Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

3 Jan. - 25 Dec. 1936

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Jan 1936:

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR GEORGE F. CORZINE

Funeral services for George F. Corzine, who passed away suddenly Saturday afternoon, were held Monday afternoon at the Shiloh Church and interment was made in the Shiloh Cemetery, Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.

Mr. Corzine was 71 years of age.  He died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charlie Farnsworth, at Pulaski after a very brief illness.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Katie Corzine; two daughters, Mrs. Farnsworth and Mrs. Otis Lindsey, both of Pulaski; one son, Cecil Corzine, of Zeigler; and many other relatives and friends.

George C. Crain directed the funeral.

(George B. Corzine married Anna Delila Corzine on 26 Aug 1841, in Union Co., Ill.  Samuel Corzine married Amy Delilah Laws on 28 May 1840, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that George Frank Corzine, barber, was born 19 Jul 1864, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Bert Corzine, a native of Dongola, Ill., died 28 Dec 1935, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Kate Essex Corzine, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  G. Franklin Corzine July 16, 1864 Dec. 28, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TRANSIENT CAMP SHOOTING MAY BE A MURDER CASE

If Dell Parks, 30 years of age, a transient camp employee at Ullin, dies in St. Mary’s Infirmary, Homer Johnson, 36 years of age, another camp employee, may have a murder charge against him.  The shooting happened Monday night.

The two men and the two women, Mrs. Joe Webb and Lorene Dillow, were together and the men got into an argument about going on a car ride.  One is said to have used a blackjack and the other retaliated with a gun.  Parks was shot in the abdomen, his intestines cut seven times and a kidney injured.

He was living Thursday, but his chances of life were very slim.  Parks seems to have no relatives or home, while Johnson is said to come from Sikes, Louisiana.

 

NEAL CRICK DIED AT HOME IN THIS CITY

Neal Crick, age 24 years, passed away Friday night at 11:20 o’clock at his home in Mound City, following a brief illness of pneumonia.

He is survived by his wife, three small children, his mother, Mrs. Belle Crick of Hopkinsville, Ky.; two sisters, Mrs. Ira Chester and Miss Dora Crick of Hopkinsville; four brothers, Buster of Hopkinsville, Elson and Linzy of East Prairie, Mo., and Cletus of Mound City.  Funeral services were held at the residence on Poplar Street Monday morning at 11 o’clock and interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Neal Crick, laborer, was born 13 Apr 1911, in Hopkinsville, Ky., the son of Archie Crick, a native of Kentucky, and Belle McClain, a native of Arkansas, died 27 Dec 1935, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Tossie Crick, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR JAMES C. YOUNTKIN

Funeral services for James Calvan Yountkin, age 83 years, who passed away at his home near Villa Ridge Thursday morning, December 27, were held Friday morning at 11 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Kate Clark, of Grand Chain, Rev. Monroe Osbone of Cairo Gospel Mission officiating.

Mr. Yountkin fell about two months ago fracturing his hip and he never recovered from the injury.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Jane Yountkin; and the following daughters:  Mrs. Carrie Brooks of McLeansboro, Illinois, Mrs. Delia Castleberry of Murphysboro, Illinois, Ola McGinnis of Carbondale, Illinois, and Mrs. Madge Dean of Kankakee, Illinois.

The Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

(James C. Younkins married Jane Finchum, on 20 Aug 1878, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that James Calvin Yountkin, farmer, was born 7 Oct 1853, in Williamson Co., Ill., died 24 Dec 1935, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Jane Yountkin, and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  James C. Younkin 1853-1935 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

 

B. F. MERCHANT DIES AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

B. F. Merchant, age 71 years, died at his home in Grand Chain Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock, following an illness of several years.  Mr. Merchant had not been confined to his bed, but a short time before his death.  He had undergone several operations and several years ago his life was despaired of but he got better.  Since his illness, his wife has passed away.  He was born and reared in Grand Chain and he is a lifelong resident of that city.

Surviving him are his daughter, Mrs. Rossie Moreland of Grand Chain; one son, Earl Merchant, of Grand Chain; five brothers, John of Karnak, Ed of Los Angeles, Calif., Will of Texarkana, Tex., Jeff of Grayville, Ill., Ernest of Wheatland, Ark.; Mrs. Mary Jainet of Indianapolis; four grandchildren and other relatives and a large number of friends.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Christian church of Grand Chain, the Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(B. F. Merchant, 27, engineer, born in Grand Chain, Ill., son of John Merchant and Luesa C. Love, married on 14 Jan 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Minnie Berry, 17, of Grand Chain, Ill., born in Massac Co., Ill., daughter of George Berry and Viola Morehead.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Frank B. Merchant Feb. 26, 1865 Dec. 27, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KARNAK CHILD DIES MONDAY MORNING

Steve Hill, Jr., seven months old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hill, died Monday morning at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Hill of Karnak.

Left to mourn the passing of the little one besides his parents and grandparents, are several aunts and uncles and other relatives.

Funeral services were held at 1:30 o’clock Wednesday afternoon at the Pentecostal church, Rev. Mrs. Hearn officiating at the funeral.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Steve Hill, Jr., was born 27 May 1935, in Karnak, Ill., the son of Steve Hill, a native of Karnak, Ill., and Delphis Hill, a native of Massac Co., Ill., died 30 Dec 1935, in Karnak, Ill., and was buried in Anderson Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Steve Hill Jr. May 27, 1935 Dec. 30, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AMOUNT OF MONEY FOUND IN BURNED HOME SMALL

The amount of money found in the charred remains of the home of Sarah Washington, colored, was small.  It was somewhere around $5 according to Mrs. Cotton of St. Louis, sister of the victim of the fire.

Rumors placed the amount anywhere from $5 to $500.

However, it was the opinion of Mrs. Cotton that some money went up in flames.  She took care of the affairs of her sister and only a short while before the fatal fire she turned over $35 to her.  It is her opinion that most of this burned.  Also the aged lady liked to keep money around the house and it is possible that she had money secreted that no one knew about.  If so, this probably burned unless it was silver.  In this case, it may be found yet.

 

FATHER AND SON KILLED BY I. C. TRAIN

Walter Benefield, 46, Anna, carpenter, and his son, Billie, 12, died Monday afternoon of last week in the Hale Willard Memorial Hospital from injuries they received a short time before when an Illinois Central passenger train hit the car in which they were riding at a crossing in Anna.

The accident happened on the first crossing south of the main crossing in Anna at about 12:30 o’clock.  The train was the second section of the No. 2, fast Illinois Central passenger train.  The Benefields were crossing the tracks to Highway 51.

It is believed that Benefield was watching the southbound train which was standing at the station in Anna and did not see the approaching northbound train.  The train struck the rear end of the Model T sedan a few inches in front of the rear wheel.—Cobden Review

(The death certificate of Walter Benefield, carpenter, states he was born 1 Jan 1889, in Alto Pass, Ill., the son of Theodore Benefield, died 23 Dec 1935, in Anna, Ill., the husband of Fannie Benefield, and was buried at Reynoldsburg, Johnson Co., Ill.  The death certificate of  Billie Benefield states he was born 20 Apr 1923, in Elco, Ill., the son of Walter Benefield, a native of Alto Pass, Ill., and Fannie Hamming, died 23 Dec 1935, in Anna, Ill., and was buried at Reynoldsburg, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Jan 1936: 

Neil Crick

             Neil Crick, age 24 years, died at his home in Mound City, Friday night at 11:20 o’clock following an illness of about 10 days of pneumonia.  He is survived by his wife and three small children; his mother, Mrs. Belle Crick, of Hopkinsville, Ky.; two sisters, Mrs. Ira Chester and Miss Dora Crick, of Hopkinsville, Ky.; four brothers, Buster of Hopkinsville, Ky., Elson and Linzy of East Prairie, Mo., and Cletus of Mound City.  Funeral services were conducted at the residence in Mound City Monday morning at 11 o’clock by Rev. Harp and interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Karnak Infant Dies

             Steve Hill, Jr., the seven months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hill of Karnak, died Monday morning at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Hill of Karnak.

             Surviving are the parents, grandparents, and other relatives.
             Funeral services were held at 1:30 o’clock Wednesday afternoon at the Pentecostal church of Karnak, Mrs. Hearn officiating.  Burial was made in the Anderson Cemetery with Wilson Funeral Services directing.

 

Well Known Grand Chain Resident Dies December 27

             B. F. Merchant, age 71 years, died Friday afternoon, December 27, at his home in Grand Chain.  Mr. Merchant was born and reared his family there.  He was the son of pioneer parents.

             Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Rossie Moreland of Grand Chain; one son, Earl Merchant, of Grand Chain; and five brothers, John of Karnak, Ed of Los Angeles, Calif., Will of Texarkana, Tex., Jeff of Grayville, Ill., Ernest of Wheatland, Ark.; one sister, Mary Jaimet of Indianapolis, Ind.; four grandchildren and other more distant relatives.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Christian church of Grand Chain, the Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  Burial was at Grand Chain, G. A. James directing.

 

George Frank Corzine

George Frank Corzine, age 71, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charlie Farnsworth near Pulaski, Saturday, Dec. 29.  He had been in failing health for some time but his death was unexpected.  Mr. Corzine was at one time a resident of Mounds, his daughter, Mrs. Farnsworth having taught in the Thistlewood grade school.

             The following obituary has been sent us:

             George Frank Corzine was born on July 19, 1864, near Dongola, Illinois, the son of Burton and Amy Corzine.  He professed faith in Christ and joined the Baptist Church in young manhood.

             On September 23, 1891, he was married to Miss Kate Essex and to this union six children were born, Cecil, Harry, Grace, Marie, Mabel and Katherine.  Three of the children, Grace, Harry and Katherine preceded him in death.

             The greater part of his life was spent in or near Dongola, where he was engaged at his trade of barber.  For the past 17 years he has been a resident of this community.

             He was always an active church member giving of his time and substance freely at all times.  He served as Sunday school superintendent at Dongola for many years and also served as Superintendent at Shiloh until about three years ago being forced to retire due to failing health.

             He leaves to mourn his death, his beloved wife and three children, Cecil of Zeigler, Marie Farnsworth, Mabel Lindsey both of Pulaski; 6 grandchildren, as well as a host of friends.

             Funeral services were held at Shiloh Church Monday at one o’clock conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola with burial at Shiloh Cemetery, George C. Crain directing.

            

Obituary

             Inella Sue, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert A. Eastman was born March 8, 1935, at 12:40 a.m. at Ullin, Illinois, after several days’ illness of double pneumonia.  The most tender care and best of medical attention was of no avail.  To know little Inella was to love her.  She had a friendly smile for everyone and was a ray of sunshine in the community where she lived.

             She will be sadly missed in the home where she spent but a few short months.  She leaves to mourn her loss, besides her father and mother, one brother, Evan Verneil; one sister, Mary Wilberts; two grandmothers, one grandfather and several aunts and uncles.  One brother, Baxter Burdell, and one little sister, Imogene Agnes, have gone on to await her coming, the latter having died just two years and nine months ago.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We take this method of thanking our friends of Mounds and Ullin for the help and assistance shown us during the illness and death of our darling baby, Inella Sue.  Especially do we thank all those who contributed toward the beautiful flowers, the quartet for the beautiful songs and Rev. Glotfelty for his words of sympathy and condolence.

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Eastman and children

Ullin, Ill.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Jan 1936: 

INFANT BURIED

             The stillborn son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Bonner was buried Saturday afternoon with short services conducted at the home of Mr. Bonner’s parents by Rev. Ellsworth Lyon.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that a male infant was stillborn 4 Jan 1936, in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of R. Wilbert Bonner, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Florence Parker, a native of Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Jan 1936:

STANLEY VISE, FORMERLY OF THIS CITY, DIED ON CHRISTMAS

Stanley Vise, who formerly lived in Mound City when his father and mother operated the St. Charles Hotel, died on Christmas Day in St. Louis of a heart attack while visiting with his wife’s relatives.

Vise was 26 years of age, the son of John H. and Dollie Hogan Vise.  He was born at Macedonia and attended high school at Benton where he made a good record in high school athletics.  Later he went to James Milliken University where he was captain of the football team his senior years, which was the year that his parents were in Mound City.

When the family left here, his father died soon after and then he began working for Campbell Soups and had headquarters at Murphysboro.  He was married to Miss Adele Knies on June 30, 1934, and it was at the home of her father that he died suddenly.

Besides his wife and his brother, Harry Vise, of Omaha, Neb., survive.  An uncle, Dr. H. A. Vise, of Benton and other relatives are listed among relatives.  The funeral and interment were at Benton two days after Christmas.

(He was buried in Masonic and Odd Fellows Cemetery in Benton, Franklin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

M. E. MINISTER DIES

Rev. Charles Atchinson, age 79 years, passed away at his home in Mt. Vernon, Illinois, December 22, 1935.  He was one of the oldest ministers in southern Illinois conference of the M. E. Church.  He retired several years ago after serving the church 50 years.  He was well and favorably known for 30 years in and around Ullin, having been minister for 4 years there, and has been back a number of times to hold meetings and preach revivals.  He was a great evangelist and built the Beech Grove Church.  He was never happier than when working in God’s vineyard and always praised God for his victories.

Several hundred souls found Christ through his labors.  He would go through all kinds of weather to hold meetings or to rectify a sin-sick soul and said he don’t think much of a religion that wouldn’t stand a wetting.  He was witty and always had an answer for all at all times.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Jan 1936:

CHARLES HONNARD, 54, DIED AT MOUNDS SUNDAY

Charles Honnard, for a number of years a resident of Pulaski, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. ___ Essex, in Mounds Sunday afternoon.

Besides his wife, Mrs. Millie Honnard, there survives one son, War___ of Champaign; one daughter, Mrs. Cecil Essix; mother, Mrs. Lizzie Honnard, Mounds; and one grandson, Homer Essex of Mounds.  Funeral services were held at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church at Pulaski Wednesday afternoon and interment was made in the Rose Hill Cemetery.

(George C. Honnard, 27, attendant at the asylum in Anna, Ill., born in Boston, Mass., the son of Joseph Honnard and Miss Ernstine, married on 3 Oct 1878, at the house of Paul Lingle in Union Co., Ill., Lizzie Lingle, 20, from Cobden, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Mr. Lingle and Miss Barringer.  Jefferson Lingle married Nancy Barringer on 6 Oct 1853, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Charles Joseph Honnard, farmer, was born 1 Aug 1881, in Cobden, Ill., the son of George Honnard, a native of France, and Lizzie Lingle, a native of Cobden, Ill., died 12 Jan 1936, in Road District 7, Mounds, Ill., husband of Millie Honnard, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Charles J. Honnard 1881-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SON OF MR. AND MRS. WALTER UNGER DIES

Rudolph Henry, 3-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Unger, died last Saturday morning after a rather short serious illness.  Although he had been under the care of a physician for some time with a minor ailment he was by no means seriously ill prior to Thursday morning.

On Thursday morning it was noticed that he was worse.  A physician was called who pronounced it pneumonia.

On Saturday morning at 8:30 his illness overcame him.

He is survived by his parents, one brother, Robert; paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Unger of Olmsted; and a number of other relatives. One brother preceded him in death.

Rudolph Henry attended the Baptist Sunday school and was well liked by the classmates in the beginners’ class.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the home of the parents.  Rev. J. L. Wall conducted the services.  A quartette from the Baptist church sang several touching hymns.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral arrangements.

(His death certificate states that Rudolph Henry Unger was born 6 Aug 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the son of Walter Unger and Ellen Welch, natives of Olmstead, Ill., died 11 Jan 1936, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds reads:  Rudy Unger Aug. 6, 1932 Jan. 11, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CHARLES OLIVER, PULASKI DIED SUDDENLY SATURDAY

Charles Oliver, 58 years of age, died suddenly Saturday afternoon at his home in Pulaski.  His death was attributed to a heart attack.

Surviving him are four daughters, Mrs. Libby Staten and Mrs. Florence Denton of Mound City, Mrs. Birdie Salmon of Cairo, and Mrs. Roxie Roche of Pulaski; two sons, Ralph of Buncombe and Herbert of Pulaski; one sister, Mrs. May Modglin, Unity; and one brother, Jake Oliver, Mound City; and eleven grandchildren.

Funeral services were held in the Mt. Pleasant Church Tuesday afternoon with Rev. H. S. Smith officiating.  Interment was made in the Rose Hill Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Charles Oliver, laborer, was born 16 May 1877, in Kentucky, the son of Jesse Oliver and Martha Hawkins, a native of Tennessee, died 11 Jan1936, in Pulaski, Ill., husband of Ruth Oliver, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Charles Oliver 1878-1936 Ruth L. Oliver 1887-1940.—Darrel Dexter)

 

81-YEAR-OLD KARNAK MAN DIED LAST SUNDAY

James Belford, of Karnak died at the Anna State Hospital last Sunday.  He had reached the advanced age of 81 years.

Surviving him are 3 sons, Ray of Karnak, Russell of Golconda, and Ross of Oakland City, Ind.

Funeral services were held at the Sulphur Springs (Ill.) Church Tuesday afternoon and interment was made in the cemetery of the same name.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

             (Samuel L. Belford married Nancy Mary Williams on 21 Apr 1852, in Pope Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that James Belford, farmer, of Karnak, Ill., was born 20 Dec 1864, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of Sam Belford and Sarah Williams, died 12 Jan 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Mary H. Belford, and was buried in Sulphur Springs Cemetery in Eddyville, Pope Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  James W. Belford 1855-1936 Mary E. Belford 1866-1921.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BUNCOMBE WOMAN DIES

Mrs. Mary Jane Walker passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lula Robertson, in Buncombe early Tuesday morning at the age of 87 years.

Surviving her are two brothers, Logan Wiggins and M. C. Wiggins of St. Louis; one sister, Francis Wiggins of Carbondale; and six sons and two daughters, W. A. Walker, C. A. Walker and C. C. Walker of Buncombe, Fred Walker, Anna, T. J. Walker, Boles, and F. M. Walker, Johnston City, and Josie Escue of Goreville; and a host of other relatives and friends.

Services were held in the M. E. church, Buncombe, Thursday morning at ten o’clock with Rev. E. O. Allen of Johnston City officiating.  Interment was made in the Cedar Grove Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(John W. Walker married Mary J. Wiggins on 12 Apr 1865, in Johnson Co., Ill.  William M. Escue married Josephine Walker on 10 Sep 1891, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mary Jane Walker was born about 1849, the daughter of John Wiggin, and died 14 Jan 1936, in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., the wife of J. W. Walker.  Her marker at Cedar Grove Cemetery at Elvira, Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Mother Mary J. Walker his wife 1848-1936 John W. Walker 1847-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

BEER AND GIN MAY BRING NEGRO TO MURDER CHARGE

Too much beer and gin may send Sylvester Gregg, 71 years of age, colored, to the penitentiary for the rest of his life.  Gregg was drunk and while drunk he fired his big gun, a 44-40 single action Frontier model Colts into the leg of one Booker Johnson, who lives in the drainage district.  The shooting happened on January 4 between Mound City and Mounds.

