Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

1 Jan. - 31 Dec. 1937

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Jan 1937: 

Deaths of the Week

CHARLES D. TRAIN

             Charles Durkee Train, long a prominent resident of Pulaski County, died Saturday evening at 6:20 o’clock at his home on Delaware Avenue following an illness of one week due to pneumonia.  His age was 81 years.

             He was born in Kenosha, Wis., on January 19, 1865, to Horatio Church Train and Maria Eunice Bullen Train. On July 16, 1890, at Sarrplain, Mo., he married Mahala E. Fry, who died on July 30, 1900.  To them were born Dorothy Mae O’Neal, who before her death resided in Denver, Colo.; Freddy C., who died in infancy; Cyril of Chicago, Gladys Hoffmeier of Mounds, and Mahala Ellen, who died in childhood.

             On July 17, 1905, in Cairo, he was married to Pearl Bertha Lackey and to that union were born Harold D. of Los Angeles, Calif., Eunice Pearl Jenkins of Mounds, Carl Delbert Train of Jacksonville, Ill., and Charlene Mildred Bullock of Mounds.  His wife, three sons and three daughters also several grandchildren survive.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the family residence at 2 o’clock, the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the M. E. Church, officiating.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery, directed by J. T. Ryan.

             His sons had been called here by his illness and all six of his children were in Mounds at the time of his death.

             Mr. Train’s life was a full and busy one.  An obituary will appear next week.

 

MRS. R. C. POOLE

             Mrs. Florence Poole, wife of Rannie C. Poole of Centralia, died at the home of her brother, James Martin, north of Mounds Tuesday morning, December 29.  Mrs. Poole had not been well for some time, but was able to come to Mounds to spend Christmas with relatives and had seemed as well as usual the evening before.  She was taken worse soon after retiring and suffered a stroke during the night.

             Before moving to Centralia, Mr. and Mrs. Poole resided in Mounds.  Both were active workers in the M. E. Church and had a large circle of friends who are grieved because of the passing of Mrs. Poole.

             Surviving are her husband, one sister, Mrs. Fred Ra___ of Mounds; four brothers, James and Franklin Martin of Mounds, Tom Martin of Centralia and Claude Martin of Cairo; also other relatives.

             The body was taken to the James Funeral Home where it lay in state until Wednesday morning when it was taken to the Gardiner Funeral Home in Centralia.  Funeral services were held there Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with interment in the Centralia cemetery.

 

LEONARD MILLER

             Leonard, four-day-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Miller of Olmstead, who was born Tuesday morning at their home, was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital in an endeavor to save his life, but died there Thursday morning. He was the first child of Mr. and Mrs. Miller.

             Funeral services were Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. Galen, pastor of the Lutheran Church of Olmstead.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

             (According to his death certificate, Leonard Miller was born 20 Dec 1936, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of Pearl Miller, a native of Union Co., Ill., and Lena Richard, a native of Olmstead, Ill., died 24 Dec 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Concord Cemetery near Olmstead, Ill.  His marker there reads Leonard E. Miller Dec. 22, 1936 Dec. 24, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARL A. MIKKIN

             Carl A. Mikkin, age 66, died at 5 o’clock Friday morning, Dec. 25, at his home near Olmstead. He had been in poor health for the past twenty years.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Olmstead Lutheran Church with Rev. W. A. Galen officiating.  Interment was at Concord Cemetery.

             He leaves his wife, Bertha; one sister, Mrs. Henry Rust, of Cairo; a daughter, Mrs. W. M. Berry of Murphysboro; three sons, Albert, William and Harry Otto, all of Olmstead.  Mr. Mikkin had been engaged in farming in that community the past forty years.

             Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

 

MARIE RANNEY

             Mrs. Marie Ranney, age 76 years, died at her home in Grand Chain at 4:10 Thursday afternoon, Dec. 24, following an illness of four weeks.

Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Congregational church in Grand Chain, Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery.

             Surviving are one son, Walter B. Leidigh; two stepdaughters, Mrs. Ernest Rich of Granite City, Mrs. Fred Watson of Medical Lake, Wash.; three grandchildren, Woodrow Leidigh of Arrow Head Springs, Calif., Virginia and Walter, Jr., of Grand Chain.

             Mrs. Ranney had been a resident of Grand Chain for the past thirty-eight years and had a wide acquaintance throughout Southern Illinois.  She was an active member of the Eastern Star of Grand Chain.

             Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

 

Cyril Train has returned to his home in Chicago and Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Train have returned to their home in Jacksonville, Ill., after having been called here on account of the illness and death of their father, C. D. Train.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Jan 1937:
DONGOLA GIRL DIES

Opal Goodman Dillon, 26 years of age, died at her home in Dongola, December 25, following an attack of pneumonia.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola Sunday at 2:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward and Rev. H. W. Karraker.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.

E. J. Ford was in charge of the funeral.

(The death certificate states that Julia Opal Dillow, housewife at 13 S. 1 East, Dongola, Ill., was born 2 Apr 1910, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of John H. Goodman and Nellie Lee Burris, natives of Illinois, died 25 Dec 1936, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., wife of Glenn Dillow, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Glenn Dillow 1904-1979 Opal Dillow 1910-1936.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOTHER OF MOUND CITY WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Nancy S. Beggs, mother of Mrs. Bertha Vines of this city, died at her home in Dongola Sunday about noon.  Mrs. Beggs, who was 84 years of age, suffered a stroke about two weeks ago which resulted in her death.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola Monday at 2 o’clock with the Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

Mrs. Beggs is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Loda Keller and Mrs. Naomi Hammond of Dongola and Mrs. Bertha Vines of this city besides many other relatives.

(Her death certificate states that Nancy S. Beggs was born 26 Sep 1852, in North Carolina, daughter of Wilson Davault and Nancy Clifford, died 27 Dec 1936, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., wife of William S. Beggs, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Dongola, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Nancy S. Beggs 1852-1935.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARL MIKKIN DIES AT HOME NEAR OLMSTEAD

Carl Mikkin, 66 years of age, died at his home near Olmstead last ___day at 5 o’clock a.m.  He had been in poor health for the past ___ty years.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Lutheran church in Olmstead with Rev. W. A. Galen officiating.  Interment was made in the Concord Cemetery.

He is survived by his wife, Ber___; one sister, Mrs. Henry Rust, of Cairo; one daughter, Mrs. W. M. ___y of Murphysboro; three sons, ___rt, William and Harry Otto, all of Olmstead.

___ Funeral Services directed the funeral.

(Henry William Rust, 28, butcher at Cairo, Ill., born in Werder, Hanover, Germany, son of William Rust and Magdalena Stolte, married on 14 Jul 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Amelia Mickin, 22, of Olmsted, born in Augstegirren, Prussia, Germany, daughter of Fred Mickin and Wilhelmine Radke.  His death certificate states that Carl A. Mikkin was born 22 Dec 1870, in Germany, the son of Frederick Mikkin, a native of Germany, died 25 Dec 1936, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Bertha Mikkin, and was buried in Concord Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DIES AT MOUNDS

Mrs. R. C. Poole of Centralia died at the home of her brother, James Martin, in Mounds, Tuesday morning at 10:50 o'clock.

She leaves her husband, one sister, Mrs. Fred Raub; the following brothers, James and Frank Martin and Claude Martin of Cairo; and other relatives.

The body was taken to the G. A. James Funeral Home from where it was taken to the Gardiner Funeral Home in Centralia, Wednesday morning where funeral services were held at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.

(According to her death certificate, Florence Poole was born 22 Jul 1875, in Johnson Co., Ill., the daughter of Green Martin and Miss Davis, natives of Illinois, died 29 Dec 1936, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of R. C. Poole, and was buried in Hill Crest Cemetery in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. MARIE RANNEY DIES AT HER HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

Mrs. Marie Ranney, 76 years of age, died at her home in Grand Chain last Thursday afternoon at 4:10 o’clock, following an illness of four weeks.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church in Grand Chain with Rev. E. C. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery.

Mrs. Ranney is survived by one son, Walter; two stepdaughters, Mrs. Ernest Rich, of Granite City, and Mrs. Fred Watson of Medical Lake, Wash.; and three grandchildren.

Pall bearers were Guy Harris, Henry Weisenborn, Edward Weisenborn, Earl Shaw, George Hollis, and Calvin Wilmoth.

Wilson Funeral Service had charge of the service.

(Her death certificate states that Maria Ranney was born 14 Jun 1860, in Pulaski Co., Ill., died 24 Dec 1936, in Grand Chain, Ill., widow of W. R. Ranney, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.  Her marker there reads:  Maria Ranney 1860-1936.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JENNIE L. BISHOP DIES

Jennie L. Bishop, 46, died at her home in Dongola, December 25, at 3:15 p.m.  Her death followed an illness or about four weeks.

Her body was taken to the Ford Funeral Home where it remained until the funeral.

She leaves her husband, Hess E. Bishop, and the following children, Mrs. Elmer Meyer of Mt. Olive, Ill., Donald Leo Bishop of Los Angeles, Calif., Dorothy, Alfred, Paul, and Georgia all of Dongola.  She also leaves her father, James Manning; and a brother, Arnie Manning of Dongola.

(James M. Manning, 23, farmer at Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of James Manning and Mary Davis, married on 3 Dec 1887, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., Dovie Fisher, 20, from Dongola, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Charles Fisher and Dora Rhinehart.  The death certificate states that Jennie Letha Bishop was born 7 Apr 1890, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of James Manning and Dovie Fisher, natives of Illinois, died 25 Dec 1936, in Dongola, Ill., the wife of Hess E. Bishop, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Jennie L. Bishop Apr. 7, 1890 Dec. 25, 1936 Hess E. Bishop Jan. 20, 1887 Mar. 12, 1955.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER MOUND CITY GIRL PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Roscoe McCormick, formerly Hazel Williams of this city, passed away in a St. Louis hospital Sunday morning following a long illness.

Mrs. McCormick, who was 27 years of age, made friends of everyone whom she chanced to meet, by her ready smile and happy disposition.

She is survived by her husband, Roscoe McCormick; and two children, Willis Hugh, 5, and Betty Jo, 2, of St. Louis; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Williams; two brothers, Curtis Bowers and Russell Williams; and two sisters, Miss Ruby Williams and Mrs. Howard Ridings of this city; and three aunts, Mrs. Ray Olmstead of East St. Louis, Mrs. Al Ritchie of Belleville, and Mrs. James Davage of Cairo, besides other relatives.

The remains were brought to Cairo from St.. Louis Sunday evening by Berbling Funeral Service and was later taken to the home of her parents, where funeral services were held Tuesday at 2 p.m.  Rev. H. F. Gerecke, Lutheran minister of St. Louis, officiated and burial was made in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Casket bearers were:  Paul Baccus, Robert Throgmorton, Kenneth House, George Ashworth, Carlos Parker and William Dooms.

Berbling Funeral Service was in charge.

(Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Hazel McCormick Aug. 21, 1909 Dec. 27, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)
 
17 SNAKES FOUND IN GRAVE NEAR GRAND CHAIN

It was an exciting time in the graveyard near Grand Chain last week when grave diggers came up on 17 snakes matted together about two feet under the ground while opening a grave.  The account of just what happened is not mentioned, for it was in the cemetery for colored people and colored men were opening the grave.  Probably some of them got out right away.  Most folks would, anyhow.

There were 17 snakes, according to G. A. James, who visited the place and among them was a copper head, an assortment of chicken and black snakes and others.  They were all mixed together in a sort of hollow space underground where they would have spent the winter.

The snakes were not very lively and were killed without difficulty.  This bears out the theory of snakes in a graveyard and proves that snakes gather together regardless of kind in den in the winter in order that whatever body warmth they have it is conserved.
 
Calli Ann, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Acuff, who passed away at their home in Grand Chain, was buried Sunday in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery.  The mother is getting along nicely. 

(Her death certificate states that Callie Ann Acuff was born 26 Dec 1936, in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Paul Acuff and Hazel Taylor, natives of Illinois, died 26 Dec 1936, in Grand Chain, Chain, Ill., and was buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Callie Ann dau. of Paul & Hazel Acuff 1936-1936. —Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Jan 1937:
GEORGE VICKERS DIES

George Vickers, 66 years of age, a former resident of this city, died at his home in DuQuoin, Tuesday at 5:05 a.m.

Funeral services were held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock at the Leonard Street Pentecostal Church in DuQuoin.

Following the services, the cortege left for Thistlewood Cemetery near Mounds, arriving there at 1:00 o'clock where interment was made.

(His death certificate states that George W. Vickers, service station worker, was born 23 Apr 1870, in Bay City, Ill., the son of George Vickers and Lucretia Ann Weeks, natives of Bay City, Ill., died 5 Jan 1937, in DuQuoin, Perry Co., Ill., the husband of Margaret Vickers, and was buried at Mounds, Pope Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
We are sorry to learn of the death of Mr. Train of Mounds, formerly of Ullin.  We extend our sympathy to his family.  (Beech Grove)

(The death certificate states that C. D. Train, a building mat manufacturer, was born 19 Jan 1855, in Keoashia, Wis., the son of Horatio Train and Mariah Buleen, natives of New York, died 26 Dec 1936, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Pearl Train, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Charles D. Train 1855-1936 Pearl B. Train 1882-1958.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Jan 1937: 

Attorney Reed Green Dies Saturday Night, January 2

             Attorney Reed Green of Cairo died suddenly Saturday night, January 2, at 11 o’clock at his home in Cairo.  His death was due to a heart attack.  He had suffered two previous attacks, one on the Sunday before.

             Saturday morning, Mr. Green had been in the First Bank & Trust Co., of which organization he was president, and in the afternoon he had been at his law office attending to business.

             He was of distinguished ancestry on his father’s side the line going back to an aunt of General George Washington.  On his mother’s side he was also descended from a pioneer family.  He taught school as a young man and had served as a member of the school board for years.  He was elected in 1888 and served two terms. In 1892 was elected state senator and served four years.  He was president of the Cairo Library Board from 1921 until his death.

             Surviving are his widow, a daughter, Mrs. Emmett J. Gillespie; and a stepdaughter, Mrs. Robert Halliday.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home, the Rev. W. P. McVay of the M. E. Church officiating.  The board of directors of the First Bank & Trust Co., served as pall bearers.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

             (His death certificate states that Reed Green, an attorney, was born 22 Sep 1865, in Illinois, the son of William H. Green, died 2 Jan 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Lula Green, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Mounds Resident Dies Suddenly at Fulton

             George V. March, for many years manager of the local office of the Fruit Dispatch Company, died very suddenly at his office in Fulton, Ky., late Sunday afternoon.  He had been suffering from angina pectoris for some time, but continued about his work until stricken by death.

             Mr. Marsh came to Mounds from New Orleans, La., as a young man.  He brought his bride here from that southern city and his two children, Frank and Ruth (Mickey), were born here.  He has many friends here who will grieve at his passing.  His age was 49 years.

             Mr. and Mrs. August Crosson, Mrs. Lucy Prindle, Mr. Otis T. Hudson and Mrs. John Travers went to Fulton Monday.  Brief services were held in a Fulton Funeral Home that afternoon.  From there the body was taken to New Orleans for burial.

             Surviving are his widow and two children, Frank, a student at St. Vincent’s Nursing School, New York City, and Ruth, a student at Murray State College, Murray, Kentucky.

             (His death certificate states that George V. Marsh of 313 West Fourth St., Fulton, Fulton Co., Ky., manager of Fulton Fruit, was born 21 Jan 1887, in St. Mary Parish, La., the son of William A. Marsh and Elizabeth Heyl, natives of Louisiana, died 3 Jan 1937, of coronary thrombosis rheumatism and was buried in Louisiana.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Broken Back Causes Death

             Charles Gunderson of Detroit, who has been confined in the Anna City Hospital with a fractured vertebrae, as the result of an automobile accident, which occurred early on the morning of December 31, near Cobden when the car he was in was overturned on the highway, died Sunday night.  Five others were in the car, two of whom were severely injured.  They were Charles Shockley and Wayne Houston, also of Detroit.

             The young men had been to Texas to take a convoy of new automobiles from a Detroit factory and were on their way home.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Jan 1937: 

Deaths of the Week

MRS. ARTHUR BARTER

       Mrs. Kate B. Barter, age 68, wife of Arthur Barter, died Tuesday evening, January 12 at her home in Spencer Heights.  Mrs. Barter had not been well for some time and only recently had suffered a fall.

       Surviving her husband, a well-known contractor; one daughter, Mrs. Idabelle Comings, of this city; two brothers, John Watkins of Memphis, Tenn., and Tom Watkins of Cairo; a niece, Mrs. Nick W. Cox of Cairo; four nephews, Robert and Corwin Watkins of Cairo, Ralph Watkins of Chicago and G. E. Weldon of Little Rock, Ark.; many other relatives and a large circle of friends.

       Mrs. Barter was a descendant of Peter Watkins, a Revolutionary soldier and was an active member of the Egyptian Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.  She had lived in Cairo for more than forty years, having moved to Pulaski County only a few years ago.

       Funeral services were held at the Berbling Funeral Home in Cairo at 1:30 o’clock Thursday afternoon, the Rev. Robert C. Dunlap officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

       (Her death certificate states that Kate Beele Barter was born 8 Mar 1868, in DuQuoin, Ill., the daughter of Thomas Corwin Watkins, a native of Zanesville, Ohio, and Lizzie Williams, died 12 Jan 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Arthur Barter, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Kate B. Barter 1868-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OPAL LOUISE BUNKER

       Opal Louise Bunker, 13, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ward Bunker of Karnak, died Friday morning, Jan. 8, at the family home.  She had been ill of pneumonia for three weeks.

       Surviving are her parents, a brother, Everett; and two sisters, Adelaide and Shirley Lee.

       Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Karnak Pentecostal church with the Rev. Mr. Ford officiating.  Burial was in the Anderson Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

       (Her death certificate states that Opal Louise Bunker was born 4 May 1923, in Karnak, Ill., the daughter of Ward Bunker and Ruby Bunker, a native of Brookport, Ill., died 8 Jan 1937, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

      

DANIEL SHEFFER

       Daniel Sheffer, of Elco, Ill., died Thursday, Jan. 7, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Tony Leipert of Granite City.

       Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church in Elco Sunday morning at 11 o’clock, the Rev. Ford Johnson, pastor, officiating.  Mr. Sheffer was the grandfather of Mrs. George Brown of this city.

       (Daniel Sheffer married Loney T. Jordan on 23 Aug 1887, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Daniel Sheffer, farmer, was born 22 Aug 1866, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Andrew Sheffer and Nancy Aulbrite, died 10 Jan 1937, in Madison Co., Ill., husband of Leona Sheffer, and was buried at Mill Creek, Ill.  His marker in Free Trinity Pentecost Church Hill Cemetery in Elco, Alexander Co., Ill., reads:  Father Daniel Sheffer Oct. 22, 1866 Jan. 7, 1937 Mother Leona T. Sheffer Nov. 15, 1871 Gone But Not Forgotten.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Joe Lyons, Pioneer Farm Bureau Builder

       Joseph P. Lyons, former charter member of the Livingston County Farm Bureau and for seven years a membership solicitor for the Illinois Agricultural Association, died at his home at Pontiac, Illinois, January 6.  He was 73 years old.

       Mr. Lyons was known throughout the state for his interests in agriculture and the promotion of the Farm Bureau throughout the county.

       (Joseph P. Lyons married Margaret McGinnis on 7 Feb 1888, in Livingston Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Joseph P. Lyons, retired hardware merchant, was born 19 Sep 1863, in Platville, Ill., the son of Bernard Lyons and Mary McKanna, natives of Ireland, died 6 Jan 1937, in Pontiac, Livingston Co., Ill., husband of Margaret McGinnis, and was buried in Odell, Livingston Co., Ill.  His marker in Saint Paul Cemetery in Odell, Ill., reads:  J. P. Lyons and his wife Margaret McGinnis Lyons Born July 26, 1862 Died July 12, 1900 Joseph Patrick Lyons 1863-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

88-YEAR-OLD TWIN SUCCUMBS

       We learn, as we go to press, that Miss Geraldine Hatton, 88-year-old twin sister of Mrs. Creptine Burks, died at the home of another sister, Mrs. Abbie Burnett, in Golconda yesterday afternoon.  Miss Hatton had been critically ill for several weeks.

       She and Mrs. Burks had been constant companions, living in the same house in Bay City all their lives until moving to Golconda recently.  They were the oldest twins in Pope County and possibly, in the state of Illinois. Both were much interested in all that went on about them and remarkably active for their age, making frequent trips to Golconda.

       Funeral arrangements have not been made at this time.—Golconda

       (Her death certificate states that Geraldine Hatton was born 1 Feb 1847, in Indiana, the daughter of Robert Hatton, a native of Indiana, and Sarah Boyed, a native of Kentucky, died 6 Jan 1937, in Golconda, Pope Co., Ill., and was buried at Rosebud, Pope Co., Ill.  Her marker in Independence Cemetery in Rosebud, Ill., reads:  Geraldine Hatton 1849-1937 Sarah Hatton 1809-1896 Mollie Hatton 1843-1924.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CLOCK IN FAMILY 123 YEARS

       One of the oldest clocks in Illinois reposes in the home of Mrs. Louella McCracken in Roodhouse.  The timepiece has been in the family 123 years and was purchased in 1812 at a public auction of the personal property of Robert Clark of Dunkirk, Pa.

       During the War in 1812, William Branyan was wounded and discharged.  He went to his home in 1813 and that same year he and his mother attended the sale of Robert Clark in Dunkirk.  There he bought the clock.  In 1834, the timepiece came to Illinois in a wagon.

       At the death of William Branyan, the clock was willed to his son, Eleazer Branyan, who lived in Christian County.  At the latter’s death, the clock was willed to Samuel P. McCracken, a nephew, who died at his home March 19, 1926, in Roodhouse.

       The clock was made in Birmingham, England, and besides the hours and minutes, it is built to show the changes of the moon, the day of the month and the day of the week.  Several years ago, a minor part was broken during the moving of the clock and the jeweler making the repairs, reported the works to be only slightly worn.

       (A marker in Sanders-Allen Cemetery in White Hall, Greene Co., Ill., reads:  William Branyan Born 1781 Died 1860 Rebecca Branyan Born 1796 Died 1870.  Another marker there reads:  Eleazer Branyan Born 1840 Died 1895.  S. P. McCracken married Luella M. Vandaveer on 12 Sep 1875, in Greene Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Samuel Perry McCracken was born 4 Aug 1853, in White Hall Township, Greene Co., Ill., the son of Samuel McCracken and Mary Branyan, natives of Pennsylvania, and died 10 Mar 1926, in Roodhouse, Greene Co., Ill.  His marker in Union Cemetery in Greene Co., Ill., reads:  Samuel P. McCracken 1853-1926 Luella M. McCracken his wife 1855-1943.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Brown were called to Elco by the death of Mrs. Brown’s grandfather, Daniel Sheffer, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Tony Leipert of Granite City, on Thursday morning.  Funeral services were held at Elco Sunday.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Jan 1937:
LAST CIVIL WAR VET IN BROOKPORT DIES
(Metropolis News)

Funeral services for William Ramage, 89, who died at 12:30 a.m. Monday, were held at 2 o'clock at the First Christian Church in Brookport.  Mr. Ramage was a member of the church and was Brookport's last remaining Civil War veteran.  His death was attributed to natural causes.

His wife, Minnie Ramage, and three children, Will Ramage and Charles Ramage, Brookport, and Mrs. A. G. Endgerson of Humble, Texas, survive.  In addition, he is survived by nineteen grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren.  After a military funeral conducted by the Brookport American Legion interment was made at Pell Cemetery.

(The death certificate states that William Ramage, barber, was born 6 Jun 1846, in Kentucky, the son of Jess Ramage, a native of Tennessee, and Lucy Brazell, a native of Kentucky, died 4 Jan 1937, in Brookport, Massac Co., Ill., the husband of Minnie Ramage, and was buried in Road District 7, Massac Co., Ill.  The application for a military headstone stated William Ramage enlisted 18 Feb 1865, as a private in Co. L, 17th Kentucky Cavalry, was honorably discharged 20 Sep 1865, and died 4 Jan 1937.  His marker in Pell Cemetery in Brookport, Ill., reads:  William Ramage Co. L 17 KY CAV.—Darrel Dexter).
 
FRANK TRAVELSTEAD DIES

Frank Travelstead, a pioneer resident of near Pomona, died suddenly at the home of his brother, Jeff Travelstead, on Cedar Creek near Pomona.  He had been in poor health for some time.  A coroner’s inquest was held to determine the cause of his death.  The body was taken to Marion Sunday where funeral and burial services were held.  His wife died about a year ago.


WILLIAM McCORMICK DIES

             William McCormick, 41, a former resident of this city, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo Sunday morning at 3 a.m. following a ten days’ illness with pneumonia.

             Mr. McCormick had been employed for the past ten year at the Bucher Brothers Bakery in Cairo.

             He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Violet Settles of Dearborn, Mich.; a stepson, Leslie Poole of Miami, Fla.; one sister and two brothers.

             Services were held Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock at his home on Sycamore Street with Rev. H. M. Cady of the Tigert Memorial Church officiating.  Following the service the funeral cortege motored to Metropolis where interment was made in the family lot in the Odd Fellows Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that William David McCormick, a baker, was born 3 Feb 1895, in Wickliffe, Ky., died 17 Jan 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Metropolis, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Father William D. McCormick 1896-1937.—Darrel Dexter)


PROMINENT CAIRO DOCTOR PASSES AWAY

             Dr. Orval Dickerson, 55, a prominent Cairo physician, died Monday night about 11:15 of heart attack.

             He had gone into a restaurant across the street from his office on Commercial and was eating a dish of ice cream before retiring a custom of his for many years, when he was stricken and was dead before he could get medical attention.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Lulu Dickerson.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday at 10 a.m. with Rev. W. P. MacVey of the Methodist Church officiating.  Following the services the body was taken to Mount Vernon where interment was made in the Salem Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Orvil Melcher Dickerson, physician, was born 3 Oct 1881, in Mt. Vernon, Ill., the son of George W. Dickerson, a native of Tennessee, and Celeste Melcher, a native of Mt. Vernon, Ill., died 18 Jan 1937, at 613 Comb Ave., Cairo, Ill., the husband of Lula Dickerson, and was buried in Salem Cemetery in Mt. Vernon, Ill.  His World War I draft registration stated that he was a medical doctor at Miller City, Ill., and his nearest relative was Lulu Bond Dickerson.  He also had a shattered arm of long duration.—Darrel Dexter)

 

S. BARTLETT KERR, OF METROPOLIS, DIES

             S. Bartlett Kerr, 73, passed away Saturday, January 9, in Paducah, Ky., from a combination of influenza and injuries suffered from a fall at his home in Metropolis.

             Kerr, an attorney and master in chancery of Massac County for the past 29 years, was also a captain in the Illinois National Guard.  He was well known in this county being a frequent business caller at the court house.

             He is survived by his wife, two children, and two brothers.

             Funeral services were held in the Methodist church at Metropolis Tuesday, January 12, at 3 p.m.  Interment was made in the Odd Fellows Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, S. Bartlett Kerr, a lawyer, was born 18 Oct 1863, in Pullsfield, Maine, the son of Daniel B. Kerr and Addie Green, natives of Maine, died 9 Jan 1937, in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., of a fractured skull—fell against rim of bath tub, and meningitis, and was buried in Metropolis, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


MRS. GEORGE BARNETT DIES AT HER HOME IN THIS CITY

Mrs. Emma Hack Barnett, 66 years of age, died at her home in this city on Main Street, last Friday evening at 7:30.  She was a resident of this city most of her life.

She is survived by her husband, George Barnett.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the G. A. James Funeral Home, conducted by Rev. Walter Van Meter.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

       (Her death certificate states that Emma Hack Barnett was born in 1870, died 15 Jan 1937, in Mound City, Ill., the wife of George Barnett, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Jan 1937: 

George Washington Brooks, a Negro, who was born in slavery 83 years ago and who died last week at the home of Mrs. Herman A. Jensen, 4130 Lafayette Avenue, St. Louis, great-granddaughter of his first owner, the late Capt. James Brooks of Jefferson County, was buried at French Village, St. Francois County, where he was freed at the start of the Civil War.

       When he was 7 years old, Brooks was given as a wedding present to Mrs. Luella Brooks Au Buchon of French Village.  After she freed him, he remained as a paid servant.  He helped rear her six children and became known in the community as “the shepherd of the flock.”

       On one occasion during the war, George Brooks, then 9 years old, rode a horse from French Village to Brooks Place in Jefferson County, through the woods in which guerillas were reported, with $1,000 in gold hidden in his boots.  Later, when troops were approaching French Village, he buried family valuables in the orchard and helped Mrs. Au Buchon to conceal her personal jewelry in a ball of yarn.  Soldiers ransacked the house and threw the ball of yarn across a room, cracking a pin, now an heirloom.  George had been at the Jensen home four years.

 

FRANCIS MARION KARRAKER

       F. Marion Karraker, age 67, died Friday morning, Jan. 15, at his home in Dongola, following a stroke of paralysis on the Monday preceding.  He had never regained consciousness.

       Mr. Karraker had been an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad for more than 48 years and for 44 years had been agent and operator for that system at Dongola.  He was the oldest agent in years of service on the Cairo to St. Louis division, and was known for his efficient service.  He was a member of the Order of Railroad Telegraphers and held membership in the Friendship Baptist Church near Dongola.

       He is survived by his wife, Ida A. Karraker; three brothers, T. N. Karraker of St. Louis, formerly of Mounds, Albert and John Karraker, both of Dongola; two sisters, Mrs. Laura Keller and Mrs. Emma Cope, both of Dongola.

       Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church of Dongola Sunday afternoon.  Burial was in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

       (Francis M. Karraker married Ida A. Graham on 23 Aug 1891, in Union Co., Ill.  Nathan Karraker married Sarah J. Knight on 25 May 1854, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Francis Marion Karraker, telegraph operator, was born 1 Jul 1869, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Nathan Karraker, a native of North Carolina, and Sarah Knight, died 15 Jan 1937, in Dongola, Ill., the husband of Ida A. Karraker, and was buried at Dongola.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Karraker attended the funeral of Mr. Karraker’s uncle, F. Marion Karraker, of Dongola, Sunday.

 

ROMUALD PATUREAUX

       Ramuald Patureaux, of Baton Rouge, La., died in the Veterans’ Hospital in Alexandria, La., Saturday, January 16.  He had been ill for several months.

       At one time Mr. Patureaux had been employed by a lumber firm in Cairo.

       He leaves his wife, formerly Mrs. Etta Reese Barnett of Pulaski County and later of Cairo, whom he married in 1930; a stepson, Frank Barnett of Baton Rouge; a stepdaughter, Mrs. Margaret Barnett Hagebush of Ashley, Ill.; a brother, and seven sisters.

       Burial was made in the Plaquemine Cemetery, Plaquemine, La.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Jan 1937:
FIVE DROWNED WHEN ICE SINKS POWER BOAT

Five colored men, all of Mound City, perished Wednesday night about 8:30 o'clock, when a power boat bringing them from the Cache levee to land in Mounds struck an ice cake, rammed a hole in her hull and sank.

The five who perished are:  Leslie Treadwell, Sherman Smith, Roosevelt Simms, Philip Burroughs, and Almore Donaldson.  Two white men and one colored man escaped.

This is the only fatalities reported and while there were still other to be brought from Mound City, unless very bad weather should come, there is no needy why any lives should have been lost.  The power boat that sank was running a risk in traveling at night as there was floating cakes of ice.

(The death certificate of Leslie Wence Treadwell, W. P. A. laborer, states he was born 9 Mar 1903, in New Madrid, Mo., the son of Thomas Treadwell and Martha Walder, natives of New Madrid, Mo., died 27 Jan 1937, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Mounds, Ill.  His World War I draft registration states that he was born in 1900 and his nearest relative was Martha Crise, of Mound City, Ill.  The death certificate of Sherman Smith, P. W. A. laborer, states he was born in 1913 in Missouri, the son of Frank Smith, a native of Missouri, died 27 Jan 1937, in Mound City, Ill., husband of Lucille Smith, and was buried in Mounds, Ill.  The death certificate of Roosevelt Simms, farmer, stated he was born 7 Sep 1912, in Carolton, Miss., the son of John Simms, a native of Elcorn, Miss., and Fannie Goodson, a native of Black Hawk, Miss., died 7 Feb 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
  
21 PERSONS KILLED IN THE CARBONDALE AREA IN A MONTH

Of the 21 persons killed in the Carbondale district during the month of December, three were killed as the result of head-on collisions.  In each case, one car was on the wrong side of the black line and in the ensuing wrecks six cars were damaged badly, three persons were killed and several injured.

It is such a simple thing to keep on the right side of the centerline, and such a disastrous thing to be on the wrong side at the wrong time that it would seem that these accidents would never happen—yet they do—through carelessness and recklessness.

Of the 21 killed on highways in this district during the months of December, six were pedestrians.

In no case could evidence be found that could hold the driver of the car responsible. Some of these pedestrians walked into the side of moving cars, others darted into the roadway from behind parked cars and stepped directly in front of a moving one.  All were adults.

The practice of safety is incumbent upon all users of the highway.

Do what we tell the children—look before you start across a highway.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Feb 1937, Flood Edition No. 2:

SISTER PASSED AWAY

             Mrs. Nannie Schaubert of Energy, sister of Will Underwood of this city, passed away Friday.  Funeral services were held at Energy Sunday afternoon.  Burial in Herrin City Cemetery.

             (Daniel Underwood married Elizabeth Bradley on 15 Oct 1871, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Nannie Schaubert, housewife at Energy, Ill., was born 18 Jun 1882, in Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of Daniel Underwood and Elizabeth Bradley, natives of Tennessee, died 29 Jan 1937, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., the wife of Charles Schaubert, and was buried in Herrin, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Feb 1937, Flood Edition No. 3:

MOUNDS MAN PASSES AWAY

             Edward A. Hartman, of Mounds, passed away Thursday, January 28, at the Holden Hospital in Carbondale following a brief illness of pneumonia.

             Mr. Hartman was a highly respected citizen of Mounds, having lived there several years and being a well-known I. C. engineer.  He was prominent in lodge work, being a member of Trinity Lodge A. F. & A. M., Queen of Egypt Chapter No. 509 O. E. S. and Zion Shrine No. 58 of the White Shrine of Jerusalem, all of Mound City.

             He leaves his widow, Mrs. Carrie Hartman, other relatives and a wide circle of friends.

             Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola on Saturday January 30, at 2 p.m. with Rev. Phillips of Herrin officiating.  His body was placed in a vault at the Ford Funeral Home where it will remain until burial can be made in the Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

             (According to his death certificate, Edward August Hartman was born 11 Apr 1880, in Centralia, Ill., the son of Fred Hartman, a native of Germany, and Louisa Ulrich, a native of France, died 28 Jan 1937, in Holden Hospital in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., the husband of Carrie Hartman, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.  His World War I draft registration states he was born in 1879 and was an Illinois Central Railroad locomotive engineer.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill., reads:  Edward A. Hartman April 11, 1879 Jan. 28, 1937 Carrie Hartman Aug. 11, 1881 Aug. 25, 1956.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OLD RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

             Frederick Bandy, 56 years of age, died at Ullin last Friday morning after a long illness of dropsy.

