational Association as a delegate from Illinois.

             Throughout her teaching career she continued her education, receiving a Bachelor of Education degree at the Southern Illinois State Normal University in Carbondale and was granted a master’s degree in the University of Chicago in 1934.

             Although Miss Hawkins was a very busy woman, she found time to write.  Besides contributing to educational journals, she published one grade school history textbook, “Leaders in American History.”  Her second book, a history text for high schools, “The Economic, Political and Social development of our American Nation,” was almost ready for publication.  She was writing it from erhu class work of the last two years.  Although the book seemed finished, she said she still had some work to do in perfecting it.

             May S. Hawkins in early life, became a professed Christian and united with the First Baptist Church of Carbondale.  Later in life she affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church in Mound City.  Upon her location in Carbondale she moved her membership to the First Methodist Church of that city, and was active there in church and Sunday school work.

             Miss Hawkins was a woman of sterling qualities, pleasing personality and upright character.  Her many years in contact with youth had made her a vast circle of friends who sorrow at her passing.  She is survived by four sisters; Mrs. Warren Crain of Villa Ridge, Mrs. M. M. Shifley , Mrs. P. A. Simmons and Mrs. A. T. Carson of Mounds; one brother, Louie Hawkins and his son, John, who constituted her household at the time of her death; and ten other nephews and nieces and ten great-nephews and nieces.

             Miss Hawkins was overcome by fatal illness last May.  Although she had sought the best medical aid there seemed to be, no relief for her until death came to her peacefully Monday morning, October 3, and found her comforted by the words of the poet:

So live that when thy summons comes to join

             That innumerable caravan that moves

To that mysterious realm where each shall take

             His chamber in the silent halls of death, thou go not like a quarry slave at night

Scourged to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed

             By an unfaltering trust approach thy grave

As one who wraps the draperies of his couch

             About him and lies down to pleasant dreams.

May S. Hawkins has gone to her reward.  May her soul rest in peace.

 

Mrs. J. Travers, Jr., was called to Carbondale on account of the death of Miss May Hawkins.

 

Miss Martha Crawford was called home from Carbondale on account of the illness and death of her father.

 

Mrs. P. G. Bride of Cairo and her sister, Miss Rena Crain of Mound City were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of Miss May S. Hawkins.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Raub, Mr. and Mrs. James Martin and C. R. Scott attended the funeral of Tom Martin in East St. Louis Wednesday.

 

Paul Britt

             Paul Britt, age 30 years, was killed by a falling tree while at work on a canal at his home, Ocala, Fla.  The accident occurred Tuesday, Sept. 27.

Surviving are his wife, Pansy; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Britt of Mound City; three sisters, Mrs. Helen Parker, Miss Subbeen Britt of Mound City and Mrs. Stella Hiatt of Ullin; and five brothers, Clyde Britt of America, Charles Britt of Sr. Marie, Idaho, and Jakie Britt, Leonard Britt and John Britt of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon in the Cairo Baptist Church, Rev. H. E. Lockard officiating.  Burial was in the Concord Cemetery near Olmstead.

             Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Oct 1938: 

MRS. EMILY ANGELINE WRIGHT PASSES AWAY IN MOUNDS

             Mrs. Emily Angeline Wright, 84, passed away Monday morning following an illness of several days.

             She had spent her entire life in Southern Illinois, having lived in Mound City a number of years, and where she resided until 1937, at which time she moved to Mounds, where she was living at the time of her death.

             She was the widow of the late Samuel Wright, whose death occurred in 1931.  She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Fred Weaver of Mattoon; one son, Rue Wright, who made his home with her; four grandchildren, Mrs. Grace Robinson of Cairo; Mrs. John Barnett of Villa Ridge; Ella, Nell and John Weaver of Mattoon; and one great-grandson, Max Robinson; and a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at her home on North Oak Street in Mounds Wednesday afternoon.  Rev. Throgmorton of the Baptist Church, whose faith she followed, conducted the services.

             Burial was made at the cemetery at Grand Chain.