Lena Dunlap, who was a housekeeper, was shot in the face and she may die.  Infection in the wounds seems to be hard to control.

Gregg was drinking his beer and gin.  He had hired Johnson to bring him wood, and Johnson brought him a load of wood.  The story is that he invited him in and that about this time Lena Dunlap, who is 35 years old, appeared to do some housework.  Suddenly Gregg wanted to know why Johnson was in the house and ordered him out.  Johnson left and out in the yard, Gregg fired and Johnson was wounded in the leg.

Lena Dunlap wanted to know why Gregg had shot him, and Gregg turned the gun on her, shooting her in the face.

The shells in the gun were old and the lead was badly corroded.  It is presumed that this corrosion a lead sulphate of some kind, was poison and infection developed and Johnson died.  The Dunlap woman is in serious condition.

Gregg says he knows nothing about it.  He thought he fired three times.  He is not sure what it was all about.

Manslaughter charge will probably put him in the penitentiary for the rest of his days which will be sober and he cannot mix his beer and gin and lose his head and kill people.

(According to the death certificate, Booker Johnson was born about 1894, the son of James Johnson and Mary Calvin, died 13 Jan 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Viola Johnson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

E. G. BRITT, MOUNDS, DIES

E. G. Britt, age 68, passed away at his home in Mounds Tuesday night shortly before midnight.  Death was attributed to a heart attack.

Left to mourn his departure are two sons, Ernest and Herman Britt of Mounds; three daughters Mrs. Julia Guy of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Lola Ellis of Cairo and Miss May Britt of Mounds.

Funeral services are to be held this afternoon at the Methodist church conducted by Miss Opal Shaffer.  Interment will be in the Thistlewood Cemetery.  James T. Ryan of Mounds is in charge of funeral arrangements.

(E. G. Britt married Sarah E. Lackey on 2 Jan 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. C. VICK, 61, OF MOUNDS DIES TUESDAY

J. C. Vick, who had reached the age of 61, passed away Tuesday afternoon at his home in Mounds.

He is survived by his wife; five children, Mrs. Lora Schwarz of America, Zon, Leslie, Bethel and Berthel of Mounds; four brothers, J. L. Vick of Tamms, Harvey and Columbus Vick of Delta and Grover Vick of Peoria; four sisters, Mrs. Allice Palmer of Diswood, Mrs. Jennie Young of Mill Creek, Mrs. C. Blackstone of Diswood and Mrs. Martha Campbell of Mounds; four grandchildren and many other relatives and friends.

Mr. Vick has been a faithful employee of the Egyptian Golf Club from the time it began, remaining a faithful employee until his death.

A short prayer and song service were held in Mounds yesterday at noon after which the funeral procession went to Delta where services were held in the Delta Baptist Church at 1:30 conducted by Rev. H. E. Vick.  Interment was made in the Delta Cemetery.

G. A. James directed the funeral.

(According to his death certificate, Joshua Cephas Vick, caretaker, was born 2 Jul 1874, in Delta, Ill., the son of Isaiah Vick and Rachel Hargus, natives of Illinois, died 14 Jan 1936, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Lucinda Vick, and was buried in Delta Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Joshua C. Vick July 3, 1874 Jan. 14, 1936 Lucinda C. Vick Dec. 1, 1875-.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FIRST FATAL ACCIDENT OF YEAR SATURDAY NIGHT

The first automobile accident death of the year 1936 for this county happened Saturday night about 10:30 o’clock when Miss Esther Burns, 18 years of age, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Burns, was killed at the intersection of the hard road north of Mound City and the road leading west to North Mounds.  Miss Burns died shortly after leaving the office of Dr. Otis Hudson on the way to the hospital at Cairo.

Riding in a car with Henry Richardson, son of Clint Richardson of Pulaski, and Miss Mary Mathis, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mathis, she was fatally injured when the car turned over and rolled down an embankment.

Richardson, driving east on the Valley Recluse Road, was listening to a radio program.  He was going between 40 and 50 miles per hour, it is said, when he came to this intersection.  At this point, the pavement is on a high fill.  Richardson attempted to slow up and make the turn to go north and his car went over the embankment and turned over.

Miss Burns suffered a fracture in her neck, amounting to the same as a broken neck, and lived but a short time.  The others, badly shaken, escaped any serious injury.  Richardson was able to testify at the inquest.  The party was headed for a dance at Karnak.

Miss Burns was survived by her parents, three brothers, Barney of Cairo, Robert of East St. Louis, and Arthur of Highland, Wis.; and two sisters, Mrs. Emily Aldrich of Long Beach, Calif., and Dorothy of Evansville, Ind.

She graduated last year from the high school at Mounds holding class honors and had held other honors during her school days.  She was employed in Evelyn’s Beauty Salon at Mounds.

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday at the Methodist church at Mounds by Rev. P. R. Golightly.  Casketbearers and flower bearers were her former school chums and mates.  The church was crowded and floral tributes were beautiful and many.  Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Esther Burns was born 23 Oct 1917, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of W. L. Burns and Alberta McDowell, natives of Illinois, died 11 Jan 1936, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker there has her photo on the stone and reads:  Daughter Esther Burns Oct. 23, 1917 Jan. 11, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GOREVILLE WOMAN DIES

Mrs. Betty Vaughn, wife of G. B. Vaughn, prominent merchant of Goreville, died Tuesday afternoon at her home after a lingering illness.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak had charge of funeral arrangements which were not completed when word of Mrs. Vaughn’s death reached this office.

(Robert G. Malaer married Dorcus A. Reynolds on 25 Oct 1865, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Betty Vaughn was born about 1875, the daughter of Robert Mallar and Dorothea Ann Reynolds, died 14 Jan 1936, in Goreville, Johnson Co., Ill., the wife of General B. Vaughn.  Her marker in Cana Cemetery in Goreville, Ill., reads:  Father General B. Vaughn 1867-1952 Mother Bettie Vaughn 1875-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GOREVILLE INFANT DIES

Alta June Terry, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Terry, passed away at Goreville Tuesday afternoon.  Funeral services were held at the M. E. Church with Rev. Sutton of Vienna officiating.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Alta June Terry was born about 1935, the son of B. F. Terry and Mildred Kelly, died 13 Jan 1936, in Goreville, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cana Cemetery in Goreville, Ill., reads:  Alta June dau. of B. F. & Mildred Terry 1934-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Frank Killius and daughter, ___orie, and Miss Margaret Unger ___ returned to their homes in St. Louis after being called to Mound City by the death of 3-year-old Rudolph Henry Unger.

 

AGED BUNCOMBE MAN DIES

Funeral services were held this morning at ten o’clock in the M. E. church at Buncombe for Mr. S. A. Rose, who died at his home in Buncombe Tuesday morning at the age of 75 years.

Surviving him he leaves besides a widow, one son, C. C. Rose of Cairo and a brother, Charles Rose of Sikeston, Mo.  Rev. E. H. Purdy of Creal Springs officiated.  Interment was made in the Masonic cemetery at Vienna.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(Stephen A. Rose, 25, farmer at Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., born in Illinois, son of Jack Rose and Elizabeth Walston, married on 30 Sep 1885, in Union Co., Ill., Sula Brown, 28, born in Massac Co., Ill., daughter of R. I. Brown and Malinda Thompson. His death certificate states that Steven A. Rose was born about 1861, the son of Jack Rose, died 14 Jan 1936, in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., the husband of Sula Rose.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Jan 1936: 

Young Girl Meets Death in Automobile Accident

Two Companions Escape Serious Injury when Coupe Plunges Down Embankment

             The Demon Speed has claimed another victim in the person of Esther Burns, the 18-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Burns of this city, who was fatally injured Saturday night about 10:15 o’clock, when the coupe in which she and two companions were riding plunged down an embankment on the old America road just east and across the pavement on Route 37 at the junction of the highway and the state aid road running between Highways No. 2 and 37, just north of Mounds.  Death came on the way to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, from Dr. O. T. Hudson’s office where she had been first taken.  She never regained consciousness.

             In the car with Miss Burns were Henry Richardson, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clint Richardson of Pulaski, the driver, and Mary Mathis, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mathis of this place.  Miss Mathis’ left leg was terribly bruised, but it is thought the bones were not injured.  She has been suffering greatly from pain and shock, but is now somewhat improved.  Young Richardson was injured only slightly.

             An inquest was held Monday morning at the office of Dr. O. T. Hudson, county coroner.  The facts concerning the accident as revealed at the inquest by the young driver of the car and two garage mechanics, Jack Marshbanks and Sam Graves who brought the badly damaged car to a local garage, were to the effect that the three young people had started from the Egyptian Tea Room to drive to Karnak.  At the top of Spencer Heights Hill they had left Route 2 and taken the state aid road leading to Route 37.  Richardson admitted that he was driving between 40 and 50 miles an hour.  The three were listening to a radio broadcast when he suddenly saw a stop sign and attempted to heed it.  The garage men stated that the gravel marks indicated that young Richardson had set his brakes about 25 to 30 feet west of Route 37, but the car could not be forced to stop and that the indications were that the car had jumped about 20 feet after leaving the highway and had plunged over the embankment.  The car, when found, they said, was facing the highway, practically demolished and indications were that it had turned over completely before righting itself.

             The probable cause of death was given by Coroner Hudson as a fracture at the base of Miss Burns’ skull.

             A verdict of accidental death was rendered which include the assertion that the accident was caused by fast driving.  A. J. Williams, G. A. Stern, W. E. Vick, Chris Bauer, D. P. Castle and F. Spencer composed the jury.

             Esther was both a beautiful and brilliant young girl, refined and modest in nearing and universally liked by those with whom she came in contact.  She was valedictorian of the 1935 graduating class of Mounds Township High School, having ranked highest in scholastics both in her high school and her grade school class.  Until recently she had held a position in Evelyn’s Beauty Salon. Esther was the youngest of the family.  She was born October 23, 1917, and died January 11, 1936.

             She leaves her parents, two sisters, Mrs. Emily Aldred of Long Beach, Calif., Miss Dorothy Burns of Evansville, Ind.; three brothers, Barney Burns of Cairo, Robert of East St. Louis, and Arthur (Jake) at home.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the Methodist church, the pastor, P. R. Glotfelty, G. A. James directing.  Many relatives and friends from out of town were here to attend the services.

             She was buried beside her sister Mildred, who died years ago.

             The flower bearers, friends of Esther, were Juanita Melton, Wanda Scruggs, Vivian Lambeth, Cora LaClede Graves, Vivian Knupp, Louise McRoy, Helen Nicolaides, and Edna Unger.

             The casket bearers were Clyde Ozment, Lebon Thompson, Frederick McRoy, Robert Wise, James Howard Thomas and Charles Wehrenberg.

 

Mound City Child Dies Saturday of Pneumonia

             Rudolph Henry Unger, three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Unger, died at 8:30 o’clock Saturday morning, January 11, at the home of his parents in Mound City after a short illness of pneumonia.

             Surviving are his parents, one brother, Robert; his paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Unger of Olmstead; and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the family residence.

             Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James directing.

 

Elias Gray Britt

             Elias Grey Britt died Tuesday night, January 14, at 10:45 o’clock at his home on South McKinley Avenue. He had reached the age of 68 years.

             Mr. Britt had been a Pulaski County farmer the greater part of his life since reaching his majority.  However he had at one time resided in Mounds and, after the death of Mrs. Britt, returned here with his children.

             Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Julia Guy of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Lola Ellis of Cairo, and Miss May Britt at home; two sons, Ernest and Herman of Mounds.

             Funeral services will be held at the M. E. church Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Miss Opal Shaffer conducting.  Burial will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery with J. T. Ryan of the Ryan Funeral Home directing.

 

Charles Honnard

             Charles Honnard of Pulaski, age 54 years, died Sunday afternoon, January 12, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Cecil Essex, in this city.  A little over  month ago, the house at Pulaski in which Mr. and Mrs. Honnard were living, was burned to the ground, and Mr. Honnard who was then ill, was dragged to safety by his mother, his wife being away from home.

             Surviving are his widow, Millie Honnard, one son, Warren of Champaign; one daughter, Mrs. Essex of Mounds; his mother, Mrs. Lizzie Honnard; one grandson, Homer Essex.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Mount Pleasant Baptist Church at Pulaski.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery, George Crain directing.

 

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of Miss Esther Burns Tuesday afternoon were Mrs. Guy McDowell of Zeigler, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. McDowell of Harrisburg, Mrs. L. L. Irwin of Bloomington, Mrs. Charles Cairn and two daughters and Mrs. Addie Greer of Karnak, Mrs. J. J. Lackey and two daughters of Mound City, Mrs. Cecil Bowles, daughter Geraldine, Mrs. Brookins, Mrs. J. C. Walmer and daughter, Mrs. Howard Brumley, all of Cairo, Frank Bianco of Pekin and Mr. and Mrs. Cal Casper and daughter of Belknap.

 

Miss Dorothy Burns, who has a position in Evansville, Ind., was called here Sunday by the death of her sister, Miss Esther Burns.

 

Joshua C. Vick

             Joshua C. Vick, age 61, died at his home in Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 1:20 o’clock.  He had lived in Mounds for the past seven years and dying this time had served as caretaker at the Egyptian Country Club.

             He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Lucinda Vick; five children, Mrs. Lora Schwartz of America, Zon, Leslie, Bethel and Berthel of Mounds.  Four sisters and four brothers also survive.

             A short service of prayer and song was conducted at the home by Rev. Glotfelty at 12 o’clock noon Thursday after which the funeral cortege left for Delta where services were held in the Delta Baptist Church at 1:30 o’clock by Rev. H. E. Vick, nephew of the deceased, assisted by Rev. Glotfelty.  Interment was made in the Delta Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Charles Oliver

             Charles Oliver of Pulaski died suddenly Saturday afternoon at his home in Pulaski, the victim of a heart attack.  He was 58 years of age.

             Mr. Oliver had been a resident of Mound City until about two years ago when he moved to Pulaski.

             Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Libbie Staten and Mrs. Florence Benton, both of Mound City, Mrs. Birdie Salmon of Cairo and Mrs. Roxie Roche of Pulaski; two sons, Ralph Oliver of Buncombe, Ill., and Herbert Oliver of Pulaski; one sister, Mrs. May Modglin of Unity; one brother, Jake Oliver of Mound City; eleven grandchildren and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Rose Hill Baptist Church in Pulaski, the Rev. Mr. Smith officiating.  Burial was made in Rose Hill Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

MRS. BETTY VAUGHN

             Mrs. Betty Vaughn, wife of G. B. Vaughn, prominent merchant of Goreville, Illinois, passed away Tuesday afternoon at her home after a lingering illness.

 

POWDER EXPLOSION KILLS MAN AT WOLF LAKE

             An unexplainable explosion took place in the jigger house of the Aetna powder plant at Wolf Lake Thursday night of last week.  The jigger house was badly torn up and two other buildings were burned.

             Jesse Casey, 31 years old, who was working alone in the jigger house at the time of the explosion, about 5:30 p.m., was killed, but there were no other fatalities.  His body was not mutilated.  Death resulted from burns.—Anna Talk

             (His death certificate states that Jesse G. Casey, powder plant employee, was born 22 Dec 1904, in Alto Pass, Ill., the son of Henry C. Casey, a native of Alto Pass, Ill., and Laura E. Abernathy, native of Wolf Lake, Ill., died 2 Jan 1936, in Road District No. 11, Union Co., Ill., husband of Curtis Casey, and was buried in Alto Pass Cemetery.  His marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Jesse G. Casey 1904-1936 Curtis E. Casey 1911-1996.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Jake Burns was called here from Highland, Wisconsin, by the death of his sister Miss Esther.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burns of East St. Louis were called here Sunday by the death of Mr. Burns’ sister, Miss Esther Burns, who died as a result of an auto accident Saturday night.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Adler and daughter Veneta of Centralia were here Tuesday to attend the funeral of Miss Esther Burns.

 

TWO BOYS DROWN IN BIG MUDDY RIVER

             Willie Wohlwen, aged 9, and Kenneth Zimbleman, aged 14, of Murphysboro, drowned in the Big Muddy River last Sunday afternoon.  The two boys with a companion, John Bartlett, went to the river at 3:30 in the afternoon and ventured out on the ice.  They tested the ice at the bank and it seemed firm, so the two boys continued walking ahead, while the Bartlett youth remained near shore.  The boys had not gone far when the ice gave way and they went down in 12 feet of water.  The Bartlett boy ran to the filter plant close by and secured help, and the bodies were recovered with a grab hook.  Efforts were made to revive them with an inhalator without success by first aid workers of the Murphysboro fire department.  The ice which spanned the river had been made soft by two days of warm weather.—Anna Democrat

             (His death certificate states that Kenneth Clarence Zimbelman was born about 1922, the son of Harry Zimbelman and Bessie Walker, died 5 Jan 1936, in Murphysboro, Jackson Co., Ill.  His marker in Tower Grove Cemetery in Murphysboro, Ill., reads:  Keneth Zimbelman July 19, 1921 Jan. 5, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The following were called to Mounds to attend the funeral of their brother, J. C. Vick:  J. L. Vick of Tamms, Harvey and Columbus Vick of Delta, Grover Vick of Peoria, Mrs. Alice Palmer of Diswood, Mrs. Jennie Young of Mill Creek, Mrs. C. Blackston of Diswood.

 

Austin Klutts of Jefferson Barracks was called home this week on account of the death of his cousin, Miss Esther Burns.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the kind friends and neighbors who assisted us in any way during the period of sorrow through which we have just passed, occasioned by the sudden death of our daughter and sister, Esther Burns.  To all those who gave the many beautiful floral tributes, to those who furnished cars, to Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, to the singers, to the Cheerful Workers class, to the flower girls and the casket bearers, we extend our special thanks.  We assure you that your kindness will never be forgotten.

             Mr. and Mrs. Walter Burns and Family

 

JAMES BELFORD

             James Belford, age 81, an old resident of Karnak, died Sunday, January 12, at the Anna State Hospital, where he had been a patient for the last two months.

             Surviving him are three sons, Ray Belford of Karnak, Russell of Golconda, and Ross of Oakland, Indiana.  Funeral services were held Tuesday at Sulphur Springs with interment in Sulphur Springs Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

S. A. ROSE

             Funeral services were held this morning at ten o’clock in the M. E. church of Buncombe, for S. A. Rose, who died at his home in Buncombe Tuesday morning at the age of 75 years.

             He is survived by his widow, one son, C. C. Rose of Cairo; and a brother, Charles Rose, of Sikeston, Mo.

             Rev. E. H. Purdy of Creal Springs officiated.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery of Vienna.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Jan 1936: 

Pioneer Resident of Community Passes On

             Christopher Columbus Jones, age 79, died at his home four miles west of Mounds at about 5 o’clock Wednesday morning, January 22.  He had been a resident of this community for 56 years.