             His home was in Mounds where he and his wife had lived for 27 years.

             The body was taken to the Ford Funeral Home in Dongola, where it was prepared for burial and taken to Chaffee, Mo., for burial.

Services were held Saturday in the Catholic church at Chaffee, after which burial was made in the local cemetery.

             Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. Ina Bandy; one sister, Mrs. Lester Hunt, of Salem, Ill.; and 3 nephews and 3 nieces.

             (The death certificate states that Fredrick Jackson Bandy was born 6 Mar 1880, in Clinton, Ky., the son of John Bandy, a native of Tennessee, and Ellen Hudson, a native of Kentucky, died 29 Jan 1937, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ina Bandy, and was buried in Chaffee, Scott Co., Mo.  He was buried in Union Park Cemetery in Chaffee, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

VIENNA WOMAN DIES

             Word has been received in Dongola of the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Whiteaker, mother of Dr. W. J. Whiteaker, who passed away Thursday morning at her home in Vienna.  Mrs. Whiteaker was 97 years of age, was the mother of the late Dr. Hall Whiteaker, who was a practicing physician in Mound City for a number of years.

             (Her death certificate states that Elizabeth Whiteaker was born 5 Oct 1839, in Alabama, the daughter of William Denton and Martha J. Hard, natives of North Carolina, died 4 Feb 1937, in Vienna, Ill., the widow of Mark Whiteaker, and was buried in Road District 5, Johnson Co., Ill.  She was buried in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Arthur Clifford, 71, colored, of Cairo, died of pneumonia fever at the Herrin hospital Tuesday night.

             (His death certificate states that Arthur Clifford, laborer at Cairo, Ill., was born about 1874, in Tennessee, died 9 Feb 1937, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., the husband of Emma Clifford, and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Henry Quick, 71, colored, of Cairo R. 1, one of the flood refugees in Herrin, died at the city hospital in Herrin Friday morning.  He suffered ill health for more than a year.  He had been a patient in the emergency hospital in Herrin since Jan. 20.  When his condition grew worse at 2 o'clock Friday morning he was transferred to the hospital proper where he died at 6 o'clock.  Red Cross officials had charge of the funeral arrangements.  His wife, 70 years old, survives him.

             (His death certificate states that Henry Quick, laborer at Cairo, Ill., was born about 1866, died 5 Feb 1937, in Herrin, Ill., the husband of Harriett Quick, and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ROBERT PORTERFIELD DEAD

             Robert Porterfield, well known and highly respected citizen of Pulaski County, died on Wednesday of last week from heart failure.  The report was that he had been out to help get up some hay before flood waters damaged it and the exertion brought on a heart attack.

             Funeral services were on Saturday of last week.

             (B. F. Porterfield married Mrs. Sarah M. Porterfield on 5 Jun 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Robert H. Porterfield, a timber piling buyer, was born 10 Nov 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Ben Franklin Porterfield, a native of Kettaning, Pa., and Sarah Hunter, a native of Leroy, Ill., died 2 Feb 1937, in Pulaski, Ill., the husband of Katie Lackey Porterfield, and was buried at Pulaski, Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Robert H. Porterfield 1874-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Feb 1937, Flood Edition No. 4:

RESIDENT OF MOUNDS DIES

             E. A. Young, 68, of Mounds, passed away last Saturday evening at 11 p.m. at the I. C. hospital in Chicago.  Mr. Young had been in failing health for several months.

             He leaves his wife and two sons, James and Harold of Mounds; and a number of other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the McCarthy Funeral Home at Anna with Rev. Hunsaker of Cobden officiating.

             The body was removed to the J. T. Ryan Funeral Home at Thebes and placed in a vault until the water had receded when burial will be made in a cemetery at Metropolis.

             J. T. Ryan had charge of the funeral.

 

VILLA RIDGE WOMAN DIES

             Martha S. Campbell, aged 77 years, wife of Samuel M. Campbell of Villa Ridge, passed away Sunday night at 11:30 p.m.

             She is survived by her husband, four sons and two daughters, three sisters and four brothers.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Delta Church at Tamms.  Burial was made in the Delta Cemetery with George C. Crain in charge.

             (Samuel M. Campbell married Martha S. Vick on 20 Jul 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Martha S. Campbell was born 17 Oct 1859, in Tamms, Ill., the daughter of Isaiah V. Vick, a native of Tennessee, and Rachel Hargis, a native of Kentucky, died 14 Feb 1937, in Villa Ridge, Ill., wife of Samuel Campbell, and was buried in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Delta Cemetery reads:  Martha S. Campbell Oct. 17, 1859 Feb. 14, 1937 Samuel M. Campbell Sept. 15, 1859 Sept. 16, 1939.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Kemp Jr., 5 years ___ed, son of Mr. and Mrs. ___ Kemp of Mound City, died at the Marion refugee camp ____ was due to pneumonia.

             He is survived by his _____ one brother.

             Funeral services were held ____ afternoon at the ____ in charge of Rev. K. _____Mound City.

             (According to his death certificate, John Kemp, Jr., black, was born 20 Aug 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the son of John E. Kemp, a native of Kentucky, and Elizabeth Cason, a native of Illinois, and died 13 Feb 1937, in Road District 9-3 in Williamson Co, Ill., and was buried in Maplewood Cemetery in Marion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Feb 1937, Flood Edition No. 5:

THOMAS F. WOOD

             Thomas F. Wood, ___ was found dead in bed ___ about five miles east of ____ Sunday morning about ____ inquest was held by Coroner __ T. Hudson of Mounds, ____ determined that death was due to valvular heart disease.

             Arrangements for ___ been made awaiting the ____ his daughter from New ____.

             G. A. James will be in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Thomas F. Wood, of America, Ill., was born in April 1861 in Illinois, the son of William Wood and Amanda Smith, died 20 Feb 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., the divorced husband of Lora Wood.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PULASKI WOMAN PASSES AWAY

             Mrs. Laura McClelland of Pulaski passed away Monday at 5:45 at her home ____ after an illness of one ___.

             She leaves her ____ King of Pulaski and ___ a nephew and niece, ___ made their home with ___ McClelland.

             Funeral services were ___day afternoon at 2 o'clock at Pleasant Baptist Church ___ Rev. Smith officiating.  Interment was made in Rosehill Cemetery at Pulaski.  George C. Crain had charge of the services.

             (Henry King married Mary A. Ledbetter on 26 Dec 1869, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James T. McClelland, 25, farmer of Pulaski, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Jefferson McClelland and Sarah Bettis, married on 13 Oct 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Anna L. Aldred, 21, of Pulaski, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Hampleton Aldred and Jane Lackey.  Her death certificate states that Laura McClellan was born 6 Apr 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Henry King, a native of Germany, and Mary Ledbetter, a native of Tennessee, died 22 Feb 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of James McClellan, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill.  Her marker in that cemetery reads:  Annie Laura McClellan Apr. 6, 1875 Feb. 22, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Mollie Terrel of Mounds passed away in Marion Feb. 17.  Death is attributed to old age and the shock of the flood disaster.

             (According to her death certificate, Mollie Terrell, black, was born about 1862 in Kentucky, died 16 Feb 1937, in Road District 9-3 Williamson Co., Ill., the wife of John Terrell, and was buried in Terrell Cemetery in La Center, Ballard Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OLD RESIDENT OF VILLA RIDGE DIES

             Elmer J. Koontz, 63 years of age, passed away at his home two and one half miles east of Villa Ridge at 3:30 a.m.  He was born and reared on this farm and had spent his entire life there.

             He is survived by four sons, Clarence and Elmer, Jr., of Villa Ridge, Harry of Fulton, Ky., and Edward of Cairo; two daughters, Vera Lewis of Cape Girardeau, Mo., and Marie Dickerson of Cairo, and two sisters.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Union Church at Villa Ridge with Rev. Ellsworth Lyons officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

             (According to his death certificate, Elmer J. Koonce, farmer, was born 24 Mar 1872, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of N. N. Koonce, a native of Harper’s Ferry, Va., and Margaret Phillips, a native of Pennsylvania, died 23 Feb 1937, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Lova Koonce, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Elmer J. Koonce 1872-1937 Lora Dell Koonce 1882-1927.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ANDREW J. CUNNINGHAM

             Andrew J. Cunningham, 74 years of age, passed away at his home at Valley Recluse Friday morning at 8:30.  He was a member of the Pilgrim Congregational Church of Mound City and of the Modern Woodmen of America.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Cunningham; one son, Jesse of Mound City; and a grandson, Carl Cunningham of Rock Island, Illinois.

             Funeral services were held at the home of Mrs. Walter Leidigh Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Ellsworth Lyon officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.

             G. A. James conducted the funeral.

             (His death certificate states that Andrew Jackson Cunningham, farmer, was born 27 Dec 1862, in Shawneetown, Ill., died 19 Feb 1937, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mary Cunningham, and was buried in Thistlewood cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Father Andrew Cunningham 1862-1937 Mother Mary Cunningham 1865-1962.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Mar 1937, Flood Edition No. 6:

WELL KNOWN MOUND CITY WOMAN DIED MONDAY

             Mrs. Adelia Fray, of Mound City, died Monday morning at 5 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Warren Anglin in Mounds, at the age of 89 years.

             Mrs. Fray was born in Pulaski County and had spent practically all her life in the county, having lived in Mound City many years.  She is survived by a granddaughter, Miss Mildred Jaccard of Mound City; a grandson, W. N. Jaccard of Glendale, Calif.; three great-grandchildren.  The body was moved to the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Throgmorton, where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock conducted by Rev. Lyons, pastor of the Congregational Church at Mound City.  Burial was held at the Thistlewood Cemetery with George C. Crain of Pulaski in charge.

             (Henry H. Fray married Delia Kirk on 15 Feb 1869, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Adelia Fray was born 12 Sep 1847, in Pulaski Co., Ill., died 1 Mar 1937, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY MAN DIES IN EXPLOSION

             Charles Reese, who formerly resided in Mound City and who operated a garage in Little Rock, Ark., was killed last Thursday in an explosion of alcohol.

             He is survived by his wife and two children, a sister, Mrs. Alden of Anna; a brother, Ernest of Little Rock; and his father, who resides in Mounds.

             (The Arkansas Death Index states Charles F. Reese died 25 Feb 1937, in Garland Co., Ark.  His marker in Greenwood Cemetery in Hot Springs, Garland Co., Ark., reads:  Charles F. Reese Dec. 12, 1902 Feb. 25, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Mar 1937:

Deaths Which Occurred During the Flood Period

EDWARD A. HARTMAN

             Edward A. Hartman of Mounds died at Holden Hospital in Carbondale Thursday, January 28, shortly after having been taken there from his home.

             Mr. Hartman was an Illinois Central employee for many years.  He was a member of the M. E. Church, the Masonic Lodge, Eastern Star Chapter and White Shrine, the Royal Arch and Knights Templar, the latter at Cairo and the Shrine at East St. Louis.  He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Carrie Hartman.

             Funeral services were held January 20, at Dongola and the body was placed in a vault at the Ford Funeral Home at that place where it remained until the water had receded from Mounds.

             Burial services were held Sunday, February 28, at Thistlewood Cemetery at two o’clock with the Masons in charge.

 

EDWIN A. YOUNG

             Edwin A. Young, age 68 years Illinois Central engineer for forty years—working in the Mounds yards until recently, when he was transferred to Cairo Junction—died Saturday night, Feb. 6, at the Illinois Central Hospital in Chicago, where he had been a patient for almost two weeks.  Mrs. Young and son, James, were at his bedside when death came as the result of cancer.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Carrie Fulkerson Young; and two sons, Harold E. Young, local postmaster, and James, an Illinois Central clerk.

             The body was met at Carbondale Monday, Feb. 10, and taken to the McCarty Funeral Home at Anna, where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. W. W. Hunsaker of Cobden.  Following the service, the body was taken to the Ryan Funeral Home at Thebes, where it was held until the flood water had receded and it could be taken to Metropolis, where Mr. Young had requested that he be buried.

             Burial was made Wednesday, February 17, by the side of his mother in the Metropolis Cemetery

             (His death certificate states that Edwin Andrew Young, engineer, of 209 S. Blanche, Mounds, Ill., was born 21 Oct 1868, in Paducah, Ky., the son of Thomas Young, a native of Kentucky, and Latitria House, died 6 Feb 1937, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., the husband of Carrie Young, and was buried at Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Chosen Friends Cemetery in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Edwin A. Young Father 1868-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN F. WELSON

             John F. Welson, a longtime resident of Villa Ridge, who had been a sufferer from rheumatism for many years, passed away Tuesday, February 9, at his home in that place.

             Mr. Welson was born October 19, 1861, and had reached the age of 75 years and almost four months.  He was preceded in death by his wife and later his sister, Miss Flo Welson.  Surviving is one sister, Miss Emma Welson, who lives at the old home place.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, Feb. 11, at the family residence with interment in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that John F. Welson was born 19 Oct 1861, in Missouri, the son of Robert Welson and Margaret Vogel, natives of Germany, died 9 Feb 1937, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widower of Flora Spencer Welson, and was buried at Villa Ridge.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John F. Welson 1861-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ELMER J. KOONCE

             Elmer J. Koonce, age 64 years, died at his farm home 2 ½ miles east of Villa Ridge at 3:30 o’clock Tuesday morning, February 23, following an illness of two days.

             He was born and reared on this farm and had spent his entire life there.

             He is survived by four sons, Clarence and Elmer W. of Villa Ridge, Harry of Fulton, Ky., and Edward of Cairo; two daughters, Mrs. Vera Lewis of Cape Girardeau, Mo., and Mrs. Marie Dickerson of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Ida Helman of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Allie Thomason of Mounds; also nine grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Union Church at Villa Ridge with Rev. Ellsworth Lyon officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James conducting.

 

MRS. H. J. HILEMAN

             Mrs. Henry J. Hileman, aged 83, passed away at her home two miles west of Olmstead at eight o’clock, Friday morning, Feb. 25, after an illness of about three months.  She had been a resident of that community for about 75 years.

             The deceased is survived by her husband, Henry J. Hileman; two daughters, Mrs. Charles Walker of Pulaski and Mrs. Florence House of Mound City; two sons, Wayne J. Hileman of Olmstead and Forest L. Hileman, who is in a veterans’ hospital; two grandchildren; two sisters, Miss Lottie Chittick of Mound City and Miss Edith Chittick of Olmstead; and a brother, Hiram Chittick, of Olmstead.

             Funeral services were held at the residence at 2 p.m. Saturday with interment in Concord Cemetery.

             G. A. James was in charge.

(Continued next week)

             (Henry J. Hileman married Alice Bagby on 16 Apr 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Alice Jane Hileman was born 18 Mar 1864, in Maysville, Ky., the daughter of Richard Bagby and Emily Horsley, natives of Kentucky, died 25 Feb 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Henry J. Hileman, and was buried in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted, Ill., reads:  Alice J. Hileman 1854-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Mar 1937: 

Publisher of Jonesboro Gazette Dies Saturday

             Albert S. Tibbetts, age 71 years, owner and publisher of the Jonesboro Gazette, a weekly newspaper established in 1848, died at his home in Jonesboro Saturday, March 6.

             Mr. Tibbetts was born in Auburn, Ill., going to Jonesboro in 1868.  He learned the printer’s trade in the office of the Gazette of which paper he eventually became owner and publisher.  He had preserved a complete file of the issues of this newspaper which are kept in the vault of the Jonesboro Bank.  These date back to the Lincoln and Douglas debates.

             Funeral services were held Monday at the Jonesboro Baptist Church at 2 o’clock with burial in the Jonesboro Cemetery.  He is survived by a daughter and a son, also a granddaughter.

             (Albert S. Tibbets married Hester S. Bouton on 1 Jun 1881, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Albert Stacy Tibbets, printer, was born 10 Jan 1858, in Auburn, Ill., the son of Hiram Tibbets, a native of Shenandoah Co., Va., and Martha Wilson, a native of Hardy Co., Va., died 6 Mar 1937, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., the widower of Esther Tibbets, and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.  His marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  Albert Stacy Tibbets 1858-1937 Esther Bouton Tibbets, 1860-1923.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Miss Mary Crosson Dies in Evansville Hospital

             Miss Mary Crosson, a former resident of Mounds, died Sunday afternoon, March 7, at St. ___ Hospital, Evansville, Ind., at the age of 77 years.

             Miss Crosson, aunt of August ____, made her home here for a number of years with her  ____, Mr. Crosson’s father, the late W. A. Crosson.  After his death she returned to Evansville, her former home.

             Her body was brought via the ____ R. R. to Mound City from which place it was brought____ T. Ryan.  Funeral services were held at Ryan’s Funeral Home at 9 o’clock Wednesday morning with burial in St. Mary’s Cemetery where her brother is also buried.

 

Daniel H. Weldy

             Daniel H. Weldy, pioneer resident of Pulaski County, died Tuesday, March 9, at his home northwest of Mounds.  His age was 86 years.  He had been in failing health for some time.

He leaves four children, Mrs. William Minton of Mounds, Mrs. Robert Galbraith of Mound City, Albert of Muncie, Ind., and Claude of Oak Park, Ill.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at Shiloh Baptist Church.  Burial was at Shiloh Cemetery, with Hartwell Funeral Service in charge.

             (Daniel H. Weldy married Julia A. Bumgard on 6 Aug 1876, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, D. H. Weldy, retired farmer, was born 12 Dec 1851, in Decatin, Ind., died 9 Mar 1937, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Julia Weldy, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Deaths Which Occurred During the Flood Period

(Continued from last week)

ROBERT M. PORTERFIELD

             Robert M. Porterfield, age 62 years, died at his home in Pulaski, February 2, his death coming suddenly.  He was born in Pulaski, November 10, 1874, the son of Benjamin F. and Sara M. Porterfield.  In 1903 he was married to Katie Lackey who with a son, John Albert Porterfield, survives.  He is survived also by a brother, John Franklin Porterfield; a sister, Pearl Porterfield; and three grandchildren.

             Mr. Porterfield was a member of Caledonia Lodge No. 47, A. F. & A. M., the Royal Arch at Cairo, the Consistory at Chicago, the Shrine and Knights Templar of Chicago.  He and his family lived in Chicago from 1917 until 1932.  He was a veteran of the Spanish-American War.

 

MRS. ELLA FITZPATRICK

             Mrs. Ella Fitzpatrick of Glendale, Calif., died of pneumonia early in February at her home there.

             Mrs. Fitzpatrick was a former resident of Mounds and Pulaski, but had lived in California for many years.  She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. William M. Crain of Centralia and Miss Olga Fitzpatrick of Glendale; also two grandchildren, Attorney Robert M. Crain of St. Louis and Miss Aileen Crain of Centralia; and one great-granddaughter of St. Louis.

             Mrs. Crain and Miss Aileen have spent the winter in Glendale helping care for Mrs. Fitzpatrick who had been confined to a wheel chair as the result of a fall in which she suffered a broken hip.

 

MARTHA S. CAMPBELL

             Mrs. Martha S. Campbell, wife of Samuel Campbell, died Sunday night, Feb. 14, at 11:30 o’clock at her home in Villa Ridge.

Besides her husband, she is survived by five sons, John, Oscar, Edward, Clyde and Sidney; two daughters, Mrs. Earl Walker and Mrs. Grace Gannon; also several grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 16, at the Delta Church, with Rev. A. M. Troutman officiating.  Burial was made in Delta Cemetery.

 

MRS. LAURA McCLELLAND

             Mrs. Laura McClelland, 62, passed away at 5:45 Monday evening , Feb. 22, at her home east of Pulaski after an illness of one week.

             The deceased is survived by a brother, Harry T. McClelland of Pulaski; three sisters, Mrs. Etta Ozment, Mrs. Ilora Helmanpoler of Peoria, and Mrs. Lucy King of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; a nephew, John King; and a niece, Mary King, both of whom made their home with Mrs. McClelland.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at the Mounds Baptist Church with the Rev. Smith officiating.  Interment was made in Rosehill Cemetery at Pulaski.

 

JAMES L. DILLE

             James L. Dille, long a prominent resident of Villa Ridge community, passed away Sunday, January 24, at his home, following a long illness.

             He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. T. P. Conant and Miss Rowena Dille of Villa Ridge; and son, Dr. Charles E. Dille of Cairo.

             Funeral services were held at Villa Ridge Tuesday, January 26, with interment at Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that James Washington Dille was born 8 May 1856, in Montgomery Co., Ohio, the son of Samuel Dille, a native of Pennsylvania, and Esther Price, a native of Ohio, died 23 Jan 1937, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., widower of Elizabeth Dille, and was buried at Villa Ridge.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  James W. Dille May 8, 1850 Jan. 23, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FREDERICK BANDY

             Fred Bandy, age 56 years, a resident of Mounds for 27 years, died at Ullin February 5, after a long illness of dropsy.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Ina Bandy; a sister, Mrs. Lester Hunt of Salem, Ill.; three nieces and three nephews.

             Funeral services were held February 6 in Chaffee, Mo., at the Catholic church with burial in the Chaffee Cemetery.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Mar 1937, Flood Edition No. 7:

MISS WILLINGHAM DEAD

             Miss Anna Frances Willingham, 19, of Cairo, passed away last Sunday morning at St. Mary's Hospital after a four weeks illness with meningitis.

             Miss Willingham was a popular young girl of both Alexander and Pulaski counties.  She was active in church and school affairs ranking high in scholarship in the local schools in college.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 at the Christian church with Reverend Walker of Bloomington, Illinois, officiating.  Interment was made at Bardwell, Ky.

             (Her death certificate states that Anna Frances Willingham was born 14 Apr 1917, in Bardwell, Ky., the daughter of Merritt C. Willingham and Clara Watson, natives of Bardwell, Ky., died 7 Mar 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery in Bardwell, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Mar 1937:

WELL KNOWN HISTORIAN DIES AT MAKANDA

             John Mulcaster, 62 years of age, of Makanda, died Monday, February 1, at Hines Hospital in Chicago. 

             He is survived by his wife and two sisters.

             Funeral services were held on Thursday, February 4, at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Julia Dowell of Marion.

             Mr. Mulcaster, a prominent historian of Southern Illinois and a well-known Republican leader of Makanda, was a former employee of the Illinois Central railroad and author of several historical stories, songs and verses.

             (The death certificate states that John G. Mulcaster, Illinois Central Railroad agent, was born 1 Oct 1876, in Monroe City, Ill., the son of Richard Mulcaster, a native of England, and Mary Hickman, a native of Missouri, died 1 Feb 1937, in Hines Hospital, Proviso Township, Cook Co., Ill., the husband of Ella Mulcaster, and was buried in Marion, Ill.  His application for a military headstone states that John G. Mulcaster was a private 1st class in the 7th US. Signal Corps during the Spanish American War.  He was buried in Tower Grove Cemetery in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CHARLES E. MINTON OF MOUNDS PASSES AWAY

             Charles Edgar Minton, 66 years of age, passed away at his home in Mounds last Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, following an illness of about three months.

             He is survived by his wife and one son, Edgar, of Washington, D.C., and two grandchildren, also four brothers and three sisters.

Mr. Minton had spent his entire life in Mounds and for 20 years had been employed by the Illinois Central Railroad.  He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Sunday at 2 p.m. at the church with Rev. W. A. Gardner and H. C. Croslin officiating.  Interment was made in the Shiloh Cemetery.  J. F. Ryan was in charge.

             (Charles Minton, 26, farmer of Villa Ridge, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of B. Minton and Julia Graddy, married on 17 Nov 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Kate Vanida, 19, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of John Vanida and Sarah Little. The death certificate of Charles Edgar Minton, a car oiler, states that he was born 1 Apr 1870, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Bird Minton, a native of Alabama, and Julia Grady, a native of Georgia, died 11 Mar 1937, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the husband of Katie Minton, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Charles E. Minton 1870-1937 Katie M. Minton 1876-1964.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HENRY D. HILEMAN DIED SUDDENLY AT OLMSTEAD

             Henry D. Hileman, 64 years of age, a prominent farmer living near Olmstead, died at his home Wednesday afternoon at 5:45 o'clock of apoplexy.  He became ill the morning of the day before and grew worse rapidly.

             Mr. Hileman was born on the farm on which he died.  He was a man most highly respected in that community, and while he had no immediate family save his aged mother, now 87 years of age, he is mourned by numerous neighbors and friends.  A cousin, Harry Walker, lived with him.  Mrs. Florence House of Mound City is a cousin.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church at Cairo and of which Mr. Hileman was a member.  

Interment will be in the Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James is in charge.

             (Thomas Hileman married Jane Cline on 14 Jan 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Henry Daniel Hileman, farmer, was born 24 Feb 1873, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of Thomas B. Hileman, a native of Jonesboro, and Margaret Jane Cline, a native of Thebes, Ill., died 17 Mar 1937, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Concord Cemetery near Olmstead, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Son Henry D. Hileman 1873-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Mar 1937: 

FLOOD REFUGEE FINDS HAVEN

             Among the residents ordered out of Mound City when the raging waters of the Ohio threatened their lives was Magnolia Royall, age 92 years and an ex-slave of the mother of the late Dr. B. A. Royall of Villa Ridge.  She was taken to Villa Ridge where she was one of the number booked to board a box car headed north to some unknown point of refuge.  Her small box of belongings was piled in with the rest of the baggage, but Magnolia slyly kept out of sight of the guardsmen and was left behind.  She persuaded a new-found friend to assist her up the long steep hill to the home of Mrs. M. Lilly Rife, daughter of Dr. Royall.  There she found Mrs. Royall, who makes her home with her daughter.  Magnolia was made welcome and cared for in the house of a maid on the place.  She was quite ill for a day and a night.

             Only one year older than Dr. Royall, Magnolia and he were playmates in childhood.  Her resting place at night was at the feet of her mistress, Dr. Royall’s mother.  When she found his widow and daughter, she felt that she had reached a safe haven.

             (W. C. Rife married M. Lilley Royall on 10 Sep 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  B. A. Royal married on 26 Nov 1871, in Pulaski Co., Ill., S. J. Bankston, the daughter of George W. and Sarah Jane (Kennedy) Bankson.  The mother of Berry A. Royall was Mary Tinsley Arnold Royall, who was born 16 Oct 1807 in Prince Edward Co., Va., and died in 1860 in Clarksburg, Carroll Co., Tenn.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Charles Edgar Minton

             Charles Edgar Minton died at his home on North Oak Street, Thursday afternoon, March 11, following a lingering illness.  His age was 66 years.

OBITUARY

             Charles Edgar Minton, son of Bird and Julia Ann Minton, was born April 1, 1870, at Villa Ridge, Illinois, and departed this life at his home in Mounds, Ill., March 11, 1937.  He was united in marriage to Miss Katie VonNida, Nov. 17, 1895, to which union one son, Edgar, was born.  He leaves to mourn his departure, his wife, and son, four brothers, James, John, Frank and Will Minton; and three sisters, Mrs. Fannie Parker, Mrs. Walter Harper and Mrs. Charles Nugent.

             He was united with the Shiloh Church at the age of 22 and was an earnest worker in the service of his master in that community.  He later transferred his membership to the First Baptist Church at Mounds, Ill., and was a member of that church at the time of his death.

             For the past 24 years of his life, he was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad and leaves a host of friends in their service.  He had a cheerful disposition, which endeared him to all his friends and will be sadly missed by all who knew him.

             Services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First Baptist Church with Rev. W. A. Gardner, pastor, and Rev. H. C. Croslin, former pastor, officiating.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Pawlish had as their guests over the weekend Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Minton of Illmo, Mo., and John Minton of Campbell, Mo.  They were here (Villa Ridge) to attend the funeral of the latter’s brother, Charlie Minton, of Mounds.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We want to express our heartfelt thanks to the many friends who were so kind and sympathetic to us during the recent illness and at the death of our husband and father.  Especially do we thank Rev. W. A. Gardiner, Rev. H. C. Croslin, those who sang, those who gave flowers, and those who gave the use of their cars.—Mrs. Charles Minton, Edgar Minton

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Mar 1937: 

Deaths That Have Occurred During the Week

CLAUDE E. MORROW

             Claude E. Morrow, age 68, died in a hospital in Fort Smith, Ark., Sunday night, March 14, at 4 o’clock.  He was a Spanish American War veteran.

             Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Cora B. Kennedy of this city, Mrs. L. L. Pace of Dyersburg, Tenn.; and one brother, John Morrow, of Kansas City, Mo.

             Funeral services were held and burial was made Friday, March 19, at Fort Smith National Cemetery, the Rev. Dr. Elbert Hefner, pastor of the Presbyterian Church officiating.  The Fort Smith Post of the Spanish American War veterans had charge of the interment.

             (Claude E. Morrow enlisted 31 May 1899, as a private in Co. E, 12th U.S. Infantry during the Spanish American War and was honorably discharged 30 May 1902.  The Arkansas Death Index states that Claude E. Morrow died 14 Mar 1937, in Sebastian Co., Ark.  He was buried in Fort Smith National Cemetery in Fort Smith, Sebastian Co., Ark.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. P. W. SCOTT

             Mrs. Matilda E. Scott, age 71 years, wife of P. W. Scott, died Monday morning, March 22, at her home on North Front Street, after a three weeks illness due to influenza and pneumonia.

             Mrs. Scott, whose maiden name was Matilda E. McClellan, was the descendant of Revolutionary ancestry, the records of which the editor had in her desk which went with the flood.  This Revolutionary soldier was an aide to Washington at the surrender of Cornwallis.  He was a Virginian.

             Surviving are her husband, two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Aldred and Mrs. Laura Lackey of Pulaski; one brother, Frank McClellan, of Zama, Miss.; also three nieces and two nephews.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Rose Hill Church in Pulaski, the Rev. W. A. Gardner of the First Baptist Church of this city officiating.  Burial was in Rose Hill Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

             (According to her death certificate, Matilda E. Scott was born 12 Oct 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Thomas J. McClellan and Sarah Bettis, a native of Tennessee, died 22 Mar 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of P. W. Scott, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. E. E. BUTLER

             Mrs. Louie E. Butler, widow of the late E. E. Butler, died Saturday morning, March 20, at her home in this city, following a protracted illness.  During the flood she had been a patient in Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, but was brought to her home about two weeks before her death.

             Mr. and Mrs. Butler made their home at Villa Ridge for a number of years.  About twenty years ago they came to Mounds where they had since resided.

             Mrs. Butler took an active interest in community affairs.  She was a member of the M. E. Church, a former president of the Mounds Woman’s Club and at her death was a member of the Mounds Library Board.  She was also active in lodge work and had a wide acquaintance both in club and lodge circles in Southern Illinois.

             She leaves two sons, Glenn Butler of New York City and Edward Butler of Mounds; one daughter, Mrs. Daisy (Paul) Powell of Vienna, Ill.; one granddaughter, Winifred Butler of East St. Louis; also one brother, Allen Meisenheimer of Spokane, Wash.  Her husband died May 11, 1936.

 

JOHN C. HOLDERFIELD

             John Calvin Holderfield died Thursday, March 18, at the home of his brother-in-law, Sherman Pruitt of Gale, where he and his wife had been for two weeks.

             Mr. Holderfield was born in Canaville, Ill., Feb. 15, 1881.  He was married in 1900 to Viola Ellen Pruitt.  For some time he had been farming near Cache, Ill., but he had been living in Mounds for a number of months.

             He is survived by his wife, eight children, Arlie of Indianapolis, Ind., Clarence of Oran, Mo., Earl and John Jr. of Mounds, Raymond of Cobden, Herman of Marion, George of Thompsonville and Maude also of Thompsonville; also one brother and four sisters, and 18 grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Sandy Creek Church in Diswood.  Interment was made in McCrite Cemetery.

             (John Holderfield married Ellen Prewitt on 3 Sep 1900, in Union Co., Ill.  His World War I draft registration in 1918 gives his birth as 15 Feb 1880, and his address as McClure, Alexander Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John C. Holderfield, retired farmer, was born 15 Feb 1881, in Creal Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., the son of Richard T. Holderfield, a native of Tennessee, and Mary Fulcher, died 19 Mar 1937, in Gale, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Ellen Holderfield, and was buried in McCrite Cemetery near Diswood, Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  John C. Holderfield 1881-1937 Ellen Holderfield 1883-1971.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Mar 1937:

PULASKI CHILD PNEUMONIA VICTIM

             Barry Joe Brown, 7 years of age, died at St. Mary's Hospital Monday morning following several weeks’ illness of pneumonia.

             He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Ora White, of Pulaski; two sisters, Mrs. Floyd Lingle of Chicago and Mrs. H. A. Brewer of Thompson, Ill.; two brothers Rowley Brown of Pulaski and Arden Brown of Olmstead.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Christian church in Pulaski with Rev. Charles Day officiating.  Interment was made in Rosehill Cemetery with George C. Crain directing the funeral.

             (His death certificate states that Berry Joe Brown was born 10 Jan 1930, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Franklin R. Brown and Ora Aldred, natives of Pulaski Co., Ill., died 22 Mar 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Berry J. Brown Jan. 10, 1930 Mar. 22, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SCOTT DIXON MET ACCIDENTAL DEATH

             Scott J. Dixon, 51, local motor dealer, was found in his garage office Monday shortly before noon.  On his desk was a shotgun with cleaning equipment.

             The coroner’s jury met and returned the verdict that he had come to his death by an accidental discharge of the shotgun, an automatic while it was being cleaned.  The shot had entered his body just below the heart and death was in all probability instantaneous.

             Scott Dixon was one of the better known residents of Metropolis, having been born in Massac County and spent all his life here.  For years he was associated with George Korte in the Dry Goods business and then was engaged in the motor business, having the Ford agency for a number of years.  About five years ago he relinquished that agency and more recently has been the local dealer for Dodge.

             He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Lydia Dixon; and one daughter, Miss Lois Evelyn Dixon.  Also one sister, Mrs. Eva Yancey of Dallas, Texas; and one half-sister, Mrs. John Borman.—Metropolis Ex.

             (Jacob Dixon married Permelia M. Leek Copland on 4 Nov 1881, in Massac Co., Ill.  B. F. Copland married Margaret P. Leek on 1 Jan 1865, in Massac Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Scott J. Dixon, auto dealer in Metropolis, Ill., was born 15 Apr 1885, in Massac Co., Ill., the son of Jacob Dixon, a native of Virginia, and Margarett Leek, a native of Massac Co., Ill., died 15 Mar 1937, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., the husband of Lydia Dixon, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Metropolis.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY

             Mrs. Louise Butler, of Mounds, passed away at her home last Saturday morning at 4:40 o'clock, following an illness of several weeks.

She is survived by the following children:  Mrs. Daisy Powell of Vienna, Edward Butler of Mounds, Glenn Butler of New York City; and a brother, Allen Meisenheimer of Spokane, Wash.