             G. A. James Funeral Service was in charge.

             (Samuel Wright married Emily A. Starks on 2 Nov 1871, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Emiley Angeline Wright was born 31 Jan 1854, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Rubin Starks and Mary Emiley Martin, natives of Kentucky, widow of Samuel Wright, died 10 Oct 1938, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HENRY MEYER

             Henry Meyer, 54, died at his home on the Karnak Route early Sunday morning.    He is survived by his wife, Sarah; and six children, William of Belknap, Neville Meyer and Mrs. Lucy May Cockerel of Metropolis, Mrs. Alice Alma Rood of Marion, Fritz Meyer and Mrs. Florence Jones of Karnak.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Mayer; one sister, Mrs. Dora Barnett of Karnak, and two brothers, John of Karnak and Fritz of Metropolis.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in the Anderson Church, Rev. Benninger of Grand Chain officiating.  Interment was made in the Anderson Cemetery.

 

MRS. CHARLES MATHIS

             Mrs. Charles Mathis of Centralia, formerly of Mounds, passed away Monday night in a hospital in Centralia.

             She is survived by her husband and six children.  She was the daughter of Mrs. Josephine Little of Karnak and leaves a number of relatives living in this county.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday in the M. E. church at Mounds.

             (Her death certificate states that Myrtle Mathis was born 3 Sep 1888, near Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Burl Little, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Josephine Manley, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 10 Oct 1938, in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill., the wife of Charles H. Martin, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AUNT BETTY OLIVER

             Mrs. Elizabeth Roach, better known in Mound City as “Aunt Betty Oliver,” passed away Tuesday afternoon at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo following a brief illness.  Aunt Betty fell several days ago and broke her hip and her death is believed to have been caused by this accident.  She was 74 years old and a resident of this city for a number of years.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the James Funeral Home in this city.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of arrangements.

             (According to her death certificate, Elizabeth Roach was born in 1864 in Kentucky, died 11 Oct 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Jack Roach.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FREIDA MARGARET LINDSAY

             Frieda Margaret Lindsay, 16, died suddenly Saturday afternoon at St. Mary’s Hospital.

             She leaves her young husband, Albert, and baby son, Albert Eugene, born at the hospital Friday.

             She is also survived by her foster parents, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor Holdman of Mounds; a sister, Miss Ellen Egner of Mounds; two brothers, Robert Welsh of Mounds and George Welsh of Dam 53; a half-sister, Mrs. Walter Unger of Mound City and cousin, Walter Unger of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning in the Pentecostal Church at McClure, Rev. M. Hamsford, officiating.  Interment was made in the Lindsey Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Freda M. Lindsey was born 28 Feb 1922, in Olmstead, Ill., the daughter of Mr. Welch, died 8 Oct 1938, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the wife of Albert A. Lindsey, and was buried in Lindsey Cemetery at McClure, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MARY AMANDA RENAUD

             Mrs. Mary Amanda Renaud passed away at her home in Tulsa, Okla., Aug. 19, from the infirmities of age.  She was the only child of John and Amanda Bartleson Smith and was born April 21, 1849, at Grand Chain, Ill.  She was married to Levi H. Mangold in 1865 and to that union five children were born, three of whom are living.  Mr. Mangold passed away in 1875 and later she married Charles Renaud to whom six children were born, four of whom are living.

             She lived in Grand Chain, her early home, for many years and later moved to Kansas, then to Tulsa. She has been a member of the Christian Church for many years.