             Mr. Jones is survived by two sons, Bruce and Sam, both of Mounds; one daughter, Mrs. Elsie Harding Cooley of Chicago; two brothers, Charles Jones of Mounds and Andrew Jones of Malden, Mo.; three sisters, Mrs. Julia Crippen of Mounds, Mrs. Ida Crain of East St. Louis and Mrs. Martha Beegle of Winona, Ark.; also two grandchildren.  A son, Alfred Jones, died last year from injuries sustained in an accident in New York City.

             A short service of prayer and song was conducted at the G. A. James Funeral Home at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon with interment at Shiloh Cemetery.

 

Raymond R. Blasdel

             Raymond Richard Blasdel, 34, died at his home near Grand Chain, Friday morning, January 17, at 11 o’clock.  He had been in failing health for a number of years.

             He leaves his widow, Mrs. Mary Blasdel; three children, Junior, Max and Lois; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Blasdel; and the following brothers and sisters:  Guy of Grand Chain, Clarence of Joppa, Mrs. Mabel Metcalf of West Frankfort, Mrs. Blanche Evers of Rector, Ark., and Mrs. Carmen Roche of Grand Chain.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at Ohio Chapel, Grand Chain, Rev. Atty of Joppa and Rev. Walter Billingsley of Mound City conducting.  Interment was made in Ohio Chapel Cemetery, the Wilson Service directing.

 

Mrs. Pauline Johnson

             Pauline Johnson, wife of G. H. Johnson of Ullin, died Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, after an illness of four months.  She was 22 years of age.

             She is survived by her husband, her father, T. E. Egner, of Ullin; one brother, Ray Egner of Ullin; three sisters, Mrs. H. H. Goins of Olmstead, Mrs. Lloyd Houchin of Osceola, Ark., and Miss Mary Helen Egner of Ullin.

             Funeral services were held at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church at Grand Chain Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock, with the Rev. Father Manion officiating. Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery.

 

W. A. McIntire

             W. A. McIntire, age 75, died at his home in Grand Chain Saturday morning, January 18, at 6 o’clock in the morning.  Mr. McIntire was born and reared in Grand Chain and had spent his entire life in that community.

             Funeral services were held at the home Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. S. C. Benninger officiating.  The casket bearers were nephews of the deceased.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

William I. Baccus

             William I. Baccus, age 62, died suddenly Sunday, January 19, at 5 o’clock in the evening, at his home north of Mound City, on the River road.  Mr. Baccus had suffered a heart attack at 10 in the morning, a second attack later in the day and when the third attack came he failed to rally.

             Before moving to his country home he was in the employ of Swisshelm Veneer Mill Co., and at the time he left Mound City he held the position of vice president and superintendent.  He had served one term as city alderman in Mound City.

             Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Hazel Baccus; three children, Paul, William Ashton and Hazel (Toots), all of Mound City; a sister, Mrs. A. J. Williams of Mounds; a brother, James Baccus of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; a half-brother, Lawrence Baccus, of Mound City; one granddaughter, and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the residence at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. J. S. Burgess of Carbondale.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.  The casket bearers were Russell Reed of Cairo, M. D. Brelsford, Loren Boyd, C. T. Poynter, George Trammel, and William Bestgen.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jan 1936:

DEATH CAME SUDDENLY TO W. I. BACCUS SUNDAY EVE

Death came rather suddenly upon W. I. Baccus at his home on the river road 2 miles northeast of Mound City Sunday evening.  He was stricken with a heart attack and at five o’clock he succumbed.  Although he had been ill off and on for several years, he had enjoyed better than usual health lately.

Mr. Baccus, whose age was 62, was well known in Mound City.  He spent twenty years with the Swisshelm Veneer Co. during which time he served this company in various capacities.  During the last years of his service he was vice president and superintendent.  He served the city as alderman for one term.

Left to mourn their loss are:  his wife, Mrs. Hazel Baccus, three children, Paul, William Ashton and Hazel, all of Mound City; a brother, James Baccus, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; half-brother, Lawrence Baccus, Mound City; and a sister, Mrs. A. J. Williams of Mounds.

Funeral services were held at the home at 2 p.m. Tuesday.  Rev. S. J. Burgess, of Carbondale, conducted the services.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Pallbearers were:  Russell Reed of Cairo, George Trammel, Dee Brelsford, Loren Boyd, C. T. Poynter, and William Bestgen.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of funeral arrangements.

(William S. Baccus married Sarah E. Garrett on 4 Jul 1869, in Massac Co., Ill.  Andrew J. Williams, 27, married Mary Belle Baccus, 16, on 10 Sep 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Isaiah Baccus, farmer, was born 13 Apr 1873, in Metropolis, Ill., the son of Sardine Baccus and Sarah Garrett, a native of Pennsylvania, died 19 Jan 1936, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Hazel Baccus, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Father William Baccus April 13, 1873 Jan. 19, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CHRISTOPHER C. JONES DIES AT HOME NEAR MOUNDS

Christopher C. Jones, 57 years a resident of this county, passed away Wednesday at 5 a.m. at his home 4 miles west of Mounds.  He had attained the advanced age of ____.

A short service of song and prayer was held at the G. A. James Funeral Home in Mounds Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(C. C. Jones married Rose Ernoma Fehrenback on 27 Oct 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Christopher Columbus Jones, farmer, was born 6 Jan 1857, in Tennessee, the son of Thomas L. Jones, a native of Tennessee, died 22 Jan 1936, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Rosa Jones, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

RAYMOND RICHARD BLASDEL DIED AT GRAND CHAIN

Raymond Richard Blasdel, age 34 years, died at his home in Grand Chain last Friday morning after an illness that lasted for several years.

Mr. Blasdel came from a family of highly respected farmers living around Grand Chain.  The loss in his death will be felt by many sorrowing friends and relatives.

Surviving him are:  his wife, Mrs. Mabel Blasdel; three children, Junior, Max and Los; his parents, Mr. and Ms. William Blasdel; and the following brothers and sisters:  Mrs. Mabel Metcalf of West Frankfort, Guy of Grand Chain, Clarence of Joppa, Mrs. Blanche Evers of Rector, Ark., and Carmen Roche of Grand Chain.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Atty of Joppa and Rev. Walter Billingsley of Mound City on Sunday afternoon.  Interment was made in the Ohio Chapel Cemetery.

The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak had charge of funeral arrangements.

(William F. Blaisdel married Clara M. Louthan on 25 Oct 1896, in Douglas Co., Ill.  According to the death certificate, Raymond Richard Blasdel, farmer at Grand Chain, Ill., was born 4 Sep 1901, in Coles Co., Ill., the son of William Blasdel, a native of Champaign Co., Ill., and Clara Loatham, a native of Coles Co., Ill., died 17 Jan 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mabel Blasdel, and was buried in Ohio Chapel Cemetery near Grand Chain, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Raymond Blasdel 1901-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

W. A. McINTIRE DIED SATURDAY AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

W. A. McIntire, 75 years of age, died Saturday at his home in Grand Chain of a paralytic stroke.  The end came quickly.  The day preceding, he was enjoying as good health as he had enjoyed since the first stroke came a year ago.

Mr. McIntire was a lifelong resident of Grand Chain.  He was born there July 24, 1860, and was married there to Miss Emma Davis on Nov. 18, 1894.  His whole lifetime was associated with Grand Chain and this county.  He was deputy sheriff under six sheriffs, Justice of the Peace for a number of years and a member of the grade and high school boards at Grand Chain for a total of 18 years.  At one time he operated a farm.

He was offered the office of warden at the Chester penitentiary during the Deneen Administration, but declined, due to the illness of his wife.

Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the home, conducted by Rev. S. C. Benninger and interment was in the Grand Chain Cemetery.

There survives his children, his brothers and sisters.  Mrs. McIntire passed away on Feb. 19, 1910.

The children living are:  Glenn, Mabel and Marie.  May died in 1917 and Ambrose in 1908.  There are two grandchildren, Billy and Keith McIntire of Mt. Carmel, Ill.  The brothers are:  George McIntire of Detroit, Mich., Stanton McIntire of Mound City and Thomas McIntire of Columbus, Ky.  The sisters are Mrs. Flora Lanier of Anna, Mrs. Mollie Gaunt of Grand Chain and Mrs. Della Cropper of Nachis, Wash.

             (W. A. McIntire married Emma Davis on 18 Nov 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William A. McIntire was born 24 Jul 1860, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of John McIntire, a native of Illinois, and Sarah Jane Weathers, a native of Tennessee, died 18 Jan 1936, in Grand Chain, Ill., husband of Emma McIntire, and was buried in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery.   His marker there reads:  Brother William A. McIntire 1860-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

POULINE JOHNSON, ULLIN, DIES

Following an illness of four months, Pauline Johnson, of Ullin, succumbed last Monday afternoon in St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo.  Mrs. Johnson was still young in years, being only 22.

             Her husband, G. H. Johnson; her father, T. E. Egner, of Ullin; one brother, Ray Egner also of Ullin; three sisters, Mrs. H. H. Goins, of Olmstead, Mrs. Lloyd Houchin of Osceola, Ark., Miss Mary Helen Egner of Ullin, are left to mourn her departure.

Funeral services were held in Grand Chain at St. Catherine’s Church Monday morning, conducted by Rev. Fr. Manion.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery.

(Anthony Egner married 20 Oct 1903, in Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill., Daisy Lavena Corzine.   Her death certificate states that Pauline Johnson was born about 1914, the daughter of T. E. Egner and Daisie Corzine, and died 20 Jan 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the wife of G. H. Johnson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sheriff C. G. McIntire and family and Stant McIntire and family attended the funeral of W. A. McIntire in Grand Chain Monday.

 

Mrs. Sylvia Ferguson and son attended the funeral of Raymond Richard Blasdel near Grand Chain Sunday.

 

Lawrence Schneider was called to St. Louis Sunday because of the death of a relative.  (Mounds)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 31 Jan 1936:

BURNED IN HOME IN MOUNDS

Amelia Ross, 75 years of age, perished in her burning home in North Mounds Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock.  When the fire was discovered, it was too late to rescue her.

At the inquest it developed that her daughter, Georgia Rose, living but a few feet away, went over to fix the fire for the night.  While the stove was hot, it was not red hot, she testified.

Evidently the fire caught from the stove and the aged woman, feeble and choked by smoke, was unable to escape.

(According to her death certificate, Amelia Ross was born about 1861 in Jackson, Miss., the daughter of David Smith and Mary Lovett, died 26 Jan 1936, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widow of Tom Ross, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JAMES WILEY CANADA DIED JANUARY 23 AT KARNAK

James Wiley Canada passed away at his home in Karnak on Thursday of last week after an illness of two months.  He was 64 years of age when death overtook him.

Nineteen years of Mr. Canada’s life had been spent in Karnak where he was a faithful employee of Main Brothers Box and Lumber Co.

Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 11 o’clock at the First Baptist Church with Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Interment was made in the Belknap Cemetery.  Modern Woodmen who are members of the Karnak lodge acted as pallbearers.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

Surviving to mourn the loss are the widow, Mrs. Fannie Canada; sons, Ray and Otis of Karnak; brothers, Tom and Will of Belknap; and sister, Mrs. Jane Betts, Belknap.

(James R. Canada married on 14 Jul 1896, in Alexander Co., Ill., Fannie Belle McKinzie.  Alonzo Betts married Jennie Canada on 28 Jan 1894, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, James Rily Canada, factory laborer, was born 12 Sep 1871, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of William and Martha Canada, natives of Illinois, died 23 Jan 1936, in Karnak, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Fannie Canada, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery at Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JAMES PHENIX DIES AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

James Phenix passed away at his home in Grand Chain early last Saturday morning at the age of 74.  For the past three years he had suffered.

Surviving are:  his wife, Mrs. Rena Phenix; children, Mary Clayton, Karnak, Hosa Ehrestin, Grand Chain, Thalmadge Phenix, Grand Chain; two brothers, W. O. Talley and Jim Talley of Mound City; and one sister, Hannah Morehead, Mound City.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at one o’clock at the Salem Church with Rev. Earl Throgmorton officiating.  Interment was made in the Salem Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(James Phenix married Renia Campbell on 26 May 1889, in Massac Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that James S. Phenix, farmer, was born 23 Jan 1863, in Missouri, the son of Rosa Hufstedler Phenix, a native of Arkansas, died 25 Jan 1936, in Road District 4 or 5, Massac Co., Ill., the husband of Renia Phenix, and was buried in Salem Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  J. W. Phenix Jan. 23, 1863 Jan. 25, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BROTHER-IN-LAW DIES

Word has been received in Mound City that Dave Jones of Toledo, Ohio, brother-in-law of Mrs. W. H. Crain, died January 11.  Mrs. Crain was en route to Toledo when he died.  Funeral services were held on the 15th.  Mrs. Crain is remaining in Toledo with her sister for a few days,

 

MRS. AMANDA KILPATRICK DIES IN CALIFORNIA

Mrs. Amanda Kilpatrick, until 9 years ago a resident of Mounds, died at her home in Long Beach, Cal., Tuesday morning.  Death came rather unexpectedly for until Monday morning when a stroke partially paralyzed her, she was in reasonably good health.  Twenty-four hours after she suffered the stroke death came.  She had reached the age of 67.

Even though away from Mounds, Mrs. Kilpatrick retained her membership in the Methodist Church and the Rebekah and Royal Neighbors lodges there.

She is survived by eleven children:  Mrs. Kate Laws and Will Tobin of Mounds, Clarence Tobin of Oakland, Cal., Ernest Tobin of Chicago, Jesse Tobin of Long Beach, Cal., Ed Tobin, Clyde Tobin and Mrs. Bessie Harris of Los Angeles, Cal., Mrs. Isola Eckardt of St. Louis, Mo., John Tobin of Palm Springs, Cal., and Mrs. Ward Cotter of Jackson, Tenn.; one sister, Mrs. Daisy Ellis of Ullin, a number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren and other relatives.

Funeral services will be held in Long Beach this afternoon and interment will be made there.

(She died 29 Jan 1936, according to the California death index.  Her marker in Sunnyside Cemetery at Long Beach, Los Angeles Co., Calif., reads:  Armada May Kilpatrick 1868-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 Jan 1936: 

Perishes When Home Burns Sunday Afternoon

             Amelia Ross, colored, age 75, perished by fire when her two-room box house burned at 5 o’clock Sunday afternoon in North Mounds, not far from “Green Row.”

             Mrs. Georgia Rose, a daughter, who lived only a short distance from her mother, had visited her mother shortly before and had found her in bed.  Mrs. Rose, according to her testimony at the inquest, had replenished the fire so that it would hold over night, before departing for her home.  Later she had occasion to open her door and thus first saw the blaze which was close enough to heat the air about her.  The fire had even then made such progress that Mrs. Rose was unable to enter the house to try to save her mother.

             At the inquest conducted by Coroner O. T. Hudson at his office Monday morning at 10 o’clock, the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.  Mrs. Rose testified that the stove in her mother’s room seemed to be in about the usual condition when she left that day as it had on previous days.  Whether the fire was caused by an overheated stove or a defective flue will probably never be known. No water mains are available in that section and the local fire department was not called.

             Forrest Spencer, chief of the fire department, estimated the fire loss at about $150.

             Beside her daughter, the aged woman leaves a son, David Robinson.

 

James Riley Canada

             James Riley Canada died Thursday night, January 23, at his home in Karnak following a two-month illness.  His age was 64 years.  He was an employee of Main Brothers Lumber Co. and had resided in Karnak some 19 years.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Fannie Canada; two sons, Ray and Otis Canada of Karnak; two brothers, Tom and Will Canada; and one sister, Mrs. Jane Betts, all of Belknap.

             Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 11 o’clock at the Baptist church of Karnak, the Rev. Earl Throgmartin officiating.  Interment was made in Belknap cemetery with members of the Modern Woodmen of America as casket bearers.  The Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

 

James Phenix

             James Phenix, 74, died at his home near Grand Chain Saturday morning, January 25, at 12:30 o’clock.  He had been ill for three years.

             He is survived by his wife, Rosa Phenix; two daughters, Mrs. Mary Clayton of Karnak and Mrs. Rosa Ehrstein of Grand Chain; one son, Talmadge, of Grand Chain; two half-brothers, W. O. Tally of Grand Chain and Jim Tally of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock at Salem Church with interment in Salem Cemetery.  Rev. Earl Throgmartin officiated and the Wilson Funeral Service conducted the funeral.

 

Mrs. Armada Kilpatrick Dies in California

             The sad news of the death of Mrs. Armada Kilpatrick of Long Beach, Calif., was received Wednesday morning by W. L. Tobin and Mrs. Kate Laws, the two of their children remaining in Mounds.

             Mrs. Kilpatrick suffered a paralytic stroke from which she failed to rally.  She was possessed of a happy, cheerful disposition and had many friends who grieve with her children at her passing.

             Mrs. Kilpatrick resided here until a few years ago and it was here she reared her family of eleven children who survive her.  She leaves Mrs. Kate Laws, W. L. Tobin of Mounds, Clarence Tobin of Oakland, Calif., Ernest Tobin of Chicago, Jesse Tobin of Long Beach, Calif., Ed and Clyde Tobin and Mrs. Bessie Harris, all of Los Angeles, Calif., Mrs. Isola Echardt of St. Louis, Mo., John Tobin of Palm Springs, Calif., and Mrs. Daisy Cotter of Jackson, Tenn.; also one sister, Mrs. Daisy Ellis, of Ullin; a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren and other relatives.

             Burial will be at Long Beach today (Friday).

 

V. Laswell has returned from Campbell, Mo., where he was called by the sudden death of his mother, which occurred at the home of her daughter in Campbell.

 

Robert T. English of Cairo, age 73, father of Lee English of Olmstead and Alvin English of Edgewood, former Mounds residents, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Sunday afternoon, January 26.

             (His death certificate states that Robert T. English was born about 1863, the son of Robert F. English and Miss Hargan, and died 26 Jan 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Nettie English.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Feb 1936: 

Retired Farmer of Ullin Dies Saturday Afternoon

             Richard Egner, age 59, died at his home near Ullin Saturday afternoon, February 1.  He had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage one week before.  He was a well-respected retired farmer of the Ullin neighborhood.

             Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Hattie Egner; and the following children:  Van and Irene of Ullin and Mrs. Estella Calvin of Olmstead.  He also leaves three brothers, Ed of Belleville, Tony of Ullin and Mike of Olmstead; three sisters, Mrs. Mary Ulrich of Grand Chain, Mrs. Kate Rode and Mrs. Caroline Hannen of Olmstead.

             Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon at Cache Chapel with the Rev. C. F. Corzine of Centralia officiating.  Interment was made in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin with the Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak in charge.