             Funeral services were held for Mrs. Butler at the family residence Monday afternoon at two o'clock with Rev. Glotfelty officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery with J. Ryan in charge.

             (E. E. Butler married Louise E. Meisenheimer on 30 May 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Louie Elizabeth Butler was born 11 Dec 1873, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Allen Meisenheimer, died 20 Mar 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of E. E. Butler, and was buried at Villa Ridge.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads Louise E. Butler 1873-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Apr 1937:

MRS. IDA HICKMAN DIES OF PNEUMONIA

             Mrs. Ida Hickman passed away at her home on North Oak Street in Mounds, Wednesday night.  She was ill of pneumonia just one week.

Mrs. Hickman is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Van Anderson of Murphysboro and Mrs. Ada Woods of Mounds.

The funeral will be held at the home at 1:30 p.m. Saturday with the Rev. Glotfelty officiating.  The cortege will leave Mounds after the funeral for Carbondale, where interment will be made in the Oakland Cemetery.  G. A. James will be in charge.

 

S. A. STEERS DIES SATURDAY AT HOME AT AGE OF 76 YEARS

Stephen A. Steers, widely known farmer of this county, passed away at his home at America Saturday night at the age of 76 years.  Pneumonia was the cause of death.

Mr. Steers was a lifelong resident of this county and took active interest in many things.  He was a member of the Christian Church at America and a charter member of the Masonic Lodge of this city and a Royal Arch Mason of Cairo.  For several years he was a director in the First National Bank of this city and in the Farm Bureau he has always been active.

His wife, Mary Mason Steers; and one daughter, the home advisor of Jersey County; survive.  There are two brothers, Earnest of America and Tom of Mound City; and two sisters, Mrs. W. C. Mason and Miss Sylvia Steers, both of America.  Besides these, there are many other relatives and friends who regret and mourn his passing.

Funeral services were held at the Christian church at America with the Masonic Lodge officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge.

(Stephen A. Steers, 35, of America, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Samuel Steers and Mary A. McClelland, married on 10 Mar 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mary E. Mason, 25, born in America, Ill., the daughter of B. F. Mason and Elizabeth Campbell.   His death certificate states that Stephen Albert Steers, farmer, was born 5 Jan 1861, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of Samuel Steers and Mary McClelland, died 27 Mar 1937, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mary Mason Steers, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Stephen A. Steers 1861-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Apr 1937: 

Steven A. Steers

             Stephen A. Steers, age 76 years, died at his home near America Saturday night, March 27, following a brief illness of pneumonia.

             Mr. Steers was born at Olmstead and later moved to America, where he has lived the past 40 years.  He was a successful farmer, well known throughout the county, a member of the Christian Church of America and a charter member of Trinity Lodge 562 A. F. A. M. of Mound City, a member of the Royal Arch Masons of Cairo.  He was a director of the First National Bank of Mound City, and an active member of the Pulaski-Alexander Farm Bureau, having served on numerous committees for that organization.

He leaves his wife, Mary Marion Steers, and daughter, Miss Helen Steers, who is Home Supervisor of the Farm Bureau of Jersey County, who was at his bedside at the time of his death; two brothers, Thomas Steers of Mound City and Ernest Steers of America; two sisters, Mrs. William Mason and Miss Sylvia Steers of America.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the home, conducted by Rev. S. J. Burgess, pastor of the First Christian Church of Carbondale.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, with Masonic rites conducted at the grave by Trinity Lodge.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

 

Miss Ida Hickam Dies Suddenly Wednesday Night

             Friends of Miss Ida Hickam were shocked Thursday morning to hear of her passing, which occurred at 11:45 o’clock Wednesday night at the home of her sister, Mrs. Ada Wood, with whom she had resided since 1916.  A case of flue developed into pneumonia and her heart was too weak to stand the strain.

             Miss Hickam was born in Carbondale, the daughter of Curtis and Sarah Hickam.  She was educated in the public schools and Carbondale Normal University.  Following the death of her parents she came to Mounds to make her home with her sister to whom she was devoted.  She was a member of the Christian Church of Carbondale.

             Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Mary E. Anderson of Murphysboro and Mrs. Ada Wood of Mounds; three nieces, Mrs. Blanche Miller of Johnston City, Mrs. V. M. Barlow of Little Rock, Ark., and Miss Pauline Anderson of Murphysboro; two nephews, Joe and Dan Anderson of Murphysboro.

             Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Wood residence on North Oak Street, the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.  Burial will be in Oakland Cemetery, Carbondale, with a short service at the grave conducted by Rev. S. J. Burgess, pastor of the Carbondale Christian Church.  G. A. James will direct the funeral.

             (The death certificate of Ida May Hickam states she was born 6 Jan 1878, in Carbondale, Ill., the daughter of Curtis Hickam and Sarah Swaar, a native of Tennessee, died 31 Mar 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Earl Smoot and daughter were called to East Prairie, Mo., Wednesday, by the death of Louis Chunn, an uncle of the former.

             (His World War I draft registration in Mississippi Co., Mo., states Louis Chunn of East Prairie, Mo., was born 11 Mar 1879, and his nearest relative was Addie May Chunn of East Prairie.  He was buried in Memorial Park Cemetery in East Prairie, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Word has been received of the death of Walter (Pete) Pollick, his death occurring while on a visit with relatives in Tennessee.  Mr. Pollick for many years lived at Villa Ridge and his many friends will deeply regret his going.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Apr 1937: 

Mrs. Sarah Thistlewood Dies at Advanced Age of 88 Years

             Mrs. Sarah Thistlewood, longtime resident of Mounds, died Monday night, April 5, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Flint Bondurant of Cairo, where she had been taken the previous Thursday after developing a severe cold.  Bronchial pneumonia developed and her frail body could not resist the disease.  She had reached the age of 88 years.

             She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Blanche (Flint) Bondurant, of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. N. B. Wright, age 93, of Beaumont, Texas, and Mrs. D. M. Goddard of Mt. Vernon, Ill.  A daughter passed away at the age of eight years, a son, Ben, died in 1910 and her husband in 1919.

             Mrs. Thistlewood was born in Coshocton, Ohio, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Seth Taylor.  At the age of 11 she moved with her parents to Mason, Ill., where in 18_6 she was married to Captain N. B. Thistlewood, who had served with distinction in the Union Army during the Civil War.  They settled in Cairo, but when her health became impaired, they built a large home on their farm near here and since that time Mrs. Thistlewood has lived in this location.

             The Illinois Central built their yards here and Captain and Mrs. Thistlewood platted their farm into town lots which they sold and which developed into the town of Mounds.  The main residence street they named “Blanche” in honor of their daughter.  Mrs. Thistlewood donated the ground for the school building which is named “Thistlewood” in her honor.

             She was a devout Christian, a devoted member of the Mounds M. E. Church and for many years held high offices in the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society of the M. E. Church.  She had an active life all her years, drove her own car until quite recently, and managed her business affairs intelligently and competently.

             Captain Thistlewood retained his interests in Cairo and was twice mayor of that city.  In 1907 he was elected United States Congressman from this District, to fill an unexpired term, was reelected in 1908 and again in 1910.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Cairo M. E. Church, the Rev. Philip R. Glotfelty, pastor of the Mounds church officiating, as stated by the Rev. W. P. McVay of the Cairo church.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

            

Mrs. Minnie Lingle Jordan, mother of Doyle Jordan of this city, died at her home in Mill Creek Monday night at the age of 50 years,  Death was caused by a stroke of apoplexy.

             (Henry M. Lingle married Sarah Cook on 3 Sep 1885, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Minnie Izora Lingle Jordan of Mill Creek was born 8 Nov 1886, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry Lingle and Sarah Cook, natives of Illinois, died 5 Apr 1937, in Mill Creek, Union Co., Ill., wife of Henry Jordan, and was buried in Sims Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Funeral Services Held for Samuel Van Dyke

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the A. M. E. Church for Samuel Van Dyke, 10-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Van Dyke.  The boy died at midnight Wednesday night after an illness of seven months.  The Rev. Mr. Tabor conducted the funeral and burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Samuel Lawrence Vandyke was born 1 Jan 1927, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Richard Lee Vandyke and Nellie Hastings, natives of Paris, Tenn., died 31 Mar 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Husband of Former Mounds Girl Killed

             Edward Sutherland, Jr., of Gilbertsville, Ky., was accidentally killed Friday morning, April 2, when he fell from a tree which he was pruning.

             Mrs. Sutherland is the former Wanda Scruggs, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Scruggs of this place.

             (His death certificate states that Edward Chester Sutherland, Jr., I. C. Railroad bridgeman, was born 29 May 1914, in Missouri, the son of Edward Chester Sutherland, Sr., and Geryte Jones, died 2 Apr 1937, in Gilbertsville, Marshall Co., Ky., of injuries when he fell from tree while trimming it, and was buried in Calvert City Cemetery in Calvert City, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sudden Death of Joe Braden Shocks Community

             Joe Braden, age 23 years, died suddenly at 7 o’clock Thursday morning at the home of his sister, Mrs. Maude Lackey, near Pulaski.  He had gone to work as usual Wednesday morning at the Western Sugar Refinery in Cairo, but grew ill after working a few hours and went to the home of his sister.  The cause of his death was recorded as cerebro meningitis.

             Joe Braden was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Braden.  He was a graduate of Mounds Township High School, class of 1933.  During his school days he was a star athlete.  He was a popular young man and had many friends who deplore his untimely passing.

             He is survived by his parents, his young wife, the former Juanita Plott of Anna and a sister, Mrs. Maude Lackey of Pulaski.  Since the flood, he and his wife had been living in Anna.

             Private funeral services will be held this morning at 10:30 at the Lackey home with Rev. W. A. Gardner of the Baptist Church officiating.  Burial will be made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Apr 1937:

JOE BRADEN OF MOUNDS DEAD OF CEREBRAL MENINGITIS

Joe Braden, of Mounds, 23 years of age, an employee of Western Sugar Refinery at Cairo, died early Thursday morning of cerebral meningitis or spotted fever after an illness of less than 24 hours.

He went to work Wednesday morning and about noon had a chill and fever began to rise.  At 5 o'clock a physician was called to the home of his sister, Mrs. Ed Lackey, at Pulaski, where he was staying and his fever was up to 105 ½.  At 2 o'clock Thursday morning, the physician was again summoned and the fever was raging and spots had begun to appear.  Death came not many hours later.

Funeral services were held this (Friday) morning at the Lackey home.  They were private.  Rev. Gardner from Mounds officiated.

The sudden death of Mr. Braden is a shock to his friends and his relatives.  He leaves, besides his wife, his mother and one sister, Mrs. Lackey.

(His death certificate states that Joe E. Braden was born 31 Jul 1914, in Broughton, Ill., the son of Ray Braden, a native of Long Branch, Ill., and Ana Mable Call, a native of Metropolis, Ill., died 8 Apr 1937, in Pulaski, Ill., the husband of Juanita Braden, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  A marker in Green Lawn Memorial Cemetery near Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  Son Joe E. Braden July 31, 1914 April 8, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

STILLBORN BABIES FOUND

Twin stillborn babies were found Thursday morning near Mounds under the viaduct.  They were white and two boys, apparently about in the second month.  They were in a glass jar.

A child must be 5 months before legal questions arise to the point of murder or manslaughter.  No inquest was held.

 

MARY LOUISE KING

Mary Louise King, 15 years old, of Pulaski, died at the home of her aunt in Cape Girardeau, Mo., on Tuesday of blood poison brought about by an infected tooth.  She was sick a very short time and desperately ill but a few hours.

Funeral services were held at the Mt. Pleasant Church Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. Thomas of Pulaski, who was called in the last moment.  Interment was in Rose Hill.

She is survived by four brothers, William, Buster, Weldon, Paul; and by her mother, Mrs. Lucy King.  She had made her home for years with her aunt, Mr. Laura McClelland, of Pulaski, who died about six weeks ago.

(Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Mary L. King Jan. 1, 1922 April 6, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OBITUARY

Mrs. Zilpha Bittle Stearns was born March 29, 1846, two miles east of Alto Pass, Ill., and died at her home in Alto Pass March 29, 1937, aged 91 years.  She was a daughter of James and Charlotte Tweedy.  

She was the last member of a large family of children.

She was united in marriage with William F. Bittle April 10, 1862, to which union six children were born; three are still living, Joshua Allen, William Edward and James Herbert.  Her husband preceded her in death more than 30 years ago, he having died on their 42nd wedding anniversary, April 10, 1904.  She later married Adam Stearns of Pomona, Ill., who died November 14, 1918.  There are 29 grandchildren, 35 great-grandchildren, and two great-great grandchildren, a total of 69 living descendants.  She accepted Christ as her Savior at an early age.  She was loved and honored by all.

Funeral services were conducted from the Baptist church by Rev. Albert Hunner.  Burial was in Alto Pass Cemetery.

(William F. Bittle married on 10 Apr 1862, in Union Co., Ill., Zilphah Tweedy, with the consent of James M. Tweedy.  James M. Twiddy married Charlotte Craig on 30 Aug 1838, in Union Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Zelpha Stearns was born 29 Mar 1846, in Cobden, Ill., the daughter of James and Lottie Tweedy, died 29 Mar 1937, in Alto Pass, Ill., the widow of Adam Stearns, and was buried in Alto Pass Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Zilpha Bittle March 29, 1846 March 29, 1937 William F. Bittle Nov. 23, 1833 April 10, 1904.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Apr 1937:

LONG LIFE

The death last week, of Mrs. Sarah Thistlewood, at the age of 88, brought to a close a long and useful life.  The name was connected with many things in this southern tip of the state and the family is one of distinction.  Public enterprise, civic responsibility, and individual effort have marked them.  The name is well stamped on Mounds and Cairo—and with honor.

(Her death certificate states that Sarah A. Thistlewood, of Mounds, Ill., was born 19 Feb 1849, in Coshocton Co., Ohio, the daughter of Seth Taylor, a native of New York State, and Miss Carson, a native of Whiting, W. Va., died 5 Apr 1937, in Cairo, Ill., the widow of N. B. Thistlewood, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Sarah A. Thistlewood 1849-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Apr 1937: 

Carbondale Normal Student Killed in Auto Accident

             Mrs. Betty Rhodes, 19, of Springfield, Mo., a student at the Carbondale Normal, was killed early Saturday, April 10, when an automobile in which she and five other students were riding, collided with another car driven by a Mr. Underwood of East Alton.

             Two other students, Marion Mitchell and William McGinnis, suffered serious injuries.  Mr. and Mrs. Underwood were treated at the Holden Hospital for minor injuries received in the collision.

             (Her death certificate states that Bettie Leanna Rhodes, student, was born 11 Jun 1915, in Springfield, Mo., the daughter of Clarence J. Rhodes, a native of Zinc, Arkansas, and Stella Sanders, a native of Billings, Mo., died 10 Apr 1937, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., and was buried in Maple Park Cemetery, Springfield, Mo.  Her marker there reads:  Bettie Leanna Rhodes June 11, 1915 Apr. 10, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John W. Campbell

             John Weston Campbell of Ullin, age 66 years, died Tuesday night, April 6, at the Anna hospital where he had gone for treatment during the flood.  His death was caused by Bright’s disease.

             Surviving are his wife, a son, Oscar; and two grandchildren.  Another son, Ralph, died in 1918.

             Funeral services were held at the Ullin Baptist Church of which he was a member, Friday afternoon, April 9, at two o’clock, the Rev. Mr. Penrod of Dongola officiating.  Burial was made in Ullin Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, John W. Campbell, carpenter, was born 10 Dec 1870, in Anna, Ill., the son of Mary Winchester Campbell, died 6 Apr 1937, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Josephine Campbell, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  John Campbell 1870-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Arlene Hagler

             Mrs. Arlene Cunningham Hagler, age 21 years, died at her home in Unity, Thursday, April 8.

             Surviving are her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cunningham of Mounds; two children, her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Cunningham; three brothers, Lloyd and Jesse of Cape Girardeau, Mo., and Robert Jr., of Mounds; and two sisters, Louise of California and Alice of Murphysboro.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the home of her parents, near here, with the Rev. W. A. Gardner, pastor of the First Baptist Church, officiating.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

            

W. A. Jones, father of Mayor J. B. Jones, suffered a stroke at his home in Harris Grove, Ky., on Monday night, the 5th.  At this time, he is still living, though there is no hope for his permanent recovery.  He was 79 years old on the 10th.  Mayor Jones returned Monday after having spent several days there.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Apr 1937: 

Father of Mayor Jones Dies Friday Night

             Mayor J. B. Jones was called to Harris Grove, Ky., Saturday morning by the death of his father, W. A. Jones, age 79 years, who suffered a stroke of paralysis on Monday night, April 5.

             Funeral services were held Monday, Mayor Jones, returning home Monday night.

             (His death certificate states that William Aus Jones, farmer, of Rt. 4, Murray, Ky., was born 10 Apr 1858, in Graves Co., Ky., the son of Dr. Thomas Jones, a native of Virginia, and Jane Brown, a native of Tennessee, died 18 Apr 1937, of apoplexy, husband of Ada Jones, and was buried in Story Chapel, Calloway Co., Ky.  His marker there reads:  Laura Ada Jones Aug. 6, 1858 Nov. 22, 1954 William A. Jones Apr. 10, 1858 Apr. 18, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Brother of E. C. Buchanan Killed in Indiana

             E. C. Buchanan was called Sunday to his old home at Linnesburg, Ind., by the death of his brother, George Buchanan, of that place, who was killed Saturday night in a train wreck at Crawfordsville, Ind.  The deceased was a bachelor.

             Surviving also are two sisters, Mrs. Amanda Newkirk and Miss Joan Buchanan, both of Linnesburg.  Another brother died five months ago.

             (A marker in Mace Cemetery in Montgomery Co., Ind., reads:  George W. Buchanan 1881-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Well Known Negro of Mound City Dies

             John Steele, an aged Mound City negro and a former coroner of Pulaski County, died Friday, April 16, at his home there.  At the time of his death he was serving as a member of the Board of Education.

             Only two months ago, his daughter, Bertha, passed away.  He leaves his wife, Lucy Steele.

             (His death certificate states that John Carr Steele, retired, of Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., was born in December 1862 in Tennessee, died 17 Apr 1937, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Henry Kupfer Fatally Injured in Auto Collision

Eight Others Hurt When Car and Bus Come Together

             Henry Kupfer, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kupfer, was fatally injured between 12 and one o’clock early Saturday morning when the car in which he was riding with Fred Wehrenberg, driver and also occupied by Charles Wehrenberg, Jr., a brother, all three of Mounds, and John Hill of Cairo, collided with a Tri-City bus driven by Dewey King and loaded with 33 negro school children of Cairo who with their teachers were starting on a pilgrimage to The Lincoln Tomb at Springfield.  All occupants of the car were taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, where young Kupfer died at 7:30 o'clock the same morning.  Five in the bus were bruised and cut and required the services of a doctor.

             The accident occurred on Sycamore Street in Cairo between the Big Four subway and the Illinois Central subway of the bridge approach.  The car was going south and the bus was headed north.  Occupants of the bus, including the driver, are reported as saying that the car, for some unknown reason, was swerving back and forth across the street as it approached.  The young men in the car later stated that a rear tire blew out which caused the car to swerve.

             The two Wehrenberg boys and Hill were severely bruised, especially Fred Wehrenberg, who was crushed about the ribs.

             The death of Henry Kupfer brings sadness to all in the community.  He had been reared here and was a graduate of M. T. H. S. Class of ’36.  Surviving him are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kupfer, living on the old Villa Ridge Road north of town; an older brother, Herman, of Marion; and three sisters Nelle of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. O. J. Heston of South Bend, Ind., and Mrs. T. J. Albright, whose home is near Anna; also a grandmother, Mrs. Jennie Crain; and an uncle, Henry Crain, of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Methodist church, the Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church of Cairo, officiating and the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty assisting.  Burial was in Liberty Cemetery with J. T. Ryan conducting.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Apr 1937:

HENRY KUPFER KILLED WHEN CAR CRASHES BUS

Henry Kupfer, about 22 years of age of Mounds, was killed last Friday about midnight near the office of the cotton seed plant immediately inside the levee at Cairo when the car in which he was riding and driven by Fred Wehrenberg crashed into the Tri City bus driven by Dewey King.

King was driving north out of Cairo with a load of colored high school students headed for a trip to Springfield.  The car of Wehrenberg's was coming south and it was weaving from side to side.  The car actually came across the road, hit the curb to the right of the bus and then went into the side of the bus.  Kupfer was injured about the head, most of his teeth being knocked out, and he suffered internal injuries, dying next morning.

Charles Wehrenberg and a man by the name of Hill from Cairo were also in the car at the time.  They were injured, but not seriously.

Findings of the inquest were an open verdict, charging no one with the responsibility for his death.

Those in the bus escaped injury, save two, who have small cuts.  Had the car struck a little farther forward, it would have killed others.

Henry Kupfer was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kupfer who reside northwest of Mounds.  In addition to his parents, Henry is survived by an elder brother, Herman, of Mounds; and three sisters, Nellie of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. T. J. Albright, who resides east of Anna, and Mrs. A. J. Eston of South Bend, Indiana.  A grandmother, Mrs. Jennie Crain, who resides near Mounds, also survives.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Methodist church in Mounds with Rev. Dunlap of Cairo in charge.  The special music was by the Methodist quartet and floral offerings were beautiful.  Interment was made in the Liberty Cemetery near Pulaski.  J. Rhyan was in charge.

(His death certificate states that Henry H. Kupfer, a warehouse man, was born 26 Dec 1916, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Arthur Kupfer, a native of Saxony, Germany, and Nora Franki Crain, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 17 Apr 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Liberty Cemetery near Pulaski, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Henry Kupfer Dec. 26, 1916 April 17, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KARNAK STUDENT DROPS DEAD AT CARBONDALE AT SCHOOL

Gordon Lee, 19 years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lee of Karnak, dropped death Tuesday at Carbondale while en route to his rooming house.  Two other students came upon him where he had fallen and first thought he had been stuck by a car.  They summoned aid, but the lad died en route to the hospital.  He had suffered a heart attack, it is thought, for there were no marks of any kind to show he had been injured or hurt.

He was a junior in the college.

Funeral services were held yesterday at Anna.

(His death certificate states that Gordon Manuel Lee, student, was born 5 May 1917, in Elco, Ill., the son of Harry Lee and Ethel Hall, a native of Anna, Ill., died 20 Apr 1937, in Carbondale, Ill., and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Gordon M. Lee 1917-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CAPT. C. F. NELLIS MEETS DEATH IN FALL FROM LADDER

Capt. C. F. Nellis, old time river pilot and captain, met a tragic death Monday evening.  He was engaged in fixing a clothes line and fell from the stepladder he was standing on.  He struck a fence post as he fell, the blow being directly over his heart, causing almost instant death.

Coroner Baynes held an inquest with the following jury:  F. E. Scott, K. Elliott Grace, C. W. Long, Louis Thane, H. C. Elliott, and Howard A. Marrow.  The verdict was accidental death.

Capt. Nellis was one of the best known pilots on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.  He once piloted the mail boat Kate Adams and was half owner with the late Capt. Brown of the steamer Fred Nellis." –Republican Herald.

(C. Ford Nellis, of Cairo, Ill., married Dollie D. Kennedy, of Metropolis, Ill., on 23 Mar 1907, in Arkansas.  According to his death certificate, Charles Ford Nellis, steamboat pilot at Metropolis, Ill., was born 19 Apr 1874, in Illinois, the son of Charles F. Nellis and Ann Kaha, natives of Pennsylvania, died 12 Apr 1937, in Metropolis, Ill., the husband of Dollie Nellis, and was buried in Miller Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mayor and J. B. Jones were called to Kentucky the past week on account of the illness and death of the former's father.  (Mounds)

 

Charles Wehrenberg, Jr., who was hurt in a car wreck Friday night and was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo, was able to return to his home in Mounds Sunday.  (Mounds)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Apr 1937:

ULLIN MAN DIES

John Rowe of Ullin passed away at St. John's Hospital in Springfield Monday afternoon from injuries received in an automobile accident.

He leaves a wife at Ullin, a brother and sister in Ohio and another sister in Pennsylvania.  He was a brother-in-law of William and Ira Robinson of Mounds.

(The death certificate states that John Jacob Rowe, proprietor of the charcoal company, was born 23 Aug 1883, in Defiance, Ohio, the son of John Rowe, a native of Studenville, Ohio, and Matilda Reusch, a native of Germany, died 27 Apr 1937, in Springfield, Ill., the husband of Myrtle Rowe, and was buried in Riverside Cemetery in Defiance, Ohio.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FIRST LIFE IN BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION AT CAIRO

The first life lost in the construction of a bridge from Cairo to Kentucky happened last week when on Wednesday Henry Witzman, 60, a night watchman, drowned on the Kentucky side.

The verdict of the coroner's jury was accidental drowning, although no one saw the accident.

Witzman is married but was living apart from his wife, it is said.  She lives at Metropolis.  Three daughters, two brothers, Otto and Ernest, live in this county, and three sisters, one, Mrs. John Welch, lives in Mound City.

 

MRS. LAMBERT DEAD

Word received at the County Relief Office by Mrs. Carrie Thomas this week of the death of Mrs. Rebecca Lambert on March 19 at Seattle, Wash.  Few details were given, other than that her death followed an operation.  She has been living with her daughter, Mrs. Malone.  The Malone boy spent a winter here and attended school in Mound City.  Mrs. Lambert was case aid supervisor in the county for more than a year.  She lived at the St. Charles Hotel while here.

(Her death record states that Rebecca K. Lambert was born about 1873, the daughter of Josiah Kempthorne and Rebecca Harris, and died 19 Mar 1937, in Seattle, King Co., Wash., the wife of Fred E. Lambert.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Apr 1937: 

John Rowe of Ullin Fatally Injured

             John J. Rowe of Ullin, age 54, died Tuesday morning in St. John’s Hospital, Springfield, where he had been taken Monday afternoon following a collision on the highway.

             Mr. Rowe was returning from a business trip to Peoria and was riding in a truck driven by Truman Sowers of Ullin, when the truck and a car driven by a hitchhiker, Claude Bell, who said he was from Jefferson Barracks, collided, the truck turning over and crushing Rowe.  The car driven by Bell was the property of William R. Osborn, a Wausaw salesman who with his wife was found at a hotel in Springfield and who claimed that Bell had offered to park his car after their arrival in Springfield.

             Mr. Rowe is survived by his wife, two brothers and two sisters.  He is a brother-in-law of Will and Ira Robinson of this city.

 

Miss Adelia Rendleman

             Miss Adelia Rendleman, age 75, died Monday morning, April 26, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Fred Leidigh of Cairo.

             Miss Rendleman is survived by her aged mother, Mrs. Agnes Rendleman.  These two lived at the tip of Bald Knob in Union County for many years and will be remembered by the many visitors to that Ozark Mountain to whom they invariably extended every courtesy.  Also surviving her are three brothers, Julius and Henry Rendleman of Alto Pass and Crawford Rendleman of Anna; three sisters, Mrs. Fred Leidigh of Cairo, Mrs. Nellie Donovan of Mounds and Mrs. G. W. Gunn of Villa Ridge.  Her father died many years ago.

             Born near Alto Pass, she was a member of the Alto Pass Congregational Church, where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, with burial in Alto Pass Cemetery.

             (Her marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Adelia Rendleman 1861-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 May 1937: 

Mrs. Nannie Burnson

             Mrs. Nannie Burnson, age 80 years, died Monday, May 3, at 1:30 p.m. at the home of her sister, Mrs. Lizzie Silver, three miles east of Pulaski, following a long illness.  She had made her home with Mrs. Silver for 47 years.

             She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Silver, and Mrs. Delia Powers of Villa Ridge; two nieces, Mrs. Paul Pavey of Cairo and Mrs. George Sitter of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the residence, the Rev. Mr. Thomas, pastor of the Pulaski M. E. Church, South, officiating. Burial was made in Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James conducting.

 

Mrs. David D. Harris Dies at Home of Her Daughter

             Mrs. David D. Harris, a resident of Mound City for many years, died Friday afternoon, April 30, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Blanckertz, on Spencer Heights following an illness of three years duration.  She and Mr. Harris had been making their home with their daughter since the flood.

             Surviving are her husband, D. D. Harris; three daughters, Mrs. Mary Blanckertz of Mounds, Mrs. E. R. Carroll of Springfield, Ill., and Mrs. W. C. Monaghan of Bluford, Ill.; one son, Fletcher Harris of Mound City; three grandchildren, Frances Blanckertz, Robert Eugene and Margaret Ann Monaghan; four brothers, James Jones of Anna, Marshall, Tell and Jake Jones of Dongola; one sister, Mrs. Sarah Verble of Anna; two half-brothers, Sidney Drake of Cairo and Artie Jones of East St. Louis; one half-sister, Mrs. Jane Toler of Cypress.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Baptist church, Rev. Knight of Mound City officiating.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 May 1937: 

MRS. D. D. HARRIS DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

Mrs. Ella Harris, wife of D. D. Harris, of Mound City, age 61 years, died Friday afternoon at 2:45 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Blanckertz on Spencer Heights at Mounds, following an illness of three years.

She leaves besides her husband, three daughters Mrs. Mary Blankertz of Mounds, Mrs. Margaret Carroll of Springfield, and Mrs. Genevieve Monaghan of Bluford; one son, Fletcher of Mounds City; three grandchildren, France Blankertz, Robert Eugene and Margaret Anna Monaghan; four brothers, James Jones of Anna, Marshall, Tell and Jake Jones of Dongola; one sister, Mrs. Sarah Verble of Anna; two half-brothers, Sidney Drake of Cairo, and Artie Jones of East St. Louis; one half-sister, Mrs. Jane Toler of Cypress, and other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Mounds at 2:00 Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. R. E. Knight of Mound City, who was assisted by Rev. Gardner of Mounds.  Music was furnished by the choir of the Mounds Baptist Church.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  The casket bearers were James Finley, John Edwards, Ray Varner, L. J. Beiswingert, George R. Martin and Frank Finley.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral arrangements.

(David D. Harris, Jr., 35, of Mound City, Ill., married on 26 Jan 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Ellen A. Jones, 22, of Dongola, Ill.  Her death certificate states that Ella Harris was born 2 Nov 1875, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Thomas Jones, died 30 Apr 1937, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of David D. Harris, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ellen A. Harris Nov. 2, 1875 April 30, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. NANNIE BURNSON DIES NEAR PULASKI

Mrs. Nannie Burnson passed away Monday at 1:30 p.m. at the home of her sister, Mrs. Lizzie Silvers three miles east of Pulaski, where she had made her home for the last 47 years.  She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Silvers and Mrs. Delia Powers of Villa Ridge; two nieces, Mrs. Paul Pavey of Cairo and Mrs. George Sitter of Mounds.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Silvers.  Rev. Thomas of the M. E. Church South of Pulaski conducted the services.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(According to her death certificate, Nannie Burnson was born 15 Mar 1857, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the daughter of Richard Burton Wallace, a native of Raleigh, N.C., and Mary A. Robinson, a native of North Carolina, died 3 May 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the widow of Benjamin Burnson, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter) 

 

AGED FARMER PLANS TO PREACH HIS OWN FUNERAL

Farmers for miles around ringed Sunday, May 16th, on their calendar today, planning to attend the funeral services for Wade Millman, 88-year-old farmer of Danville, Ill., on that day.

"I'm going to preach the sermon myself," Millman said as he invited his friends and neighbors to his last rites.

"But it won't be a sermon and I don't aim to preach.  I'm just going to talk and I'll have things to say that may teach you something.

"I don't want any preaching or singing at my funeral, so I just decided to take care of things myself and get it over with."

Millman said he had selected his six pallbearers and has paid them five dollars each for their services.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 May 1937: 

OBITUARY

Mrs. Elizabeth Holman, age 74 years, died at her home in Olmstead Sunday, May 9th, at 10 a.m.  She had been in failing health for some time.  About four weeks ago she fell and broke her hip and was confined to her bed until death.  She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Jewell Davis of Olmsted; four sons, George and Percy of Olmsted and Edward and Ewing of East St. Louis; two brothers, John Green of Oscar, Ky., and George Green of Herrin, Ill.; one sister, Mrs. Hallie Butcher of East St. Louis and ten grandchildren.  She had made her home in Olmsted for the past 19 years and was an active member of the M. E. Church South.  Funeral services were held at the M.E. church Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock.  Rev. D. B. Kazee officiated.  Burial was made in the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery at Bandana, Ky.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

The pallbearers at Olmstead were members of the American Legion, Mrs. Holman having been a Gold Star mother.  At LaCenter the pallbearers were selected from old friends of the deceased.

(Her death certificate states that Elizabeth Holman was born 3 Apr 1863, in Kentucky, the daughter of William Green and Sallie Ezelle, died 9 May 1937, in Olmstead, Ill., the widow of George Holman, and was buried in Oscar, Ballard Co., Ky., and was buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. LIBBY MAY RABEY DIED AT MOUNDS

Mrs. Libby May Rabey, age 43 years, died at her home in Mounds at 7:15 o'clock May 10.  She had been ill for the past five weeks.  She leaves her husband and five children, four daughters, Mrs. Iota King, Louise Ravey of Martin, Tenn., Mabel and Laura May Rabey of Mounds; one son, Carnell Ravey of Mounds.

J. T. Ryan had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Her death certificate states that Libby May Rabey was born 28 Sep 1895, in Clinton, Ky., the daughter of Sid Moore, a native of Clinton, Ky., and Laura May Daniel, a native of Fulton, Ky., died 10 May 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of Melvin Rabey, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Libbye M. Rabey Sept. 28, 1895 May 10 1937 M. Balter Rabey June 26, 1888 June 11, 1963.—Darrel Dexter)

 

RESIDENT OF NEAR MOUNDS DIES AT OUTWOOD, KY.

Fred Parker, 41 years of age, died Thursday, May 6, at 1:20 p.m. at the Veterans Hospital, Outwood, Ky., where he had been ill for the past 10 months.  He and his family resided 3 miles west of Mounds.  He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Laura Parker of Mounds, four brothers, Clyde, Carmon and Ralph of Mounds, and Ray of Union, Mo.; three sisters, Letha Echols and Mrs. Etta Varner of Mounds, and Mrs. Mattie Essex of Villa Ridge; and three children, Freda, Vivian, and Ruby, who are making their home with their Grandmother Parker.

Rev. Hall conducted the services Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at the Anderson Church near Boaz, Ill.  As Mr. Parker was a World War veteran, members of the American Legion served as pallbearers and honorary pallbearers.

He was laid to rest at Anderson Cemetery.  The funeral arrangements were made by G. A. James.