             The following children survive her:  Frank Mangold, Tulsa, Okla., Mrs. Lou Bartleson, West Plains, Mo., Mrs. Lena Wilson, Tulsa, Okla., John L. Renaud, Tulsa, Okla., Mrs. Henry Donmeyer, New Cambria, Kansas, Roy Renaud, Tulsa, Okla., and Mrs. E. B. Painter of Tulsa, Okla.  She is also survived by 17 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

       (Levi H. Mangold married Mary Amanda Smith on 24 Sep 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Zephran C. Renaud married Mary Amanda Mangold on 5 Nov 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Louis Bartleson, 24, farmer of Grand Chain, Ill., born in Grand Obion, Ky., the son of Edwin Bartleson and Nancy O. Anglin married Minnie Mangold, 21, of Grand Chain, Ill., born in Beloit, Kan., daughter of Levi H. Mangold and Mary A. Smith, on 2 Sep 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Robert Wilson married Lenne Mangold on 21 Jun 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Mary Amanda Renaud was buried in Rose Hill Memorial Park in Tulsa, Okla.—Darrel Dexter)

 

NATHAN GILBERT MELVIN

             Nathan Gilbert Melvin, 58, died Saturday afternoon at his home in Ullin after an illness of two years.

             Mr. Melvin is survived by his wife, Sarah; nine children, Mrs. Ora Knupp, Mrs. Edna McHarry, Nathan, Jr., Misses Cora, Winifred, Olive, and Margaret, all of Ullin; Harvey of Mounds, and Mrs. Mary McCluskey of Belknap.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon in the Baptist church at Ullin, Rev. Hobart Peterson officiating and burial was made in the New Hope Cemetery.

             (When he registered for the draft in Pulaski Co., Ill., in 1918, he lived in Ullin, Ill., and worked as a coal mine and lumber dealer.  He stated he was born 25 Jan 1880, and his “left limb practically useless from rheumatism.”  His nearest relative was Sarah Olive Melvin. His death certificate states that Nathan Gilbert Melvin was born 22 Jan 1880, in East Cape, Ill., the son of Nathan Melvin and Mary Williams, died 8 Oct 1938, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Sarah Trammel Melvin, and was buried in New Hope Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Nathan G. Melvin Jan. 29, 1880 Oct. 8, 1938 Olive Melvin Dec. 6, 1887 Dec. 25, 1956 Cora Melvin July 1, 1909 April 9, 1982.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Oct 1938: 

Pioneer Resident of Pulaski County Dies Monday Morning

             Mrs. Emily Angeline Wright, widow of the late Samuel Wright, died Monday morning, October 10, at 6:30 o’clock at the age of 84 years, 8 months and 10 days.  She had spent her entire life in this section of Illinois and had been a member of the Baptist church for 42 years.  Her husband died December 5, 1931.

             Mrs. Wright is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Fred Weaver, of Mattoon; one son, Rue Wright, who made his home with her; four grandchildren, Mrs. Grace Robinson of Cairo, Mrs. John Barnett of Villa Ridge, Ella Nell and John Weaver of Mattoon; and one great-grandson, Max Robinson; four nieces, Mrs. Phil Hyde of Olney, Mrs. William Stevers of Phoenix, Ariz., Mrs. Ruben Dever and Miss Kathleen Starks of Cairo; three nephews, John Starks of Cairo, Charlie and Frank Starks of Morehouse, Mo., also survive her.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at one o’clock at her home on North Oak Street.  Rev. Earl Throgmorton, pastor of the First Baptist Church, officiating.  Burial was in the Grand Chain cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Cora Ragsdale

             Mrs. Cora Ragsdale, age 66 years, passed away at 2:15 o’clock Saturday morning at her home in Buncombe, after an illness of seven months.  She was the widow of the late William Ragsdale.

             Mrs. Ragsdale is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Blanche Mighell of St. Louis; three sons, Morely Ragsdale of Chicago, Herbert Ragsdale and Franzo Ragsdale of Buncombe; and one sister, Mrs. Sarah Hennard of Anna.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon in the Methodist church at Buncombe.  Rev. J. B. Jones of Vienna officiating.  Interment was made in the Mt. Zion Cemetery, directed by Wilson Funeral Service.

             (William M. Ragsdale married Cora Etta Smith on 22 Oct 1891, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Zion Cemetery at Buncombe, Ill., reads:  W. M. Ragsdale Born June 15, 1866 Died Mar. 27, 1911 C. E. Ragsdale his wife Born Nov. 29, 1872 Died Oct. 8, 1938.—Darrel Dexter)