 

Mrs. Sarah George

             Mrs. Sarah E. George, age 73, died Monday afternoon, February 3, at her home in Cypress.  Her maiden name was Littleton.  She was born in Tennessee and came to Illinois with her parents when a girl.  She was the wife of W. E. George, who until his retirement from business three years ago was a general merchant in Cypress and a stockholder in the Cypress Bank.

             She is survived by her husband, eight sons, Rolla E., W. T., Walter, Clyde, Dee, Fred, Curtis and Homer, all living in or near Cypress; a twin sister, Mrs. Emma Carter; and twenty-five grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at the family home in Cypress Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock conducted by her pastor, Rev. W. L. Cummins of the M. E. Church, assisted by Rev. A. M. Troutman.  Interment was made in Cypress Fraternal Cemetery.

             (W. E. George married Sarah E. Littleton on 5 Dec 1886, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Sarah E. George was born about 1863, the daughter of Thomas Littleton and Mary Thompson, died 3 Feb 1936, in Cypress, Johnson Co., Ill., the wife of W. E. George.  Her marker in Cypress Masonic Cemetery reads:  Father William E. George 1862-1938 Mother Sarah E. George 1862-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The following were weekend guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Tobin, Ernest L. Tobin of Chicago, Mrs. George Eckardt of St. Louis, Mrs. Ward Cotter and daughter of Jackson, Tenn., brothers and sisters of Mr. Tobin and were called here on account of the death of their mother.

 

Jane Elkins

             Jane Elkins, age 82 years, died Saturday morning, February 1, at the Anna State Hospital of the infirmities of old age.  She had been ill for about one month.  Her home was near Villa Ridge.

             Surviving is one nephew, Owen Billingsley, whose home is also near Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at one o’clock at Cedar Grove Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak had charge of the funeral.

 

Mrs. J. G. Akins and son Howard were called to Bradford, Tenn., on account of the death of the former’s brother, Tom Rutledge.

             (This is likely the same person as W. T. Rutledge, who runs a filling station, was born 6 Nov 1893, in Tennessee, the son of T. P. Rutledge, a native of Tennessee, and Emma Woods, a native of Arkansas, married, died 4 Feb 1936, in Bradford, Gibson Co., Tenn., and was buried in Bradford, Tenn.  His World War I draft registration lists his name as William Thomas Rutledge and states he was born in Bradford, Tenn.  His marker in Bradford Cemetery in Bradford, Tenn., reads:  W. T. Rutledge 1893-1936 World War Veteran.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to express our sincere thanks to the friends and neighbors who called on us to express their sympathy and to those who sent flowers upon hearing of the death of our dear Mother and Sister in her far-away California home.  We assure you that your kindness and thoughtfulness will long be remembered.

The Tobin Family

Mrs. Daisy Ellis

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Feb 1936:

PARALYTIC STROKE CLAIMS RICHARD EGNER OF ULLIN

A paralytic stroke, suffered about a week before, claimed the life of Richard Egner of Ullin last Saturday afternoon. Death came about 12:30 to this 59-year-old man.

Surviving him are the following, his wife, Mrs. Hattie Egner; the following children:  Dan of Ullin, Mrs. Estella Calvin of Olmstead, Irene Egner of Ullin; the following brothers and sisters:  Ed Egner of Belleville, Tony Egner of Ullin, Mike Egner of Olmstead, Mrs. Mary Ulrich of Grand Chain, Mrs. Kate Rode and Mrs. Caroline Hannen of Olmstead.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at Cache Chapel with Rev. C. S. Corzine of Centralia officiating.  Internment was made in Cache Chapel Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Richard Egner, farmer, was born 8 Sep 1876, in Richwood Co., Ind., the son of Mike and Josephine Egner, natives of Indiana, died 1 Feb 1936, in Ullin, Ill., husband of Hattie Egner, and was buried in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin.  His marker there reads:  Hattie Egner 1887-1968 Richard Egner 1876-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AGED WOMAN DIES

___s Elkins, age 82, died Saturday morning at the state hospital in Anna after a month’s illness.  Her home was near Villa Ridge.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon and interment was made in Cedar Grove Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that Jannie Elkins was born 12 Dec 1853, in Lick Creek, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of David Lloyd and Sarah M. Townsend, natives of Tennessee, died 1 Feb 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., the widow of Harrison Elkins, and was buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery at Goreville, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LEE HOLDMAN DIES AT AMERICA OF PNEUMONIA

Lee Holdman, 19-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Holdman, died Tuesday night at 10:30 from an attack of pneumonia.  He lived with his parents near America.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today at the home.  Interment will be made in the cemetery at Mounds.

Surviving the deceased, besides his parents, are:  three brothers, Taylor of Mounds and John and James of America; six sisters, Gladys Wright, Urbana, Josie Hyatt, Ullin, Pearl Rothman, Kentucky, Ines, Lela and Edith, America.

             (His death certificate states that Lee Holdman, farmer, was born 13 Jan 1917, in Kentucky, the son of John Holdman and Bessie Hall, natives of Kentucky, died 4 Feb 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Lee Holdman Jan. 13, 1919 Feb. 4, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Feb 1936:

WILLIAM F. ANGLIN DIED SUNDAY AT VILLA RIDGE

William F. Anglin died Sunday morning at his home at Villa Ridge at the age of 70 years.  He had been ill only a short time when death overtook him.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the residence.  Rev. Ellsworth Lyons officiated.  Interment was made in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds.

Mr. Anglin is survived by his widow, two sisters, Mrs. Jennie Crain of Mounds and Mrs. Annie James of Mount Shasta, California; one brother, Thomas Anglin of Berkeley, California; one half brother, James Daniels of Mounds; three stepsons, Frank, Elmer and Adolphus Clifford all of Villa Ridge.

(According to his death certificate, William F. Anglin, farmer, was born 18 Apr 1865, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of Henry L. Anglin, a native of Boonville, Mo., and Mary Kennedy, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 9 Feb 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Annie Anglin, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Francis M. Anglin Feb. 20, 1853 March 29, 1946 Will F. Anglin April 18, 1865 Feb. 9, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MATHILDA JACOBSMEYER, 79, PASSED AWAY SUNDAY A. M.

Mathilda Jacobsmeyer, 70 years old, passed away at the home of her son, Erwin Jacobsmeyer, of Olmstead, Sunday morning at 2:10.  Death came after only a short illness.

Mrs. Jacobsmeyer was born to Mr. and Mrs. Casper Trampe of St.Louis.  The parents were natives of Germany.

Twenty-eight years ago she came to Olmsted where she has continuously made her home since.  Her husband, Henry Jacobsmeyer, died almost 12 years ago at Olmstead.

Left to mourn their loss are two daughters, Mrs. Walter Callies of ___ and Mrs. George Schuker of Olmsted and the son at whose home she died.  Ten grandchildren also survive.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. ___ Lutheran Church with the pastor, the Rev. A. W. Galen, officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.  Pallbearers were Clarence Erdbruegger, Carl ___ler, William Kneicht, Oliver ____, John Holhubner, and War___ Schnaare.

(Her death certificate states that Mathilda Jacobsmeyer was born 19 Jun 1857, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Casper Trampe and Dorothy Westerfield, natives of Germany, died 9 Feb 1936, in Olmstead, Ill, the widow of Henry Jacobsmeyer, and was buried in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Henry Jacobsmeyer 1855-1924 Mathilda Jacobsmeyer 1857-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER SEXTON OF MOUNDS CEMETERIES DIES

W. M. Frederick, for many years sexton of the cemeteries at Mounds, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Archie Anderson, of Leachville, Ark., Sunday night.  Because of his long connection with the cemetery, he will be remembered by many.

Mr. Frederick was 89 years old when he died.  He was born in Germany, coming to America at the age of 20.  After three years in New York, he moved to Villa Ridge.  When he later became sexton of the cemeteries he moved to Mounds.

He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Archie Anderson of Leesville, Ark., Mrs. M. P. Mathis of Shawnee, Okla., Mrs. B. W. Henley of Harrisburg, and Mrs. Spencer Titus of Mounds; one son, George Frederick of Chicago; eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at Mounds in the Congregational Church.  Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, officiated.

Mrs. Anderson and Mr. and Mrs. Don Choate accompanied the remains to Mounds.

 

MOTHER DIES

Mrs. Charles Bowman, mother of Charles Griffith, passed away last week at her home in Peru, Ind., after a short illness of pneumonia.  Because of weather conditions in that territory which hindered transportation, Mr. Griffith was unable to attend the funeral.

 

JOHN BENNETT TUCKER DIED SATURDAY NIGHT

John Bennett Tucker died Saturday night at 11 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ronald Moore.  He suffered a paralytic stroke prior to his death.  He had reached the age of 69.

Born in Metropolis, Mr. Tucker moved to Mound City about 45 years ago.  For years he was employed at the marine ways.

He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Moore, and two grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at the residence Monday afternoon with Rev. E. Hayden officiating.  Internment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

Pallbearers were taken largely from employees of the shipyards and were as follows:  Andrew Campbell, Frank Bergman, George Sweeney, Robert Burns, and George Martin.

(His death certificate states that John B. Tucker, caulker at the ship yard, was born 29 Nov 1866, in Metropolis, Ill., the son of Bennett Tucker, a native of Metropolis, Ill., and Nancy Belew, a native of Massac Co., Ill., died 8 Feb 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Mame Tucker, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

92-YEAR-OLD DONGOLA MAN DIED FRIDAY AT ANNA

Samuel Mull, 92 years old, died at the Anna State Hospital last Friday after an illness of eight months.  A large number of his 92 years had been spent in and around Dongola, where he was highly respected.  He was a carpenter, but had been retired for the last twelve years.

Surviving him are two sons, John and Frank Mull of Dongola; a half-sister, Mrs. Mary Verble of McClure; 14 grandchildren, and 15 great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the First Baptist Church in Dongola with Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

(Samuel Mull married Phoebe Verble on 2 Mar 1865, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Samuel Mull, carpenter, was born 18 Dec 1843, in Illinois, died 7 Feb 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Phoebe Mull, and was buried at Dongola.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Samuel Mull Dec. 18, 1843 Feb. 7, 1936 Phebe Mull his wife Dec. 18, 1845 March 8, 1911.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DONGOLA MAN DIES

Isaac Newton Jones passed away at his home near Dongola Tuesday morning at 3 o’clock at the age of 80 years.

He had been sick about three weeks with pneumonia.

He is survived by one son, W. H. Jones, of Cypress, Illinois; and 5 stepchildren, Tom and Dan of Dongola, Cal at home, Alva at Dixon and Rettie in Iowa.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at Chapel Church with Rev. Troutman of Cypress officiating.  Interment was made in the Cache Chapel Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Isaac Newton Jones, farmer in rural Dongola, Ill., was born 11 Jan 1855, in Johnson Co., Ill., died 11 Feb 1936, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., husband of Sarah Jones, and was buried in Chapel Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Luther Chapel Cemetery in Cypress, Ill., reads:  I. N. Jones 1855-1936 Emma Jones 1855-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AGED LADY OF MOUNDS PASSED AWAY MONDAY

Mary Ann Fulkerson, age 84, passed away at her home in Mounds Monday morning at 3:30 after an illness of some duration.  She had been a resident of Mounds for 32 years.  Her husband, Richard M. Fulkerson, preceded her in death 24 years ago.

Left to mourn the death of Mrs. Fulkerson are four daughters, Mrs. Carrie Young, Mrs. Linta Copeland, Mrs. Amana Crawford and Miss Martha Copeland, all of Mounds; and one son, Otto Fulkerson of East St. Louis; and a number of grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon in the Congregational church.  W. R. Wiessman of St. Louis, one of Jehovah’s Witnesses, conducted a Watchtower service.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Pallbearers were G.M. Quarrels, W. L. Tobin, Richard Copeland, C. F. Melton, Frank Bour, and George Sitter.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(Richard M. Taylor married Mary Ann Taylor on 20 Jul 1870, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary Ann Fulkerson was born 12 Apr 1851, in Raum, Ill., the daughter of Harvey Taylor and Lucretia Yarber, natives of Tennessee, died 10 Feb 1936, in Mounds, Ill., the widow of Richard M. Fulkerson, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mary Ann Fulkerson April 12, 1851 Feb. 10, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Feb 1936: 

Mrs. Mary A. Fulkerson

             Mrs. Mary A. Fulkerson, long a resident of Mounds, died at her home on Blanche Avenue early Monday morning following a lingering illness during which time her children had tenderly cared for her.  She was one of the best known of the older residents of the community and besides her sorrowing family, leaves a host of friends to mourn her passing.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational Church, conducted by one of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Walter Weissman, of St. Louis, Mo.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

             The casket bearers were G. M. Quarles, W. L. Tobin, Richard Copeland, C. F. Melton, Frank Bour, and George Sitter.

OBITUARY

             Mrs. Mary A. Fulkerson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Taylor, was born at Raum, Illinois, April 12, 1851, and passed away at her home in Mounds, February 10, having reached the age of 84 years, 9 months and 28 days.  She was married at the age of 18 to Dr. R. M. Fulkerson of Lusk, Illinois, who preceded her in death several years ago.  She leaves to mourn her passing four daughters, Mrs. Oren Crawford, Miss Martha Fulkerson, Mrs. E. A. Young and Mrs. Charles Copeland of Mounds and one son, Otto Fulkerson of East St. Louis.  Two children also preceded her in death, Harry Fulkerson and Mrs. America Fleming.  She also leaves a number of grandchildren and a host of friends.  She was a loving mother and a Christian woman, faithfully serving as one of Jehovah’s Witnesses, until death claimed her.  Her cheerful disposition and loving nature endeared her to all who knew her.  She showed remarkable patience in her hours of suffering, proving her steadfast faith in Christ.

Oh yes, we’ll miss our mother

Who has gone from us awhile

But we know the hour is coming

             When again we’ll see her smile.

Just a while we’ll mourn her passing

Then will come that happy day

She will come back a perfect body

And will forever with us stay.


Former Vice President Charles Curtis Dies Saturday

             Charles Curtis, former vice president of the United States, succumbed to an attack of heart disease Saturday, February 8, at his home in Washington, D.C., age 75.  He made his home with his sister, Mrs. Dolly Gann and her husband, Edward E. Gann.  He and Mr. Gann were partners in law.  With Herbert Hoover as running mate, he was elected to the vice presidency in 1928, and the two were defeated in 1932.

             Curtis was born in 1860 on a farm near Topeka, Kansas, the son of Capt. Orran A. Curtis, a Kansas pioneer who married a girl of Indian descent.  Orphaned in 1865 he went to live with his mother’s Indian relatives on the Kaw reservation, living in a tepee and attending a mission school.  He learned to ride horseback.  He went later to live with his father’s people and became a jockey on Kansas race tracks.  He worked his way through school and was admitted to the bar in Kansas in 1881.  In 1884 he became prosecutor of Shawnee County.  He was elected to Congress in 1892 and to the Senate in 1907.  In 1924 he became Republican leader of the Senate.

             Funeral services were held in Topeka Tuesday, the state capitol being used for the first time for the funeral of a private citizen.

 

William M. Frederick

             William M. Frederick, for  many years a resident of Villa Ridge and Mounds, died Sunday night, February 9, at 7:30 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Archie Anderson of Leeechville, Ark., at the age of 89 years.

             Mr. Frederick, who was born in Germany, came to America at the age of twenty and lived in New York for several years, later coming to Villa Ridge and from there to Mounds.

             After coming to Mounds, Mr. Frederick was superintendent of Beech Grove and Thistlewood cemeteries from 1896 until 1928, retiring only because of failing strength.  For the past three years he has divided his time between his daughter in Harrisburg, Ill., and Mrs. Anderson in Leechville.  He had extensive property interests in this vicinity.

             Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. M. P. Mathis of Shawnee, Okla., Mrs. D. W. Henley of Harrisburg and Mrs. Spencer Titus of Mounds; one son, George Frederick of Chicago; eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held in the Congregational church of Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock the Rev. S. C. Benninger conducting.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by the side of his wife who died 40 years ago.

 

Coincidence

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Fleming of Spencer Heights were bereaved each of a grandparent during the same night.

             Mrs. Fleming’s maternal grandfather, William M. Frederick, died Sunday night at 7:30 o’clock in Leechville, Ark., and Mr. Fleming’s maternal grandmother, Mrs. Mary Fulkerson, died Sunday night at 3 o’clock at her home here.  Mr. Frederick was brought here for burial and while his body lay in state at the Congregational church, Mrs. Fulkerson’s reposed at the James Funeral Home.

             Mrs. Fleming is the former Thelma Titus, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Titus.  Mr. Fleming is a son of the late Mrs. America Fulkerson Fleming.

 

ISAAC NEWTON JONES

             Isaac Newton Jones passed away at his home near Dongola, Tuesday, February 11, at 3 o’clock, age 80 years.  He had been sick about three weeks with pneumonia.

             He is survived by one son, W. H. Jones, of Cypress, Illinois; and five step-children, Tom and Dan of Dongola, Cal at home, Alva of Dixon, and Rettie in Iowa.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at Chapel Church, Rev. Troutman of Cypress officiating.  Interment was made in the Cache Chapel Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directing the funeral.

 

MRS. MATHILDA JACOBSMEYER

             Mrs. Mathilda Trante Jacobsmeyer, age 78 years, died at 2 o’clock Sunday morning, February 9, at the home of her son in Olmstead, following a short illness.  She had resided in Olmstead for 28 years.

             Surviving are one son, Erwin Jacobsmeyer of Olmstead; two daughters, Mrs. Walter Cailes of St. Louis, Mo., and Mrs. George Shukar of Olmstead; also ten grandchildren and many other relatives.  Her husband died about twelve years ago.

             Funeral services were held at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Olmstead Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. A. W. Galen conducting.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery with G. A. James directing.

 

FATHER OF MOUNDS RESIDENTS DIES AT HOME NEAR ANNA

       Mrs. Jewell Wilson, James and Frank Lasley were called to Anna last week by the illness and death of their father, W. H. Lasley.  Mr. Lasley, a farmer all his life, had moved from near Vienna to a home six miles east of Anna about a year ago.

       Surviving are his wife and twelve children.

       (His World War I draft registration lists his name as William Henry Lasley.  According to his death certificate, William H. Lasley, farmer at Anna, Ill., was born 3 Feb 1879, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of James Lasley and Mollie Womick, a native of Illinois, died 6 Feb 1936, in Road District 2, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Lula Lasley, and was buried in Whitesides Cemetery in Bloomfield, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

COLORED RESIDENT DIES FOLLOWING STROKE

       Mrs. Lydia Littlejohn VanDyke, wife of John VanDyke, died Wednesday morning, February 12, as the result of a paralytic stroke suffered the afternoon of February 4.  She had never regained consciousness.

       Mrs. VanDyke leaves her husband, father and three sisters, one of whom is very ill at her home in St. Louis.