(His death certificate states that Fred Parker of Mounds, Ill., farmer, was born 20 Nov 1895, in Illinois, the son of W. C. and Laura M. Parker, natives of Illinois, died 6 May 1937, at the Veterans’ Administration Facility 6 in Outwood, Macedonia Precinct, Christian Co., Ky., of far advanced tuberculosis pulmonary, and was buried at Mound City, Ill.  Leatha M. Echols’ application for a veteran’s headstone states Fred Parker, bugler in Battery A, 325th Field Artillery, 84th Division, enlisted 22 Feb 1918, and was honorably discharged 28 Feb 1919.  He died 6 May 1937 and was buried in Anderson Cemetery in Boaz, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. ELIZABETH HOLMAN DIES

Mrs. Elizabeth Holman, age 74 years, died at her home in Olmstead, Sunday morning at 10 o'clock.  She had resided in Olmstead for the past 19 years and was an active member of the M. E. Church South, where funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, with Rev. Kazee officiating.

Burial was made in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery at Bandana, Ky.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Jewell Davis of Olmstead; four sons, Percy and George of Olmsted, Bedford and Ewing of East St. Louis; two brothers, John Green of Oscar, Ky., and George Green of Herrin, Ill.; and one sister, Mrs. Hallie Butcher, of East St. Louis.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 May 1937: 

Prominent Cairo Citizen Dies Sunday Morning

             Egbert Alfred Smith, age 80 years, long a prominent citizen of Cairo, died Sunday morning at 1 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, where he had been a patient for two weeks.

             Mr. Smith was born in Dundas, Ontario, Canada, June 1, 1856, and came to Cairo with his parents at the age of three years.

             He entered the business world at the early age of 16 years, first as a merchant, later becoming a farmer and banker, as well.  Among his cherished dream for this section were good roads and river bridges.  He fathered the “Y” bridge idea.  He organized the Cairo & Thebes railroad—now the Missouri Pacific and was president of that organization during the period of construction which involved the filling of some 24 city blocks in Cairo, including the present site of the station on Washington Avenue and Sixteenth Street.  The building of the railroad was held up for a time because of an injunction, the excuse for which was that the railroad would kill all the children in Cairo.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Phyllis Howard Smith; and five children, Egbert A. Smith, Mrs. Vernet Rees, Miss Carolyn Smith, Mrs. Phyllis Midkiff, now in England, and Mrs. Charles S. Eytinge, of New York City.

             Funeral services were held at the Church of the Redeemer Tuesday morning.  Burial followed in Villa Ridge cemetery.

             (Egbert Smith married Phyllis May Howard on 19 May 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Egbert Alfred Smith, Sr., retired, was born 18 Jun 1856, in Dundas, Ontario, the son of James Smith, a native of England, and Catherine Turner, a native of Canada, died 9 May 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Phyllis Smith, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. W. B. Rabey

             Mrs. Libby Mae Rabey, age 43, died at her home on South Oak Street Monday morning, May 10, after a long illness.

             Surviving her are her husband, W. B. Rabey; and five children, Mrs. Iota King and Louise Rabey of Martin, Tenn., Mabel, Laura May and Carnell Rabey, all of Mounds; two brothers, Orvin Moore of Fulton, Ky., and Jesse Moore of Crutcherfield, Ky.; four sisters, Mrs. Ruby Phillips, Misses Gertrude, Delma and Riva Moore of Crutchfield; also a stepmother, Mrs. Ruby Moore, of Crutchfield.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, the Rev. W. A. Gardner, pastor, officiating.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, J. T. Ryan officiating.

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Holman

             Mrs. Elizabeth Holman, age 74, died at her home in Olmstead Sunday morning, May 9, at 10 o’clock.  She had made her home in Olmstead for 19 years.

             Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Jewel Davis of Olmstead; four sons, Percy and George of Olmstead, Bedford and Ewing of East St. Louis; two brothers, John Green of Oscar, Ky., and George Green of Herrin; one sister, Mrs. Hallie Butcher of East St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at the Olmstead M. E. Church South, of which she had long been an active member.  The Rev. Mr. Kazee officiated.  Burial was in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, LaCenter, Ky., G. A. James directing.

             Mrs. Holman was a Gold Star mother and members of the American Legion served as pallbearers for her at Olmstead and friends of the deceased were her casket bearers at LaCenter.

 

Fred Parker

             Fred Parker, age 41 years, died at the Veterans Hospital at Outwood, Ky., Thursday at 1:30 p.m.  He had been in this hospital for the past ten months.

             He is survived by three children, Freda, Vivian and Ruby, who made their home with their Grandmother Parker; mother, Mrs. Laura Parker, of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Letha Echols and Mrs. Etta Varner of Mounds and Mrs. Mattie Essex of Villa Ridge; four brothers, Clyde, Carman and Ralph of Mounds and Ray of Union, Mo.

             Funeral services were conducted at Anderson Church near Boaz, Sunday at 2 p.m. by Rev. Hall and interment was made in the Anderson Cemetery.

             The active and honorary pallbearers were members of the American Legion.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 May 1937: 

Mother of Henry Karraker Dies at Home in Dongola

             Mrs. Anna Karraker, widow of J. F. Karraker, passed away at her home in Dongola Friday, May 14, at the age of 73 years, 11 months and 15 days.  She was the mother of Henry H. Karraker of this city.

             Born in Natchez, Miss., May 29, 1863, Mrs. Karraker was the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Charles Montgomery.

             Surviving are seven children, three sons, Earle Karraker of DuQuoin, Henry of Mounds and Roy of Flora; four daughters, Mrs. Viola Beggs of Cypress, Mrs. Orpha Keller of Dongola, Mrs. Minnie Sullards of Mt. Carmel and Mrs. Clara Ford of Evansville, Ind.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, at the Baptist church of Dongola, with the Rev. W. J. Ward officiating, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Wilson.  Burial was in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery, E. J. Ford directing.

 

Infant Dies

             Ellen Rose Walter, infant daughter of Mr. and Mr. Clellan Walter of near Grand Chain, died Thursday morning, May 13.  The babe was buried Thursday afternoon, the Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating, and interment in Anderson Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (Her death certificate states that Ellen Rose Walter was stillborn 13 May 1937, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Clellan Walter, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Helen A. Conant, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Anderson Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Husband of Former Mounds Girl Dies

             Thomas Warren Wallace of Cairo, age 27 years, husband of the former Geneva Mahoney, of this city, died Thursday, May 13, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, after a three weeks’ illness. He was an employee of the Coca Cola Bottling Company.

             He is survived by his wife, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James W. Wallace of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Kathryn John and Doris Ann Wallace, both of Cairo; his grandmother, Mrs. Cora Wallace of Vienna, and other relatives.  He was the son-in-law of Mrs. John Sadler of this place.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock at Karcher Brothers Funeral Home with Rev. W. P. MacVey, pastor of the First M. E. Church of Cairo officiating, assisted by Rev. R. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the Mounds M. E. Church.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Thomas Warren Wallace was born 31 Mar 1910, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of James W. Wallace, a native of Massac Co., Ill., and Kate Holcombe, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 13 May 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Geneva Mahoney, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Thos. Warren Wallace 1910-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Charles McAdoo Killed, Wife Injured in Auto Accident

Charles McAdoo, of Fulton, Ky., a former Mounds resident, was fatally injured Monday evening when his car which he was driving crashed into a telegraph pole near Brownville, Tenn.  Mrs. McAdoo, formerly Miss Nora Ryan of this city, was seriously injured.  Bobby, their five-year-old son, was only slightly hurt and was able to identify the family and to tell other motorists who came to their assistance where to locate relatives.  Mr. McAdoo was taken to a nearby hospital, but lived only a short time.

             The McAdoo family was returning home after a trip to Memphis, Tenn.  In attempting to pass a car, a collision with another car approaching from the opposite direction seemed inevitable and Mr. McAdoo turned to the left of the road, crashing into the pole.

             Mrs. McAdoo and Bobby and the body of her husband were brought to Mounds Tuesday evening and taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ryan.

             Surviving Mr. McAdoo, besides his wife and son, are three sisters, Mrs. B. R. Wilson, Reeves, Tenn., Mrs. J. P. Flanagan, Troy, Miss., and Mrs. Ruth Higgs, Martin, Tenn.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Ryan residence at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

 

Dies in New York

             William Wiedner, father of Mrs. Otto Witzman of Olmstead, died Friday, May 14, at his home in New York.  His wife, now deceased, was the former Miss Molly Mikken of Olmstead.

             Surviving, besides Mrs. Witzman, are two other daughters, Mrs. Everett Bever of Cairo and Mrs. Helen Jones of Cassadaga, Fla.

             Burial was made in New York.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 May 1937: 

MRS. ANNA KARRAKER DIES AT HER HOME IN DONGOLA

Mrs. Anna Karraker, 73, died at her home in Dongola Friday at 11:30 p.m.  Death came suddenly although she had been in poor health for some time.

Her husband, J. Karraker, died in 1934.  She is survived by the following children:  Earl Karraker, of DuQuoin, formerly of this city, Henry Karraker of Mounds, Mrs. Viola Beggs and Mrs. Orpha Keller both of Dongola, Roy Karraker of Flora, Mrs. Minnie Sullards of Mt. Carmel and Mrs. Clara Fard of Evansville, Ill.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola Sunday at 2:30.  She was laid to rest in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery under the direction of E. J. Ford.

(Joseph F. Karraker, 20, a farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of Pathen Karraker and Sarah J. Knight, married on 26 Feb 1880, in Union Co., Ill., George Anna Montgomery 16, from Dongola, Ill., born in St. Helena, La., daughter of E. L. Montgomery and E. T. Longacre.  The death certificate states that Anna Montgomery Karraker was born 29 May 1863, in Mississippi, the daughter of E. L. Montgomery, a native of Mississippi, died 16 May 1937, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the widow of J. F. Karraker, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Dongola, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  J. Frank Karraker 1859-1934 Anna M. Karraker 1863-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUNDS MAN KILLED IN AUTO CRASH

Charles McAdoo was killed and his wife seriously injured in an auto crash Monday evening.  Their 5-year-old son, Bobby, was uninjured.

Mr. McAdoo and family were returning to their home in Fulton, Ky., when their machine crashed into a telephone pole after passing another car 40 miles south of Jackson.

Although Mrs. McAdoo was in a critical condition, she was moved to Mounds with the body of her husband.

The McAdoos are well known in Mounds, having lived there for some time after their marriage.  Mrs. McAdoo is a sister of Jimmie Ryan of Mounds and has other relatives in that vicinity.

(His death certificate states that Charles Austin McAdoo, an Illinois Central conductor of Fulton, Ky., was born about 1890, in Tennessee, the son of William T. McAdoo and Margarete Austin, natives of Tennessee, and died 17 May 1937, at Haywood County Memorial Hospital in Brownsville, Haywood Co., Tenn., of a fractured skull caused by an auto accident, the husband of Nora Ryan McAdoo.  His marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Charles A. McAdoo 1889-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TWO PROMINENT MEN OF CAIRO DEAD IN LAST WEEK

Two prominent men of Cairo died within the past week, Edward Hill, insurance man, and Hal Aisthorpe, former cashier of the First Bank & Trust Co.  Hill died last Saturday at the age of 44 years while Aisthorpe died Monday at the age of 56 years.

Hill was identified with numerous lodges and associations as a mixer and pusher while Aisthorpe was long associated with financial circles.  He was a cool-headed and careful banker and the survival of the First Bank & Trust Co. through the era of bank collapses is due some to his hard work and careful planning.  The worries of those days may have had something to do with his early death.

(His death certificate states that Edward Scofield Hill, an insurance agent, of 2818 Park Ave., Cairo, Ill., was born 25 Jan 1893, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Richard C. Hill, a native of Richmond, Va., and Louise Harriette Scofield, a native of Cairo, Ill., died 15 May 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  Edward S. Hill 1893-1937.  The death certificate of Haliday Remington Aisthorpe, a banker, of 2907 Washington St., Cairo, Ill., states that he was born 15 Jul 1881, in Cairo, Ill., the son of John S. Aisthorpe, a native of England, and Ada C. Halliday, died 17 May 1937, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Bess Winslow Aisthorpe, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Halliday R. Aisthorpe 1881-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 May 1937: 

FORMER MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIES IN OKALHOMA

Mrs. Kate Finley Sneed died Thursday, May 18, at the Eastern Star Home in Oklahoma, where she had been ill for the past three years.

At the age of seven, she came to Mound City, received her education and began teaching in different schools throughout the county at the age of 17.

After her marriage, she moved to Oklahoma, where she became quite prominent.  She was a Past Worthy Matron of the Order of the Eastern Star and a member of the Rebekahs.

She is survived by one son, Dabney M. Sneed of Durant, Okla.; and three brothers, James and Frank Finley of Mound City and Ira Finley of N. S. Pittsburgh, Pa.

The funeral service was held at All Saints Episcopal Church.  Interment was made in Oak Hill Cemetery at McAllister, Okla.

(Joseph H. Sneed, 40, of Milburn, Dyer Co., Tenn., married on 17 Feb 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Kate Finley, 17, of Cairo, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 May 1937: 

Mrs. Emma K. Smith

             Mrs. Emma K. Smith, aged mother of Attorney J. Kelley Smith, died Thursday morning about 11:30 o’clock after an illness of a week or two.  Although in her eighties, Mrs. Smith’s mentality was very strong and she was a voluminous reader.  She had been able to get about until her last illness.

             Brief funeral services will be held this afternoon at the grave with burial in Clinton, Ky., her former home.

 

Mrs. Bessie Webb of Arlington, Ky., was among those who attended the funeral of Charles McAdoo last Thursday.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Parham and Mrs. Kate Hagan of Fulton, Ky., were called here last week by the death of Charles McAdoo.

 

Mrs. Nora Ryan McAdoo is slowly improving following injuries received in an auto accident last week.

 

Billy Travers has returned to his work at the U. of I. after having been called here by the death of his uncle, Charles McAdoo.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Jun 1937: 

To Unveil Marker to Soldier of 1812

             The Egyptian Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution will unveil a Government marker Sunday afternoon, June 20, at 2:30 p.m. at Marion Cemetery near West Salem, Edwards County, in memory of Marvin Powers Blood, member of the Vermont State Militia in the War of 1812, whose certified service was in Captain Phelps’ Company, Col. Jonathon Williams’ Regiment.  He was the son of John Blood, a soldier of the Revolution.  The American Legion Post of West Salem will assist in the unveiling ceremonies.  The public is invited to attend.

             Marvin Blood is the grandfather of Mrs. William L. Toler, historian of Egyptian Chapter, and is the great-grandfather of Mrs. William L. Williams of Grayville, a member of the Wabash Chapter, Carmi.  A boulder in memory of his wife, Martha Cabot Blood, daughter of Francis Cabot, Revolutionary soldiers, was unveiled October 13, 1936.

 

Former Tri-City Bus Driver Was Killed in Accident

A. L. Hines of Memphis, Tenn., a former Mound City man, was killed and seven passengers in the Missouri Pacific bus he was driving were injured in a wreck eighteen miles south of Poplar Bluff, Mo.

The place of the accident was at a curve on highway 67 just north of the Missouri-Arkansas line.  Hines lost control of the bus, according to report, and the vehicle slipped off the shoulder of the blacktop surface, and overturned in a ditch, pinning the driver under the bus.

Four of the seven passengers injured were in a critical condition in a Poplar Bluff hospital.

 

Former Pulaski County Man Buried Here Tuesday

             Lorenzo D. Reese, a former resident of this section and well known in the county, died Sunday night, May 30, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. ___ett Alden of Anna.  Another daughter is the former Mrs. Etta ___ett of Mounds and Cairo, who ___ married a New Orleans man.

             Funeral services were held at Anna ___day with burial in Beech Grove Cemetery Mounds.

 

Death Calls Miss Opal Shaffer after Long Illness

             Miss Edith Opal Shaffer, age 35 years, died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Mary Shaffer, at 5:35 Sunday morning, May 30, after a lingering illness.  She had resided in Mounds 17 years and had been a teacher in Mounds Thistlewood grade school for 15 years.

             Miss Shaffer, from childhood a devout Christian, had served as pastor of the Assembly of God Church for a number of years.

             Surviving her are her mother, one sister, Mrs. Virginia Egner of Mounds; four brothers, Rev. T. A. Shaffer of Crossville, H. L. Shaffer of Mounds, Edgar Shaffer of Joppa and Artie Shaffer of Chicago.    

             Funeral services were held at the Assembly of God church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Samuel Skyles of Murphysboro officiating, assisted by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty of the Mounds Methodist Church.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery, G. A. James directing.  Casket bearers were Richard Copeland, James Gamble, Henry Gunn, Earl Sitton, George Parrot, and Robert Foss.

 

Billie Martin

             Billie Martin, age 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Martin, died at Jefferson Barracks Hospital Monday morning, May 31, at 1:10 o’clock.  He had been ill for some time.

             Surviving are his parents, a sister, Pauline; and other relatives, among them an aunt, Mrs. Fred Raub of this city, who went to St. Louis to attend the funeral services.  He was buried in the vicinity of St. Louis.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Jun 1937: 

BUS DRIVER KILLED; SEVEN OTHERS INJURED

A. L. Hines, of Memphis, Tenn., driver of a Missouri Pacific bus, was killed and seven passengers injured in a wreck on Highway 67, eighteen miles south of Poplar Bluff, Mo.

The injured, whom were taken to hospitals at Poplar Bluff, were Mrs. E. C. Johnson of Jonesboro, Ark., Mrs. W. S. Walker of Jonesboro, Leslie Ingram, Moro, Ark., Albert Robinson, Memphis, Tenn., Tallie Sartin, St. Louis, Susie Hill, negro, of Memphis; and Ed Love, negro, of Parkin, Ark.

It seems that the driver lost control of the bus and it slipped off the black top surfaced shoulder of the highway and overturned in a ditch.  The driver was pinned underneath the wreckage.

Hines was a driver with several years’ experience.  He had been driving for Tri-City Transportation Co., Greyhound Lines, Mohawk Stages, and Missouri Pacific.

He was well known in Mounds and Mound City.

 

FORMER MOUND CITY TEACHER DIES

Opal Edith Shaffer, 35 years old, died at the home of her mother, in Mounds Sunday morning at 5:35 o'clock.  Miss Shaffer had been a resident of Mounds for 17 years and taught at the Thistlewood School for 15 years.  She was also a pastor of the Assembly of God Church for a number of years.

Those most grieved by her death are her mother, Mrs. Mary Shaffer of Mounds; one sister, Mrs. Virginia Egner; four brothers, T. A. Shaffer of Crossville, H. L. Shaffer of Mounds, Edgar Shaffer of Joppa and Artie Shaffer of Chicago, besides other relatives and many friends.

The funeral services held at the Assembly of God church in Mounds, were conducted by Rev. Samuel Skyles of Murphysboro, assisted by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty of Mounds.

She was buried at the Grand Chain cemetery with 12 of her pupils of the Thistlewood School as flower bearers.  The pallbearers were James Gamble, George Parrot, Earl Sitton, Robert Foss, Henry Gunn, and Richard Copeland.

The funeral was under the direction of G. A. James.

(Her death certificate states that Opal Edith Shaffer, a public school teacher, was born 26 Sep 1901, in Grand Chain, Ill., the daughter of E. Z. Shaffer, and Mary Jaynes, natives of Illinois, died 30 May 1937, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried at Grand Chain, Ill.  Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Opal Edith Shaffer 1901-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CAIRO PIONEER DIES

Harry A. Eichoff, a resident of Cairo for more than fifty years, died at his home on Fifth Street, Sunday morning.  He had been ill since last January.

Mr. Eichoff came to Cairo in 1886 when the Illinois Central Bridge was being built, found employment on the bridge job and remained in Cairo.  He has been employed by many concerns in Cairo and at the time of his death was custodian to the Masonic Temple.  He has become a prominent Mason in Southern Illinois, Kentucky and Missouri, having been taken 32 degrees in the Order.

He is survived by his wife and son, William F.; two daughters, Mrs. Floyd Sanford and Mrs. Howard Kendall; and one brother, Frank, all living in Chicago.

The funeral services were at the Masonic Temple, with Rev. C. R. Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church, officiating.

Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery, the Masonic Lodge having charge of the rites at the grave.

The pallbearers were members of Cairo Lodge 237, A. F. & A. M. of which Bro. Eichoff was a member.

(Harry H. Eichoff, a native of Muscatine, Iowa, the son of William Eichoff and Ellen Brown, married on 23 Dec 1885, in Muscatine, Iowa, Flora M. Phelps, a native of Muscatine, Iowa, the daughter of Charles F. Phelps and Mary Bunely.  His death certificate states that Harry August Eichoff, engineer, was born 15 Feb 1864, in Muscatine, Iowa, the son of William F. Eichoff, a native of Hamburg, Germany, and Mary Ellen Brown, a native of England, died 30 May 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Kathyrn Eichoff, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Katie Eichoff 1877-1956 Harry A. Eichoff 1864-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. EMMA K. SMITH DIES

Mrs. Emma K. Smith died at Mounds Thursday morning at 11:30.  She was the widow of the late Dr. Lee Smith, formerly of Clinton, Ky.  Her two sons, J. Kelly Smith, a prominent lawyer of Mounds, and Dr. M. L. Smith of Owensboro, Ky., survive her.

Rev. W. A. Gardner of Mounds and Rev. O. A. Carmean of Cairo, officiated at the services in Clinton, Ky.

James H. Davis of Owensboro and J. T. Ryan of Mounds directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Emma Kelly Smith, of Mace, Ky., was born 16 Oct 1850, in Davies Co., Ky., the daughter of Joseph Kelly and Harriett C. Jones, a native of Kentucky, died 27 Feb 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Lee M. Smith, died 28 May 1937, in Clinton, Hickman Co., Ky., and was buried in Clinton Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH OF LORENZO D. REESE

Lorenzo D. Reese, prominent in Mounds and Pulaski County, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Everett Alden of Anna, Sunday night.  Services were conducted at 3 o'clock and burial was at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(His death certificate states that Lorenzo Dow Reese, engine fireman, was born 21 Nov 1861, in Mountain Grove, Missouri, died 30 May 1937, in Anna, Ill., widower of Friedona Reese, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BOY'S NECK IS BROKE WHEN TEAM RUNS AWAY

(Golconda Herald-Enterprise)

Elsberry Wilson, 4 ½ year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Elsberry Hancock of Oak, was instantly killed Friday morning when a team, hitched to a wagon in which the boy and his father and younger brother were riding, ran away, throwing him under a wheel.  Death caused by a broken neck, was instantaneous.

Mr. Hancock was hauling a load of manure from the barn, holding the reins with one hand and his younger son on his knee with the other.  The family had been cleaning house and a rug, hanging from a clothesline, was flapping about in the wind.  It frightened the horses and in a moment they were out of control.  Mr. Hancock, in his testimony before the coroner’s jury, said that he realized he could do nothing with the team and so he decided to jump with the child he was holding.  Wilson, he thought, could manage by himself.  When he hit the ground, he fell on the little boy.  Thinking he was hurt, the father picked him up and looked for Wilson.  His sister had already reached the scene of the tragedy and was holding the lifeless body of the child in her arms.

             (His death certificate states that Elsberry Wilson Hancock was born 7 Oct 1932, in Oak, Ill., the son of Elsberry Hancock, a native of Oak, Ill., and Mary Ruth Frick, a native of Carlinville, Ill., died 21 May 1937, in Road District 2, Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in Gossage Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Jun 1937: 

BIG FOUR R. R. BRAKEMAN KILLED AT KARNAK TUESDAY

Death came swiftly and without warning to B. H. Wiggs, 54, brakeman on a Big Four local Tuesday morning about 10:30 o'clock at Karnak.  Wiggs, whose home is in Mt. Carmel, is survived by his widow and two sons.

According to reports, Wiggs was coupling two baggage cars to his train.  It is said that the cars were about eighteen inches apart and he signaled for the engineer to back the train.  The engineer compiled with the signal and Wiggs stepped between the cars to couple the draw bars.  He did not reappear and after some time another brakeman, Everett West, went to see what was detaining Wiggs.  He found him lying on his face under the cars.  Wiggs' chest and one arm were said to have been badly crushed.  In backing up the train, he was probably caught between the draw bars for marks in the rock on the track indicated that his feet had dragged the ground for a few feet.

Wiggs had been a brakeman on the Big Four railroad for 35 years. –Vienna Times

(This is likely David Harrison Wiggs, who was born 4 Jul 1884, died 1 Jun 1937, and was buried in Highland Memorial Cemetery in Mount Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill.  His World War I draft registration in September 1918, states he lived at 1006 Pear St., Mt. Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill., and was a railway conductor for C. C. C. & St. Louis Railway Co. at Mt. Carmel.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER DUQUOIN BANKER DEAD

H. C. Miller, former president of the First National Bank of DuQuoin, died Saturday, June 5, at John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Md.         

Mr. Miller had been in ill health for the past year and had been under observation of physicians and specialists of Southern Illinois and was taken to Maryland the ___ day before his death.

He was a member of the Illinois Banker's Association and an associate of the Illinois Chambers of Commerce.

He is survived by his wife and two sons, Mark and Harry; his mother, Mrs. Emma Miller; and brother, Ike Miller, of St. Louis.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Vernon G. ___ Cameron, Tex., formerly of DuQuoin.  Burial was made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at DuQuoin.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Jun 1937: 

YOUNG MOTHER SACRIFICES LIFE FOR DAUGHTER

At Cave-in-Rock Friday morning occurred a shocking tragedy that snuffed out the life of Mrs. Thomas Partain, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Joyner, of Herod, Ill.

Attracted by the screams of her 4-year-old daughter, Mrs. Partain ran to her to find the little one had taken hold of an aerial, which had come in contract with an electrically charged wire.  When she attempted to release the child, Mrs. Partain was instantly killed, failing across the body of the child.

A strange circumstance is that the little one's hands were burned before the mother reached her, yet she survived the shock that was instantly fatal to her mother.  The child was taken to a hospital, where her injured hands are being treated.

Mrs. Partain was 32 years old.  She is survived by her husband, a 13-year-old son, Deneen, and Marjorie Ruth, the daughter for whom she gave her life.

The funeral was held at Karber's Ridge Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Charles Durfee officiating.—Golconda Herald-Enterprise.

(The death certificate states that Bessie Jane Partain was born 20 Apr 1903, in Herod, Ill., died 4 Jun 1937, in Cave-in-Rock, Hardin Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 2, Hardin Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mount Zion Cemetery in Rock Creek, Hardin Co., Ill., reads:  Bessie Partain 1904-1937 Thomas Partain 1902-1974.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY GIRL'S HUSBAND DIES

R. L. Carrollton of Baton Rouge, La., died in a hospital there, Saturday evening, following an automobile accident in which he was injured about two weeks ago. He never regained consciousness after the accident.

He leaves his wife, Mrs. Helen Carrollton; a young son, Tommy; his mother and a brother, all of Baton Rouge.

The day before the accident, Mr. Carrollton had received a promotion to the highest professorship at the Louisiana State University.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon in Baton Rouge and interment was made there.

Mrs. Carrollton before her marriage was Miss Helen Parker of Mound City, sister of Miss Gladys Parker of Wood River, Ill., Albert and Carlos Parker of Mound City.  Her sister was with her at the time of Mr. Carrollton's death.

(The Louisiana Death Index states that Roderick L. Carleton was born about 1903 and died 12 Jun 1937, in East Baton Rouge Parish, La.  He was buried in Roselawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Baton, Rouge, La.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DIES

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Lance of Pulaski was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery last Friday, having died at birth.  Mrs. Lance was before her marriage Miss Elaine Palmer of Pulaski.

(His death certificate states that Billy Lance  was stillborn 10 Jun 1937, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Alvin Lance and Elaine Palmer, natives of Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski.  His marker there reads:  Billy son of Alvin & Elaine Lance.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OLIVE BRANCH BOY KILLED BY HIT AND RUN DRIVER

Gerald W. Light, 19-year-old youth of Olive Branch, was killed by a hit-and-run driver two miles north of Olive Branch Saturday night.  The youth was on his way to Olive Branch.

According to witnesses, the car was traveling at a high rate of speed when it hit the boy.  The car slowed down only slightly and then sped on.  The license number was not obtained.  The young victim was killed instantly.

(His death certificate states that Gerald W. Light, farmer, was born 18 Mar 1918, in Olive Branch, Ill., the son of Walter Light, a native of Olive Branch, Ill., and Clara Holshouser, a native of Union Co., Ill., and died 12 Jun 1937, in Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Twentee Cemetery in Road District 4, Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Twentee Crossing Cemetery reads:  Gerald W. Light Mar. 18, 1918 June 12, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

WOMAN WHO NOMINATED BRYAN PASSES AWAY

The last remains of Mrs. Lucille Taylor, wife of Capt. Taylor of Elizabethtown, were taken to St. Louis Sunday, June 6, by Mr. G. T. Lee, for burial in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Mrs. Taylor was a member of the Spanish-American Auxiliary.  In years past she was named by a prominent American figure to impersonate the Goddess of Liberty in a nation-wide pageant.  It was she who placed William Jennings Bryan's name for president the first time.  When he was nominated she led the parade around the convention hall.  When the cheers for Mr. Bryan died way, another cheer rose, this time for Mrs. Taylor.  She was hoisted to willing shoulders and carried triumphantly down the hall.  But in her triumph there was tragedy.  In their enthusiasm the men who lifted her had injured the slight figure, and Mrs. Taylor was thereafter a cripple.—Golconda Herald-Enterprise

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Jun 1937: 

Mrs. Harry Dishinger and daughter, Jeanette, have returned from Mobile, Ala., where they were called by the illness of Captain M. D. Cogswell, uncle of Mr. Dishinger, who passed away a week ago.

             (The Alabama Death Index records that Mason Daniel Cogswell was born about 1860, the son of Daniel Cogswell and Cynthia Cleveland, and died 6 Jun 1937, in Springhill, Mobile Co., Ala., the husband of Viola Simpson.  His marker in Magnolia Cemetery in Mobile, Ala., reads:  Capt. M. D. Cogswell 1860-1937 Viola G. Cogswell 1875-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Jun 1937: 

Farm Hand Drops Dead

             Robert Glover, a negro farm hand on the D. H. Leidigh farm, dropped dead in the field while operating a walking cultivator, Monday afternoon.  His death grip on the reins of the horses he was driving brought the team to a stop.

             Glover, who had been working for Leidigh since 1910, was 62 years of age. 

 

Former Ullin Man Dies at Home in McClure

             Ben H. Anderson, age 73 years, died Saturday morning, June 19, at his home in McClure following a ___g illness.  Four years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis and a second stroke caused his death.

             For many years Mr. Anderson lived on a farm south of Ullin and at one time headed a movement that resulted in prospecting for ___ in that section.  Coincidentally, his death was the death only a week or so ago of George Porter, a prospector who had charge of the sinking of the well.  Mr. Porter, a native of Bone Gap, died at Mt. Carmel where he had made his home for many years.

             Mr. Anderson is survived by his wife; a son, Ralph Anderson of McClure; a brother, Tom of Anna; and a sister, whose home is in California.  Another sister, Mrs. __. H. Goddard of Carbondale, died last fall.

             Funeral services were held at the family home Monday morning at __ o’clock.  Burial was made in Dongola cemetery.

             (Benjamin Harden Anderson, 24, clerk in dry goods and grocery store in Dongola, Ill., born in Anna, Ill., son of Harrison Anderson and Rose Worley, married on 3 Apr 1890, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., Lydia Cora Henley, 20, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of Thomas Henley and Mary Hurt.  William H. Goddard, 21, farmer, born in Anna, Ill., the son of Timothy H. and Susan (Summers) Goddard, married on 20 May 1883, in Union Co., Ill., Alice L. Anderson, 21, born in Anna, Ill., daughter of James H. and Rose (Worley) Anderson.  James H. Anderson married Rosannah Worley on 28 Nov 1858, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Benjamin H. Anderson, farmer, was born 10 Feb 1865, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the son of Harrison Anderson and Rose Worley, natives of Illinois, died 19 Jun 1937, in Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Dongola, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Father of Mrs. Henri Cowles Dies Suddenly Wednesday

             J. F. Hoffman, age 62, of Mound City died suddenly of a heart attack Wednesday afternoon, June 23, at the house of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mason of Cairo, where he had been living since the flood.

             Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Bernard Miller of Cairo, Mrs. Albert Parker of Mound City and Mrs. C. L. Cowles of this place; two grandsons of Cairo and a sister, Mrs. Josephine Hargan of Miller City.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of his daughter in Mound City.  Burial will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

 

Marker for Soldier of 1812 Unveiled Sunday Afternoon

             An impressive ceremony conducted by the Egyptian Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Cairo, marked the unveiling and dedication of a Government marker to the memory of Marvin P. Blood, a soldier in the War of 1812, at Marion church yard in Edwards County Sunday afternoon, June 20, 100 years from the time this soldier and his family came as pioneers to Illinois.  Although the day was warm, there was a large attendance of his descendants and their friends who had gathered under the shade of the trees surrounding the beautiful church and grounds adjoining the well-kept cemetery.

             Mrs. Clyde Hornbuckle, regent of the chapter, presided.  Following the presentation of the colors by the McCormack Post of the American Legion of West Salem, Charles Hornbuckle, a young member of the Sons of the Revolution, led the pledge of the allegiance to the flag.  The invocation was given by the presiding regent and a biography of the veteran by his granddaughter, Mrs. Grace Cabot Toler of Mounds.  The stone was unveiled by Misses Helene Jenner of Parkersburg and Mabel Gunther of West Salem, great-great-granddaughter of Marvin Blood.  A beautiful wreath, the gift of the Chapter, was placed by another granddaughter, Mrs. Cora Blood Badgley, of Olney, the oldest living descendant.  Taking for his subject “One’s Intangible Assets,” U. R. Dusch of West Salem, Post Commander of the McCormack Post of the American Legion, made an appropriate patriotic talk.  One verse of America, with bugle accompaniment by Clyde Kaericher of West Salem, was sung.  Mr. Kaercher also sounded Taps.  The benediction by the regent closed the ceremony.

             This marker to Marvin Blood stands near a boulder dedicated to the memory of his wife, Martha Cabot Blood, on October 13, 1936, by the Wabash and Egyptian chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Biographical Sketch of Marvin P. Blood

             Marvin Powers Blood was born Jan. 8, 1793 at Windsor, Windsor County, Vermont, and died October 1860, at Bennington, Edwards County, Illinois.  He was the son of John Blood, a soldier of the Revolution, who endured the hardships of Valley Forge during the winter of 1777 and fought in the battles of Monmouth and Rhode Island.

             Marvin was of the seventh generation from James Blood, brother of Col. Thomas Blood of whom we have recently read so much.  Most of the newspapers failed to state the connection between Col. Thomas Blood and his King, Charles II, who knighted him and restored his estates in Ireland following the supposed attempt to “steal” the crown jewels.  James Blood came to Concord, Mass., from England in 1639.

             Marvin’s mother was Asenath Powers, daughter of Joseph Powers, Jr., and Abigail Benjamin, and herself of the fifth generation descended from Walter Power (La Poer) of England who landed at Salem, Mass., in 1664.  The La Poer family is as old as William the Conqueror, one of whose officers bore that name at the Battle of Hastings, as appears on the roll of survivors in Battle Abbey.