       (The 1910 census of Ward 1 Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., lists Lydia Vandyke born about 1881 in Mississippi, and her husband John Vandyke born about 1882 in Tennessee, a clothes cleaner.  The 1930 census gives John’s occupation as tailor and Lydia’s as assistant tailor.  Her death certificate states that Lydia Van Dyke was born about 1888 in Red Banks, Miss., the daughter of Newton Littlejohn and Mattie Osby, a native of Red Banks, Miss., died 12 Feb 1936, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of J. H. Van Dyke, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  Lydia Van Dyke Sept. 26, 1891 Feb. 12, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Rufus Muscovalley, colored, died Friday, February 7, at his home in North Mounds. He leaves a wife and five children, the youngest having been born the day before his death.

       (The 1930 census of Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., lists Rufus Muscovalley, born about 1904 in Illinois, a farm laborer; his wife, Leola born about 1905 in Tennessee; and their children all born in Illinois:  Odessa, about 1924, Edward, about 1925, Andrew, about 1928, and Melvin in 1930.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Otto Fulkerson and family of East St. Louis were called here Monday by the death of Mr. Fulkerson’s mother, Mrs. Mary Fulkerson.

 

Mrs. Archie Anderson, daughter of Mrs. Don Choate, and Mr. Choate of Leechville, Ark., are visiting in Mounds, having accompanied the body of Mrs. Anderson’s father, William M. Frederick, who died at the Anderson home Sunday night.

 

WILLIAM F. ANGLIN

       William F. Anglin, age 70, died following a brief illness at his home near Villa Ridge Sunday morning, February 9.

       Mr. Anglin is survived by his wife, two sisters, Mrs. Jennie Crain of Mounds and Mrs. Annie James of Mount Shasta, Calif.; one brother, Thomas Anglin of Berkeley, Calif.; one half brother, James Daniels of Mounds; three stepsons, Frank, Elmer and Adolphus Clifford, all of Villa Ridge.             

       Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at one o’clock at the residence with Rev. Ellsworth Lyon, pastor of the Villa Ridge Union Church officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with the Hartwell Funeral service conducting.

 

FORMER MOUNDS RESIDENT DIES IN OHIO HOME

       W. H. Grimes, for a number of years a resident of Mounds, died at his home in Hilliard, Ohio, on January 26, and was buried in Kansas City, Kansas, his old home, according to a letter from Mrs. Grimes received by Mrs. Sarah Thistlewood.  Mrs. Grimes will make her home in Kansas City.  While here Mr. and Mrs. Grimes were devoted workers in the Methodist Church.

 

FATHER OF W. A. EASTMAN DIES IN ANNA

       Harmon Eastman, age 70 years, died at his home in Anna on Thursday, February 6, of heart trouble.

       Mr. Eastman was the father of W. A. Eastman, formerly of Mounds, but now residing in Ullin and also Mrs. Stanley Campbell of Mounds.

       Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the local M. E. Church, assisted at the funeral services which were held Saturday, February 8, at the Anna M. E. church of which the deceased was a devout member.

       (Harman Eastman, 23, farmer from Anna, Ill., born in Anna, Ill., son of Horace T. Eastman and Hannah Snow, married on 11 Nov 1888, at Isaac N. Baker’s house in Union Co., Ill., Maggie S. Baker, 22, born in Allen Springs, Pope Co., Ill., daughter of Isaac N. Baker and Louisa H. Grant.   His death certificate states that Harmon Eastman, retired farmer, was born 28 Feb 1865, in Anna, Ill., the son of Horace T. Eastman, a native of Medina, New York, and Hannah L. Snow, a native of Sandusky, Ohio, died 6 Feb 1936, in Anna, Ill., the husband of Maggie L. Eastman, and was buried in Ann Cemetry.  His marker there reads:  Harmon Eastman Feb. 28, 1865 Feb. 6, 1936 Maggie L. Eastman July 25, 1866 June 1, 1944.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Feb 1936: 

Peter S. Horsley

       Peter S. Horsley of Grand Chain, age 86, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, Friday, February 14, at 5 p.m.  He had been an invalid for seven years.

       Mr. Horsley is survived by a daughter, Grace, of Grand Chain; and a grandson, Dean McClelland, of Mounds.  Mrs. Horsley died only a few weeks ago.

       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the family residence conducted by Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational Church.  Interment was made in Masonic cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

Prominent Mound City Resident Dies Friday Night

       W. T. Jaccard, age 71 years, a prominent citizen of Mound City, died at his home Friday night, February 14, at 11:45 o’clock following a two weeks’ illness.

       Mr. Jaccard was a member of I. O. O. F. lodge and the Rebekah Lodge of Mound City and the Cairo Encampment.  He was Township school treasurer for many years and had been active in the work of the Pilgrim Congregational Church.  He had lived in Mound City during his entire life.

       Surviving him are a daughter, Miss Mildred Jaccard, at home; and a son, W. N. Jaccard of Glendale, Calif.; a half-brother, M. L. Capoot of Mound City; an uncle, L. D. Stophlet, also of Mound City; and three grandchildren in California.

       His son arrived Tuesday evening from California, to attend the funeral services which were held Wednesday afternoon at the Pilgrim Congregational Church, the pastor, Rev. Ellsworth Lyon, officiating.  The Mound City and Cairo I. O. O. F. lodges conducted their ritual at the church.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

       The casket bearers were C. F. Bode, Gwin Cull, Ed Beaver, J. G. Trampert, George R. Martin and S. I. Dunn.  The flower bearers were boys of his Sunday school class, George Thomas Kennedy, Kenneth McIntire, Lawrence Edwards, Jim Bob Keller, Paul Salmon, and Leon Boren.

 

MAN INDICTED ON DEATH CHARGE IS SNOWSTORM HERO

       Near Darling, Wisconsin, last week, a thirty-five year-old man, who the present month must go to Madison to face charges of manslaughter in the circuit court, forced his way over treacherous ice-bound, snow-clogged roads to bring hope of life to twenty-year-old Clayton Alfred, critically ill in the Darlington Hospital.

       The man is Edward F. Boyle, who in September 1934 was involved in an accident on a Madison street, in which Mrs. Ida Jordon of Batavia, Illinois, was killed.  Boyle arrested for failing to stop and give aid, was released on bail after pleading not guilty to the charges.  His case is set for hearing or trial on the February docket of the Wisconsin circuit court.—Ogle County Reporter

 

CARD OF THANKS

       We desire to express our most sincere and heartfelt thanks to those who so kindly assisted us, and for the many kind expression of sympathy extended, during the recent illness and death of our beloved Mother and Grandmother, Mary Ann Fulkerson.  We assure you that your kindness and thoughtfulness will long be remembered.

THE FAMILY

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Feb 1936:

W. T. JACCARD ANSWERED FINAL CALL FRIDAY NIGHT

W. T. Jaccard, for many years a grocery merchant of Mound City, answered that final call that all must answer at 11:45 last Friday night.  He was 71 years of age.

Death was attributed to paralytic strokes, the first of which struck about three weeks ago.  The last one hit him Thursday morning when he was apparently recovering and tried to get up.

Mr. Jaccard was born north of Mound City and had spent his entire life in Pulaski County.  When he first came here he worked in the grocery store of his uncle, L. D. Stophlet.  He later went into business for himself.

The name Jaccard comes from France.  Peter Jaccard, the grandfather of W. T., fought under Napoleon Bonaparte, it is said.  The house that Peter Jaccard built is still standing north of Mound City.  “Bill,” as Mr. Jaccard was familiarly known, had in his possession the certificate of the original grant of this farm by the government when it was homesteaded by his grandfather.

Surviving the deceased are:  one daughter, Miss Mildred Jaccard, who resided with her father; one son, W. N. Jaccard, of Glendale, Cal.; also three grandchildren in Glendale; a half-brother Mike Capoot, of Mound City; an uncle, L. D. Stophlet, of Mound City; and a niece, Mrs. H. A. Sitter of Drayton Plaines, Mich.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon in the Congregational church of which he was a member and clerk.  Rev. Ellsworth Lyons, pastor of the church, officiated.  At the close of the services the Odd Fellows Lodges of Mound City and Cairo held their rites.

Pallbearers were:  C. F. Bode, Mike Cull, Ed Beaver, John Trampert, George R. Martin and S. I. Dunn.  Flower bearers were members of Mr. Jaccard’s Sunday school class as follows:  George Thomas Kennedy, Kenneth McIntire, Lawrence Edwards, Jim Bob Keller, Paul Salmon, and Leon Moore.

Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery by the side of his wife who preceded him in death in 1924.

             (Samuel Peter Jackard married Rhoda Duncan on 15 Apr 1827, in Union Co., Ill.  William T. Jaccard married Henrietta Stophlet on 25 Oct 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James Capoot married Mrs. Henrietta Jaccard on 11 Jun 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  W. T. Jaccard married Minnie Fray about 1890, according to the 1900 census of Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PETER HORSLEY, AGE 86, OF GRAND CHAIN, DIES

Peter Horsley, known to his acquaintances as Pete, died in the hospital at Cairo on Friday of last week, the result of a fall which he recently sustained at his home in Grand Chain.  Because of his advanced age, of 86, he could not stand the effects of the fall and a broken bone.

His wife preceded him in death last December.

Surviving him are:  his daughter, Miss Grace Horsley of Grand Chain; and grandson, Dean McClelland of Mounds.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 3:30 at the residence in Grand Chain conducted by Rev. S. C. Benninger.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Peter Horsley was born 15 Nov 1849, in Carter Co., Ky., the son of Hiram Horsley, died 14 Feb 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the widower of Lizzie Horsley, and was buried in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Peter Horsley Nov. 5, 1849 Feb. 14, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PASSED AWAY

Martha Eleanor Jones passed away at her home near Carterville, Illinois, Wednesday afternoon at the age of 80 years.

She is survived by her husband, G. H. Jones; one sister, Mrs. France Ward, Marion, Illinois; one brother, Walter Hudson, Herrin; eleven children, Marshall, Carbondale, Rosie Coleman, Makanda, Thomas, Carbondale, Roy of Marion, Mrs. C. A. Smallwood, East St. Louis, Harvey Hudgens, Goreville, Mrs. Roy Goodman, Marion, Mrs. Oscar Wallace, Buncombe, John S. of Goreville, George of Creal Springs and Mrs. Carl Blockworth, Carterville.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Mt. Hebron Church.  Rev. Pete Williams of Goreville officiated.  Interment was made in the Mt. Hebron Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Martha Elenor Jones was born 17 Mar 1856, in Tennessee, the daughter of William Hudson, died 19 Feb 1936, in Carterville Township, Williamson Co., Ill., the wife of G. H. Jones, and was buried in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Hebron Cemetery reads:  George H. Jones Sept. 9, 1858 June 25, 1952 Martha E. Jones March 17, 1856 Feb. 19, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Feb 1936:

ELIZABETH BEGGS CLAIMED BY DEATH

Elizabeth Beggs, of near Cypress, was claimed by death last Sunday morning at 4 o’clock.  Her death was attributed to old age, she was 78 years old.

Surviving are five children, Oli___, Johnston City, R. M. of Vienna, Sarah Moak of Cypress, ___ of Vienna, and Mrs. Ethel ___, Dongola; two brothers, ___rd of Dongola and James ___ Missouri; and one sister, ____ Hinkle of Jonesboro.

Services were held Monday morning at __ o’clock at Friendship Church in Union County with Rev. ____ officiating.  Interment was made in Friendship Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(Isaac Beggs, 36, farmer from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the son of John H. Beggs and Manurvy Corzine, married 3rd on 13 Dec 1883, in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, 25, from Dongola, born in Mississippi Co., Ark., daughter of John Clifford and Eliza Penry.  John R. Campbell, 21, from Dongola Precinct, Union Co., Ill., married on 12 Oct 1876, in Union Co., Ill., Elizabeth W. Clifford, 18, from Dongola Precinct.  According to her death certificate, Elizabeth Beggs was born about 1858 and died 23 Feb 1936, in Road District 3, Johnson Co., Ill., the wife of Isaac Beggs.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JAMES CLAUDE MINNER SUCCUMBS TO ATTACK OF PNEUMONIA

James Claude Minner succumbed to an attack of pneumonia at 6:45 ___ morning after an illness of ___ a week.  His condition ___ serious from the begging and at one time were there ____ for his life.

He was 39 years old.  Eighteen years of his time had been spent in Mound City.  For the past years he has been in the shoe ___business.

Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. ___ Minner, and three children, ___ward, Gladys Marie and ___ at home.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the First Baptist Church with Rev. E. E. Hayden ____ the M. E. Church, officiating.  Interment was made in ___d cemetery at Mounds.  Pallbearers were Afton Winters, ___ards, Paul Stout, Alvia ___, ___o Edwards and Bird ____.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that James Claude Minner, shoe cobbler in Mound City, Ill., was born 15 Jan 1897, in Charleston, Mo., the son of James Minner and Linnie Burgess, died 23 Feb 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Lula Minner, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KARNAK WOMAN DIES

Mrs. Lelia Meyer, of Karnak, died at her home Friday night at the age of 42 years after an illness lasting a year.

Besides her husband, three children survive, namely:  Martha and twin daughters, Alice and Aline, and a sister, Mrs. Becky Smart, of Bradford, Ark.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon in the Pentecostal church.  Rev. D. M. Osbone of Cairo officiated.

The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Florence Lelia Meyer was born 1 Jun 1893, in McNair Co., Tenn., the daughter of Nath Banham, a native of McNair Co., Tenn., and Adeline Kiser, a native of Tennessee, died 21 Feb 1936, in Karnak, Ill., the wife of Hugh Meyer, and was buried in Ohio Chapel Cemetery at Grand Chain, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Lelia Meyer June 1, 1894 Feb. 21, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. SOPHRONIA BENTON DIES AT MOUNDS, AGE 78

Mrs. Sophronia Benton died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. A. Shifley, in Mounds, on Wednesday of last week.

She was the daughter of the late Anthony and Mary Louise George of Dongola, and was born and reared near Dongola.

Surviving are one son, Henry L. Hoffner, Dongola; three daughters, Mrs. John L. Swink, Dongola, Mrs. Shifley, Mounds, and Miss Georgia L. Benton of Cairo; eleven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends.

Mrs. Benton professed faith in Christ at an early age and joined the Mt. Pisgah Church where she retained her membership.  Her illness was of long duration, but she bore it with patience, continuing to pour her Christian spirit on others.

The funeral services were held Friday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Shifley conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury of Jonesboro and assisted by Rev. Henry Shifley, Ullin.  Interment was made at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Dongola.

Those who sang were:  Mrs. Wave Wingo, Mrs. Chris Bauer, Mrs. Henry Stern, Georg Schuler, and Hugh Atherton.  Pallbearers were J. R. Travis, J. T. Knupp, E. B. Adams, N. M. Shifely, H. Hamlett, and T. G. Akin.

(Henry A. Hoffner, 24, from Wetaug, Ill., married on 12 Sep 1875, at the house of Anthony George in Union Co., Ill., Sophronia George, 17, from Dongola, Ill.  John T. Benton, 50, farmer of Union Co., Ill., born in Tennessee, son of William Benton and Molly Cupp married 2nd on 26 Feb 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Frona Hoffner, 41, of Wetaug, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Anthony George and Louisa Augustine.  Her death certificate states that Sophronia Benton was born 20 Oct 1857, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Anthony George and Mary Louisa Augustine, natives of Germany, died 19 Feb 1936, in Mounds, Ill., widow of John Benton, and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery at Wetaug, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Sophronia Benton Oct. 20, 1857 Feb. 19, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. LOTTIE COX DIES

Mrs. Lottie Cox passed away at her home near Goreville, Illinois Tuesday morning at the age of 64 years.

Surviving are:  three children, Mrs. Mae Tripp and Mrs. Cora Wolaver of Marion and Roy Cox who is in Alaska; and a sister, Mrs. Lizzie Jacon of Gale, Illinois.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock at the Busby Chapel Church near Goreville, Rev. George Hudson officiating.  Internment was made in the Busby Chapel Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(F. M. Cox married Charlotta Lambert on 27 Jun 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Lottie Cox of rural Makanda, Ill., was born 10 May 1871, in Tunnel Hill, Ill., the son of Mr. Lambert and Martha At___, died 25 Feb 1936, in Road District 1, Union Co., Ill., the widow of Franklin Marion Cox, and was buried in Busby Cemetery in Goreville Township, Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to take this opportunity to thank our many friends who died during the illness and death of our father and brother, W. T. Jaccard.  Especially do we wish to express our appreciation to those who sent the beautiful floral offerings, to the choir for their songs of comfort and to Rev. Ellsworth Lyons for his comforting words.

Miss Mildred Jaccard

W. N. Jaccard

M. L. Capoot

 

Those who came to Mounds Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. John Benton are:  Mrs. Lee Fisher, of Dongola, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Copeland of Fulton, Mrs. Dewey Goodman of Centralia, Mrs. Minnie Earnhart of Ullin and Mr. and Mrs. George Knupp of Dongola.

 

Mrs. Doris Edwards and son, Virgil, attended the funeral of Logan Galbraith, which was held Sunday afternoon at the Karcher Funeral Home at Cairo, Rev. Thomas officiating.  Interment as made in the Thistlewood Cemetery under the direction of Karcher Brothers. (Olmsted)

             (According to his death certificate, Logan W. Galbraith of Cairo, Ill., was born 10 Dec 1863, in Mt. Vernon, Ill., the son of Miles Galbraith, a native of Tennessee, and Matilda Ellis, a native of Shawneetown, Ill., died 21 Feb 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Laura Galbraith, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Feb 1936: 

Logan W. Galbraith

       Logan W. Galbraith of Future City, age 72 years, died Friday morning, February 21, at 7:30 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, following an illness of three months.

       Surviving are his wife, Laura; three sons, Milas Galbraith, of Effingham, Ill., Ray and Wilbur of Cairo; three brothers, Milas S. and Thomas E. of Cairo and Robert Galbraith until recently of Pulaski County; three sisters, Mrs. Melissa Clancy of Ullin, Mrs. Lizzie Lampley of Villa Ridge and Mrs. Elizera Neistrath of Long Beach, Calif.; two grandchildren and many other relatives.

       Funeral services were held at Karcher Brothers Funeral Home in Cairo Sunday afternoon with the Rev. D. R. Thomas conducting.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

 

James Claude Minner

Funeral services for James Claude Minner, age 39, who died at his home in Mound City Sunday morning at 6:45 o’clock following a few weeks illness of pneumonia, were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church in Mound City with Rev. Everett Hayden, pastor of the First M. E. Church officiating.  He had resided in Mound City for the past 18 years and recently had conducted a shoe repair shop there.

       Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. Lula Minner; and three children, Claude Edward, Gladys Marie and Louie all at home.

       Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  The casket bearers were Afton Winters, John Edwards, Paul Stout, Alvia Smith, Otto Edwards and Bird Minton.

 

Mrs. Sophronia Benton

       Mrs. Sophronia Benton was born near Dongola, Illinois, October 20, 1857, to Anthony and Mary Louise George and departed this life at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. A. Shifley in Mounds, Illinois, February 19, 1936, age 78 years 3 months, 29 days.  She was first married to Henry L. Hoffner who preceded her in death.  To this union ten children were born, three of whom survive, as follows:  Mrs. John Swink of Dongola, Mrs. S. A. Shifley, of Mounds, and Henry L. Hoffner of Dongola; also eleven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.  She was again united in marriage to J. T. Benton in February 1899 who also preceded her in death on February 21, 1922.  To this union one daughter was born, Miss Georgia Benton, of Cairo.

       At an early age, she professed faith in Christ and united with Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church, where she retained her membership.

       She endured her many years of illness with patience and abiding faith in The Heavenly Father, always bearing testimony of His great love and care in the words and deeds to her family, neighbors and many friends.

       The funeral services were held Friday, February 21, at 1:30 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. A. Shifley, conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury of Jonesboro, assisted by Bro. Henry Shifley of Ullin.  Music was furnished by Mesdames Wingo, C. H. Bauer, and Henry Stern, Messrs. George Schuler and Hugh Atherton.  The pallbearers were J. R. Travers, H. A. Hamlett, J. T. Knupp, T. G. Akin, M. M. Shifley, and E. B. Adams.  Interment was made in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug.  E. J. Ford of Dongola directed the funeral.

 

Miss Virginia Shifley, who was called here by the death of her grandmother, Mrs. Sophronia Benton, returned Saturday to her duties as student nurse in Baptist Memorial Hospital, Memphis, Tenn.

 

Mrs. C. F. Melton, who was called to Palmersville, Tenn., by the illness and death of her brother J. F. McWherter, Mr. Melton, their daughter Miss Ruth and H. L. Atherton, who attended his funeral, returned home the first of last week accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Clark, who were also called to Palmersville from California.  Mrs. Clark, sister of Mrs. Melton, will remain several months while Mr. Clark, a Government auditor will be busy in the south and west.

 

LOTTIE COX

       Mrs. Lottie Cox passed away at her home near Goreville, Illinois, Tuesday morning at age of 64 years.

       She leaves three children, Mrs. Mae Tripp and Mrs. Cora Wolaer of Marion and Roy Cox, who is in Alaska; a sister, Lizzie Jacon of Gale.

       Services were held Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock at the Busby Chapel Church near Goreville, Rev. George Hudson, officiating.  Interment was made in the Busby Chapel Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directing the funeral.

 

ELIZABETH BEGGS

       Funeral services were held Monday morning at 11 o’clock at 11 o’clock for Elizabeth Beggs, who passed away Sunday morning at her home near Cypress, Illinois, at the age of 76 years.

       She is survived by two brothers, Jake Clifford, Dongola, Jim Clifford, Missouri; and two sisters, Mrs. Belle Hinkle, McLeansboro, Ill., and Mrs. Chamberlain.

       Five children, Oliver Campbell, Johnson City, Ill., R. M. Beggs, Vienna, Ill., route 3, Mrs. Sarah Moak, Cypress, Ill., Arizona Beggs, Vienna, Ill., Route 3, Ethel Ozment, Dongola, Ill., Route.

       Services were held at Friendship Church, Rev. E. S. Dunn officiating.  Interment was made in the Friendship Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Mar 1936: 

Pneumonia Claims Mrs. Warner Wall Following Short Illness

       Mrs. Maria Scheck Wall, age 35 years, died Tuesday night, March 3, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where she had been taken from her home on the Meridian Road only a few hours before.  She was a victim of double pneumonia and had been ill only five days.

       She is survived by her husband, Attorney Warner Wall; and her mother, Mrs. Scheck, who, since the death of Mr. Scheck some five years ago, had made her home with Mrs. Wall.

       Mr. and Mrs. Wall married in Chicago, but later Mr. Wall transferred his law practice from Chicago to Mound City.  They moved to the farm known as the Polk farm where they have since resided.  She had many friends in the community and will be missed from that large circle.

       Funeral services will be held this morning at nine o’clock at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Mound City, the Rev. Father Gilmore officiating.  The casket bearers will be George Moses, F. L. Graves, George A. Thorpe, Leonard T. Beisswingert, D. T. Clancy, and D. H. Leidigh.  Interment will be made in Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing.

       (According to her death certificate, Marie Wall was born 9 Feb 1901, in Minneapolis, Minn., the daughter of Joseph A. Scheck and Catherine Kartgen, natives of Chicago, Ill., died 3 Mar 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Warner Wall, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Marie A. Wall Feb. 9, 1901 March 3, 1936 Beloved Wife and Daughter.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Carmack

       John Carmack of Mill Creek, age 61, died Tuesday morning at Anna and was brought to the James Funeral Home in Mounds.

       Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Cynthia Carmack of Mill Creek; two children, Fred and Ruby Carmack of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; three sisters, Mrs. Zon Walston of Mounds, Mrs. Ellsworth Mangum of Anna and Mrs. Arthur Ratcliff of Los Angeles, Calif.; two brothers, William of Anna and James of Mill Creek.

       Funeral services were held at the James Funeral Home Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by J. C. Mench.  Interment was made in the Anna Cemetery.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Mar 1936:

CICERO THOMPSON, COLORED JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, DIED

             Cicero Thompson, a colored Justice of the Peace in Mound City, died last Saturday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. N. Humble, in Mounds.  He was 73 years of age at the time of his death.  He had been in failing health for some time.

             Cicero had been a Justice of the Peace for many years.  He was a familiar figure about the courthouse where he conducted many of his trials.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the White Chapel A. M. E. Church in Mound City and a large crowd of both white and colored attended.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

             (Cicero M. Thompson married Anna R. Richerson on 22 Dec 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Cicero Melon Thompson, Justice of the Peace, was born in 1863, died 29 Feb 1936, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Anna Thompson, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Vienna Times last week printed a news story of the accident in which Clifford Veach of Vienna ran over David Hardy Kern, 14-year-old boy of Waterloo, Illinois.  The accident happened in or near Waterloo.  The lad was on a bicycle, and turned his bicycle out into the road as the car horn sounded.  Veach tried to turn the opposite way and the lad turned back.  The boy died soon after in the hospital in St. Louis.  The boy is the son of V. H. Kern, who traveled through this section for the Federal Land Bank and is known to quite a number of people.

             (His marker in Waterloo City Cemetery reads:  David Hardy Kern 1922-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEATH OF MRS. WARNER WALL SHOCK TO THIS COMMUNITY

             This community was shocked beyond expression when the sad news spread Tuesday night and Wednesday morning that Mrs. Warner Wall, living several miles above Mound City, on the Meridian Road, had died.  Not many knew that she had even been ill.

             Death was attributed to the influenza and pneumonia of which she had been ill for five days.  On Tuesday afternoon she was taken to the hospital in Cairo in an effort to save her life, but she passed away about 8:30 that evening.

Mrs. Wall was a native of Chicago, where she and her husband were married.  She came to this community to live when the late Judge W. A. Wall became unable to take care of his affairs and Warren came to take them up.  In no time at all she had endeared herself to many, many people by her jovial disposition and straightforward and unassuming manner.

Not long after coming here her father, Joseph A. Sheck, passed away in Chicago and her mother came here to make her home with Attorney and Mrs. Wall.  Only the husband and mother, Mrs. Catherine Scheck, remain to mourn the loss of the wife and daughter, except a vast host of friends that will forever have a pleasant memory of her.

Especially will the death of Mrs. Wall be felt in the Villa Ridge community where she took an active part in its affairs.

Funeral services are to be held this morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Mound City.  Interment will be made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  G. A. James has charge of funeral arrangement.

(Her death certificate states that Marie Wall was born 9 Feb 1901, in Minneapolis, Minn., the daughter of Joseph A. Scheck and Catherine Kartgen, natives of Chicago, Ill., died 3 Mar 1936, in Cairo, Ill., wife of Warner Wall, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  Marie A. Wall Feb. 9, 1901 March 3, 1936 Beloved Wife and Daughter.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MATILDA STAUDACHER DIED LAST WEEK AT ULLIN

Mrs. Mathilda Staudacher of Ullin passed away at her home on Thursday of last week after lapsing into a diabetic coma.  She had been in a serious condition for two or three days before her death.  She was 59 years of age.

Surviving Mrs. Staudacher are:  her husband, William; children, William of Ullin, Florence of Anna, Mrs. Grace Kearney, Flint, Mich., Mrs. Edna Knight, Wetaug, Marie Keller, Elco, Paul and Minnie Belle, Ullin; stepchildren, Charles and Arch of Marion, Ill., Mrs. Flora Allen of St. Louis, Mo., Mrs. Sophia Carman of Ullin; one sister, Mrs. Cora Mize; three brothers, Willie Poole of Tamms and Jim and Mike Poole of Mill Creek.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church with Rev. Elmer Smith in charge.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Matilda Staudacher was born 28 Dec 1877, in Mill Creek, Ill., the daughter of Mike Poole, a native of North Carolina, and Miss Price, died 27 Feb 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of William Staudacher, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker there reads:  William Staudacher 1865-1945 Matilda Staudacher 1877-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Roy Edwards, Wilma Richards, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Edwards attended the funeral of Mrs. James Edwards at Jonesboro Friday.  Mrs. Edwards was the mother of Clyde Edwards who worked in Hogendobler’s Store some time ago.  (Olmstead)

             (According to her death certificate, Flarrie Elizabeth Edwards was born 14 Jun 1883 in Cobden, Ill., the daughter of Henry Kerr, a native of Huntsville, Ala., and Mattie E. Sisk, a native of Larkinsville, Ala., died 26 Feb 1936, in Jonesboro, Ill., the wife of James Edwards, and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.  Her marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  James C. Edwards Dec. 31, 1878 April 3, 1960 Flarrie E. Edwards June 14, 1883 Feb. 26, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN CARMACK DIES

John Carmack, age 61 years, died at Anna Tuesday morning.  His body was brought to Mounds where funeral services were held at the James Funeral Home Thursday afternoon conducted by J. C. Mench.  A quartette from the M. E. Church furnished the music.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Anna.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

Surviving Mr. Carmack are his wife, Mrs. Cynthia Carmack of Mill Creek; two children, Fred and Ruby Carmack of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; three sisters, Mrs. Zon Walston of Mounds, Mrs. Ellsworth Mangum of Anna, and Mrs. Arthur Ratcliff of Los Angeles, Cal.; and two brothers, William of Anna and James of Mill Creek.

(William J. Carmack, 21, from Anna Precinct, married on 6 Aug 1874, in Union Co., Ill., Sarah F. Perkins, 21, from Cobden Precinct.  His death certificate states that John Carmack, a veterinarian, was born 29 Oct 1874, in Anna, Ill., the son of William Carmack, a native of Tennessee, and Sarah Perkins, a native of Kentucky, died 3 Mar 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Cynthia Carmack, and was buried in Anna City Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DIES NEAR GOREVILLE

Mrs. Isa Jane Blankenship died at her home near Goreville, Illinois, on Friday of last week, of pneumonia.  She had been sick one week at the time of her death.  Her age was 49 years.

Left to mourn their loss are:  her husband, T. R. Blankenship; children, Ruth Stokes, Ruby Adams, Luther and Margaret of Goreville, and Mrs. Muriel Zeigler of Jackson, Tenn.; brothers Jeff Easton, Indianapolis, Ind., and Everett Watson of East St. Louis; a sister, Mrs. Arminta Pulliam of Carterville.

Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sunday at Pulley’s Mill Church with Mrs. Charles Curtiss of Carterville officiating.  Interment was made in Terry cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

             (W. M. Watson married Minna Rushing on 27 Sep 1866, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Isa Jane Blankenship was born 21 Nov 1886, in Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of William Watson and Jemimah Rushing, natives of Tennessee, died 27 Feb 1936, in Southern Township, Williamson Co., Ill., the wife of T. R. Blankenship, and was buried in Goreville Township, Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cana Cemetery at Goreville, Ill., reads:  Isa W. Blankenship 1886-1936 Richard Blankenship 1884-1970.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several from here (Pulaski) attended the funeral of Mrs. Matilda Staudacher at Ullin Friday.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Mar 1936:

JOHN B. “GRANDPA” DEAN DIED MONDAY MORNING

             John B. “Grandpa” Dean died Monday morning at 7 o’clock from the flu and a stroke of paralysis.  He has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. J. C. Stout, for a number of years.  He was 76 years of age.

             Surviving Mr. Dean are four daughters, Mrs. J. C. Stout, Mound City, Mrs. Ethel Reed and Mrs. Ella Burk, of Aurora, Illinois, and Mrs. Leona Moyers of Whiteville, N.C.; and one son, Charles Dean, of Aurora; 16 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the graveside in the Johnson Cemetery near Vienna.  Rev. J. L. Wall, assisted by Rev. Knight conducted the services.  Franz Gustafson, John Edwards, Alva Smith, W. E. Sheerer, Frank Beshers, and Tom Moyers were pallbearers.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that John B. Dean, retired laborer, was born 4 May 1859, in Illinois, the son of Charles Dean and Francis Arflack, natives of Tennessee, died 9 Mar 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the widower of Mary Dean, and was buried in Johnson Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

96-YEAR-OLD WOMAN DIES

Fanny Hamilton, a 96-year-old colored woman of Mounds, died Saturday at her home.  The last 31 years of her life have been spent in Pulaski County.  She leaves two daughters, two sons and several grandchildren.

(The 1900 census of Ward 6, Cairo, Ill., and the 1910 census of Burkville, Pulaski Co., Ill., names her husband as Mattson Hamilton and her children as Rebecca born May 1879 in Mississippi,  Katy born Feb 1885 in Illinois, Rosie born Jan 1887 in Illinois, Otto born Apr 1889 in Illinois, and Frank Hamilton born May 1891 in Illinois.  Her grandchildren living in the household in 1910 were Granville Wilson, Aron Wilson, Johnnie Smith, and Florell Rodgers. According to the death certificate, Fannie Hamilton was born 29 Dec 1839, in Natchez, Miss., died 7 Mar 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the widow of Matt Hamilton, and was buried in Church Aid Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Mar 1936: 

Sister of Senator Borah Dies at 88

       Mrs. Alice Crews Heidinger, 88 years old, sister of United States Senator William E. Borah, of Idaho, died at her home in Fairfield March 8.  She suffered a paralytic stroke Saturday.  Funeral services were held Tuesday, with burial in Black Oak Cemetery, near the old Borah homestead, where the Senator was born.

       Two sisters, Mrs. Hattie Rinard of Fairfield and Mrs. Sadie Mabry of St. Louis, also survive.

       (Jacob Heidinger married Mrs. Mary A. Borah Crews on 30 Nov 1904, in Wayne Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mary Alice Borah Crews Heidinger was born 2 Apr 1847, in Jasper Township, Wayne Co., Ill., the daughter of William Nathan Borah, a native of Kentucky, and Eliza West, a native of Massolin Township, Wayne Co., Ill., died 8 Mar 1936, in Jasper, Wayne Co., Ill., widow of Caleb Crews, and was buried in Massilon, Wayne Co., Ill.  Her marker in Crews Cemetery in Toms Prairie, Wayne Co., Ill., reads:  Mary Alice Crews 1847-1936 Caleb Crews 1836-1899.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Young Colored Man Dies

       Joe Hobbs, colored, age 23 years, died at the Anna State Hospital Wednesday and was brought here for burial.  He is survived by his mother, Maggie Hobbs, his father, three brothers and a sister.  Funeral services will be held today at 1 o’clock p.m. at the Free Will Baptist Church.  Interment will be made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

       (George Hobbs, 21, farmer at Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Villa Ridge, Ill., son of Green Hobbs, married on 25 Jul 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Maggie Ramey, 18, of Villa Ridge, born in Jorden, Ky., daughter of Mason F. Reymey and Bell Welchcraft.  His death certificate states that James Hobbs, a cook at Mounds, Ill., was born 24 Apr 1912, in Mounds, Ill., the son of George Hobbs and Maggie Rainey, a native of Illinois, died 11 Mar 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Mar 1936: 

Sister of Mrs. D. Winchester Dies Tuesday Night

       Mrs. Ada Etherton Rigdon, wife of David Rigdon of Holly, Colo., and sister of Mrs. Dallas Winchester of this city, died Tuesday night in Holden Hospital, Carbondale, after a lingering illness.

       Funeral services were held Thursday in Carbondale.  Interment will be made in Topeka, Kan., her former home.

 

War Veteran 105 Years Old

       Rev. N. London, colored, of Olive Branch, celebrated his 105th birthday Saturday at his home where dinner was served to more than 50 guests.  He is a Civil War veteran, having served three years in the army.  He is said to be “hale and hearty” in spite of his advanced age.  He has five children, 12 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.

 

Sudden Death of Earnleigh Hayden Shocks Entire Community

       Earnleigh Hayden of Valley Recluse died suddenly Monday afternoon, March 16, a little after 4 o’clock after having been stricken with apoplexy only about 40 minutes earlier while at his work as foreman on a WPA project.  Without warning he fell and while being taken to his home in an automobile became unconscious and never revived.  A doctor was summoned, but nothing could be done.

       Mr. Hayden, whose age was 48 years, had lived his entire life in this county, having been born at the very place where he had lived all his life and where he died.  He was known and liked by the entire community and will be greatly missed.
       Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mildred Hayden; three sons, Phillip and Herbert of Valley Recluse and Donald of Cairo; three brothers, W. T. Hayden of Fisk, Mo., J. T. Hayden of Valley Recluse and Sam J. Hayden of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. J. L. Wanura of Mounds and Miss Romantha Hayden, who made her home with Earnleigh and family; also three grandchildren and a host of friends.

       Funeral services were conducted from the home Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Mr. J. C. Mench of Mounds officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

SEEKS MOTHER

       Murphysboro—Martin Smith, 16 years old, is here seeking word of his mother, who, he says, was Cecilia Hamilton, formerly of Jackson County, from whom he was adopted soon after birth.  He was born in the Iowa State Hospital, Iowa City, he said, and was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Morris Smith, June 20, 1920.  They took him to Fargo, N.C., where the foster father died six years ago and Mrs. Smith died recently.  Following her death the body went to the Iowa hospital in search of information, but all he could learn was his mother’s name and the fact that she came from this county.  Several citizens have interested themselves in his case and arrangements have been made for him to stay temporarily at the local CCC camp.

 

HOBO BICYCLIST KILLED

       Anna—A hobo bicyclist, Leo McCoy, whose home, it was learned, is at Victoria, Ark., was struck by a car driven by Fred Roberts who, with his daughter, was returning to his home in Grand Tower, Saturday night.  When McCoy fell from the bicycle, his head struck the pavement, fracturing his skull.  The accident happened when Roberts swung out in passing another car and did not see the bicycle which carried no lights.  McCoy was 45 years old.  His body was taken by Norris & Son to their undertaking rooms where an inquest revealed the facts.  Burial took place in the Jonesboro Cemetery at county expense.