             In 1812 Marvin Blood enlisted in the Vermont detached militia, U.S. Service.  Family history records that he reached the rank of major in the Vermont State Militia and his son, Sylvester Henry Blood, my father, often told me that he and the other children played with their father’s epaulettes until they wore them out.  He was addressed as Major Blood by all who knew him.  I never heard my mother call his name in any other way.

             I have the following letter written by the Adjutant General of Vermont:

Montpelier, Vt., July 9, 1932

Dear Mrs. Toler:

             Replying to your letter of July 4, I take pleasure in sending you herewith a transcript of the service of Marvin Blood as it appears on our records of the War of 1812.

             I am unable to find any record that would prove the service of Marvin Blood in the Militia following the War of 1812, for the reason that from 1814 to 1888 there are practically no records in this office on the Militia that existed at that time.  I think the facts stated in your letter are excellent evidence that he did serve in the State Militia and reached the grade of Major.  I am sorry to say there are no records that would absolutely prove this.

Very truly,

Herbert T. Johnson

The Adjutant General

             Following is the transcript of service:

             “I hereby certify that the following is a current transcript from the records on file in this office, regarding soldiers who served in the War of 1812-1814. Extract:

             MARVIN BLOOD (private) served in Captain Phelps’ Company, Col. Jonathan Williams’ Regiment, Detached Militia.  U.S. Service, 1812.

             H. T. Johnson, Adjutant General

             When this marker was inscribed the Government officials, Veterans Department, from the evidence presented, omitted the word, “Private” from the inscription.

             Marvin Blood was married in Vermont in 1815 to Martha Cabot, daughter of Francis Cabot, a Revolutionary War soldier and Patriot.  They were the parents of nine children.  Their first child was born in Vermont; all the others in New York State.

             In the summer of 1637, just one hundred years ago, Marvin Blood and his friend, Samuel Hix, built at Olean Point, N.Y., two flatboats.  That fall with each in command of a boat they and their families with a number of their neighbors and their families, wended their way from Olean Point down the Alleghany River to Pittsburgh, Pa. where the Alleghany and the Monongahela meet to form the Ohio, then on down the Ohio, through the Locks at Cincinnati, and on to Mt. Vernon, Ind., where they landed.  Marvin and his family crossed the Big Wabash at or near New Harmony and moved into Illinois, settling on the Little Wabash and naming the place Bennington for Bennington, Vt.  Here he lived the trying life of a pioneer for the remaining twenty-two years of his life.  The old homestead is still in possession of his descendants.

Grace Cabot (Blood) Toler

 

Young Man Drowned Sunday Afternoon at Dam 53

             Leon Leonard Test, of Vienna, age 30, was drowned Sunday afternoon at Dam 53 while swimming near the locks with a party of friends.  He was considered a good swimmer.  The accident occurred about 4:45 o’clock and Test’s body was recovered at 6:32. 

             Coroner Otis T. Hudson conducted an inquest, the jury returning a verdict of accidental drowning.  Among those who testified were Archie ___, Ray Sanders and Lawrence Sanders.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Jun 1937: 

FORMER SLAVE FILES SUIT FOR DIVORCE

(Golconda Herald Enterprise)

             According to a dispatch from Elizabethtown, Ill., Harry Whitehead, 97, former slave and veteran of the Civil War, has applied for divorce from his wife, Anna, 84, another former slave.  The pair was married September 11, 1907.

             Mrs. Whitehead, who, like her husband, had been married once before, left Elizabethtown in June, 1936, to live with her son, Willard, in Anderson, Ind.

             Harry Whitehead was born on a plantation in Virginia, May 29, 1840.  He served his master, James Whitehead, until he was 20.  Then he ran away and joined the Union Army at Chattanooga, Tenn.  He served two years and ten months in the army.

             Eight months before the end of the war, he was captured by Hood’s Army at Dalton, Ga., and held a prisoner.  He mustered out of the Union army at Nashville, Tenn., in 1865.

             In 1868, Whitehead arrived at Elizabethtown, and a year later he married Melia Austin.  They had 11 children, three of whom are living.  The marriage license was issued to “Uncle Harry” and “Melia” by James McFarland, first county clerk of Hardin County.

             (His death certificate states that Harry Whitehead was born 29 May 1839, in Georgia, died 21 Jul 1937, in Elizabethtown, Hardin Co., Ill., divorced, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Elizabethtown, Hardin Co., Ill.  He filed for a pension in 1889 for service in Co. F, 44th U.S. Colored Infantry.  His military record states he was taken a prisoner of war on 13 Oct 1864 and remained a prisoner in May 1865.  His application for a military headstone states he was born in Virginia, enlisted 13 Jul 1864 in Tennessee and was honorably discharged 30 Apr 1866.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT MARY ANN MEYER DIES

             Mary Ann Meyer, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Meyer, of Karnak, died at their home Wednesday night.  Her death is mourned by her parents, two sisters, Margaret Jabonsky and Pauline Meyer; and two brothers, Herman and Carl Meyer, all of Karnak.

             The funeral services were held at the home June 18, and burial was in the Ohio Cemetery east of Grand Chain.  Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

 

PROMINENT MOUND CITY MAN DIES

             John Frederick Hoffman, more popularly known as “Fred” Hoffman, died at the home of Mrs. Pete Mason in Cairo, Wednesday evening.  He has been living with the Masons since the flood.

             Mr. Hoffman, who was 62 years old, was born in Mound City and has lived here all his life.  Until Prohibition he was a saloon keeper; then he opened a dry goods store and was in business until a few years ago, when he retired.  His health has been failing, due to a weak heart, for quite some time and he has been confined to his home for the past two weeks.

             He leaves three daughters:  Mrs. Albert Parker and Mrs. Bernard Miller of Mound City, and Mrs. Charles Cowles of Mounds and a sister, Mrs. Hargan of Miller City.

             The services will be held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Albert Parker, Friday, June 25, at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Klose of the Church of the Redeemer at Cairo will officiate.  Burial will be at Beech Grove Cemetery, where Mrs. Hoffman was laid to rest a few years ago.

       G. A. James has charge of the arrangements.

       (Henry C. Hoffman married Lucy J. Cockrum on 23 Jan 1859, in Perry Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John Frederick Hoffman was born about 1875, the son of Henry Hoffman and Lucy Jane Cochran, died 23 Jun 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Elizabeth M. Hoffman.  His marker in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  John F. Hoffman 1874-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

REGRETS LOSING HER THIRD SET OF TEETH

             The only regret that Aunt Mary Stewart, living near Greencastle, Ind., had as she headed toward her 104th birthday was that about all of her third set of teeth have been pulled.

             “I don’t care about the looks, but it is just the discomfort of trying to eat three square meals a day without teeth,” she said.  She lost her second set of teeth twenty years ago.

             “I guess hard work and living a simple life have helped me to live so long,” she declared.  “You’ll think I’m lying, but I never had a cent in my hand until I was 30 years old, and then a man gave me a two-cent piece.  Sometime before that I won $10 in a contest, but my dad took charge of that money.

             Aunt Mary, who will be 104 September 17th, lives alone and does all her own work.—Golconda Herald Enterprise

 

ANOTHER DROWNING AT DAM 53

             Leon L. Test, 30 years of age, drowned at Dam 53 last Sunday afternoon while swimming near the locks.  Apparently he was caught in an eddy which sucked him under and held him, for the victim was considered an excellent swimmer.

             Test had been in the water only about ten minutes when he was taken under.  A lady standing nearby, saw him go down and when he failed to come up, called the attention of others to that fact.  Thinking that Test was only trying his ability to stay under the water, little alarm was felt at first.  However, when the time passed that he could possibly stay down, and he failed to show up, a search was begun.  About two hours later his body was found.  Efforts to revive him were futile.

             The coroner’s jury, which returned a verdict of accidental drowning, was composed of C. D. Vaughn, George F. Hollis, John Ledbetter, Charles Burkstaller and W. E. Shaw.

             (His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads: Leon Leonard son of Hattie & Benjamin Test 1906-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ELCO MAN DIES

George Savage, of Elco, died Sunday afternoon at St. Mary's Infirmary after a long illness.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Stainforth's Funeral Home.  Burial was at Thistlewood Cemetery.

(His death certificate states that George Savage was born about 1875 and died 20 Jun 1937, in Cairo, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PLOWS FURROW AS STRAIGHT AS REST

Robert Glover, a colored hired hand on the farm of Dee H. Leidigh of Villa Ridge, plowed his last furrow before he dropped dead Monday as straight as any he had ever plowed.  Apparently, death struck instantly and he merely toppled back, jerking the lines slightly as he dropped, which halted the team.

Glover was 62 years of age and had been working on the Leidigh farm off and on since 1910.

 

MRS. MYRTLE MATHENY PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Myrtle Matheny, 44, formerly of Karnak and Belknap, died at Wood River Tuesday June 15, as the result of complications from the extraction of a tooth.

The services officiated by Rev. Earl Throgmorton, of Karnak, were held Friday, June 18, at the home of Mrs. Miller at Belknap.  Interment as made in the Masonic Cemetery.

Mrs. Matheny is survived by her husband, Oda; her mother, Mrs. Linsey of New Columbia; and two children, Robert and Dana.

Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

(Her marker in Belknap Masonic Cemetery reads:  Myrtle E. Matheny 1892-1937 Oda L. Matheny 1896-1951.—Darrel Dexter)

 

C. F. Kendall was called to Saginaw, Mich., by the death of his nephew, Henry Counselman. (Olmsted)

             (He was allegedly struck by a sheriff’s auto.  A marker in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Saginaw, Mich., reads:  Henry W. Counselman Jan. 10, 1914 June 18, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Jul 1937:
INFANT SON DIES

James Gordon, 7-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. James T. Malley of Mounds, died at the home of his parents Saturday afternoon.

Those mourning his death, besides his parents, are his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Woodney, of Unity and Mr. and Mrs. John Malley of Mounds and many other relatives.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Malley, with Rev. Smith of Olive Branch officiating.  He was laid to rest in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Pallbearers were Edward Traves, Billy Brown, Billy Denham and Ernest Denham.

(His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  James Gordon Malley Dec. 5, 1936 June 26, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

METROPOLIS BOY HIT BY BALL DIES

Clyde Eugene Carvel, 16-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Carvel of Metropolis, died in the I. C. hospital in Paducah Tuesday morning from injuries received Sunday afternoon when he was hit on the head by a baseball, when a ball pitched by one of the players hit a post and glanced, hitting the youth.—Brookport Independent

(His death certificate states that Clyde Eugene Carvel of Metropolis, Ill., was born 27 Apr 1921, in Illinois, the son of Thomas Carvel and Dena Elliott, natives of Illinois, and died 22 Jun 1937, at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., of a skull fracture after being struck by a thrown baseball in a public place at Metropolis, Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Marion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Jul 1937: 

Mrs. G. W. Jones

             Mrs. Frances Wiggin Jones, age 78 years, widow of the late G. W. Jones, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ella Walker, near Goreville Saturday night, June 26, at eleven o’clock after a brief illness.

             Surviving are two children, G. Harry Jones of Carbondale and Mrs. Ella Walker, who lives on the old home place near Goreville; three grandchildren, Dean Jones, Mrs. Trecil Jones Kraus of Murphysboro and Mrs. Mary Vera Jones Brown of West Vienna; two great-grandchildren, and one brother, M. C. Wiggins of Goreville.

             Following the death of her husband, Mrs. Jones made her home alternately with her son and daughter.

             Funeral services were held Monday with burial in Friendship Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

             (Her marker in Friendship Cemetery near Dongola, Union Co., Ill., reads:  G. W. Jones 1857-1929 Frances Jones 1859-1937 We Will Meet In Heaven.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Lucinda Lackey Aldred Dies in Her 90th Year

             Mrs. Lucinda Ellen Lackey Aldred of Pulaski died at her home early Tuesday morning, June 29th, at the age of 89 years, 5 months and 13 days.  She was the daughter of Alfred Lackey and was born January 11, 1848.  Mrs. Lackey had been ill for about four months.  She was known as “Aunt Cindy” to her relatives and many friends.

Surviving are five children, A. W. Aldred of Pulaski, Mrs. Abbie L. Costley of Cairo, C. E. Aldred of Raymondville, Texas, E. J. Aldred of Cairo and Mrs. Laura Nolan of St. Louis; also many grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.  Her husband, James Aldred, died 27 years ago.

             Mrs. Aldred came from a pioneer family.  Her grandfather, Thomas Lackey, came to Illinois with his family from North Carolina by ox team in 1822.  His son Joel Lackey was born in North Carolina and came with his father to Illinois.  Somewhere between 1834 and 1850 Joel built a house east of Pulaski, which is still standing.  Family tradition has it that Abraham Lincoln was a visitor in that house as he rode on horseback either from Shawneetown or Old Caledonia, county set of Pulaski County, from 1843 to 1861.  The road traveled at that time went past the Lackey homestead.

             On February 28, 1936, Mrs. J. P. Schuh and Mrs. O. L. Herbert of Cairo and Mrs. William L. Toler, members of the historical research committee of the Egyptian Chapter of D. A. R., visited Mrs. Aldred who told them of her memories of the Lincoln visit to her Uncle Joel’s home.  She said that Lincoln addressed a crowd that had gathered there and that her father held her in his arms that she might the better see the man who afterward became President Lincoln.  She could not remember her exact age at the time.  She said that later her Uncle Joel accompanied Lincoln on horseback away from the Lackey home to some point on his journey westward.

             Funeral services for Mrs. Aldred were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church with the Rev. Mr. Thomas officiating.  Burial was made in Rosehill Cemetery.

 

Infant Dies

James Gordon Malley, seven months old son of Mr. and Mrs. James T. Malley, died Saturday, June 26, at the home of his parents.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Jul 1937: 

Mrs. J. C. Mench Dies in Childress, Texas

             Mrs. J. C. Mench, long a resident of Mounds before going to Texas to reside, passed away Saturday, July 3, at her home in Childress, Texas, following an extended illness.

             She is survived by her husband, for many years secretary of the Mounds Railroad Y. M. C. A., two sons, Logan of Mounds and Charles of Roswell, New Mexico; one daughter, Mrs. Percy Hunt of Mounds; also three grandchildren.

             During Mrs. Mench’s service as Y. M. C. A. secretary, Mrs. Mench devoted much of her time to the work in the office and in many religious services using her musical talent as accompanist for the singers.  Both were noted for their devotion to the sick and afflicted.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Alton, Ill., her old home.

 

Former First Lady of Illinois Called by Death

             Mrs. Florence Pullman Lowden, wife of the former Governor Frank O. Lowden, was found dead early Monday morning at the Lowden Sinisippi farm home near Oregon, Ill.  The Lowdens had returned May 20 from a trip to Europe.

             She was the daughter of George M. Pullman of car fame and wealth.  She is survived by her husband and four children.

             (Her death certificate states that Florence Pullman Lowden was born 11 Aug 1868, in Chicago, Ill., the daughter of George M. Pullman, a native of Brockton, N.Y., and Hattie Sawyer, a native of St. Louis, Mo., died 5 Jul 1937, in Nashua, Ogle Co., Ill., the wife of Frank O. Lowden, and was buried in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill.  Her marker in Graceland Cemetery in Chicago reads:  Florence Pullman wife of Frank O. Lowden Aug. 14, 1868 July 5, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Lucinda Fain

             Mrs. Lucinda Fain, age 78 years, of Karnak, widow of the late William Marshall Fain, died Friday, July 2.

             Surviving are the following children:  Charles Fain of Paducah, Mrs. Viola Woody of St. Louis, Mrs. Sadie Tucker of Karnak, Mrs. Bertha Brown of Buncombe, and Howard Fain of St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Cynthia Harrell of Piggott, Ark.  For the past year Mrs. Fain has resided in Karnak with her daughter, Mrs. Sadie Tucker.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Belknap at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon, with Rev. Metcalf officiating.  Interment was made in Masonic cemetery at Belknap.

             Pallbearers were Leslie Barnett, Ray Hutton, Gilbert Hanle, and Earl Throgmorton.  Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (William M. Fain married Lucinda Penrod on 29 Oct 1876, in Union Co., Ill.  David Penrod married Tempie Keller on 14 Oct 1832, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Lucinda Fain was born 17 Oct 1858, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Allen Penrod, a native of Georgia, and Tempie Keller, died 2 Jul 1937, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of William Marshall Fain, and was buried at Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Belknap Masonic Cemetery reads:  Lucinda Fain 1859-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Jul 1937:
EUGENE JACKSON DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

Eugene Warren Jackson, son of Dr. and Mrs. L. L. Jackson, of Vienna found peace and rest after long suffering, Sunday evening, July 4th.

He was born in Carrier Mills, Ill., March 18, 1911.  His parents moved from Marion, Ill., to Mound City when Eugene was in his sophomore year in high school.  He was prominent in school activities
and graduated in 1928 with a good academic standing.  His parents moved to Vienna, but Eugene stayed in Mound City until his graduation, after which he joined them.  He studied law at the University of
Illinois and later accepted a position with the federal government at Washington, D.C., which position he held until illness necessitates his resignation.  He then returned to Vienna and while under his father's care there, he was advised to go to Ottawa to the sanitarium.

From there he was taken to New Mexico and received the best of medical attention, but to no avail.  Realizing the futileness of medical care, and the seriousness of his condition he requested to be brought
home.

He leaves his parents, two brothers, Lowell of Vienna, and Gale of New Mexico; one sister, Miss Juanita of Vienna; his grandfather, C. L. Buchanan, of Bernie, Mo., and other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the First Methodist Church in Vienna.  Interment was made at the Vienna Fraternal Cemetery.  Wilson Murrie Funeral Service was in charge of the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Eugene Warren Jackson, filing clerk, was born 18 Mar 1911, in Carrier Mills, Ill., the son of L. L. Jackson, a native of Carrier Mills, Ill., and Mable Buchanan, a native of Stonepark, Ill., died 4 Jul 1937, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Eugene Warren Jackson 1911-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

DROWNING AT CAIRO

Juanita Barksdale, 11 years of age, of DuQuoin, drowned at Cairo Sunday about noon when the canoe in which she was riding with others turned over.  She fell into deep water and was never seen.  John Stucher, shoe repairman, who was operating the canoe, a sister, Helen, 9, and a cousin, Virginia Verble of Anna, 15, clung to Stucker and the canoe until rivermen reached them, and barely in time.  Stucker was trying to save both girls and they had pulled him under once or twice and he was going under again when reached by the river men in a boat and hauled to the surface by the hair of the head.

(Her death certificate states that Juanita Lucille Barksdale, of DuQuoin, Perry Co., Ill., was born 3 Nov 1925, in Anna, Ill., the daughter of Curtis Barksdale and Ollie Carter, natives of Anna, Ill., died 4 Jul 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Casper Cemetery near Anna, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Juanita L. Barksdale Nov 3, 1925 July 4, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

LLOYD GALBRAITH KILLED IN AUTO CRASH

Lloyd Galbraith, age 19 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Galbraith, was killed in an automobile accident Sunday, July 4, near Willow Springs, Ill.

Mr. and Mrs. Galbraith and family were residents of Mound City until the recent flood when they moved to Cairo.

Lloyd was reared in Mound City and graduated from the Mound City Community High School in 1934, after which he enlisted in the C. C. C. and was at Camp in Willow Springs when the accident occurred. While in camp he travels a distance of some 20 miles to pursue his studies at night school in Chicago.

Besides his parents, he leaves two brothers, Marion, of Washington, D.C. and Robert of St. Jose, Calif.; one sister, Mrs. Evelyn Soldere, of Sciotoville, Ohio; and many other relatives and friends.
The services were held at Karcher Brothers Funeral Home in Cairo at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon.  Interment was made in Mounds.

The pallbearers were selected from his classmates at Mound City.

(His death certificate states that Lloyd Galbraith, a chauffeur, of 436 W. 8th St., Cairo, Ill., was born 31 Oct 1916, in America, Ill., died 5 Jul 1937, in Justice Park, Cook Co., Ill., and was buried in Cairo Cemetery.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill., reads:  Lloyd Galbraith 1917-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. J. C. MENCH PASSES AWAY AT CHILDRESS, TEXAS

Mrs. J. C. Mench, wife of J. C. Mench, formerly of Mounds, passed away at the home of her son, Charles in Childress, Texas, Saturday morning about 5 o'clock.  Mrs. Mench's death was not unexpected as she had been ill for many months.  She was a beautiful Christian character and had many friends in Mounds and Pulaski County.

She leaves to mourn her passing her husband, J. C. Mench; daughter Mrs. Percy Hunt, of Mounds; and two sons, Logan of Mounds, and Charles of Childress, Texas.

The body was taken to Alton for burial.

(Jacob C. Mench married Mary Jeannette Logan on 5 Jul 1899, in Madison Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mrs. Mary Jeanette Mench, of 507 Ave. A, Childress, Texas, was born 29 May 1864, in Illinois, the daughter of D. D. Logan, a native of Alabama, and Suzan Hendrick, a native of Kentucky, died 3 Jul 1937, in Childress, Childress Co., Texas, of hypostatic pneumonia, the wife of J. C. Mench, and was buried in Alton, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Jul 1937:
MRS. JOHN L. MARTIN OF OLMSTEAD PASSES AWAY

Jennie Martin, wife of John L. Martin of Olmsted, died Thursday at 8:00 o'clock a.m.  She leaves her husband, John L. Martin, and one daughter, Mrs. Grace Comstock, of Carbondale, Illinois.  Mrs. Martin was a daughter of the late J. W. Hood, a pioneer merchant of Olmsted.

She was a sister of the late Judge Fred Hood of Mound City and the late Judge Harry Hood of Cairo.
The funeral will be held at the Methodist church at Olmsted at 1:00 o'clock p.m. Sunday and interment at the Russell Cemetery about a mile and a half west of Carterville, Illinois.  Wilson Funeral Service of
Karnak will be in charge of the funeral.

(According to her death certificate, Virginia Frances Martin was born 9 Aug 1867, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of J. W. Hood, and died 15 Jul 1937, in Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of John W. Martin, and was buried in Williamson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Russell Cemetery in Williamson Co., Ill., reads:  John L. Martin 1862-1946 Virginia F. Martin 1867-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

DIES FROM INJURIES

Mrs. Elizabeth Cox, living near Tamms, died soon after being struck by a car driven by Lester Bean of Mounds on Wednesday of last week.

She was 85 years old and stepped, the testimony showed, into the road in the path of the coming car just as another car moved out.

(Her death certificate states that Elizabeth Cox, of Tamms, Ill., was born 22 Jun 1852, in Wayne City, Ill., the daughter of Elizabeth Harlen, died 7 Jul 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Delta Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.  She was the wife of Socratis H. Cox, who was born Nov. 19, 1855, and died Dec. 31, 1928.  Her marker there reads:  Elizebeth Cox Jan. 22, 1855 July 7, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

INFANT DIES

Judith Ann Bierbaum, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Bierbaum, of Olmsted, born Tuesday morning, died Tuesday night at 8 o'clock.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon from the residence.

Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead, with G. A. James in charge.

(Her death certificate states that Judith Ann Bierbaum was born 13 Jul 1937, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of Otto Bierbaum, a native of Germany, and Wilmont Crippen, a native of Ullin, Ill., died 13 Jul 1937, in Olmstead, Ill., and was buried in Olmstead, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

LOUIS J. EGNER DIES NEAR DAM 53

Louis J. Egner died at his home near Dam 53 Tuesday morning after an illness of several months.
Funeral services were held at Concord Cemetery at Olmstead Wednesday afternoon.

Karcher Brothers were in charge.

(His death certificate states that Louis J. Egner, farmer, was born 11 Jul 1888, in Illinois, the son of August Egner and Elizabeth Huffman, a native of St. Louis, Mo., died 13 Jul 1937, in Olmstead, Ill., the husband of Pearl Egner, and was buried at Olmstead.—Darrel Dexter)

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Jul 1937: 

Louis J. Egner

             Louis J. Egner, 49, died Tuesday, July 13, at his home near Dam 53 after a lingering illness.

             Surviving are three daughters, Ethel May, 17, Betty, 9, and Clara, 7; one son, Louis Wayne, 15; three stepchildren, Robert Greer of Cairo, Mrs. Opal Greer and Miss Edna Greer of Junction City; his mother, Mrs. August Egner of Olmstead; one sister, Mrs. Lawrence Harman of Ullin; and one brother, August Egner of Chicago.

             Funeral services and burial were held at Concord Cemetery Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

 

Tragic Drowning in Mississippi at Cairo

             Frank Richard Dresden, 38, a fisherman met death by drowning in the Mississippi River Monday under unusual circumstances.  Dresden had been employed to stand by in a boat beneath the Mississippi River bridge for the rescue of painters working on the bridge in case one should fall into the river.  The high waves made by a passing steamboat swept over his small boat and Dresden was thrown into the water, the accident occurring about 10:30 a.m. Monday.  The boat was anchored, but he evidently drifted too far away from it to regain it.  With an oar in each hand he buffeted the waves and kept afloat for some time.

             Miss Rosa Willing, 18, daughter of Frank Willing, another fisherman, jumped into another boat and rowed within 30 yards of Dresden, who was all the time being carried downstream.  When he saw the girl he turned loose of one oar and raised the free hand, calling, “Hi.”  He must have been too exhausted to recover the oar and unable to hold himself afloat, as he soon sank and she never saw him again.  With hands blistered and the hot sun beaming down on her, the girl covered the place where she had last seen him and recovered one oar and finally the other, the last one near Wickliffe, Ky.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Jul 1937: 

Mrs. Ira Wise

             Mrs. Ada Belle Wise, age 54, wife of Ira Wise of Olmstead, died at her home Tuesday morning, July 20, following a three weeks’ illness.

             She leaves her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Rutherman, Mrs. Sybil Copeland, Miss Mary __ Wise; one son, Kenneth Wise, of Olmstead; three sisters, Mrs. __nie Kendell of Vienna, Mrs. Ola ___ter of Harrisburg and Mrs. Lulu __rkley of Benton; also one brother, Robert Wickam of Vienna.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. Church South, of which she was a devout member.  The Rev. D. B. ___ce officiated.  Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead, _ A. James directing.

 

Mother of Mrs. P. T. Langan Dies Suddenly Tuesday Morning

             Mrs. Frances Chrest Rennie of Cairo, widow of the late James E. Rennie, died Tuesday morning at nine o’clock following a heart attack at her home, 507 Twenty-eighth Street.

             Mrs. Rennie was born July 29, 1850, in Springfield, Ohio, removing to Cairo at the time of her marriage.  Mr. Rennie died a little more than a year ago and Mrs. Rennie had continued to reside at the home in which they had spent so many years.  She was alert mentally and able to go about until the day of her death.

             She was an active member of the Egyptian Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution and attended the last meeting of the year, held on Flag Day, June 14.

             She leaves one daughter, Mrs. P. T. Langan of Cairo; one brother, George Chrest of St. Paul, Minn.; seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the residence, the Rev. C. Robert Dunlap of the Lutheran Church officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery, her grandsons serving as casket bearers.

             (According to her death certificate, Frances Chrest Rennie was born 29 Jul 1850, in Springfield, Ill., the daughter of Jacob P. Chrest, a native of Hagerstown, Md., and Sarah Jane Athen, a native of Springfield, Ohio, died 20 Jul 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of J. F. Rennie, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Frances Rennie July 29, 1849 July 20, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Dr. William J. Whitaker

             Dr. William J. Whitaker, 65, died at his home in Dongola Saturday morning, July 17.  Dr. Whitaker had been practicing medicine in Southern Illinois for 37 years and had been located at Dongola for the past six years.

             He leaves his wife; one son, Hall Whitaker of Dongola; four sisters, Mrs. Arleta McElroy, Harrisburg, Mrs. Martha Burris and Mrs. Geneva Brown of Vienna, Mrs. A. L. Compton of Marion.  He was a prominent member of the Masonic Lodge and of the M. E. Church at Harrisburg.

             Burial was made at Vienna Sunday afternoon.

 

Mrs. John L. Martin of Olmstead Dies July 15

             Mrs. Virginia Martin, wife of John L. Martin of Olmstead, died at her home at eight o’clock Thursday morning, July 15, at the age of 69 years.  Her health had been failing for the past five years.

             Surviving are her husband and one daughter, Mrs. Grace Comstock of Carbondale.

             Funeral services were held at the M. E. church in Olmstead Sunday afternoon at one o’clock, the Rev. Kezee officiating.  Mrs. Martin had been active in the work of this church.  Burial was in Russell Cemetery two miles west of Carterville, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Stern and Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Atherton attended the funeral of Dr. W. J. Whitaker of Dongola who was buried at Vienna Sunday.

 

Mrs. L. Hodge and son Roy were called to Bay City Sunday to attend the funeral of the former’s nephew, Dewey Weeks.

             (His death certificate states that Dewey Weeks, Jr., was born 29 Jan 1932, in New Liberty, Pope Co., Ill., the son of Dewey Weeks and Mary Henretta Johnson, natives of Illinois, died 16 Jul 1937, in Golconda, Pope Co., Ill.  His marker in Azotus Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill., reads:  Dewey Jr. Weeks Jan. 29, 1937 July 16, 1937 He Was The Sunshine Of Our Home.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Jul 1937:
MRS. ADA BELLE WISE DIES AT HER HOME IN OLMSTEAD

Mrs. Ada Belle Wise, age 54, wife of Ira Wise, died at her home in Olmstead Tuesday morning, July 20, following an illness of three weeks.

Besides her husband, she leaves three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Ruth___man, Mrs. Sybil Copeland, Miss Mary Lou Wise; one son, Kenneth Wise, all of Olmstead, and many other relatives.

Services were held Thursday at the M. E. Church South of Olmsted by Rev. D. B. Kazee officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted.

G. A. James was in charge of the arrangements.

(James J. Wickhaus married Amanda M. Darter on 3 Dec 1874, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Ada Belle Wise was born 30 Jan 1883, in Bloomfield, Ill., the daughter of James Wickham and Amanda Darter, native of Illinois, died 20 Jul 1937, in Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Ira Wise.  Her marker in Olmsted Masonic Cemetery reads:  Ada Belle Wise Jan. 30, 1883 Sept. 20, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

LIGHTNING KILLS GIRL

Miss Benita Schneider, 18 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Schneider, of DuQuoin, was killed by a bolt of lightning during an electrical storm, Thursday, July 15.

Surviving, in addition to her parents, are two brothers, Harold and Melvin; and two sisters, Florine and Pauline; all of whom reside at the home of their parents.

Funeral services were conducted Monday, July 19, from the Sacred Heart Church, with Fr. C. N. Haffner in charge.  Burial was made in Sacred Heart Cemetery.

(According to her death certificate, Benita Elizabeth Schneider was born 10 Oct 1918, in DuQuoin, Ill., the daughter of George Peter Schneider and Viola Mann, natives of DuQuoin, Ill., and died 15 Jul 1937, in Perry Co., Ill., and was buried in DuQuoin, Perry Co., Ill.  She was buried in Section C-32, lot 1 in McElvain Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)


DR. W. J. WHITEAKER PASSES AWAY IN DONGOLA

Dr. William J. Whiteaker, 65, died at his home in Dongola, Saturday, July 17.  Although confined to his home a short time he had been in ill health several months.

Dr. Whiteaker had practiced for 37 years while living throughout Southern Illinois.  He resided in Pulaski for several years and in Dongola the past six years.

He leaves his wife, Mrs. Alice Whitaker; and one son, Hall of Dongola; and many other relatives and friends.  He was a brother of the late Dr. Hall Whiteaker formerly of Mound City.

Dr. Whiteaker was a member of the Caledonia Lodge No. 47 A. F. & A.M. of Pulaski, Royal Arch Masons of Cairo, Royal Neighbors and Modern Woodmen, both of Dongola.

The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the M. E. church in Vienna, conducted by the Rev. J. B. Jones, assisted by Rev. J. G. Hurley.

Caledonia Lodge No. 47 A. F. & A.M. officiated at the burial in Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna.

(William J. Whiteaker married Alice E. Mathis on 21 Nov 1900, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery states Dr. William Joseph Whiteaker was born 11 Jan 1872, and died 17 Jul 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Jul 1937:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR FARMER KILLED IN RUNAWAY ACCIDENT

Funeral services are to be held at St. Raphael's Church for Joseph Slaughter, 64, a farmer living northwest of Mounds, who was killed Tuesday night when his team ran away and he was thrown out on a road northwest of Mounds.  The accident happened about 8:30 o'clock and he lived until 2 a.m.  A broken neck or fractured skull brought death.

Residents along the road heard the team running and the wagon clattering.  They also heard him alluding to the team to quiet them.  A little later, Claude Moore, and Bertha McClellan found Slaughter in the road unconscious and injured.  They picked him up, placed him in their small truck and hauled him to the McClellan home where medical aid was summoned.

He was later moved to his own home.  He roused enough to talk, inquire about his team and complain of a terrible pain in his head.  Towards midnight he lapsed into unconsciousness and passed away.

His wife, four daughters and three sons survive.  The children are:  Mrs. Roy Volner, Mrs. Paul Essex, and Mrs. Lee Griffin, all of Alton, and Mrs. Ernest Bowles, who lives near Mounds.  Two sons, Bernard and Robert, live at Alton and Joseph, Jr., lives at Memphis.  A coroner’s inquest resulted in a verdict of accidental death.

Testimony showed that the team of mules he drove was fractious and that he had trouble with them.  The wrecked wagon and the team were evidence of what had happened.

(Joseph Henry Slaughter, 24, mechanic, born in Mound City, Ill., son of William Slaughter and Mary Reed, married on 27 Apr 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Anna E. Cheery 17, of Mound City, born in Bowling Green, Ky., daughter of R. H. Cherry and Elisabeth Reeves.  His death certificate states that Joseph Henry Slaughter, carpenter, was born 8 May 1873, in Mound City, Ill., the son of William Slaughter and Emma Reed, a native of Tennessee, and died 28 Jul 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Anna Slaughter.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. C. G. McIntire, sons Carl and Kenneth, attended the funeral services for the former's aunt, Mrs. __od, last Sunday afternoon at the Anderson Church near Boaz.

Mr. and Mrs. George Jackson were in Elco Monday, where they attended funeral services for Mrs. Jackson's grandmother, Mrs. __ndy Thompson.

(George W. Thompson married Lucinda Miller on 4 Jul 1867, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Lucienda E. Thompson was born 27 Jan 1852, in North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Miller, died 24Jul 1937, in Tamms, Alexander Co., Ill., the widow of George W. Thompson, and was buried in Miller Cemetery near Elco, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for the many courtesies, the helpful and kind acts, for the flowers and for their assistance during the illness and death of our wife and mother, Mrs. Ada Bell Wise.
Ira Wise and Children

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Jul 1937: 

Former Carbondale Boy to Hang for Murder

             Robert Kenyon, a resident of Carbondale twelve years ago, was sentenced to death by hanging Friday for the kidnapping and murder of __. J. C. B. Brown of Willow Springs, ___.