       (His death certificate states that Leo McCoy of Victoria, Ark., was born about 1891, died 7 Mar 1936, in Road District 11, Union Co., Ill., nd was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. HOWARD GOODMAN AND HER CHILDREN AWARDED $30,000

       Anna—Mrs. Howard Goodman of Centralia, and her two children, have been awarded by verdict $30,000 damages growing out of the death of her husband, Howard Goodman, an engineer on the Burlington Route who, with his fireman and a brakeman, was killed in December 1934 in a collision of their freight train with a coal train at a siding near Herrin.  The jury awarded Mrs. Goodman $15,000; her son, Howard Jr., 5 years old, $10,000; and the daughter, Janis, 17 years old, $5,000.  Mrs. Goodman had sued for $50,000.  She plans to put the children’s money in a trust fund for their education.

 

FAMILY WIPED OUT IN AUTO ACCIDENT

       Vienna—One of the most gruesome occurrences ever to be witnessed in the little city of Stonefort occurred Thursday afternoon when Lloyd Ragain, 35, his wife, Adelle and their 4 year-old son were killed, when their automobile was struck by a Big Four train at a railroad crossing within the city limits.

       The car, a Durant coupe, was rolled in front of the locomotive of the train for many yards before it was stopped.  The bodies were all thrown to the side of the rails before the train was halted.  The car was a mass of twisted steel.—Times

       (His death certificate states that William Loyd Ragon, coal miner, was born 27 Apr 1896, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of Joe Ragon, a native of Johnson Co., Ill., and Laura Ragon, a native of Pope Co., Ill., died 6 Mar 1936, in Stonefort, Saline Co., Ill., husband of Adela Ragon, and was buried in Saline Cemetery, Carrier Mills, Saline Co., Ill.  His wife’s death certificate states that Adela Josephine Ragon was born 22 Jun 1901, in Huntsville, Mo., the daughter of William Rogers and Aliva Vanderbeck, natives of Huntsville, Mo., died 6 Mar 1936, in Stonefort, Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Saline Cemetery at Carrier Mills.  Their son’s death certificate reads:  Patrick Francis Ragon was born 18 Apr 1932, in Saline Co., Ill., the son of Loyd Ragon, a native of Pope Co., Ill., and Adela Rogers, a native of Huntsville, Mo., died 6 Mar 1936, in Stonefort, Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Saline Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Mar 1936:

FORMER RESIDENT DIES IN CARUTHERSVILLE, MO.

Jim Monan, until about thirteen years ago a resident of Mound City, died Sunday at his home in Caruthersville, Mo., according to word received by relatives in Mound City.

             Mr. Monan will be remembered as a ferry operator here years ago and also operator of the “Sugar Loaf” boat for Polk’s canning factory.

John Edwards is a brother-in-law to the deceased and J. M. Monan and Mrs. Edith Schuler are nephew and niece.

(A marker in Little Prairie Cemetery at Caruthersville, Pemiscot Co., Mo., reads:  Father James R. Monan 1863-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

EARNLEIGH HAYDEN TAKEN SUDDENLY BY DEATH MONDAY

Earnleigh Hayden of Valley Recluse was taken suddenly by death last Monday afternoon while working as foreman of a WPA road job.  Apoplexy was the cause of death.  It was about 3:30 when the stroke hit him.  He lost consciousness when loaded into a car to be taken home and never regained it, dying about 4:10 at his home.  He has had high blood pressure for some time.

Mr. Hayden was 48 years old when he died and had lived on the same spot all his life.

He had a jovial disposition never failing to have a joke ready for every occasion.  For years he traveled for the Fuller Brush Co., and many housewives will remember him and his jokes.  He had always been an ardent Democrat.

Surviving the deceased are:  his wife, Mrs. Mildred Hayden; three sons, Phil and Herbert of Valley Recluse and Donald of Cairo; three brothers, W. T. of Fisk, Mo., J. T. of Valley Recluse and S. J. of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. J. L. Wanura of Mounds and Miss Romantha Hayden, who made her home with the deceased; and three grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence.  J. C. Mench of Mounds officiated.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Earnleigh Hayden, farmer, was born 6 May 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of William Hayden, a native of Indiana, and Mariah James, died 16 Mar 1936, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mildred Hayden, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Earnleigh Hayden 1887-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SISTER OF MRS. DALLAS WINCHESTER DIED TUESDAY

Mrs. Ada Rigdon of Murphysboro died Tuesday night at 11:45.  She was a sister of Mrs. Dallas Winchester of Mounds.  Mrs. Winchester had been at her bedside for a number of days.

Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon.

(Lewis Etherton married Mary Etherton on 16 Aug 1885, in Jackson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Ada Ruth Rigdon was born 13 Feb 1887, in Murphysboro, Ill., the daughter of Lewis Etherton, a native of Murphysboro, Ill., and Mary Etherton, a native of Pomona, Ill., died 17 Mar 1936, in Carbondale, Ill., the wife of Hy D. Rigdon, and was buried in Memorial Cemetery in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kan.  Her marker in Penwell-Gabel Cemetery in Topeka, Kan., reads:  Ada Ruth Rigdon, 1887-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MATTIE MAE LESLEY DIES

Mrs. Mattie Mae Lesley died at her home in Goreville on Wednesday of last week after an illness of nine days of pneumonia.

She is survived by her husband, William Lesley; one daughter, Mrs. Walter Hancock; seven sisters, Mrs. Midla Frances, Mrs. Annie Nanney, Mrs. Alice Toler, Mrs. Myrtle Stilley and Mrs. Oma Johns, all of Goreville; Mrs. Cora Walker of Wolf Lake and Mrs. Beulah McGlome of Cobden.

Funeral services were held Friday morning at the Presbyterian church with Rev. P. Williams, assisted by Rev. Clay Barnham, officiating.  Interment was made in the Howard Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Jefferson Howard, 23, born in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of John Howard and M. Walker, married Mary C. Stump, 18, born in Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of Charles P. Stump and P. Van Winkle, on 26 Aug 1885, in Union Co., Ill.  Mattie Mae Lesley was born 15 Feb 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of Jeff Howard and Mattie Stumpf, died 11 Mar 1936, in Goreville, Johnson Co., Ill., the wife of William Lesley, and was buried at Goreville.  Her marker in Howard Cemetery at Goreville, Ill., reads:  W. S. D. Lesley 1877-1963 Mattie M. Lesley 1891-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN MARLMAN DIED NEAR KARNAK LAST SATURDAY

John Marlman, age 68, died near Karnak last Saturday morning at 12:35 after an illness of 11 weeks duration.

Surviving are:  his wife, Mrs. Emma Marlman; two sons, Archie Marlman, of Marion, and Walter Marlman of Granite City, Illinois; two daughters, Mrs. Elsie Mesker, Cypress; Mrs. Herman Baccus, Karnak.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Anderson Church near Karnak with Rev. Robert Mourn of Lawrenceville, Illinois, and Rev. W. E. Browning of Karnak officiating.  Interment was made in the Anderson Cemetery.

Mr. Marlman was a member of the Methodist Church and the Masonic Lodge.  The Masons held their rites.  The Wilson Funeral Service had charge of funeral arrangement.

(John Marlman married Emma Lippert on 25 Dec 1890, in Massac Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Marlman, farmer, was born 7 Mar 1868, in Massac Co., Ill., the son of Louis Marlman and Caroline Jenkins, natives of Germany, died 14 Mar 1936, in Road District 5, Massac Co., Ill., the husband of Emma Marlman.  His marker in Anderson Cemetery at Boaz, Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Mother Emma Marlman 1869-1941 Father John Marlman 1868-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CLARENCE BUNKER, KARNAK, DIED LAST SATURDAY

Clarence Bunker, age 55 years, died last Saturday at Karnak.  He had been ill for a ____.

Mr. Bunker is survived ___ mother, Mrs. Ida Bunker ___ following brothers, ____ George, Rod and Wa_____ of Karnak, Mrs. Ma___ Johnston City, Mrs. _____ of Karnak, Mrs. M____ Marion; the following ____ Mrs. Mabel Goode of ____ Orley and Harvey ____ Karnak,.

Funeral services were ____ day morning at ten o’clock at the Baptist church with ___ Throgmorton officiating.  Interment was made in Ohio Chapel Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Clarence D. Bunker, factory worker, was born 25 Apr 1881, in Montgomery Co., Ind., the son of John D. Bunker and Ida M. Stump, natives of Indiana, and died 14 Mar 1936, in Karnak, Ill., divorced husband of Emma Hannah Bunker.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Mar 1936:

MAURICE LENTZ MAY NOT RECOVER FROM INJURIES

Maurice Lentz, formerly of Mounds, but for the last year or two of Coulterville, Illinois, may not recover from injuries received in an accident last Sunday.  Lentz was working for a Coulterville undertaker and he and his employer were making an ambulance call when, it is reported, a truck swerved sharply in front of them, causing the accident.  Both Lentz and his boss were seriously injured.  In fact, little hope is held for the recovery of either one.

The accident occurred on Route 13 north of New Athens.

Both the undertaker, Robert M. Burns, and Lentz are in the St. Elizabeth Hospital at Belleville.

Lentz will be remembered as having been in the employee of G. A. James several years ago.  He is a likeable young man and his many friends are hoping that he may recover.

 

WILLIAM FRANK CALDWELL DIED LAST FRIDAY

William Frank Caldwell, age 75, passed away at his home in Mound City last Friday morning at 6:30.  He had been ill several weeks and death was attributed to bulbar paralysis.

Mr. Caldwell had lived in Mound City for the past 15 years and during most of that time had been pastor of the Pentecost Church.

Surviving are:  his wife, Mrs. Susie Caldwell; four daughters, Mrs. Bernice Perkins of Jackson, Tenn., Mrs. Novie Baxter, Oscar, Ky., Mrs. Hallie Kimbrell, St. Louis, and Mrs. Allie Caywood, of Harvey, Illinois; two sons, R. A. of St. Louis and William H. of Newark, New Jersey; two brothers, Leander of Akron, Ohio, and Jeff, of Lynnville, Ky.; one sister, Mrs. Pheba Tibbs, of Bardwell, Ky.

Services were held Sunday afternoon at the Pentecost church with Rev. Earl Harp of Mound City, officiating and Rev. Shelton, assisting.  Interment was made in the Oscar Cemetery at Oscar, Ky.

             (His death certificate states that William Frank Caldwell, minister at Mound City, Ill., was born 27 Mar 1871, in Graves Co., Ky., the son of James A. Caldwell and Elizabeth Cantor, died 20 Mar 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Susie Caldwell, and was buried in Oscar Cemetery in Oscar, Ballard Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OSS BROWN DIED WEDNESDAY IN HOSPITAL IN EAST ST. LOUIS

Oss Brown, of Alton, Illinois, passed away Wednesday morning in a hospital in East St. Louis.  Death was attributed to pneumonia.  He was the son of James P. Brown, one of the pioneer families of Southern Illinois.

G. A. James went to East St. Louis Wednesday and brought the body to Mound City to lie in state at the home of Mrs. John Keesee, a sister.  Funeral services are to be held this afternoon from the Keesee home with G. A. James directing.

Surviving Mr. Brown are his wife, Mrs. Shela Brown, and two small sons, one brother, Malthus Brown; four sisters, Mrs. Olen Bowers, Mrs. Charles Keesee, Mrs. John Keesee, all of Mound City, and Mrs. Roy Pratt, of Danville, Illinois.

(According to his death certificate, Osa Onley Brown, engineer at East Alton, Madison Co., Ill., was born 3 Dec 1901, in Miller City, Alexander Co., Ill., the son of James Brown and Belle Huff, natives of Missouri, died 25 Mar 1936, in East St. Louis, St. Clair Co., Ill., husband of Shela Brown, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD

Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock at the Baptist church, Goreville, for Florence Gertrude Malear.

Surviving are:  a husband, William Thomas Malear; and nine children, Carrie Ragan, Marion, Murray Malear, Henderson, Ky., Gertie Bradley, Marion, Nettie Albright, Verhines, Illinois, Walter Malear, Goreville, John Malear, Paducah, Ky., Beulah Lannon and Afton Pentecost of Marion, and Lawrence Malear of St. Louis.

Rev. Travelstead officiated at the service.  Interment as made in the Terry cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(W. T. Malaer married F. G. Mozley on 23 Dec 1883, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cana Cemetery in Goreville, Ill., reads:  William Thomas Malaer 1858-1940 Florence Malaer 1856-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. SARAH ELLEN EVERS DIED FRIDAY AT GRAND CHAIN

Mrs. Sarah Ellen Evers, wife of Will Evers, passed away at her home near Grand Chain, Illinois, last Friday morning at the age of 59 years.

Surviving are:  five children, Fern Price of East St. Louis, William Evers, Charles Guy Evers, Albert Evers, and John Evers of Karnak; four sisters, Nettie Richards, Beulah Crawford and Willie Casper of Belknap and Nealie Evers of Salem.  She is also survived by her mother, Jane Morgan, of Belknap, Illinois.

Services were held at the M. E. church, Belknap, Illinois, Sunday afternoon at two o’clock.  Rev. W. E. Browning officiated, assisted by Rev. W. A. Naill of Herrin.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak was in charge.

(Her marker in Belknap Masonic Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill., reads:  Resting in Peace Father William T. Evers 1866-1940 Mother Sarah E. Evers 1879-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. John Newell and Mrs. J. Walker were called to Belleville, Illinois, Saturday on account of injury to the former’s grandson, Maurice Lentz.  He was working for an undertaker.  The injury was caused by an automobile accident. (Mounds)

 

A large number from here (America) attended Earnleigh Hayden’s funeral Thursday near Mounds.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Mar 1936: 

Sarah Ellen Evers

       Mrs. Sarah Ellen Evers, wife of Will Evers, passed away at their home near Grand Chain, Friday morning at the age of 59 years.

       Surviving are four sisters, Mrs. Nettie Richards, Mrs. Beulah Crawford, and Mrs. Willie Casper of Belknap, and Mrs. Nealie Evers of Salem; five children, Mrs. Fern Price of East St. Louis, William Evers, Charles Guy Evers, Albert Evers and John Evers of Karnak.  She is also survived by her mother, Mrs. Jane Morgan of Belknap.  Services were held at the M. E. church, Belknap, Sunday afternoon at two o’clock, with Rev. W. E. Browning, officiating, assisted by Rev. W. A. Nall of Herrin.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak in charge.

 

Widow of Late President H. W. Shryock Dies

       Mrs. Jessie Burnett Shryock, widow of H. W. Shryock, former president of the Southern Illinois Teacher’s College at Carbondale, died Monday night at the age of 73.  She is survived by a son, Burnett, talented artist and member of the college faculty.  President Shryock died in April of last year.

       (Her death certificate states that Jessie Shryock was born 17 Dec 1862, in Olney, Ill., the daughter of Dwight Burnett and Mary Ann Bristol, a native of Elmyra, N.Y., died 23 Mar 1936, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., widow of Henry W. Shryock, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery, Carbondale, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Dr. R. E. Barrows of Cairo Dies Suddenly in Indiana

       Dr. Roy Edgar Barrows, 51, of Cairo, died suddenly of a heart attack Friday morning, March 20, while visiting relatives in Mishawaka, Ind.  Mrs. Barrows and their daughter, Jane, were with him.  Dr. Barrows had been practicing in Cairo since 1913 when he established an office there with the late Dr. W. F. Grinstead.  He was a prominent member of the Illinois Medical Society and the American Medical Association.

       (Roy Edgar Barrows married Gertrude Ellsasser in St. Joseph Co., Ind.  When he registered for the draft in World War I, he was a physician and lived with his wife at the Marine Hospital in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Fairview Cemetery in Mishawaka, Ind., reads:  Roy Edgar Barrows, M.D. Born October 3, 1884 Died March 20, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. R. C. Connell, Mrs. O. T. Hudson and Mrs. Luther Hodge attended the funeral of Mrs. Dallas Winchester’s sister in Carbondale last Thursday.

 

MRS. WILLIAM THOMAS MALEAR

       Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock at the Baptist church, Goreville, Illinois, for Florence Gertrude Malear.

       Surviving are her husband, William Thomas Malear; and nine children, Carrie Ragan, Marion, Murray Malear, Henderson, Ky., Gertie Bradley, Marion, Nettie Albright, Verhines, Ill., Walter Malear, Goreville, John Malear, Paducah, Ky., Beulah Lannon and Afton Pentecost of Marion, and Lawrence Malear of St. Louis.

       Rev. Travelstead officiated at the service.  Interment was made in the Terry Cemetery with the Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directing.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Apr 1936: 

T. W. Baine of Pulaski Dies in St. Louis Hospital

       Thomas William Baine, prominent farmer living west of Pulaski, died Wednesday night, April 1, at about eleven o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital, St. Louis, following a gall stone operation on March 26.  He had been improving and his death was a great shock to his family as they had thought he would soon be well again.

       Mr. Baine was born in Humboldt, Tenn., January 23, 1882, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas William Baine.  He came to Villa Ridge with his parents in his early boyhood.  He was married to Elizabeth Weiskopf of Carmi and lived for a while in Cairo.  He and his family have lived in this county since 1913.  At the time of his death he was Commissioner of Road District No. 2, west of Pulaski.

       Mr. Baine is survived by his wife, and five children:  Mrs. T. M. (Ruby) Ridgeway of Mounds, Miss Ruth Baine, a nurse, who was with him in St. Louis, Carl and Harold Baine, at home and T. W. Jr., attending school in Jacksonville, Fla.; also four grandchildren.

       Funeral arrangements have not yet been made, but the body will be brought to the home of Mrs. Ridgeway.

 

Bruno Richard Hauptman Granted Extension of Life

       Just at the hour set for his execution last Tuesday night, Richard Bruno Hauptman was granted a 48-hour reprieve.

       A letter written by him to Governor Hoffman of New Jersey which Hauptman supposed would be read only after his death, emphatically declared his innocence.

       The Mercer County grand jury, which saved his life Tuesday night with the aid of the prison warden, is still in session at this writing (Thursday afternoon) and they have called in Governor Hoffman to testify.  It is now believed that the execution will be further stayed.

       (Bruno Richard Hauptman was executed 3 Apr 1936, in the electric chair at the New Jersey State Prison for the kidnapping of the 20-month-old son of Charles Lindbergh.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of P. A. Simmons Dies

       Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Shifley were in Olive Branch Thursday afternoon, called there to attend the funeral of Mrs. Simmons-Weldy, mother of P. A. Simmons, who only last week returned to Southern Illinois from Tucson, Ariz.

       Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock with interment in Olive Branch cemetery.