             When the verdict was heard, Kenyon asked for a cigarette and lighted it seemingly unconcerned.

             Kenyon’s father was a mechanic in Carbondale for a period of five years.

 

Mrs. Helen Post Wood

             Mrs. Helen Post Wood, 75, died at her home east of Karnak Friday night, July 23, at 10:30 o’clock following a long illness. She had been a widow for 13 years.

             She leaves four children, Mrs. August Inman, Mrs. George Walter and Otis Wood of Karnak, and Estes Wood of Grand Chain; one sister, Mrs. Cora Berry of Karnak and one brother, Willis Anderson of Grand Chain.

             Funeral services were held at the Anderson Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Mr. Isaacs of Crab Orchard officiating.  Interment was in Anderson Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral service directing.

             (Napoleon Wood married Helen Anderson on 21 Mar 1880, in Massac Co., Ill.  Newt Anderson married Nancy Castleberry on 22 May 1851, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Helen Post Woods was born 22 Aug 1861, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Newt Anderson and Nancy Castlebury, died 23 Jul 1937, in Massac Co., Ill., widow of Napoleon Wood, and was buried in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

  

Joseph Slaughter Fatally Injured by Runaway Team

             Joseph Slaughter, a farmer living near here, was fatally injured Tuesday night about 9:30 o’clock when a mule team he was driving got out of control on the road near the Clarence Taylor farm.  Mr. Slaughter was found lying in the road with his head badly injured by Bertha McClellan and Claud Moore who removed him to the McClellan home nearby and made him as comfortable as was possible while they sent for a doctor.

             Mrs. Ernest Bowles, a daughter of Mr. Slaughter, was called and he regained consciousness for brief periods, during which time he recognized his daughter.  Following the arrival of the doctor and the administration of treatment, Mr. Slaughter was removed to his home.  The seriousness of his condition was not realized until his death which occurred soon after midnight.

             Mrs. Slaughter was visiting three of her children who live in Alton and Mrs. Bowles was the only member of the immediate family present at his death.  Coroner’s jury gave a verdict of accidental death.

             He leaves his wife and seven children:  Mrs. Roy Volner, Mrs. Paul Essex, Mrs. Lee Griffin, all of Alton, and Mrs. Ernest Bowles of Mounds, Bernard and Robert Slaughter of Alton and Joseph Jr., of Memphis, Tenn.  One son died several years ago.  Also surviving are a sister, Mrs. Ed Bergman of Cairo; and two brothers, William of Cairo and George of Detroit; and nine grandchildren.  His age was 64 years.

             Funeral services will be held today (Friday) at 9 a.m. at St. Raphael’s Church with Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  The Ryan Funeral Service will direct.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Aug 1937: 

Sister of S. A. and M. M. Shifley Dies at Home in Ullin

             Mrs. Flora Belle Adkins died at her home in Ullin Saturday, July 31, at 2:30 a.m. after a three-month illness.

             Flora Belle Shifley, daughter of Elizabeth Davis Shifley and Alfred Shifley, was born near Dongola, Illinois.  In 1898 she was married to J. T. Adkins, who passed away 16 years ago.  To this union were born eight children, six of whom survive, namely:  Robert of East St. Louis, Terrill of Ullin, Blanche Rhymer of Cape Girardeau, Mo., Ferban Darett of East St. Louis, Beatrice Ragsdale and Flora Belle Brown of Ullin.  Also surviving are twelve grandchildren, three brothers, Henry Shifley of Ullin, S. A. and M. M. Shifley of Mounds; and two half brothers, William Shifley of Anna and Logan Jones of Peoria.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at three o’clock at the Ullin Baptist Church, the Rev. Mr. Peterson of Cape Girardeau officiating.  Burial was in Butteridge Cemetery, the Rhymer Funeral Service directing.

 

Memorial Service at Shiloh

             A memorial service was held at Shiloh Church Sunday, August 1st, in memory of Edward Haller, who died in the hospital at Anna, Feb. 8, during the high water.  The body was buried by G. A. James undertaker without a funeral service, as it was not convenient to have a service at that time.

             Mr. Haller was born and reared at Kokomo, Indiana.  He was 74 years old.  He was married to Mrs. Sarah Atherton, who preceded him in death about 5 years ago.  There were no children.

             He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Josie Beckum; and two nephews, William and Fred Beckum, of Kokomo, Ind.; a step-daughter, Mrs. Homer Beegle, of Mounds; a step-granddaughter, Mrs. C. W. Fuller, of Graterford, Pa.; and a step-grandson, Robert Jones, of Urbandale, Ill.

             Mr. Haller had been a Christian for 50 years and was a member of Shiloh Baptist Church.

             The service was conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola, a friend of the family.

             (His death certificate states that Edward Haller, common laborer, was born 4 Mar 1863, in White Co., Ind., the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Haller, died 8 Feb 1937, in Union Co., Ill., the widower of Elizabeth Haller, and was buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Aug 1937:
DEATHS

Flora Bell Adkins, 57, died at her home in Ullin Saturday, July 31.

She had been ill for some time.  Her husband, J. T. Adkins, died about sixteen years ago.  Surviving her are six children, Robert and Ferban Darett, of East St. Louis, Beatrice Ragsdale, Flora Belle Brown, and Terrell of Ullin; and Blanche Rhymer of Cape Girardeau, Mo.  Services were held at the First Baptist Church of Ullin.

(John Thomas Adkins, 42, of Ullin, Ill., farmer, born in Marion Co., Ala., son of Robert Adkins and Margaret Andetond, married 3rd on 15 Aug 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Flora Bell Shively, 18, of Ullin, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Alford R. Shifley and Elisabeth Davis.  Alfred C. Shiffle, 40, from Dongola, Ill., married Elizabeth Davis, 33, from Mill Creek, Ill., on 28 Dec 1876, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Flora Bell Adkins was born 15 Aug 1880, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Alfred Shifley, a native of Germany, and Elizabeth Davis, a native of North Carolina, died 31 Jul 1937, in Ullin, Ill., the widow of J. T. Adkins.  Her marker in Butter Ridge Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Flora B. Adkins Aug. 15, 1880 July 31, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

SISTER OF MOUND CITY MAN VICTIM OF INFURIATED MAN

Ernest Simpson, an employee of the Ladoga Canning Company, was called to Columbus, Ky., Wednesday morning because of the serious injuries inflicted upon his sister, Mrs. W. J. Morse, by her husband.

Morse, infuriated and probably half insane because of his wife, remonstrated about the treatment of the children, slashed the throats of three children aged one, three and five, as they lay sleeping and
plunged the knife into the back of the boy, 8 years old, five times.

The boy ran from the house and was found dead a short distance away.  He then attacked and stabbed his wife, and she was reported in a critical condition.  No word has been received here up until noon
yesterday if she would live or die.

Morse is said to be an ex-soldier and to have been gassed in the war.  This is not verified.  He was removed from Columbus for safe keeping.
             (The death records show that the children of William J. Morse, a native of Missouri, and Jane Simpson, a native of Hickman Co., Ky., came to their death “at the hands of their father with knife wounds in body.”  They were:  Billie Lee Morse, born 6 Apr 1930, in Hickman Co., Ky., James T. Morse, born 17 Jun 1932, in Hickman Co., Ky., Inez Morse, born 10 Dec 1934, in Hickman Co., Ky., and Margaret E. Morse, born 27 Sep 1936, in Hickman Co., Ky.  They were buried in Zion Cemetery in Hickman Co., Ky., where there are markers for Billie, Ted, Inez and Martha Morse.  The one for Ted (James Theodore Morse) gives his birth as 16 Jun 1932.  The one for Inez gives her birth as 10 Dec 1933.  The one for Martha Morse records her birth as 21 Sep 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Aug 1937:
FIFTH VICTIM OF J. W. MORSE IS NOW EXPECTED TO DIE

Mrs. J. W. Morse, of Columbus, Ky., sister of Ernest Simpson of this city, is expected to die, the fifth victim of her husband who suddenly seized a knife in a fit of temper and stabbed and killed his four
children and stabbed his wife.  Pneumonia has developed; it is now thought that Mrs. Morse will die.  The tragedy happened on Wednesday of last week.

Word is now that Morse had threatened his wife about a week or so before, but at the time this happened, no violent quarrel had provoked it.  An empty bottle that had contained liquor was found, and while Morse drank little or seldom, it is thought that he was drinking when he seized a knife that had been made in Mound City by Mr. Simpson only a few weeks ago, and began stabbing and cutting the children as they lay sleeping.  The 8-year-old boy awakened to run to his mother and was stabbed.  Later his father came upon him as he lay some distance from the house and brutally trampled him to death.

INFANT DIES AT OLMSTEAD

Nadine Richards, six months old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Richards of Olmsted, died Saturday night following an illness of several weeks.

Funeral services were held at Cache Chapel with Rev. E. A. Thomas of Pulaski officiating.  Interment was made in Cache Chapel cemetery.

She leaves two small sisters besides her parents.

Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Nadine Richards was born 23 Jan 1937, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Wilbur Richards, a native of Ullin, Ill., and Erma Poole, a native of Mill Creek, Ill., died 7 Aug 1937, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Nadine Richards Jan. 23, 1937 Aug. 6, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Aug 1937: 

Brother and Sister Killed in Separate Accidents

             Rolla Ferrill, of Unionville, was killed Friday morning when his loaded coal truck rolled down grade at the home of Fowler Moseley near Unionville.

             Ferrill had left the truck cab when the truck started to roll down grade and Ferrill ran in front of it to get into the cab.  He was caught between the truck and a fence and his head, arms and legs crushed.

             Funeral services were conducted at the Unionville Christian Church Sunday afternoon by Rev. J. D. Waters, followed by interment in the Pell Cemetery here by Undertaker W. P. Baynes.

             An inquest was held by Coroner W. P. Baynes and a verdict of accidental death was returned.

             A sister of Mr. Ferrill, Mrs. Alda Ferrill Devers, 54, wife of Charles Devers of Hodgenville, Ky., was killed en route to attend the funeral of her brother, when the car in which she was riding overturned four times 12 miles east of Henderson.              Brookport Independent

             (When he registered for the draft, Rolla Rhyne Ferrill, of Unionville, Massac Co., Ill., stated he was born 18 Feb 1884, and was a blacksmith and a miller.  His death certificate states that Rolla R. Ferrill, truck driver, of Brookport, Massac Co., Ill., was born 18 Feb 1885, in Kentucky, the son of Betty B. Gardner, a native of West Virginia, died 30 Jul 1937, in Road District 1, Massac Co., Ill., husband of Lucille Ferrill, and was buried in Pell Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.  Her marker in Red Hill Cemetery in Hodgenville, Larue Co., Ky., reads:  Alda wife of C. W. Dever 1877-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of Mrs. Ada Stone Dies at Home in Kansas

             Word has been received from Mrs. Ada Stone of the death of her mother, Mrs. Kathyrn Lyerla of Chrestline, Kansas, who was known in this vicinity, having visited her daughter here at various times.  Mrs. Stone was called to Chrestline last week by her mother’s serious illness.

             (Her marker in Park Cemetery, Columbus, Cherokee Co., Kan., reads:  Mother Kathyrn S. Lyerla 1851-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Aug 1937: 

Mrs. W. O. Peeler

             Mrs. Stella Peeler, age 63 years, died Thursday morning, August 5, at her home in Cypress following a long illness. She was an active member of the M. E. Church.

             She leaves her husband, W. O. Peeler; three sons, Dr. William R. Peeler of Dayton, Ohio, E. L. Peeler of Karnak, Luther Peeler of West Carrollton, Ohio; one daughter, Mrs. O. D. Hunter of Cypress; her mother, Malinda Sowers of Ullin; three sisters, Mrs. Garl Hartman of Dongola, Mrs. Ray Mowery of Ullin and Mrs. William Shelton of Pontiac, Mich.; three brothers Rev. T. B. Sowers of Greenville, Roy Sowers of Dix, and Seth Sowers of St. Louis.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Cypress, with Rev. Lee Darnell of West Frankfort officiating, assisted by Rev. Earl Meyer of Cypress.  Burial was in the Masonic Cemetery at Cypress.

             Methodist ministers served as casket bearers under the direction of the Wilson Funeral Service.

             (W. O. Peeler married on 28 May 1893, in Johnson Co., Ill., Flora S. Sowers.  Her death certificate states that Flora Estella Peeler was born 17 Jun 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Eli Sowers, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., and Malinda Braddy, a native of Alexander Co., Ill., died 12 Aug 1937, in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., the wife of W. O. Peeler, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery at Cypress.  Her marker there reads:  At Rest Father William O. Peeler 1873-1959 Mother Flora E. Peeler 1874-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Virginia Bristol

             Mrs. Virginia W. Bristol, who died Sunday morning at the Methodist Old Folks Home at Lawrenceville, was brought to Mounds Tuesday morning and taken to the James Funeral Home.  Funeral services were held at 1:30 o’clock that afternoon at Beech Grove Cemetery, Rev. Robert Morrin, superintendent of the Old Folks Home, officiating, assisted by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the local M. E. Church.  Mrs. Bristol was a former resident of Cairo.

             (Her death certificate states that Virginia W. Bristol was born 24 Feb 1864, in McClure, Ill., the daughter of John Bracken, a native of South Carolina, and Isabelle Wiseman, a native of Illinois, died 15 Aug 1937, at the M. E. Old Folks Home in Lawrenceville, Lawrence Co., Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

            

Mrs. Mary E. Trott Dies at Home of Her Daughter

             Mrs. Mary E. Trott, age 85, died Wednesday, August 4, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otto Ohmart, following a long illness.  The immediate cause of her death was a paralytic stroke.  She had made her home with her daughter for the past eleven years.  A number of years ago she lost her eyesight, but was able to get about the home quite well.  She had been a member of the Methodist church since childhood.

             Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Ohmart of this city and Mrs. Elizabeth Martin of Paris, Ill.; two sons, W. F. Trott of Evansville, Ind., and J. S. Trott, of Paris.  W. F. was with her at the time of her death.  Also surviving are eighteen grandchildren and seventeen great-grandchildren.

             Brief services were held Thursday afternoon at the G. A. James Funeral Home with P. R. Glotfelty, M. E. pastor, officiating, after which the body was sent to Paris, Ill., via the New York Central Railroad, Mr. and Mrs. Ohmart and family and W. F. Trott driving through by auto to Paris where services were held and burial made on Friday by the side of her husband, who died in 1918.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Aug 1937:
KILLS MAN RESISTING ARREST

John Arms, policeman at Johnston City, shot and killed last week, Curtis Williams, 40 years of age, when he resisted arrest, according to Johnston City papers.  Arms had gone to the house to serve a
warrant when Williams threatened him with a razor and started toward him.  Arms fired three times and killed him.  The coroner’s jury exonerated the policeman.  The deceased man had recently returned from
Vandalia where he served a short term.  A wife and four children survive.

(His death certificate states that Curtis M. Williams, a barber at Johnston City, Ill., was born 23 Jun 1902, in Karnak, Ill., the son of Monroe Williams and Laura Hays, natives of Illinois, died 10 Aug 1937, in Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Ohio Williams, and was buried in Inna, Jefferson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FALL IN BARN FATAL

Leonard Earl Penrod, 16 years old, living southwest of Vienna, was fatally injured on August 4, according to the Vienna Times, when he slid down the hay in a barn, about eight feet and hit his spine.  He and his companion started to race out of the barn to get a drink while unloading hay, and Penrod, when he did not show up, was found on the floor.  In sliding down the hay, he had turned and fallen in such a way that his back was hurt and one side was paralyzed.  He died the day after the fall.

(The death certificate of Leonard Earl Penrod states that he was born 13 Sep 1921, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Millie Penrod and Veira Morgan, natives of Vienna, Ill., and died 5 Aug 1937, in Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried four miles west of Vienna in Bridges Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Leonard E. Penrod Sept. 13, 1921 Aug. 5, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

AGED MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Mary E. Trott, aged 85 years, died Wednesday, August 11, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otto Ohmart, in Mounds.  The cause of her death was apoplexy.

She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Martin, Paris, Ill., and Mrs. Otto Ohmart, Mounds, Ill.; two sons, W. F. Trott, Evansville, Ind., and J. S. Trott, Paris, Ill.; also 18 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.

The services were Thursday afternoon at James Funeral Home in Mounds, with Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.  The body was taken to Paris, Illinois, where interment was made in Edgar Cemetery beside her husband who preceded her in death in 1918.

G. A. James was in charge of arrangements.

(According to her death certificate, Mary E Trott was born 19 Nov 1851, in Calvert Co., Md., the daughter of William Dare, a native of Maryland, died 11 Aug 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of John Trott, and was buried in Edgar Cemetery in Paris, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FORMER TEACHER DEAD

Miss Merel Rawlins of LaCenter, Ky., who formerly taught the primary grade here, in Mound City about 1930, died the first of last week at LaCenter of heart trouble.  Funeral services were Wednesday, according to word received here.

 

Several relatives and friends attended the funeral of Mrs. Flora Peeler Sunday in Cypress.  She was formerly from this place.


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Aug 1937:
PROMINENT MOUNDS MAN DIES

Clement Felix Melton, prominent businessman and school official of Mounds, for many years passed away at his home Wednesday morning.  He had been ill for several months, but the last two months found him worse.

Mr. Melton, aged 58, had lived in Mounds for 33 years and was associated with his brother, Herbert, in the grocery business on North Oak Street.  He was president of the Board of Education of School District No. 6 and a member and officer for more than 25 years.  He was re-elected last April for a one-year term.

Mr. Melton joined the Methodist Church when he was quite young and was very attentive until ill health kept him close to home.  A few weeks before his death, he was able, with the assistance of his brother, to attend church and receive communion.

Services will be held at 2:30 this afternoon with Rev. P. R. Glotfelty pastor of the M. E. church of Mounds, officiating.  He will be laid to rest in Spencer Heights Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

He is survived by his wife, Marrie; a daughter, Ruth of Effingham; four brothers, two sisters, and many other relatives.

Mr. Melton had many friends in Mounds who will sympathize with the family and mourn his death.

(His death certificate states that Clement Felix Melton, grocer, was born 16 Feb 1879, in Sharon, Tenn., the son of Matthew Melton, a native of Camden, Tenn., and Luella Ethridge, born in Paris, Tenn., died 25 Aug 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Morie Melton, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Clement F. Melton 1879-1937 Morie E. Melton 1880-1950.—Darrel Dexter)

LUFKIN MOSES DIED OF INJURIES IN AUTO WRECK

Lufkin Moses, 18 years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Moses, of Mounds, died Wednesday morning about 8 o'clock at St. Mary's Infirmary in Cairo of injuries received about midnight Sunday in an automobile accident near Sikeston, Mo.  The car struck an object or dodged and hit a small culvert.

With him at the time were his parents, his sister, Miss Cassie, and Miss Geneva Hamaway, of New York, and Miss Luefta Boalby and Miss Hanna Joe of Cairo.  The youth, who was driving, suffered a broken leg, crushed chest, concussion of the brain and a broken jaw.  The chest injury contributed much towards his death.

Miss Boalby had a broken shoulder, Miss Joe was cut about the head and Miss Cassie had a broken rib.

The accident rolled the car over and smashed it until it is little wonder that others were not killed and more seriously hurt.

Lufkin was a senior this year in the high school.  His funeral will be this morning from the Catholic church at Mounds.  Besides his parents, he is survived by two sisters, Cassie and Nida, and four brothers.  The family is widely known and they have many friends to sympathize with them in their loss.

(The death certificate states that George Lufkin Moses was born 14 Aug 1919, in Mounds, Ill., the son of George W. Moses, a native of Bittegrena, Syria, and Mary Hamaway, a native of Damascus, Syria, died 25 Aug 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Son Lufkin Moses Aug. 14, 1919 Aug 25, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Aug 1937: 

C. F. Melton Dies Early Wednesday Morning

             Clement Felix Melton died Wednesday morning, August 25, at 7:20 o’clock after a long and valiant struggle to regain his health.  He had been ill for many months and had been confined to his home through the summer.  His age at death was 58 years.

             Mr. Melton was born at Sharon, Tenn., the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mathew Melton.  He came from Tennessee 33 years ago and opened a general store.  With the aid of his brother, Herbert, he has operated this business through all these years, gradually closing out most of the lines save the grocery.

             He united with the Methodist Church at the age of 13 and helped to organize the local M. E. Church, transferring his membership here.  He was superintendent of the M. E. Sunday school for many years, member of the church choir and male quartette and prominent in all church activities.

             He was president of the Board of Education of School District No. 6, having served in that capacity for a number of years and before then was a member, the entire service covering a quarter of a century.

             He is survived by his wife, Morrie McWherter Melton; a daughter Ruth, member of the high school faculty at Effingham; four brothers, Herbert of Mounds, Leonard and Gilbert of Chicago and Harvey of Trumann, Ark.; two sisters, Mrs. Lizzie Taylor of Martin, Tenn., and Mrs. Clara Chandler of Dresden, Tenn., and many other relatives less near.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Methodist church, the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor, officiating.  Burial will be made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Lufkin Moses Dies from Injuries in Motor Accident

Six Others Less Seriously Hurt When Car Strikes Bridge Abutment

             Lufkin Moses, 18, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. George Moses, was fatally injured in an auto accident which occurred Monday morning about 1 o’clock one and one-half miles east of Sikeston, Mo., when the car he was driving struck a bridge abutment and overturned as the party of seven in the Moses car was returning from Steele, Mo.

             Mr. and Mrs. Moses were riding in the front seat with Lufkin, their daughter, Cassie, a cousin, Geneva Hamaway of New York, Lutefa Boalby and Hannah Joe of Cairo in the back seat.  All were injured more or less seriously.

             Lufkin passed away early Wednesday morning at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he and his sister, Cassie, were patients.  The others had been able to return home after receiving first aid.  He suffered a crushed lower jaw, broken leg, chest injuries, brain concussion and internal hemorrhage.  Miss Cassie suffered two broken ribs and chest injuries.  Mr. Moses received a severe injury to his neck and both he and Mrs. Moses were severely bruised.  Miss Boalby received a fractured shoulder, Miss Joe and Miss Hamaway less serious injuries.

             Mr. and Mrs. Moses, their son and daughter were thrown clear of the car.  The others remained in it.

             According to reports an oil can had been dropped on the highway and Lufkin, in an effort to avoid the can, struck the bridge abutment overturning the car, a Ford V-8 which was badly bent and damaged.  Viewing the wrecked car, it seems a miracle that anyone in it escaped alive.

             Lufkin was a senior in Mounds Township High school.  His early and tragic death will be mourned by a large circle of relatives and friends.

             Funeral services will be held at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church this morning at 9:39 o’clock, the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment will be made in St. Mary’s Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Fred Gulley and family attended the funeral of his sister, Miss Marie Gulley, which was held in Marion.

 

A 14-year-old boy named Nelson was found critically ill under a tree in their yard at Grand Tower last Friday.  His brother went home at noon and found the boy lying on the grass.  The boy did not want any dinner and complained of being sick and that his stomach hurt.  The brother assisted him and they started to go into the house, but the sick boy’s strength gave out and he had to lie down under another tree.  Taken into the house finally, he was placed on a bed.  When a doctor arrived, the boy was found unconscious on another bed, not the one where he had previously been placed.  At St. Andrew’s Hospital in Murphysboro that evening the boy died.  Death was due, it was said, to hemorrhage of the brain.—Anna Talk

             (His death certificate states that Ira Lee Nelson was born 22 Nov 1922, in Grand Tower, Jackson Co., Ill., the son of Dain Nelson, a native of Jackson Co., Ill., and Clara Jones, a native of Ava, Jackson Co., Ill., died 13 Aug 1937, in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill., and was buried in Walker Hill Cemetery at Grand Tower.  His marker there reads:  Son Ira Lee Nelson 1922-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Early in the week the daily papers contained an account of the death of three Americans by shells in the Chinese war zone, one of those being Prof. Robert Karl Reischauer, of Princeton University, who was traveling with 11 professors and students of things Oriental—a tour under the University Travel Bureau.  He was a son of Rev. A. K. Reischauer, a former missionary, and now head of a Christian college in Tokio, Japan, who is a brother of Ed Reischauer of Jonesboro.  Prof. Reischauer had made a study of Oriental problems and was the author of several books on Japanese history.  His father has been in Japan for many years.—Anna Democrat

             (The Report of the Death of an American Citizen Abroad states that Robert Karl Reischauer was born 14 May 1907, and died 14 Aug 1937, at 5 p.m. at Shanghai General Hospital in Shanghai, China.  “Death caused by an exploding bomb from a bombing plane.”  The death certificate lists primary cause of death “shock” and secondary cause “shell wounds legs compound fractures legs.” His widow was Jean Reischauer, J-3 Prospect Apartments, Princeton, N.J.; his parents were Dr. and Mrs. Robert Reischauer, Presbyterian Mission Board, Tokyo, Japan; and his brother was Mr. Edwin Reischauer, 106 Tatemoto, Izumu, Kami, Kyu-Ku Kyoto.  He was cremated and his ashes buried in Tama Reien Cemetery, Fuchu City, Tokyo, Japan.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Sep 1937: 

Well Known Colored Resident Dies August 25

             Mrs. Fanny Taylor Evans, wife of Josh Evans, passed away at her home on North Elm Street Wednesday, August 25, following a few days’ illness.

             Born in Mississippi, she moved to Tennessee while quite young.  She taught school in Martin, Tenn., before her marriage.  She came to Mounds in 1895 and has since been an active member of Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church and a teacher in the Sunday school.

             She is survived by her husband, Josh Evans.  Her last blood relative, a brother, died within a year.

             Funeral services were held Saturday, August 28, at 12 o’clock noon at Pilgrim Rest Church, the Rev. L. Thompson, pastor, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

Mrs. Anna Ledbetter

             Mrs. Anna Ledbetter, age 59 years, died at her home at 3:30 o’clock, Wednesday morning, September 1, following a long illness.  She was the widow of A. W. Ledbetter, for many years a special agent for the Illinois Central Railroad.  Besides her husband, one daughter, Nellie, preceded her in death.

             Surviving are one sister, Mrs. Della Clanton, of Cairo, and two brothers, Mide Waterman of Miller City and Pearl Waterman of Mounds; one step-brother, Marion Waterman, of Alton, Ill.; other relatives and friends.

             Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church with the Rev. T. Ury of Jonesboro officiating.  Burial will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Superintendent of Prison Farm Dies

             P. N. Lewis, superintendent of the farm at the Southern Illinois Penitentiary at Menard, died Sunday in a Murphysboro hospital after a brief illness.

             Mr. Lewis, a cousin of Speaker of the House Louie E. Lewis, was a former resident of Herrin and a prominent civic worker in that city.  Later he purchased a large farm near Marion and removed his family there, remaining until Governor Horner appointed him superintendent of the prison farm.

             (His death certificate states that Phillip Napoleon Lewis, state employee, of Menard, Ill., was born 29 Jan 1870, in Creal Springs, Ill., the son of Daniel Lewis and Harriett Cash, a native of Kentucky, died 29 Aug 1937, in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill., husband of Ethel G. Lewis, and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Chester, Randolph Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Philip N. Lewis 1870-1937 Ethel G. Lewis 1880-1971.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of C. F. Melton last Friday afternoon were Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Eastman and family of Anna.

 

Harold Melton, who was called here by the death of his uncle, C. F. Melton, has returned to his work in Chicago.  Harold is making good as a successful salesman.

 

Leonard and Gilbert Melton of Chicago and Harvey Melton of Trumann, Ark., who were called here by the death of their brother, C. F. Melton, have returned to their homes.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to take this means of thanking our many friends who did what they could to lessen our sorrow in the loss of our son and brother.  Especially those who ministered to him in his last illness, who contributed flowers, the choir that furnished the music and Father Jantzen and Father Gilmartin who conducted the services.

Mr. and Mrs. George Moses and family

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Sep 1937:

MOUNDS PIONEER DIED

             Mrs. Anna Ledbetter, 59, died at her home in Mounds on Wednesday morning.  She had resided in Mounds for the past 43 years.

             Surviving are:  one sister, Mrs. __la Clanton of Cairo; two brothers, Mid Waterman of Miller City and Paul Waterman of Mounds; also one stepbrother, Marion Waterman of Alton; and many other relatives and friends.

             Funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church in Mounds.  She will be laid to rest beside her husband, A. L. Ledbetter, in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             The funeral arrangements are in charge of G. A. James.

             (John W. Cantrell married Martha Cauble on 30 Dec 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  Charles W. Waterman married Mrs. Martha Cantrell on 23 Jan 1877, in Alexander Co., Ill.  A. W. Ledbetter, 36, of Carbondale, Ill., a railroad laborer, married on 24 Feb 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Anna Waterman, 24, of Beechwood, Ill.  W. T. Clanton, 23, of Beechwood, Ill., carpenter, born in Olmsted, Ill., the son of Jackson Clanton and Henrietta Spence, married on 31 Dec 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Estella E. Waterman, 17, of Beechwood, Ill., born in Thebes, Ill., daughter of Charles Waterman and Martha Cauble.  Her death certificate states that Anna Ledbetter was born 15 Dec 1877, in Illinois, the daughter of Mr. Cantrell and Martha Cauble, a native of Illinois, died 1 Sep 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the widow of A. W. Ledbetter, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLED BY AUTO

             Billy Cline was killed at his new home in South Carolina.  He was struck by an auto.

Billy was a nephew of Mrs. Will Crite of Ullin.  He was the son of the late Frank Cline, an ex-soldier of the World War, who passed away a year ago last April.  The widow and her children lived in Dongola until a few weeks ago when they moved to her former home in South Carolina.

Billy was deaf and dumb and it is thought that this probably contributed to the cause of his death.

(Frank Cline was born in 1891 in Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Daniel Cline and Anna Cantrell.  William Noah “Bill” Crite married on 29 May 1910, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., Essie Viola Cline, the daughter of Daniel Cline and Anna Cantrell.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Fanny Evans, a highly respected colored woman, died at her home in Mounds, Thursday, from a stroke of apoplexy. (Mounds)

             (Joshua Evans, 25, of Beechwood, Ill., common laborer, colored, born in Bardwell, Ky., son of Joe and Diana Evans, married on 25 Jan 1898, Fannie H. Taylor, 21, of Beechwood, Ill., colored, born in Cayuga, Miss., daughter of Pleasant and Charity Taylor.  According to her death certificate, Fanny Evans was born 7 Nov 1881, in Itica, Miss., the daughter of Pleasant Taylor, a native of Mississippi, died 25 Aug 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of Joshua Evans, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Sep 1937:

SISTER OF MOUND CITY WOMAN DIED

Mrs. Florence Hopper McGee, wife of Charlie McGee, died at her home in Kentucky, Tuesday following a two-day illness.  Mrs. McGee had been in bad health for some time, but her sudden death was a shock to her family and friends.  She was a Christian woman of high standing in that community.

She leaves her husband, Charlie McGee; one son, Armstead McGee, of Columbus; two daughters, Mrs. Alice Grogan of Mound City and Mrs. Mott Samuel of Columbus, Ky.; four brothers, John, Bob, Earl, and Lige Hopper; two half-brothers Johnnie and Monroe Hopper; and many other relatives and friends.

She lost two sons during the World War; one was killed in action and the other died from sickness.

The pallbearers were Mrs. McGee’s nephews, Omer McGee, Bernard McGee, Earl McGee, Jessie Hopper, and Calvin Webb.

The flower girls were her granddaughters and nieces.

Burial was in Columbus Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Florence Hopper McGee was born 20 Dec 1875, in Kentucky, the daughter of John Hopper and Sallie Collier, natives of Kentucky, died 31 Aug 1937, in Columbus, Hickman Co., Ky., of cerebral hemorrhage, with chronic nephritis and hypertension, the wife of Charlie McGee, and was buried at Columbus, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Sep 1937: 

James E. Law

             James E. Law, 24, of Cairo, died Friday morning, September 2, at St. Mary’s Hospital, where he had undergone an operation the day before.  Surviving are his wife, Brema Hogendobler Law; one son, James William, age six months; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James A. Law of Cairo; and other relatives.

             Mr. Law was proprietor of Heine’s Café, Cairo.  He was a member of the Lutheran Church, the Masonic and Elk lodges of Cairo.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Lutheran church at 2:30 o’clock, the pastor, Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, officiating.  Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds, the Masonic Lodge conducting services at the grave.

             (His death certificate states that James E. Law was born about 1913, the son of James A. Law and Caherine Eichoff, died 3 Sep 1937, in Illinois, husband of Brema E. Law.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Our community (Villa Ridge) was shocked Friday by the news of the sudden death of James E. Law of Cairo after an operation at St. Mary’s Hospital, Thursday afternoon.  Mr. Law was the husband of Brema Hogendobler Law, who, with a six months old son, father and mother are left to mourn.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hogendobler of Newark, Ohio, were called here Saturday by the sudden death of the former’s brother-in-law, Jimmie Law, of Cairo.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Sep 1937: 

Oldest Illinois D. A. R. Member Dies Sunday in Cairo

             Mrs. Sarah Catherine McCormick, of Cairo, died Sunday, September 12, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. M. McGruder, of 738 Center Street, following several months of illness.   Had she lived until December 22, she would have celebrated her 99th birthday.

             Mrs. McCormick was the daughter of Louis and Sarah Harrod Bottorff and was born in Clark County, Indiana, on December 22, 1838.  She was a pioneer American, with Revolutionary soldiers on both sides of her family, her great-grandfather, Capt. William Harrod, having served under George Rodgers Clark in the conquest of the Northwest Territory.  She was a member of the Egyptian Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, being the oldest D. A. R. in the State of Illinois.

             She was married on November 13, 1860, to Dr. Joseph C. McCormick, who was accidentally killed in an earth slide while exploring an Indian mound near Knoxville, Tenn., October 3, 1887.  Since that time she has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. E. M. McGruder, moving to Cairo with them in 1899 from Paducah.  She was a member of the Paducah Presbyterian Church.

             Surviving are her daughter, two grandsons, Millard McGruder of Louisville, Ky., and Joseph McGruder of Cairo; two brothers, Louis Bottorff of Speed, Ind., and Moses E. Bottorff of Jeffersonville, Ind.

             Funeral services were held in Cairo at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, Rev. Joseph W. Fix, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

             (Her death certificate states that Sarah Catherine McCormick was born about 1839, the daughter of Louis Botroff and Sarah Harrod, and died 11 Sep 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the widow of Joseph C. McCormick.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds states she was born 22 Dec 1838, and died 12 Sep 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Father of Rev. H. C. Croslin Dies Last Friday Night

             Word has been received here of the death of H. L. Croslin which occurred at his home six miles east of West Frankfort last Friday evening.  Mr. Croslin was the father of Rev. H. C. Croslin of Carrier Mills, a former pastor of the First Baptist Church of Mounds.

                           (Lonnie Crosslin married Ellenora Gettings on 18 Jun 1882, in Franklin Co., Ill.  According to a death certificate, L. C. Croslin, farmer, of West Frankfort, Ill., was born 20 Nov 1858, in Parish, Ill., the son of Thomas Croslin and Elvira Carter, natives of Tennessee, died 10 Sep 1937, in Frankfort, Franklin Co., Ill., widower of Gertrude Bolinger, and was buried in East Fork Cemetery in Frankfort, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Our Mother Ella Croslin 1865-1900 Alonzo Croslin 1858-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

            

Dr. Masaryk Dies

             Dr. Thomas Masaryk, first president of the Czecho-Slovakian Republic, died Sept. 14.  Dr. Masaryk, who was 87, had been critically ill since September 2.

             We had the pleasure of hearing Dr. Masaryk speak in Chicago a good many years ago and have since held him in warm admiration.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Sep 1937: 

Dies in California

             Mrs. Lena Black received word recently of the death of her cousin, George Anthony, of Portersville, Calif., which occurred at his home September 11.  He is survived by his wife and one sister, Mrs. Fred Itzenhauser, both of Portersville.

             Mr. Anthony and his mother visited in Mounds in the spring of 1917 and were here during the cyclone which caused so much damage in South Mounds and on the south end of Blanche, Delaware and McKinley.  His mother was a sister of the late Mrs. Phillip Stern.

             (The California Death Index states that George Anthony was born in 1886 and died 10 Sep 1937, in San Joaquin, Calif.  He was buried in Vandalia Cemetery in Porterville, Tulare Co., Calif.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Head of Anna State Hospital Died There Sunday

             Dr. R. A. Goodner, age 74, died Sunday, September 19, at the Anna State Hospital, where he held the position of superintendent.  He had been ill for several months.

             He is survived by one son, Sidney, living in Nashville, Illinois.  Burial was made Tuesday in Nashville, his former home.

             Dr. Goodner had served as managing officer under two governors, having been appointed first during the administration of Governor Edward F. Dunne in 1913.  He was reappointed in 1933 by Governor Henry Horner.  He had also served as superintendent of the hospital at Kankakee.

             (Ralph A. Goodner married Mary C. Fitzgerrell on 6 Jun 1888, in Jefferson Co., Ill.  Madison Goodner married Marietta Cone on 25 Sep 1862, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Ralph A. Goodner, physician, was born 17 Dec 1864, in Chester, Ill., the son of Madison M. Goodner and Marietta Cone, natives of Illinois, died 19 Sep 1937, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., widower of Mary C. Goodner, and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery in Nashville, Washington Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Bone Gap Flyer Dies in Plane Crash

             A navy biplane bound from Squantum, Mass., to Norfolk, Va., crashed into thick woods on a long Island North Shore estate near Brookville, N. Y., Monday, killing both occupants.

             They were identified as S. A. Mackenzie, a lieutenant and R. A. Schmidt, naval aviator.  Mackenzie was from Winchester, Mass., and R. A. Schmidt from Bone Gap, Ill.

             Schmidt had escaped death by crawling from an overturned plane in the legion of the United States Flying School at Pensacola, Fla., a few months ago.

             Son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schmidt of Bone Gap, the youth graduated from the University of Illinois in 1935 and enrolled in the Pensacola school in August of the same year.  He received his commission May 19, 1937, and was stationed aboard the U. S. S. Yorktown.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Sep 1937:

GUY BEAUMAN SUPPOSED TO HAVE ACCIDENTALLY KILLED SELF

Guy Beauman, brother of the late Mrs. George Trammell of this city, and widely known as an orchardist, was found by his son near a wire fence late Saturday in a dying condition.  His shotgun was nearby.  It is presumed that in crawling through the fence he discharged the gun. 

Beauman had an immense orchard, working more people in apple season than any other industry in Johnson County.  His home was not far from Tunnel Hill and was high up in the hills.

Not long ago, Mr. Beauman had a serious car wreck, driving his car into an abutment that came near killing him.

(Derick F. Beauman married Cynthia Caroline Corgan on 22 Dec 1861, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Guy Beauman, horticulturalist at Tunnel Hill, Ill., was born 23 Feb 1869, in Lick Creek, Ill., the son of D. Beauman, a native of Three Rivers, Canada, and Carrie Corgan, a native of Aurora, Ill., died 18 Sep 1937, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended Pete Britt’s funeral in Ullin Monday p.m.

             (This is likely the same person as Russell Britt, whose funeral was in Ullin on this day.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Glen Hunter was called to the bedside of her sister in Kentucky, who is seriously ill, last Wednesday and returned home Sunday night to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law Monday.  (Beech Grove)

             (The funeral was likely that of Mrs. Hunter’s mother-in-law, Addie Williamson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Addie Williamson of Peoria, formerly of Beech Grove neighborhood, passed away at the home of her daughter, Madge Pierce, in Herrin, Ill., Sunday morning, Sept. 12, after a two months’ illness.  She was 62 years of age.

Mrs. Williamson was brought to the home of her son, Glen Hunter, until burial, Tuesday afternoon.

Funeral services were held for her at Mt. Pisgah by Rev. W. J. Ward and interment was made at Mt. Pisgah by Elmer Ford.

She leaves her children, Glen Hunter near Dongola, Mrs. Madge Pierce, of Herrin, Mrs. Mae Miller of Olmstead, Mrs. Daniel Britt, Elco, Mrs. Muriel Williamson of Madison, Wis., Earl and Jack Williamson of Peoria; her father, Eli Mowery of Detroit, Mich.; two sisters, Mrs. Clara Lentz of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Cora Winstead of California; a brother, Harvey Mowery of Olmstead and several grandchildren.

(Addie Elmina Mowery, daughter of Eli Mowery and Amanda Jane Cruse, married on 3 Sep 1893, in Union Co., Ill., Elvis I. Hunter, the son of Jasper Newton Hunter and Alinta Lee.  Addie married 2nd on 12 Apr 1908, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Matthew Williamson.  According to her death certificate, Addie L. Williamson, of 312 South 20th St., Herrin, Ill., was born 5 Mar 1875, in Wetaug, Ill., the daughter of Eli Mowery and Amanda Cruse, natives of Illinois, died 12 Sep 1937, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., the widow of Mathew Williamson, and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A number from this place (Mounds) attended the funeral of Russell Britt at the Ullin M. E. Church, Monday afternoon.  Rev. Elmer Smith conducted the funeral and interment was made in Ullin Cemetery.

             (According to his death certificate, Russell Britt, farmer at Ullin, Ill., was born in 1909 in Illinois, the son of W. R. and Mary Eugene Britt, died 17 Sep 1937, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Darnel Britt, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Russell son of W. R. & Mary Britt 1909-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Oct 1937:

MRS. W. M. JONES DIES

Mrs. Mary Jones died at her home in Mounds Sunday after a lingering illness.

She is survived by her husband, W. M. Jones; two sons and one daughter of Chicago.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at Bardwell, Ky.

(Her death certificate states that Mary Jones was born 3 Sep 1894, in Bardwell, Ky., the daughter of Tom Boswell and Iola Matt, natives of Bardwell, Ky., died 26 Sep 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of William Jones, and was buried in Bardwell, Ky.  Her marker in Bardwell Cemetery reads:  Mary Jones Sept. 3, 1894 Sept. 26, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN DIES AT CHAMPAIGN

Mrs. Sarah E. Sims, a resident of Mound City for the past 54 years died at the Burnham Hospital at Champaign, Thursday, Sept. 30, at __a.m.

She and her daughter, Ora, went to Champaign during the flood to stay with another daughter, Mrs. ___rence Reid.  Mrs. Sims remained at her daughter’s home until her illness five weeks ago, when she was taken to the hospital.

She leaves two daughters, son John of Cairo, five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

The funeral services will be conducted at the James Funeral Home Saturday at 2 p.m. by Rev. A. L. ___.  Mrs. Sims had been a devout member of the Methodist Church in Mound City.

Burial will be in Beech Grove Cemetery beside her husband who died in 1918.

 

JACOB E. BRADDY DIES

Jacob Braddy died at the home of his son, B. A. Braddy, in Mounds, Saturday morning, at the age of 86 years.  His death was not unexpected as he had been ill for some time.  He leaves two sons, B. A. Braddy and George Braddy; one sister, Mrs. E. Showers of Ullin; and one daughter, Mrs. J. S. Scott of Livingston, Ill.; and five grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Lutheran church at Jonesboro.  Rev. J. S. Powell officiated.  Interment was made in Jonesboro Cemetery.

G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Jacob Braddy married on 3 Jun 1874, in Union Co., Ill., Cornelia Rendleman.  Jacob Eli Braddy married on 14 Sep 1921, Mrs. Mary Ellen Lewis Pelton.  Eli Sowers, son of Catharine Mowery, married Malinda Braddy on 27 Mar 1873, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Jacob Eli Braddy, retired merchant, was born 29 Aug 1851, in Ullin, Ill., the son of Benjamin A. Braddy, a native of North Carolina, died 25 Sep 1937, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mary Ellen Braddy, and was buried in Jonesboro, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Mary E. Braddy 1855-1927 Jacob E. Braddy 1851-1937 Frances E. Braddy 1852-1919.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TWO DROWN IN OHIO RIVER AT GOLCONDA

Two young men, John Rose, 19, and J. V. Hilton, 15, of New Columbia, were drowned in the Ohio River at Golconda, Sept. 18th.  They were in a small boat above Dam 51, when they approached too close and were carried over the dam.  The boat overturned and both boys were drowned.  One of the boys disappeared immediately and the other swam 300 feet before going down.  L. Vanzant, lockmaster at the dam, said the boys were apparently not familiar with the dam and approached too close.

Both boys were well known throughout the county.

(His death certificate states that John Rose, farmer, was born 28 Oct 1917, in Grantsburg, Ill., the son of John W. Rose, a native of Tennessee, and Martha J. Rushing, a native of Illinois, died 19 Sep 1937, in Golconda Dam, Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in Road District 3, Massac Co., Ill.  The death certificate of J. A. Hilton, farm boy at Belknap, Ill., states he was born 14 Dec 1921, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Ernest Hilton, a native of Stonefort, Ill., and Lura Leverett, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 9 Oct 1937, in Golconda Dam, Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. HARRY COLESON DIES

Mrs. Amelia Coleson, 55, died Monday night at her home near Olmstead.  She had been ill several months.

She is survived by her husband, Harry Coleson, seven children, one sister, and one brother.

Rev. Earl Throgmorton conducted the services in the home Wednesday afternoon.  Burial was made in New Hope Cemetery.

Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

             (According to her death certificate, Amilia Coleson was born 16 Oct 1880, in Chicago, Ill., the son of Louis Kisman, a native of Germany, died 27 Sep 1937, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Harry Coleson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Oct 1937: 

J. E. Braddy Dies after Illness of Two Months

(Writes Own Obituary)

             Jacob Eli Braddy, age 86 years, died Saturday morning, September 25, at 11:20 o’clock, at the home of his son, R. A. Braddy, having taken ill July 20.  Until that time, he had had no serious illness.  He had made his home with his son and family in Mounds for the past twelve years.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Salem Lutheran Church at Jonesboro, with the Rev. J. S. Powell officiating.  Burial was made in the Jonesboro Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             Mr. Braddy had written his own obituary some time ago, leaving space for the date of his death.  Below we publish the obituary as written by him.

             “Jacob E. Braddy was born August 29th, 1851, and departed this life September 25th, 1937 at 11:20 a.m.

             “He was born and reared on a farm in Alexander County near Ullin, Ill.  At the age of 23 he was married to Frances C. Rendleman of Jonesboro, Ill.  Of this union there were two born, one daughter and one son, Mrs. J. F. Scott, now living in Decatur, Ill., and B. A. Braddy of Mounds, Ill.  In the fall of 1875 he moved to Jonesboro where he engaged in farming for seven years. In 1882 he moved in town where he engaged in several different kinds of business in which he was fairly successful.  Mrs. Braddy having passed away on Oct. 28th, 1919, he was married to Mrs. Mary E. Pelton of Chattanooga, Tenn., who also preceded him in death on Sept. 26th, 1927.  Mr. Braddy was a member of the Lutheran Church of Jonesboro which he dearly loved.  He leaves to mourn his loss one daughter, one son, seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, one half-sister and one half-brother.”

 

Mrs. W. M. Jones Dies Following Lingering Illness

             Mrs. Mary Jones, wife of W. M. Jones, died at her home here Sunday afternoon at 2:15 o’clock following a long illness.  Her age at death was 43 years.

             She leaves her husband, two sons, Hazel and Fred; and a daughter, Mrs. Albert Painter, of Chicago.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Bardwell, Ky., cemetery, at 2:30 o’clock, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Those who attended the funeral of Mrs. William Jones at Bardwell, Ky., Tuesday were Mrs. Fred Boren, Mrs. Arthur Ellis, Mrs. Myrtle Matson, Mrs. Pearl Martin and daughter Miss Sarah.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to extend our sincere thanks to the friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and following the death of our Father and Grandfather, J. E. Braddy.  We also wish to extend our appreciation to those who sent flowers and offered cars, to those who sang and to the minister for their comforting words.  Their deeds of thoughtfulness will not be forgotten.

             B. A. Braddy and Family

             Mrs. J. F. Scott and Family

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Oct 1937:

WILLARD MASON DIES

Word has been received of the death of Willard Mason, who died at the Missouri Pacific Hospital in St. Louis early Tuesday morning.  The body was brought to Karcher Brothers Funeral Home in Cairo, Wednesday morning where it remained until the services Thursday afternoon.  Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church officiated.  Burial was in Spencer Heights.  The pallbearers were Lee Dorsett, P. R. Lee, Mark Capoot, Tom Burns, William Ryan, John Bouchet, Sam Abell, and R. E. Smith.

Mrs. Mason was formerly Helen Ford of Mound City.

(His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill., reads:  Helen Mason Oct. 26, 1896 Aug. 7, 1976 James W. Mason Dec. 27, 1884 Oct. 5, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Winkler attended the funeral in St. Louis of Mrs. Winkler’s cousin, Mrs. Mary Ellenberger, of that city.  Mrs. Ellenberger died after an operation Wednesday.  She was buried in Sunset Burial Park in St. Louis.  Mr. and Mrs. Winkler left Friday and returned home Saturday. 

             (Her marker in Sunset Memorial Park in Affton, St. Louis Co., Mo., reads:  Mary B. Eilenberger.  She was buried next to Charles Eilenberger.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Oct 1937:

MRS. NETTIE PERKS PASSED AWAY AT HOME OF BROTHER

Mrs. Nettie B. Perks, wife of the late Leslie Perks, died Tuesday night at the home of her brother, George Schuler, in Mounds, at the age of 64.  She had been ill for several months and very critically ill for some time and death was not at all unexpected.  Heart trouble and hardening of the arteries were given as immediate causes of death.

Mrs. Perks was Miss Schuler and was born in Mound City and grew up here.  She was married to L. C. Perks about 38 years ago and Mr. Perks, who became one of the powers in finance and business, died about 12 years ago.  Since that time and during the division of the Perks & Higgins affairs with its resulting entanglements and lawsuits, she has devoted much of her time in taking care of her affairs.

Mrs. Perks had a wide circle of friends.  She took active part in the Methodist Church of Mound City and was held in high esteem by those who came in contact with her.

Funeral services were held yesterday (Thursday) afternoon at the Methodist church, Rev. Roy N. Kean, former pastor, returning from Granite City, to conduct the services.  Pallbearers were C. E. Richey, George Eichhorn, James Finley, Mike Winkler, George W. Gunn, and Mark Capoot.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

There survives her one brother, George Schuler, of Mounds; two sisters, Miss Kate Schuler of Mounds and Mrs. J. Murphy of Mound City.  Other relatives had preceded her in death.  There are many nieces and nephews.

(George Schuler married Julia Kennedy on 24 May 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Nettie B. Perks, real estate dealer in Mound City, Ill., was born 9 Mar 1875, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of George Schuler, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Julia Kennedy, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 12 Oct 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the widow of Leslie C. Perks, and was buried in Mounds, Ill.   Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  N. B. Perks 1873-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT’S DEATH

Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur File will be sorry to hear of the sudden death of their three-month old son, Dennis Marshall.  The baby died Wednesday morning at 8:00 o’clock.

Rev. J. L. Wall will conduct the services this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church in Mound City.  Interment will be in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Mrs. File was formerly Miss Ruth Youngblood of this city and the young people lived here for a time after their marriage.  Later they moved to Urbandale where they now reside.

(Dennis Marshall File, of Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., was born 7 Jul 1937, in Urbandale, Ill., the son of Arthur File, a native of Cypress, Ill., and Ruth Youngblood, a native of Mound City, Ill., died 13 Oct 1937, in Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Elvis Miller attended the funeral of Grandmother Anderson in Tamms last Wednesday. (Beech Grove)

             (Elvis Everett Miller married on 27 Jul 1932, in Alwxander Co., Ill., Nellie Mae Anderson.  Lewis Gibson married Mary Bailey on 17 Jun 1866, in Effingham Co., Ill.  A death certificate for Sarah Jane Anderson Sharp states she was born 8 Oct 1869, in Newton, Ill., the daughter of Louis Gibson and Mary Bailey, died 4 Oct 1937, in Alexander Co., Ill., the wife of William Arthur Sharp, and was buried in Cummins Cemetery in Road District 6, Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cummins Cemetery reads:  Sarah Jane Anderson Mother Oct. 8, 1868 Oct. 4, 1937.  Next to her grave is a marker for William L. Anderson Father July 6, 1862 Dec. 23, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. W. P. Schnaare and Mrs. Walter Jackson attended the funeral of John Willard Mason at the Lutheran church at Cairo Thursday.  (America)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Oct 1937: 

Ex-Rep. Ray Carroll Dies in Auto Accident

             Former State Representative Ray Carroll, 52, of Marion, was found dead near his overturned automobile five miles west of Marion Wednesday night.  He was alone at the time of the accident, which cost him his life.

             Mr. Carroll was an employee in the waterworks division of the State Department of Public Works and Buildings and was city treasurer of Marion at the time of his death.  He is survived by his wife and two daughters.

             Mr. Carroll had many friends in Mounds and was here on State business only last week.

 

Mrs. Nettie B. Perks

             Mrs. Nettie B. Perks, widow of the late L. C. Perks of Mound City, died Tuesday night, October 12, at the home of her brother, George T. Schuler in this city, after an illness of several months.  Her age at death was 64 years.

             Mrs. Perks had been a lifelong resident of Mound City, but had been living with her brother and family since the flood.  She was married to L. C. Perks thirty-eight years ago.  Mr. Perks died in 1925.  She had been a member of the Mound City M. E. Church since her girlhood.

Surviving are two sisters, Miss Kate Schuler of Mounds and Mrs. Jennie Murphy of Mound City; one brother, George T. Schuler of Mounds, and other relatives including nephews and nieces.

             Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Mound City Thursday afternoon at two o’clock with the pastor, Rev. A. L. Jones officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James directing.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Oct 1937: 

Among those from a distance attending the funeral of Mrs. Nettie B. Perks last Thursday were Dr. and Mrs. L. Turney of Brownstown, Mrs. Minnie Brown of St. Elmo, Jack and Robert Murphy of Detroit, Mich., Dr. and Mrs. William Turney and Mrs. Cora Frizzell of Shelbyville, Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, Mrs. Lura Margraves and Loren Margraves of Herrin, Rev. and Mrs. Roy Kean of Granite City, Mrs. John Armstrong of Carterville and May Hawkins of Carbondale.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Oct 1937:

EX-STATE REPRESENTATIVE KILLED IN CRASH

(Johnston City Progress)

Former Democratic State Representative Ray Carroll, 52, of Marion, was found dead near his overturned automobile near the Sneed highway route 13 intersection, Wednesday afternoon at 5:45 o’clock.

Mr. Carroll was returning from Herrin where he had been to get an adjustment on his 1938 Buick car.  The car overturned just after it had passed under the railroad on the Sneed highway and Mr. Carroll’s body was found 40 feet from the car.  He had died from a broken neck.

Carroll was city treasurer of Marion and state waterworks official in the state department of public works and buildings.  He had served as president of the Marion Lions Club for two consecutive years.

He is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Schmidt and Miss Betty Carroll.

             (His death certificate states that Ray C. Carroll, inspector for the State Department Water Works, of Marion, Ill., was born 20 Apr 1887, in Spring Garden, Ill., the son of James H. Carroll and Amanda Taylor, died 13 Oct 1937, in Williamson Co., Ill., the husband of Leota Carroll, and was buried in Ina Township, Jefferson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFANT DIES AT OLMSTEAD

Junior Lee Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Miller, of Olmsted, died Saturday evening six hours after birth.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the residence, with Rev. H. L. Metcalf of Karnak officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.

Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Junior Lee Miller was born 16 Oct 1937, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of Pearl Miller and Minnie Baldwin, natives of Union Co., Ill., and died 16 Oct 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Concord Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Junior Lee Miller Oct. 22, 1937-Oct 29, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

COLORED YOUTH OF VIENNA BURNS TO DEATH

Melvin Thomas, age 21, son of Ernie and Minnie Thomas, was burned to death Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 12, when he was trapped in the home of his brother, Louie Thomas, with whom he had been living.

From reports and testimonial the inquest it is thought that Thomas had tried to light an oil stove in order to prepare his lunch and the stove had exploded or got out of control and fighting the fire he had been overcome with the fumes.  Another theory offered was that he ahd lain down with a lighted cigarette caught the bed on fire.  His charred body was found in the part of the house that had been the kitchen.

Louie Thomas is employed in Chicago and his wife too was working at the time in a tavern in Vienna.

             (His death certificate states that Melvin Levi Thomas was born 13 Oct 1915, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Ernie Thomas and Minnie Reece, died 12 Oct 1937, in Vienna, Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Vienna, Ill.  There is no marker for him in the cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HELD FOR GRAND JURY ON MURDER CHARGE

At the inquest held Oct. 10 at Marion, the coroner’s jury bound Henry Moore, 75, farmer living near Pittsburg, over to the grand jury on a charge of beating his blind wife to death.

Moore testified that his wife had fallen on a stone step as she was leaving the back of their house and he founded her lying in the yard.  He had been prying off some laths from the side of the barn when he heard her call, so he said, but a bloodstained board, like those Moore said he had been working with was found underneath the porch.  A bloodstained crowbar was also produced as evidence.

About thirty days before her death, Mrs. Moore had told Deputy Sheriff Sanders that her husband had threatened her, but Moore denounced this statement.

The verdict was based upon circumstantial evidence and Moore now awaits a verdict of the grand jury.

             (Henry Moore married Aliza J. Harris on 18 Aug 1881, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Calvin Harris married Julia Morris on 15 Nov 1855, in Williamson Co., Ill.  A death certificate for Eliza Jane Moore, of Rock Creek Township, Williamson Co., Ill., states she was born 3 Dec 1863, in Corinth Township, Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of Calvin Harris, a native of Tennessee, and Julia Morris, died 8 Oct 1937, in Creal Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Corinth Township, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Oct 1937:

MRS. CARRIE DANIELS PASSES AWAY IN MOUNDS

Mrs. Carrie May Daniels, 53, died suddenly from a heart attack at her home on North Oak Street in Mounds, Monday evening.

She is the mother of Bonnie and Ollie Daniels of Mounds, and leaves other relatives throughout the state.

Funeral services by Rev. Ward of Dongola were held Wednesday afternoon at Shiloh Church.  Interment was in Shiloh cemetery.

James Ryan was in charge of arrangements.

(Carrie May Daniels was born 5 Oct 1884, in Anna, Ill., the daughter of Eley Gray, died 25 Oct 1937, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of Gussie Daniels, and was buried in Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Death Comes to Aunt Mag Wilkins at 94

Aunt Mag Wilkins, respected by both her own race and the white people, passed away last Sunday at the home of her son, Frank, in Springfield at the age of 94 years.  The feebleness of age, which gradually wore her down, brought this venerable woman to her grave.

Three generations knew her.  They knew her as the midwife who ushered them into this world.  They knew her as a kind old colored lady, who had a high sense of courage and honor and who worked and toiled.  They knew her as a useful woman until age finally brought her to a helpless state.

Aunt Mag was born in Scott County, Missouri, and came to Cairo when a small child.  She recalled the slave days, the days of the war and then later days with keen interest.  A vast experience was hers and the last experience was the flood days when she left this town, among the last, on a stretcher, unable to walk.  Had she been able bodied, it is to be doubted if she would have left until the water came in.

In the rush and hurry of the flood and the days that followed, little was heard of her.  She was at Springfield, Ill., with her son.  Her home here had been repaired, and possibly, in another week or so if her health had permitted, she would have returned here.  But death cut this short.  Her funeral was Tuesday in Springfield.
             Her son and one daughter, living in Texas, survive.  But she leaves a long memory and there are few homes in Mound City into which Aunt Mag has not gone.  A very useful and highly respected life has come to a close.

 

JACOB KNUPP DIES AT HIS HOME NEAR OLSMTEAD

Jacob Sylvester Knupp, age 40 years, died at his home in Olmstead, Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  He had resided in Olmsted for the past 13 years.

He is survived by his wife, Lucy Knupp; three sons, Robert, Jacob Jr., and Charles, all at home; his father, Daniel Knupp of Villa Ridge; three brothers Jesse and Jonas of Villa Ridge and J. T of Mounds; four sisters, Mrs. Jennie Reese, of Hot Springs, Ark., Mrs. Josie Burd of Olmstead, Mrs. Joyce Bagby of Olmsted and Mrs. Jacoba Edwards of Villa Ridge.

Funeral services were conducted from the M. E. Church South at Olmsted, of which he was a member, at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon by Rev. Kazee and interment was made in Concord Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

(Daniel Knupp, 21, of Wetaug Precinct, Pulaski Co., Ill., married on 17 Jan 1875, at the house of Moses Casper in Union Co., Ill., Catherine Hoffner, 23, from Dongola Precinct, Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Jacob Sylvester Knupp, laborer in Olmstead, Ill., was born 20 May 1897, in Wetaug, Ill., the son of Daniel Knupp and Katherine Hoffner, died 26 Oct 1937, in Olmstead, Ill., the husband of Lucy Knupp, and was buried at Olmstead, Ill.  His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Jacob S. Knupp 1897-1937 Lucy A. Knupp 1903-1943.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Henry Harris (colored) died Tuesday evening at 4 p.m. (Grand Chain)

             (His death certificate states that Henry Harris, a cook, was born 5 Aug 1888, in Puscalosia, Ala., died 19 Oct 1937, in Grand Chain, Ill., the husband of Lucille Harris, and was buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. Huebotter and daughter, Ruth, were called to Peoria, on the account of the death of Mrs. Huebotter’s sister.  (Grand Chain)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Oct 1937: 

Mrs. Carrie Daniels Found Dead Monday Evening

             Mrs. Carrie May Daniels, age 53, was found dead Monday evening, Oct. 25, about 5 o’clock at her home on North Oak Street.  She had gone shortly before to the rear of the yard to get some kindling and a few minutes later when a neighbor stepped in the kitchen she found Mrs. Daniels on the floor dead.

             Surviving are two sons, Bonnie and Ollie Daniels of this city; three sisters, Mrs. Bessie Adams, Mrs. Rosa Westerman of Springfield, and Mrs. Ora Hodglin of Odin; one brother, Elmer Gray of Salem; and five grandchildren.  Her husband, Gus Daniels, died a number of years ago.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Shiloh Church with Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.  Burial was in Shiloh Cemetery with J. T. Ryan directing.

 

In Memoriam

             In memory of my dear daughter, Fanny Griffin, who departed this life Oct. 26, 1936.

Rest in Peace my dearest daughter

             Years may go but memories stay,

You are gone but not forgotten

             And I’ll meet you some sweet day,

Kate Blue, mother

Rev. O. Morrison, brother

 

Jacob Sylvester Knupp

             Jacob Sylvester Knupp, age 40 years, died at his home in Olmstead Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  He had resided in Olmstead for the past 13 years.

             He is survived by his wife, Lucy Knupp; three sons, Robert, Jacob Junior and Charles, all at home; his father, Daniel Knupp of Villa Ridge; three brothers, Jesse Knupp and Jonas Knupp of Villa Ridge and J. T. Knupp of Mounds; four sisters, Mrs. Jennie Reese of Hot Springs, Ark., Mrs. Josie Burd of Olmstead, Mrs. Joyce Bagby of Olmstead, Mrs. Jacoba Edwards of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were conducted from the M. E. Church South at Olmstead, of which he was a member, at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon by Rev. Kazee and interment made in Concord Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Nov 1937:

Mr. and Mrs. Mid Britt of Mounds and Mr. and Mrs. Garrett Britt of Cairo left Sunday for California, where they have gone partly on a vacation to appear before the parole board of that state in behalf of a cousin who, some ten years ago, while with a party of men, were involved in a gun fight in which a man was killed.  He is eligible for parole at this time.  They will return about Thanksgiving.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Nov 1937:

The March 2, 1876, issue of the Mound City newspaper, The Patriot, stated that the body of John C. Vogle, who left home without the knowledge of anyone, was found “at the end of the slough near the old mud bridge.”  Squire John W. Carter presided at the inquest.  Accidental was the verdict.

 

The March 2, 1876, issue of the Mound City newspaper, The Patriot, contained “A little item tells of the death of Grandmother Cartwright at Pleasant Plains in February.  Mrs. Cartwright was the wife of Peter Cartwright, who played a prominent part in Methodism in the southern half of Illinois and who was one of the founders of the present University of Illinois.”

 

The inside of the 2 Mar 1876, issue of the Mound City newspaper, The Patriot, contains the personals and news stories, most of which have few heads.  One of the items is the death of Shelton E. Hunter, who was 24 years of age and was city clerk.  A resolution of respect appears in this issue.  This was a brother of Mrs. Rhyan and also of Mrs. J. T. Armstrong, both of whom are quite well known in this city and county.

             (His marker in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Shelton Emery son of E. L. & S. A. Hunter Died March 1, 1876 Aged 24 Years, 3 Months.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SIMPLE BURIAL

             One of the strange stories told is the one now of an old man who died at the county farm some time ago.  Instead of a burial, he was simply carried out on the farm and interred in the earth.  Cost was $3.

 

FORMER RESIDENT PASSES AWAY IN NEBRASKA

             Word has been received here of the death of F. G. Fricke of Plattsmouth, Nebraska, on Oct. 24, at the age of 91 years.  Mr. Fricke will be remembered as having built the house now occupied by C. F. Bode and in which he was also engaged in the drug business.

             (The 1880 census of Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., shows that F. G. Fricke, a druggist, was born about 1846 in Brunswick, Germany.  His wife, Emma, was born about 1850 in Brunswick, Germany.  Children, all born in Illinois, were Dora, born about 1873, Carl, born about 1876, and Albert born about 1878.  The 1900 census of Ward 1, Plattsmouth, Cass Co., Neb., states F. G. was born in April 1848 and Emma in February 1848.  Children, all born in Nebraska, Fritz, born in June 1880, Lena, born in January 1884, and Edwin, born in March 1890, were added to the family since the 1880 census.  The 1930 census of Plattsmouth gives his name as Ferdrick G. Fricke.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Nov 1937:

JOHN FISHER DEAD

             John Fisher, editor of the Cairo Evening Citizen, died yesterday after an illness of three years or more.  A paralytic stroke crippled him at ___ time and gradually he grew ___.  Much of the management of the newspaper has been carried on by his wife during his illness.

             (His death certificate states that John Copeland Fisher, publisher, was born 11 Apr 1870, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of George Fisher and Susan Copeland, natives of Middleburg, Vermont, died 17 Nov 1937, in Cairo, Ill., husband of Bess Brown Fisher, and was buried in Thebes Cemetery in Thebes, Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  John Copeland Fisher Apr. 11, 1870 Nov. 17, 1937 Bessie Brown Fisher Dec. 17, 1886 Feb. 6, 1968.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT

             ___ Cross, son of Susie Williams, died in an automobile accident in Centralia last Sunday.  The funeral and burial was held in ____s Thursday afternoon.

             Mrs. Williams, a highly respected old lady, was a probation officer in ___ County and was quite prominent in politics.

             (John Cross, 36, of Beechwood, Ill., married Susie Coile, 20, of Beechwood, Ill., on 26 Nov 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Thomas N. Cross, a box packer, of Centralia, Marion Co., Ill., was born 16 Mar 1896, in Mounds, Ill., the son of John Cross, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Susie Coyle, a native of Mounds, Ill., died 14 Nov 1937, in Carlyle, Clinton Co., Ill., the divorced husband of Fern Bailey Cross, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Thomas W. Cross Mar. 16, 1896 Nov. 14, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OTTO JOHNSON PASSES AWAY

             Otto Johnson, age 58, died at the Hale-Willard Hospital in Anna, Sunday, Nov. 14.  Saturday, while at work, he had a stroke and was taken to the hospital at Anna.

             Services were held at the Christian Chapel Church near Dongola at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Wiley Mathis of Vienna.  He was buried in the Chapel cemetery.  Funeral arrangements were made by Elmer J. Ford.

             Surviving are his wife, Izora Johnson, three children and other relatives, including grandchildren, brothers and sisters.

             (William F. Johnson married Sarah Corzine on 26 Oct 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  According to the death certificate, Henry Otto Johnson, a common laborer, of Dongola, Ill., was born 1 Mar 1879, in Dongola, Ill., the son of William Johnson, a native of North Carolina, and Sarah Corzine, a native of Illinois, died 14 Nov 1937, in Anna, Ill., the husband of Izora Johnson, and was buried in Chapel Cemetery in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Otto H. Johnson Mar. 1, 1879 Nov. 14, 1937 Izora L. Johnson Jan. 18, 1880 Dec. 5, 1948.—Darrel Dexter)

            

CATCH MAN WANTED FOR MURDER IN ANOTHER STATE

             Walter Kirby, colored, wanted in Indianapolis, was picked up Monday night at Cairo as he was preparing to catch the ferry for Kentucky through the efforts of the office of the sheriff of this county and the police of Cairo.

             The telegram here to Sheriff McIntire sent Jim Wilson to Ullin to set a trap with Jesse Meals.  Kirby walked into it and officers followed his trail and picked him up in Cairo.  He is held in this county awaiting arrival of Indianapolis police.

 

SALESMAN KILLED WHEN CAR CRASHES INTO PIPE TRUCK

             Gerald Wallick, 39, salesman for the McKinley Importing Co., of Chicago, but a resident of Sterling was instantly killed Tuesday afternoon on the highway near Grand Chain when his car crashed into a big truck carrying oil well pipes, driven by W. E. Hicks, of Shreveport, La.

             Wallick had his head crushed, being thrown through his windshield.  His car was wrecked while the truck suffered some damage.

             The coroner’s jury placed the blame upon Wallick, who was driving at a rapid rate of speed and who was over the black line.

             (The death certificate states that Gerald R. Wallick, traveling salesman, of 505 W. Eleventh St., Sterling, Ill., was born 8 Jun 1898, in Willisville, Ill., the son of Jacob Milo Wallick and Ellen Jones, natives of Knoxville, Ill., died 16 Nov 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Edith Wallick, and was buried in Riverside Cemetery in Sterling, Whiteside Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Gerald R. Wallick 1898-1937 Edith M. Wallick 1887-1957.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FALL PROVES FATAL TO AGED BLIND LADY

             Mrs. Clarinda Sheffer of Dongola, age 83, passed away Friday night.

             Mrs. Sheffer, a widow, had been a resident of Dongola practically all her life.  She had been blind for a number of years.  Friday, while going to the back porch of her home, she fell off the porch and suffered internal injuries, which caused her death.

             Wilson Funeral Service had charge of the funeral which was held Sunday at the Baptist church at Dongola.  Interment was made in Friendship Cemetery.

             (George W. Sheffer, 23, from Dongola Precinct, Union Co., Ill., married on 24 Dec 1874, at the house of Adaline Penrod, in Union Co., Ill., Clarinda Penrod, 20, from Dongola Precinct. James A. Penrod married Adaline Ballard on 9 May 1852, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Clarinda Sheffer was born 2 Aug 1854, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of James Penrod and Adaline Ballard, natives of Union Co., Ill., died 12 Nov 1937, in Dongola, Ill., the widow of George W. Sheffer, and was buried in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Friendship Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Clarenda Sheffer 1854-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Susie Williams, highly respected colored citizen of Mounds, was called to Centralia Monday a.m. by the death of her son, Tom Cross, who was killed.  (Mounds)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Nov 1937: 

William Riley Graves

             William Riley Graves, age 79, died early Saturday morning, November 13, at his home in Belknap, following a two weeks’ illness.  Surviving are one son, Irvin, and one daughter, Mrs. D. Murphy of East St. Louis.  His wife preceded him in death.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Belknap M. E. Church, the Rev. H. L. Metcalf officiating.  Burial was made in the Masonic Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

             (His marker in Masonic Cemetery in Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  William Riley Graves 1858-1937 Eda Matilda Graves 1865-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Killed in Auto Accident

             Mrs. Susie Williams received word Monday morning that her son, Tom Cross, a former Mounds resident, had been killed that morning in an automobile accident near Centralia where he resided.  The car driven by Cross was also occupied by several other men, the party having started early on a hunting trip.  In rounding a curve he lost control of the car.  He was the only one killed.

 

Word has been received in Mounds of the death of Mrs. W. L. Blancett’s mother, Mrs. Jones at her home in Milan, Tenn.

 

Father of Mrs. Clarence Beedle Dies in Boskydell

             Sylvester O’Daniel, father of Mrs. Clarence Beedle of this city, passed away Sunday morning, November 14, at 4 o’clock at his home in Boskydell, following a lingering illness.

             Surviving are his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Beulah Beedle, two sons, John of Chester and Ernest of Boskydell; also a number of grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist church in Boskydell the Rev. Mr. Stokes officiating.  Interment was made in the Sterns Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Sylvester O’Daniel, section foreman, was born 6 Jan 1862, in Makanda, Ill., the son of John O’Daniel, a native of Georgia, and Elizabeth Hagler, a native of Makanda, Ill., died 14 Nov 1937, in Makanda, Jackson Co., Ill., the husband of Emma Stearns, and was buried in Stearns Cemetery in Makanda, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Sylvester O’Daniel 1862-1937 Emma I. O’Daniel 1869-1947.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Editor John C. Fisher Dies at His Cairo Home

             In sad undertones the news was passed from person to person yesterday morning that John C. Fisher, editor and publisher of the Cairo Citizen had passed peacefully away, the evening before at his home in Cairo.  His friends knew that he had suffered a paralytic stroke in 1934 while on a business trip to St. Louis.  Friends and business associates in Cairo have missed his community activities since that day and have felt the loss of personal touch with his pleasing personality.

             A native of Cairo he has been a part of its life for more than three score years.  For 52 years the name Fisher has been connected with the Cairo Citizen, his father before him having founded the weekly paper by that name.  Mr. Fisher bore his illness patiently although he often yearned to get back to his desk in the office and take up its activities once more, for these had become life to him.  All that is mortal of him will rest in the Thebes Cemetery, but there are many forward movements which will go farther because of his having been a part of them.

 

Called to Sikeston

             Mr. and Mrs. Glen Whiteside and little daughter Joyce were called to Sikeston, Mo., Friday by the death of Mr. Whiteside’s mother, Mrs. O. L. Whiteside, which occurred Thursday at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis.  Funeral services will be held Saturday at Sikeston.

             (Oscar L. Whiteside and Ella Whiteside, born about 1875 in Illinois, are in the 1930 census of Lilbourn, New Madrid Co., Mo.  Her marker in Sikeston City Cemetery reads:  Oscar L. Whiteside Oct. 19, 1875 July 2, 1951 Ella Whiteside July 9, 1874 Nov. 18, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Immediately after the three Garr brothers were acquitted of murdering Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt at Shelbyville, Kentucky, the three brothers were invited to dine as guests of honor of the local Methodist Ladies Aid.

             (Denhardt was tried for the murder of his girlfiend, Vera Garr Taylor, in November 1936, but the result was a hung jury.  Awaiting a second trial, he was gunned down in front of the Amrstrong Hotel in Shelbyville, Ky., by E. S. Garr, Jack Garr, and Roy Garr.  They were cleared of all charges, alleging self-defense and mental illness.  According to his death certificate, H. H. Denhardt, attorney at law, of 1034 Laurel Ave., Bowling Green, Ky., the son of William Denhardt and Margaret Geyger, natives of Germany, was born 8 Mar 1876, in Bowling Green, Ky., died 20 Sep 1937, “murdered 2 bullets through body and one through skull,” divorced husband of Elizabeth Glaze Denhardt, and was buried in Fairview Cemetery in Bowling Green, Warren Co., Ky.  His marker there reads:  Brigadier General Henry H. Denhardt Commander 75th Inf. Brigade U. S. N. C. U. S. A. Maj. 3rd Ky. Inf. Mexican Border Service 1916-17 Overseas World War June 1918 to Mar. 1919 Cited for Bravery in Argonne-Meuse Offensive 1918 Mar. 8, 1876 Sept. 20, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Nov 1937: 

Death of Lewis H. Frizzell Saddens Entire Community

             Lewis H. Frizzell, a Mounds druggist for the past 25 years, died Saturday morning, November 20, at nine o’clock at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis at the age of 48 years.

             While his death was not unexpected, his passing casts gloom over Mounds where he had so long been a very part of the community life.

             At the age of 23, Mr. Frizzell came as pharmacist to the Wood’s Drug Store, the first drug store established here.  He arrived in June 1912, one month after the death of Mr. George Wood, assisting Mrs. Wood in the management of the drug store and later taking it over, changing the name to Frizzell’s Drug Store.  At the time of his coming he became a member of the Wood household and that has since been his home.  Following a critical illness in 1922, he was tenderly nursed to returning health by the members of this household.  He was welcomed as one of the family and, having a deep fondness for music and good literature, he spent the small amount of leisure time he had at the piano and among his books.  Quiet, unassuming, intelligent, alert, his fair-mindedness made and kept him friends.

             Mr. Frizzell was made a director in the First State Bank of Mounds in its early years and 16 years ago was made vice president, which office he held at the time of his death.

             His surviving relatives and the organizations to which he belonged are mentioned in the obituary written by a Vienna friend and published below.

             Brought from St. Louis by Funeral Director G. A. James, his earthly remains were taken to the Wood residence, which had been his only home so many years.  All day long Sunday, his friends called to pay their respects to his memory.  Funeral services were held there Monday morning at 10 o’clock Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Hurley of Vienna, officiating.  Burial was made in the Vienna Cemetery amidst a profusion of the flowers he loved so well.

             Casket bearers were H. C. Moore, Sam House, J. W. Broman, J. Hobart Jenkins, Joe (Baker) Graves and Ralph Eastwood.

             Others going to Vienna Cemetery were Mrs. Ada M. Wood, Dr. and Mrs. H. J. Elkins, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, J. E. Harrison, Mr. and Mrs. George Sitter, W. L. Toler, Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Quarles, R. E. Smoot, J. B. Henson, H. H. Melton, Mrs. Virginia Webb, Mrs. O. Crawford, and daughter, Miss Mary, Misses Pauline Nicolaides, Marguerite Alexander, and Sarah Struckmeyer, Mr. and Mrs. John Ryan, all of Mounds, Mrs. Mary Anderson and daughter, Miss Pauline of Murphysboro.

OBITUARY

             The writer of this brief sketch or tribute to the life of Lewis H. Frizzell, whose earthly career has ended so early and for whom we mourn today, must say that another tragedy has come to us.  We lived close to this fellow as a babe when he was born.  His parents were near and dear friends to us if we ever had any friends.  We have known Lewis since his babyhood.  He grew up with our boy.  The two were in kindergarten, grade and high school together.  We have watched him during his days in college and during the years that have followed in his business career. Can you blame us for saying that his early going is a tragedy?

             Born in Vienna, Ill., April 27, 1889, his parents were Lewis H. and Sidney Poor Frizzell.  The father was Sheriff of Johnson County at the time Lewis was born, and it may truly be said of him that he was of two pioneer families of Johnson County.

             After completing his high school course in Vienna, he entered Northwestern University at Chicago and graduated as a pharmacist.  After completing his school work he went to Berlin, Wis., where he held a responsible position as a pharmacist for three years.

             In the year 1912 he settled in Mounds, where he has made his home since that time.  He first began as clerk in the Drug Store, which later became his own.  Those of you who are here know more of his life and the sacrifice and service he has rendered to his community than the writer could possibly know.  It has however often come to our ears that his strict attention to business—the long hours at the task and too few hours at pleasure and recreation were for his own physical hurt.

             Fifteen years ago he underwent an operation for a stomach disorder.  After his recovery from that, he was himself again physically until after the Great Flood which came last January.  His store with others was flooded and in the work at the time and in the mental strain and the hardships that followed in getting started after the cleanup that had to be, his health began to fail.  He went to Hot Springs for a stay; then to St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo; then he spent five weeks in the home of his sister, Mrs. T. D. Johnson, and husband in Cairo.  Four weeks ago he was taken to Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, where his ailment was pronounced incurable—with nothing to do but minister to his suffering and await the moment for the last farewell.  The end came at nine o’clock Saturday morning.

             His sister, Mrs. T. D. Johnson, and husband of Cairo, and his brother, Herman P. Frizzell, have been with him all or part of the time since he had been in St. Louis, and they have the consolation of knowing that everything that medical skill and tender nursing was done to have his life spared, and when that failed to have the end come as painlessly and peacefully as was possible.  Another sister, Mrs. Arista Moore, now in Virginia, survives.  He was not a member of any church body, but had expressed to his minister that he was prepared and ready to go.

             He was a World War veteran, a member of the American Legion and had received the degrees of Masonry from the Blue Lodge to the Consistory.  Peace to his memory.

 

Henry C. Lawler

             Henry Clay Lawler, age 67, better known as Harry Lawler, died at his home in Cairo Sunday afternoon, November 21, following a short illness.

             Surviving are one son, Bud Lawler, of Mound City, a former manager of Roxy Theatre in this city; one daughter, Mrs. Clarence Hearon, of Urbandale; his aged mother, Mrs. Ann Carson; and a sister, Mrs. Lula Skelton of Tyler, Texas; two brothers, Perry Carson, also of Tyler, Texas, and Ed Carson of Memphis, Tenn.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in Cairo at the Berbling Funeral Home with the Rev. Wesley Pearce officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds.

 

Father of Mark Talley Dies in Urbandale

             James Wesley Talley, age 85 years, died at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. Horace Herndon of Urbandale Sunday night, November 21, having resided there since the flood in January.  Prior to that time he had resided in Mound City for thirty-one years.

             Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Hall of Mound City and Mrs. Minnie Mohundro of Urbandale; six sons, Dolph Talley of Hickman, Ky., Noah, Gilbert and Ernest of Mound City; Mark of Mounds and Charles of Urbandale; one sister, Mrs. Hannah Moorehead of Mound City; one half-brother, Will Talley of Grand Chain; twenty-two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock at the James Funeral Home in Mound City with burial here.

 

Card of Thanks

             Since it is not possible for me to thank each one personally, I am using this means of expressing my appreciation to the friends and neighbors for their sympathy and help during the illness and following the death of L. H. Frizzell, to the minister for his words of consolation, to those who sent the beautiful flowers, to those who offered the use of their cars; to the American Legion and to the Masonic Lodge, orders in which he held membership.  All kindnesses are here gratefully acknowledged.

(Mrs.) Ada M. Wood

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Nov 1937:

INFANT DIES

             The 10-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rose died Thursday at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter VanMeter, in Mound City.  She had been ill with pneumonia.

Funeral services were conducted Saturday at the Pentecost church in Mound City.  Burial was in Spencer Heights.

             (Her death certificate states that Dorris Ann Rose was born 18 Jan 1937, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Louis Rose, a native of Arkansas, and Hattie Van Meter, a native of Cairo, Ill., died 18 Nov 1937, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLS TWO IN ROW

             Raymond Washington, colored, of Cairo, killed two other negroes on last Friday night, in Cairo, as the result of a row over the union at the Federal Barge Line.  He killed William Daniels and John Tyler and wounded a third.  The cause of the killing is said to have been over the assessment of dues on him as a nonunion worker, double that of the union man, the refusal to let him join the union and other things.  Washington testified that he had been waylaid and threatened.  “Heavy” Foster, who was an intended victim, fell to the floor at the first shot and thus escaped.

             (The death certificate states that John Tyler was born 6 Oct 1902, in Cairo, Ill., the son of John Wasly Tyler and Mammi Green, natives of Cairo, Ill., died 20 Nov 1937, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Cairo City Cemetery in Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

L. H. FRIZZELL PASSES AWAY AT BARNES HOSPITAL

             Louis H. Frizzell, who operated the Rexall Drug Store in Mounds, died at the Barnes Hospital in St. Louis Saturday morning.

             His body was brought to the home of Mrs. Ada Wood in Mounds and the funeral services were conducted Monday by Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, assisted by Rev. Hurley of Vienna, where interment was made.

             He leaves two sisters, Mrs. T. D. Johnson, Cairo, and Mrs. Arista Moore, of Virginia; also one brother, Herman Frizzell, of Vienna.

             He was a member of the American Legion and of the Masonic Order and has been vice president of the First State Bank of Mounds.

             The pallbearers were H. C. Moore, Joe Graves, J. W. Brohamn, Hobert Jenkins, Sam House, and Ralph Eastwood.

             Mr. Frizzell had been a resident of Mounds since 1913 and had many friends who will mourn his death.

             The stores were closed from 9-11 Monday morning in his honor.

             (His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads:  Lewis H. Frizzell, Jr., 1889-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. W. TALLEY DIES AT HOME OF GRANDDAUGHTER IN URBANDALE

             James Wesley Talley died at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. Horace Herndon, in Urbandale, Sunday night.

             Mr. Talley had been a resident of Mound City for 31 years and was well known here, but at the time of the flood last winter, he went to live with his granddaughter.

             He leaves two daughters, Mrs. Minnie Mohundro of Urbandale and Mrs. Myrtle Hall of Mound City; six sons, Dolphys Talley of Hickman, Ky., Mark of Mounds, Charles of Urbandale, and Noah, Gilbert, and Ernest of Mound City; also many other relatives and friends.

             The body was taken to the G. A. James Funeral Home in Mound City where the services were held Wednesday afternoon with Rev. Overby, former pastor of the Baptist Church of Mound City officiating.  Burial was made in Mounds.

             The pallbearers were J. G. Trampert, John McNeil, J. R. Read, J. M. Monan, Mark Capoot, and Dan Hurley.

             (James W. Talley married Mary E. Folks on 3 Dec 1882, in Massac Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that James Wesley Talley, retired farmer, was born 8 Aug 1855, in Dallas, Texas, the son of Allen Talley, died 21 Nov 1937, in Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Elizabeth Talley, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HENRY CLAY LAWLER DIES IN CAIRO

             Henry Clay Lawler, better known as Harry Lawler, passed away at his home in Cairo Sunday afternoon.  He had only been ill a few days.  He is survived by his aged mother, Mrs. Ann Carson; one daughter, Mrs. Clarence Hearon of Urbandale; and one son, Von “Bud” Lawler of Mound City, also brothers and sister living outside of the state.

The funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon at the Berbling Funeral Home where the body lay in state, Rev. Wesley Pearce officiating.  Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Mrs. Lawler was a former resident of Mound City.

             (Harry C. Lawler, 28, of Mound City, Ill., married Anna E. Martin, 26, of Mound City, Ill., on 4 Nov 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  F. M. Carson married Ann H. Lawler on 17 Oct 1875, in Pulaski Co., Ill. His death certificate states that Henry Clay Lawler, ship carpenter, of Cairo, Ill., was born 20 Nov 1870, in Olmstead, Ill., died 21 Nov 1937, in Cairo, Ill., divorced husband of Nan Lawler, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis McIntosh and son, Lariel Dean, attended the funeral of Uncle Alex Smoot at Christian Chapel Friday.  (Swan Pond)

             (Alexander Smoot married Rachel C. Jones on 25 Sep 1870, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Alexander Smoot was born 28 Jul 1851, in Wetaug, Ill., the son of John Smoot and Sally Peeler, natives of Wetaug, Ill., died 17 Nov 1937, in Jonesboro, Ill., the husband of Rachael Smoot, and was buried in Christian Chapel Cemetery in Dongola, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Dec 1937:

FIRE AT CYPRESS FATAL; WOMAN KNOWN HERE

             A fire on Tuesday night of last week at Cypress was fatal to the ____ of Mrs. James Wildy, who ___ years in Mound City and ___ is now at Cairo.  She was Mrs. ___ward Harlan, and frequently ___d in Mound City.  At one time ___ with Mr. and Mrs. Willis ____.  She was about 50 years of age.

             A small boy, Ury Sheffer, 4 years old, also perished as the result of the fire.

             ___ the garage, owned by Har___ Carter, were five apartments.  ___ was a rear and a front en___.  The fire started in one of ___ apartments and was well under ___ when discovered.  The man who saw the smoke coming from the apartment and opened the door was nearly overcomes by the heat ___ make that burst out.  Probable ___ door cut off one avenue ___ for some.

             ___ were accounted for as the fire ___, save these two.  It was ___ then to get back up to the apartments and a hole was cut ___ the garage below through the ___ and the bodies thus removed.  Though fire had not reached them, ___ had been suffocated by smoke and heat.

             The boy revived under artificial respiration treatment to die about ___ hours later.

It is presumed that the boy ran to the apartment of Mrs. Harlan and they could not escape.  Some ___ seeing the woman at the window ___.  Since it was only two stories, __ the body could probably have ___ had he been lowered and ___ from the window.

             (William H. Shourd married Sarah P. Dunn on 19 Dec 1880, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Lou Harlan, of Cache, Ill., was born 21 Jul 1882, in Mt. Pisgah, Ill., the daughter of William Shourd and Sarah Dunn, natives of Tennessee, died 23 Nov 1937, in Cypress, Ill., the widow of Elijah Harlan, and was buried in Beech Ridge Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Lou Harlan July 21, 1882 Nov. 23, 1937.  The death certificate of Donald Ury Shaffer states that he was born 4 Nov 1932, in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Thomas Ury Shaffer, a native of Cypress, Ill., and Mildred Templeton, a native of Illinois, died 24 Nov 1937, in Cypress, Ill., and was buried in Cypress Cemetery.  His marker in Cypress Masonic Cemetery reads:  Donald Urie Sheffer 1932-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BROTHER OF MRS. MERTZ DIES

             ___ Gray, brother of Mrs. ___ Mertz, formerly of this city, died at his home in Beardstown, ___ this morning.

             He is the son of the late James ___ of Cairo, and leaves his wife __ daughters, Mrs. Ralph ___ nier of Waukegan, Ill., Mrs. ___ Beaty of Monmouth, Ill., Mrs. ___ Rebman of Frederick, Ill., and ___ and Ruth; also two sons, Jack and James all of Beardstown.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning at St. Alexis Catholic Church.

             (This may be the same person as James T. Gray who married Estella C. Eisenhauer on 26 Oct 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, James T. Gray, a miller, was born 9 Feb 1870, in Cairo, Ill., the son of James Gray, a native of New York, and Susan Vincent, a native of Tennessee, died 26 Nov 1937, in Beardstown, Cass Co., Ill., the husband of Cora Gray, and was buried in St. Alexius Cemetery in Beardstown.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATHS

             ___ June Palmer, age 12, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Palmer in Pulaski.  She had been ill only a short time.  Besides her parents, she leaves one brother, Vaughn; and three sisters, Evelyn Mize, Mrs. Elaine Lentz, and Betty Jo Palmer; and other relatives and friends who will ___ her death.

             The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Charles A. Day at the Christian church in Pulaski ___day afternoon.  Burial was in Rose Hill Cemetery under the direction of George C. Crain.

             (Her death certificate states that Letty June Palmer was born 17 Jun 1925, in Pulaski, Ill., the daughter of Arthur Palmer, a native of Pulaski, Ill., and Nellie Gillespie, a native of Harvell, Ill., died 26 Nov 1937, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Letty J. Palmer 1925-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

___Baker of Dongola passed away at his home Saturday after an illness of pneumonia, which lasted about ten days.

             He was born and reared near Dongola.  ___Baker spent his entire life in that community except for a period of about six months, which time he was overseas as a soldier during the World War.

             He is survived by this wife, Velva; __ children, Bernice, Louise and ___; also three brothers and four sisters.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola with Rev. S. ___ of Mt. Vernon officiating.  Interment was made in Chapel Cemetery.  Elmer J. Ford was in charge.

             (The death certificate states that Edward Baker, farmer, was born 29 Sep 1889, in Dongola, Ill., the son of John P. Baker, a native of Germany, and Lilly Drumgool, a native of Indiana, died 27 Nov 1937, in Dongola, Ill., the husband of Velva Baker, and was buried in Chapel Cemetery in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Edward Baker 1889-1937 Velva Baker 1897-1987.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Dec 1937: 

Union County Pioneer Woman Dies in Cairo

             Mrs. Agnes Rendleman, age 96 years, died Saturday, November 27, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Leidigh, of Cairo.  She was the grandmother of Henry Gunn of this city and her body was brought to his home to rest in state until Sunday afternoon when funeral services were held at the Alto Pass Congregational church.

             Mrs. Rendleman was born in Scott County, Mo., in 1841 and was married to Henry Rendleman of Union County, Ill., in 1861.  She is survived by six children, two children and her husband having preceded her in death.  Those surviving are Mrs. Eugenia Gunn of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Fred Leidigh of Cairo, Mrs. Nellie Donovan of Mounds, Julius and Harry Rendleman of Alto Pass and Crawford Rendleman of Anna; thirty-six grandchildren, forty-two great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild.

             The Rendleman home was on the crest of Bald Knob Mountain near Alto Pass.  Visitors were kindly permitted to visit the observatory on the roof where a large telescope permitted a fine view over the surrounding country.  There, even after the death of Mr. Rendleman, Mrs. Rendleman and one daughter continued to live for many years.

             (According to her death certificate, Agnes Rendleman of Cairo, Ill., was born 26 Jul 1841, in Scott Co., Mo., died 27 Nov 1937, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., widow of Henry Rendleman, and was buried in Alto Pass Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Henry Rendleman 1840-1914 Agnes Rendleman his wife 1841-1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Dec 1937: 

A. C. Auld Dies Suddenly Early Sunday Morning

             The community was shocked Sunday morning to hear of the sudden death of Alonzo Conn Auld, age 62 years.  While he had been afflicted with heart trouble for the past ten years or more years, he was looking well and able to be out among his friends each day.  Friday evening he was suddenly taken seriously ill.  Suffering intensely he lived only until Sunday morning at 4 o’clock.

             Born at Denison, Ohio, he moved to Mounds many years ago.  He had been in the employ of the Illinois Central, retiring in February 1926 after twenty-nine years of service.  He was a member of the B. of L. F. & T. at Carbondale.

             He leaves three sisters, Miss Jessie Auld, with whom he made his home, Mrs. Alex Deeslie and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun.  His mother and two brothers had preceded him in death since the coming of the Auld family to Mounds from Ohio.  Also surviving are a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the home with Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational Church, officiating.  Burial was made in the family lot in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Brother of A. S. Calhoun Dies Suddenly in Iowa

A.    S. Calhoun was called to Waterloo, Iowa, the first of last week by the death of his brother, A. W. Calhoun, which occurred Monday, November 29.  Mr. Calhoun, a conductor on the Illinois Central between Fort Dodge and Waterloo, was on his home run and was only about six miles from Waterloo when he was suddenly stricken and died.  Funeral services were held at Waterloo Thursday, December 2.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery in Waterloo, Black Hawk Co., Iowa reads:  Albert W. Calhoun 1875-1937 Katherine S. Calhoun 1875-1949.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Marguerite Delahunt

             Mrs. Marguerite Delahunt, age 87, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. L. D. Smith, in Villa Ridge Sunday morning, December 5.  Her husband died a number of years ago.

             Mrs. Delahunt was born in St. Louis, Mo., on January 1, 1851.  She was a graduate nurse and practiced that profession in her younger days.

             Surviving are one brother, James W. Donnel, of Eureka, Calif.; one sister, Mrs. Smith, with who she made her home; also several nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held at St. Raphael’s Church in this city Tuesday morning at eight o’clock.  Burial was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing.

            

Brother of Mrs. W. L. Toler Dies Early Tuesday Morning

             Stephen Alpheus Blood, brother of Mrs. W. L. Toler, died early Tuesday morning, December 7, at his home in Owensville, Ind., following a long illness.

             Surviving are his wife, Jessie McClure Blood, of Owensville; one son, S. A. Blood, Jr., of Owensville; one daughter, Mrs. Bess Williams, of Grayville, Ill.; two sisters, Mrs. Ada Whitney of Mt. Carmel, Ill., and Mrs. Grace Cabot Toler, of Mounds; two grandchildren, William Alpheus Williams and Wanda Ruth Blood; also a number of nieces and nephews.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at Owensville, with interment at Grayville, his former home.

             (Sephen Alpheus Bood was born 4 Jul 1860, in Grayville, Edwards Co., Ill., and died 7 Dec 1937, the son of Sylvester Henry Blood and Prudence Jane Hicks.  He was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in Grayville, Edwards Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter).

 

Dongola Man Dies

             Rufus Edward Bishop, age 59 years, died at his home near Dongola Sunday night, December 5, following a two-year illness of heart trouble.  Formerly he had been a railroad employee.

             Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Flora Cagle of Marion and Mrs. Mary Yost of Anna; four brothers, James, Jonah, Oscar and George.  The five bachelor brothers had lived together at their home in Union County for many years.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10:30 o’clock at Pleasant Grove Church, the Rev. Earl Throgmorton of this city officiating.  Burial was made in McGinnis Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

             (Abram Bishop married Sarah M. W. Brown on 10 Dec 1865, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Rufus Edward Bishop, engineer, was born 11 Mar 1878, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Abram Bishop, a native of Union Co., Ill., and Sarah Brown, a native of Tennessee, died 5 Dec 1937, in Road District 2, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in McGinnis Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Adel Burke of St. Louis arrived Monday to attend the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Margaret Dale, who passed away at the home of her sister, Mrs. Kate Smith, Sunday morning.  Mrs. Smith is slowly improving from a serious illness.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Dec 1937:

KISSED THE LADIES

             The death of “Patience Worth” or Mrs. H. H. Rodgers, formerly Miss Pearl Pollard, recalls to many the story of her uncle, George Cordingly, who grew up here and who went to Chicago where as a spiritualist he attained some prominence and considerable wealth.

             He returned here to the funeral of a relative at one time, dressed in a high hat and cut away coat.  His mustache and arched eyebrows gave him an unusual appearance, and he was quite gallant.

             Among other things, he kissed nearly every woman he knew.  There seems to have been few who escaped his caress and greeting.  Even the married ladies who went to the funeral and hung back in the corner of the church did not.  He spied them, and they were warmly saluted—and went home to explain to their husbands.

             Cordingly is dead now, but a lot of the women he kissed that day are still living here and around in these parts.

             Cordingly attended public school here, and he used to send the school into a panic when he went into a trance, grasping his seat and staring like a fixed image.  Later he held séances here, as many people will recall.  In fact, here and other places over the county has had and may still have a considerable following of spiritualism which Cordingly, the man who kissed the ladies, helped along.

 

MYSTERY STILL SURROUNDS DEATH OF MAN AT PULASKI

Mystery still surrounds the death of Doc Thompson, colored, found dead on the pavement early Sunday morning in Pulaski.  He had been run over by a truck but may have been dead or unconscious when run over.

Two women saw him lying on the pavement, stopped their car and tried to flag a truck which was coming south.  The truck ran over Thompson as he lay prostrate and authorities investigating could not decide if Thompson was dead before the truck ran over him or was unconscious.  There were some marks on him that the truck did not make.  He was known to have been drinking during the night.

 

MRS. MARGUERITE DELAHUNT DIES AT VILLA RIDGE

Mrs. Marguerite Delahunt, age 87, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. L. D. Smith, at Villa Ridge Sunday morning at 1 o’clock.

She leaves one brother, James W. Donnell, of Eureka, Calif.; and the sister at whose home she died, also many nieces and nephews.

Services were held at St. Raphael’s Church in Mounds Tuesday, with Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

(Her death certificate states that Marguerite Delahunt, retired nurse, was born 1 Jan 1851, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of James Donnell, a native of Pennsylvania, and Marguerite Gander, died 5 Dec 1937, in Villa Ridge, Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FOREST L. HILEMAN PASSES AWAY AFTER LONG ILLNESS

Forest L. Hileman, died at the age of 40, at the Veteran’s Hospital at Jacksonville, Ill., on Saturday, Dec. 4.

He leaves his wife and one son, Donald; two sisters, Mrs. Florence House, of Mound City, and Mrs. Daisy Walker of Pulaski; a brother, Wayne of Olmsted; and his father, Henry Hileman; Mrs. Lottie Chittick of Mound City, and Edith Chittick, his aunts; and one uncle, Hiram Chittick, of Olmstead.

(The death certificate states that Forrest Hileman, farmer at Olmstead, Ill., was born 3 Jun 1897, in Illinois, died 4 Dec 1937, in Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Ill., husband of Nettie Pearl Hileman, and was buried in Concord Cemetery at Olmstead, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Forest L. Hileman Nov 1897- Dec 1937.  The application for a military headstone states Forest Lawson Hileman enlisted 18 Dec 1917, as a private in 1st Co., Air Service, and was honorably discharged 31 Dec 1918.  He last served with 501 Squadron, Air Service Division.—Darrel Dexter)

            

B. B. CAUBLE DIES

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at the Center Church for B. B. Cauble, who died at his home near Olmsted, Wednesday of last week.  Rev. Thomas of Pulaski officiated.  Burial was made in the Concord Cemetery.

(His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted, Ill., reads:  Benjamin Caudle 1863-1937 S. Matilda Caudle 1861-1922.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ALONZO CONN AULD PASSES AWAY AT MOUNDS

Alonzo Conn Auld, age 62, died at his home in Mounds Sunday morning after a brief illness of three days.  A resident of Mounds for the past 42 years, Auld was employed by the Illinois Central until his retirement in 1926, after serving the railroad for 29 years.

His three sisters, Mrs. Alex Deeslie, Miss Jessie Auld, and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun, all of Mounds, survive to mourn his passing.

Funeral services by Rev. S. C. Benninger, Congregational minister, of Grand Chain were conducted at the home on Tuesday afternoon.

The casket bearers were of the Brotherhood of Local Fireman and Engineers of which Auld was a member.

Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

(His death certificate states that Alonzo Conn Auld, retired railroad engineer, was born 10 Mar 1875, in Dennison, Ohio, the son of Samuel A. Auld and Alwilda Holmes, natives of Harrison Co., Ohio, died 5 Dec 1937, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Alonzo Conn Auld Mar. 10, 1875 Dec. 5, 1937.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Medium of Literary Note Was Born Here

             Mrs. H. H. Rodgers, who wrote many poems and books thru the guidance of “Patience Worth,” died in Santa Monica, Calif., last Friday.

She was the daughter of Mrs. Molly Pollard, formerly Molly Cordingly, of Mound City, and was born here in 1883.  They lived in a little three-room house where the Mound City High School now stands and quite a few of the “ole timers” will remember Mrs. Pollard and her daughter, Pearl.

The family lived in St. Louis at the time of Pearl’s marriage to John H. Curran, former State Immigration Commissioner, Mr. Curran died in 1921 and in 1936 she married Dr. Horace Henry Rodgers, a retired physician of California.  Dr. Rodgers is a brother of Mrs. Fred Butler, late of Cairo.

Patience Worth came to Mrs. Rodgers, who was then Mrs. John Curran, on a July evening in 1913.  Mrs. Rogers and Mrs. Emily Grant Hutchins, wife of the Secretary of Tower Grove Park Board in St. Louis, were sitting at an Ouija board when the pointer on the board wrote this statements, “Many moons ago I lived.  Again I come.  Patience Worth is my name.”  From that night on, “Patience Worth” directed the mind of Mrs. Rodgers.

She did not claim to be a medium or a spiritualist, but did claim to have a religious vision.  She would gaze into space and see things that had happened many years, even centuries ago, and when scientist and professors would do research work on these “visions,” they found that she had seen them correctly to the minutest detail.  Yet she could not foretell the future.

She was called a psychic wonder and this power that she possessed would give her the ability to say what was in her mind.  She never attempted to write any of her visions, but would dictate word for word what she saw and what “Patience Worth” directed.

She had only an average education, but dictated a 600-page book in Old English that a prominent English professor declared was the most perfect copy since Chaucer.  Her most prominent books are “Patience Worth,” “The Pot upon the Wheel,” “Hope Trueblood,” and “The Sorry Tale.”  All of her works are of a religious nature and most of them are above the intelligence of the average person.  Psychologists who have examined her state that she must have a “power” as she does not have the faculties to originate the material used in her prose and verse.

She is survived by a stepdaughter of her former marriage, Miss Julia Curran, and an adopted daughter who she called Patience Worth.  She is now Mrs. Patrician W. Peters, of Santa Monica.

George Cordingly, an uncle, did practice spiritualism and had a cult in Chicago.  Word of his death was received here this past summer.

Mrs. Rodgers who married three or four times during her life, visited Mound City a number of times.  She had a charming personality.  She sang at the funeral of her mother.

(George G. Pollard married Mary E. Cordingley on 6 May 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John H. Curran, of St. Louis, Mo., married on 27 Jan 1907, in Bismark, St. Francois Co., Mo., Mo., Pearl Pollard of Bismark, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Funeral services for Forest Hileman were held at the Olmsted Methodist Church Monday afternoon, Rev. Thomas officiating.  Burial was in the Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James in charge.  (Olmstead)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Dec 1937:

FORMER MOUNDS EDITOR DIES IN BEAUMONT, TEXAS

             Word has been received here of the death of Norman M. Harris at one time the editor of the Mounds paper about 20 years ago and a writer, while running that paper that aroused the wrath of many and diverse persons.