       (Her death certificate states that Margaret Weldy was born 27 Oct 1864, at Flatwoods, Pope Co., Ill., the daughter of D. M. Kerley and Ruth Halloway, died 1 Apr 1936, in Road District 4, Alexander Co., Ill., wife of D. H. Weldy, and was buried in Olive Branch Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

George Krigsheuser

       George Krigsheuser, who lived on a farm near Grand Chain, died at Anna, Thursday morning, following an illness of about two weeks.

       He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Anna Krigsheuser; three daughters, Laura Edwards, Los Angeles, Calif., Adalia Hannan, Olmstead, Ill., Alma Neal, Indianapolis, Ind.; four sons, Arthur Krigsheuser, Belleville, Ill., Erwin Krigsheuser, Los Angeles, Calif., George Krigsheuser, Grand Chain, Ill.; three half-brothers and one half-sister.

       Funeral services were conducted at the Congregational church in Grand Chain Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. C. S. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

William Henry Scherick Dies Suddenly Monday

       William Henry Scherick, age 68, died at his home near Villa Ridge Monday morning at six o’clock.  He had not been in good health for some time and soon after he had arisen and dressed himself he had a heart attack from which he did not recover.  He was born and reared in this community and lived there most of his life.

       Surviving him are a brother, A. M. Scherick, with whom he lived; a nephew, O. L. McBride; two nieces, Mrs. Anna Royce of Mound City and Miss Minnie Davidson of Joliet; a grandniece, Miss Evelyn Royce; and two grand-nephews, John and Charles Royce, all of Mound City.

       Funeral services were held at the Villa Ridge Union Church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. Ellsworth Lyon officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Well Known Colored Resident Buried Sunday

       Mrs. Hattie Johnson Black, who died Wednesday, March 25, at the home of her brother here in Mounds, was buried Sunday.  Services were held at the Pilgrim Rest Church with the pastor, Rev. Gray, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  The funeral was one of the largest colored funerals ever held in Mounds and the floral offerings were exceptionally numerous and beautiful.

       Mrs. Black leaves one son, Allen Johnson, and one grandson, Allen Johnson, Jr.  She had been in New Orleans some time for treatment, returning home only a few weeks before her death.

       (Her death certificate states that Hattie Black was born in 1880 in Vincen, Alabama, the daughter of Brasry and Vinney O’Neil, natives of Vincen, Alabama, died 26 Mar 1936, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., widow of James Black, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mother Hattie Black Jan. 22, 1874 March 25, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

APPRECIATION

       We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the kind friends and neighbors who assisted us in any way during the period of sorrow following the sudden death of our dear brother and uncle, William Henry Scherick.  Especially do we thank the Villa Ridge Community Club for the flowers and also the others who sent flowers and those who offered the use of their cars.  Your kindness and services will long be remembered.

A. M. Scherick

Miss Minnie Davidson

Mrs. John Royce

 

CARD OF THANKS

       We desire to express our sincere thanks to the friends and neighbors who so kindly gave sympathy and help during the illness and following the death of our beloved Mother and Grandmother, Mrs. Hattie Johnson Black.  We wish especially to thank those who sent the beautiful floral offerings and who offered the use of their cars.  All courtesies will long be remembered.

       Allen Johnson and Son

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Apr 1936:

MRS. ED DANBY DIES FROM MAD DOG BITE

Mrs. Ed Danby, of Cairo, died last Friday morning in the Barnes Hospital in St. Louis from rabies.  Mrs. Danby was bitten some time ago, but did not consider it serious and so neglected to take treatment.

Mrs. Danby has one relative living in this county, Edward Stout, of Mounds.  Mr. Danby is a former resident of Mound City.  Mrs. Danby was widely known here.

Funeral services were held in Cairo last Sunday afternoon.

 

REX ADAMS DIED

Word has been received in Mound City that Rex Adams, son of Irvin Adams, night watchman for the city, died in St. Louis.  No particulars were learned, but it is said that Rex fell dead while bossing a WPA job.

Rex had spent very little time in Mound City in recent years.  However, he had a number of friends here.

 

GEORGE KRIGSHEUSER DIED NEAR GRAND CHAIN SATURDAY

George Krigsheuser, age 71 years, died Thursday morning of last week at his home near Grand Chain.  He had been sick for two weeks.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

Surviving Mr. Krigsheuser are:  His wife, Mrs. Anna Krigsheuser; three daughters, Mrs. Laura Edwards, Los Angeles, Cal., Mrs. Adalia Hannan, Olmstead, and Alma Neal, Indianapolis, Ind.; four sons, Arthur, Belleville, Ill., Erwin, Los Angeles, Calif., George, Chicago, and Oscar, Grand Chain; three half-brothers, William and Frank Workmaster, of Belleville, and Joe Workmaster, of Springfield, Mo.; and one half-sister, Mrs. Anna Schoenborn, of Belleville.

(According to his death certificate, George Krigsheuser, farmer, was born in 1865 in St. Louis, Mo., died 26 Mar 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Anna Krigsheuser, and was buried at Grand Chain, Ill. –Darrel Dexter)

 

FRANK CLINE, DONGOLA, VETERAN, DIED TUESDAY

Frank Cline, 44 years old, of Dongola, died at his home about 2 o’clock Tuesday morning after a long illness of heart trouble.  Mr. Cline was a World War veteran and was never in good health after the war.

Surviving are:  his wife, Mrs. Mary Cline; seven children, Billie, Grace, Eugene, Leo, Lorene, Bobbie, and James.  He also leaves one brother, Fred Cline, of Carterville; and two sisters, Mrs. Viola Crite of Ullin, and Mrs. Mary Casper, of Caruthersville, Mo.

Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward.  Interment was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery with military honors by the Miller-Manning Post of the American Legion.

(Daniel Cline married Anna Cantrall on 6 Jul 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Frank Cline, farmer, was born 9 Sep 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill., the son of Daniel Cline and Anna Cantrell, natives of Illinois, died 31 Mar 1936, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., husband of Mary Cline, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.  The application for a military headstone states that Frank H. Cline was a corporal in the 306th Auxiliary Remount Depot, Quatermaster Corps, enlisted 31 Jul 1917, honorably discharged 5 Mar 1919, and died 30 Mar 1936.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Frank H. Cline Illinois Corp. 306 Aux. RMT Depot QMC March 30, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. GRACE CASEY DIED

Mrs. Grace Garner Casey died at her home in Johnston City, Illinois, recently, after an illness of several months.  She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Maud Marlowe; two grandsons and two granddaughters of West Virginia.  Her husband, Frank Casey, died about three years ago, having been struck by an automobile.  Mrs. Casey was a former resident of this city and was the daughter-in-law of the late Dr. N. R. Casey.

(Green P. Garner married Mrs. Eliza A. Simpson on 21 Nov 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Carrol Simpson married Eliza A. Hicks on 6 Jun 1852, in Massac Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Grace E. Casey was born 12 Sep 1874, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the daughter of Green P. Garner and Eliza Hicks, natives of Illinois, died 14 Feb 1936, in Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Frank R. Casey, and was buried in Johnston City.—Darrel Dexter)

 

WILLIAM HENRY SCHERICK DIED AT VILLA RIDGE

William Henry Scherick died at his home near Villa Ridge Monday morning at 6 o’clock of a heart attack.  He and his brother lived there together.  Mr. Scherick, although having been in bad health for the past two years, had arisen from bed and dressed when his heart failed.  He dropped to the floor and died almost instantly.  He was 68 years old.

Mr. Scherick was a life-long resident of Villa Ridge.  He was born within a short distance of the place where he died.

Surviving is one brother, A. M. Scherick, besides several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Wednesday at 2 p.m. at the Union Church in Villa Ridge.  Rev. Ellsworth Lyon officiated.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  Thad Conant, John Clancy, Charles Hogendobler, Dee Leidigh, James Hogendobler, and Walter Hogendobler were pall bearers.  G. A. James had charge of funeral arrangements.

(According to the death certificate, William Henry Scherick, farmer, was born 18 May 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Benjamin H. Sherrick and Elizabeth Metzger, natives of Pennsylvania, died 30 Mar 1936, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., divorced husband of Rydal Scherrick, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill., reads:  William H. Scheirich 1867-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Joyce Royce was called to Villa Ridge Monday morning by the death of her uncle, William Henry Scherick.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Apr 1936:

JAMES KYNASTON DIED

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in Chicago for James Kynaston, husband of the former Miss Martha Dick, native of Olmstead.  Mr. Kynaston died on Saturday of pneumonia, which developed after an operation.

(According to his death certificate, James Kynaston was born 24 Nov 1879, in Cairo, Ill., the son of James Kynaston, a native of England, and Adeline Behurst, a native of Cairo, Ill., died 4 Apr 1936, in Chicago, Ill., and was buried in Beverly Cemetery in Worth, Cook Co., Ill.  His marker in Beverly Cemetery in Blue Island, Ill., reads:  Husband James W. Kynaston 1879-1936 Wife Bertha E. Kynaston 1884-1974.—Darrel Dexter)

 

W. L. METCALF MEETS ACCIDENTAL DEATH IN CHICAGO

William L. Metcalf, formerly of Grand Chain, met an accidental death last week while employed in ___ mill in Chicago.  Mr. Metcalf was 43 years of age.  He had ___ a ladder, the rungs of which were coated with ice, slipped and fell into a bin of sawdust.  He ___ __hed too much of the dust ___ was removed from the ___ died four hours later.

             Surviving are:  wife, Mrs. Lillie Metcalf; one son, George Nathan, ___ o; three daughters, Fran___, ____or, and Deloris, all of Chicago; ___ father, N. G. Metcalf, of Grand Chain.  His mother was killed in an automobile accident ___ year ago.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Christian church at Grand Chain, with Rev. ___ officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

             (N. G. Metcalf married Martha Ella Miller on 13 Dec 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Lee Metcalf, laborer, was born 3 Feb 1893, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of Nate Metcalf and Ella Miller, died 3 Apr 1936, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., husband of Lillian Metcalf, and was buried in Grand Chain, Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  W. L. Metcalf Feb. 3, 1893 April 3, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ARTHUR HOLBROOK OF MOUNDS DIED SUDDENLY YESTERDAY

Arthur Holbrook, switchman for the I. C., died suddenly at his home in Mounds yesterday morning about 10:15.  He was ill about 30 minutes before dying.  It is presumed that his death was due to heart trouble.  He had worked the night before.

             Funeral arrangements will await word from his two brothers in Pennsylvania.  He has no children, only his wife surviving.

Mr. Holbrook had lived in Mounds for years and was well known.  His death was quite a shock.

(His death certificate states that Arthur Holbrook, I. C. Railroad switchman at Mounds, Ill., was born 10 Jul 1875, in Cedar Springs, Mich., died 9 Apr 1936, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Abby S. Holbrook, and was buried in Mound City National Cemetery.  His interment record states that Arthur J. Holbrook was a private in Co. K, 15th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was honorably discharged 31 Jan 1899, and died 9 Apr 1936.  Arthur John Holbrook, of New Castle, Lawrence Co., Pa., born 10 Jul 1872, in Cedar Springs, Mich., enlisted on 13 Jun 1898, husband of Abby Sanderson Holbrook of North Oak Street, Mounds, Ill.  He served at Sheridan Point, Va., from June to November 1898 and at Athrus, Ga., from November 1898 to January 1899, during the Spanish American War.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. ANNE YOAKUM DIED MONDAY IN MOUNDS

Mrs. Annie Yoakum, age 72 years, died Monday morning at her home in Mounds.  Mrs. Yoakum had made her home in that city for the past 30 years.

Surviving are:  three children, Mrs. Mary Raud, and Mrs. Lula Essex of Poplar Bluff, Mo., and son Mart Yoakum; two sisters, Mrs. Ella Wilson, of Mound City, and Mrs. Natty Glass, of Rosebud, Illinois; a brother, Harry Barber of Grand Chain; and several grandchildren and other relatives.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church in Mounds with Rev. W. A. Gardner officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood cemetery.

(U. S. G. Yoakum, 30, of New Grand Chian, Ill, farmer, born in Johnson Co., Ill., son of Jackson Yoakum, married on 25 Jun 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Anna Jacques, 35, born in Grand Chain, Ill., daughter of John Barbour and Miss Cane.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Annie Yoakum 1863-1936 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

H. M. BRITT, SR., PASSED AWAY NEAR OLMSTEAD SUNDAY

H. M. Britt, Sr., age 69 years, passed away Sunday afternoon at his home near Olmstead after almost a lifetime spent in this county.  He was born and reared near Olmstead, and with the exception of two years that he spent in Cairo in business, his life was spent in that vicinity.  He was a successful and prominent farmer.  His death was attributed to apoplexy of which he suffered for ten weeks.  Three strokes occurred before death came.

Mr. Britt was the son of Daniel J. and Amanda Britt and was born October 30, 1866.

His jovial disposition made him loved by all who knew him and his family and friends will miss his ready wit.  Even though he was afflicted for several years before his death, he was always happy and had a smile for everyone.

Left to mourn the departure of this aged man are:  his wife, Mrs. Anna Britt; four children, Mrs. Ellen Hudson of Ullin, H. M.  Jr., of Mounds, G. H. Britt, of Cairo, and Ulen Britt of Olmstead; one brother, George Britt; and one half brother, Tom Wood; five grandchildren and many relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the residence conducted by Rev. Everett Hayden, pastor of the M. E. Church of Mound City.  Interment was made in the Mounds cemetery.  Pallbearers were:  Clyde Smoot, Louis Vick, Adolphus West, Glen Wilson, Richmond Britton, and Charles Hannon.  Honorary pallbearers were:  Henry Eastwood, William Eastwood, Gus Curt, Sam Riley, John Coleman and Glen Curry.  George Crain of Pulaski directed the funeral.

(Daniel J. Britt married Amanda Wood on 17 Sep 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  H. M. Britt Sr. Oct. 30, 1866 Apr. 5, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SERVICES FOR INFANT

Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock at the home over the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Forest Smiley, of Karnak.  Rev. Mr. Hern conducted the services.  Interment was made in the Anderson cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service had charge of funeral arrangements.

(A marker in Anderson Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Margie Sue Dau. of Forest & Bernice Smiley born & died April 3, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

W. R. BRITT DIED THURSDAY AT HOME WEST OF ULLIN

William R. Britt, who had lived for exactly three-quarters of a century, died at his home west of Ullin Thursday morning of last week.  He had been ill for several weeks.

Mr. Britt is survived by his widow and six sons:  Earl and Frank Britt of Ullin, Sam, Russell, and Stillman Britt of Elco, Hallie Britt of St. Charles, Ark.; three daughters, Mrs. Ethel Jameson of Newark N.J., Mrs. Lulu Maxwell of Ullin, Mrs. Minnie Jackson of Mound City; also two brothers, George Britt and H. M. Britt of Olmsted, besides a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Elco with Mrs. Catherine Campbell officiating.  Interment was in Ullin Cemetery.

(W. R. Britt, 35, saloon and restaurant keeper in Pulaski, Ill., born in Little Rock, Ark., son of Daniel Britt and Mariah Guthrie, married 2nd on 4 Jul 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mary Ann Anglin, 22, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of William Anglin and Lucinda Graves. The death certificate states that William Ruben Britt, farmer at Ullin, Ill., was born 15 Jun 1861, in Little Rock, Ark., the son of Dan Britt, died 2 Apr 1936, in Road District 6, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Mary Britt, and was buried in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  W. Rubin Britt 1860-1936 Mary E. Britt 1875-1960.—Darrel Dexter)

 

NATE ATHERTON, MOUNDS, PASSED AWAY TUESDAY

Nate Atherton, Mounds, age 61 years, passed away at his home early Tuesday morning.  Mr. Atherton was injured by an automobile in 1934 and never fully recovered. 

He was a member of the B. of E. L. at Jackson, Tenn.

Left to mourn his departure is one son, Hazel Earl, of Mounds; and one brother, C. E. Atherton, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.

Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Wednesday morning.  Rev. W. A. Gardner officiated.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Bardwell, Ky.

(According to his death certificate, Nate Atherton, pensioned railroad engineer, was born 17 Aug 1876, in Carlisle Co., Ky., the son of Kennedy Atherton, a native of Kentucky, died 7 Apr 1936, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., the widower of Alma Atherton, and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery.  His World War I draft registration gives his birthdate as 17 Aug 1875.—Darrel Dexter)

 

THOMAS W. BAINE, PULASKI, DIED LAST THURSDAY

Thomas W. Baine, of Pulaski, died Thursday of last week in St. Anthony’s Hospital in St. Louis, following a gall bladder operation.  He had been ailing for three months.

Mr. Baine was 54 years old.  He was well known in the community in which he lived.  He was recently elected road district commissioner.

He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Baine; children, Mrs. T. M. Ridgway, Mounds, Carl and Harold of Pulaski, Ruth of Cuba, Mo., and T. M. of Florida; brother, Isaac Horner; and sisters, Mrs. Alice Von Nida, and Mrs. A. G. Miller of Cairo and Mrs. Rebecca Hendricks, Malden, Mo.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the First Baptist Church in Mounds with Rev. W. A. Gardner officiating.  Nephews of the deceased were pallbearers and flower bearers were members of the Mothers’ Club.  The floral offerings were beautiful and numerous.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(When he registered for the draft during World War I, Thomas William Baine, of Villa Ridge, Ill., stated he was born 23 Jan 1882, and was a brakeman on the Illinois Central Railroad.  His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Lizzie C. Baine.  His marker in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Father Thomas William Baine 1882 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

RIVER GIVES UP DEAD AFTER SIXTEEN MONTHS

The body of Robert Paul Castor, of Olmsted, floated in near the Bruce plant in the Cairo Drainage District last Saturday and was recovered.  It had been in the river since December 1, 1934.

Identity was established at the inquest by the clothes and teeth.  So long in the water rendered all other marks useless.  A belt, tie pin, a watch and high top shoes proved beyond all doubt that it was Castor, who, with Vernon Hughes, started to return from the Kentucky shore that night.  Rough water upset their boat, it is presumed, and all that was known is that their cries were heard and that the cries finally died out.

After the inquest, the body was taken by G. A. James to prepare for burial.

The body of Hughes was found last June, but the body of Castor must have caught or lodged under the water and remained until the present flood tore it loose.

Castor is survived by his mother, Mrs. Kitty Castor, of Olmsted; one brother, Lloyd Castor, of Danville; and three sisters, Miss Vivian of Olmstead, Mrs. Jeannette Bevans of St. Louis and Mrs. Ruth Holman of Olmsted.

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon at the M. E. Church South of Olmsted, by Rev. Kazee, assisted by Rev. McKinney.  Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery.  George Bellamy, Carl Eiselmeyer, Carmon Albright, Roy Edwards, Chilton Ramsey, and Clyde Burd carried the remains of their former companion to its last resting place.

 

Leona Moyers, who was called to this city by the death of her father John B. Dean, has returned to her home in Whiteville, N.C.

 

Those from Mound City who attended the funeral of Mrs. Annie Yoakum, sister of Mrs. Ella Wilson, were:  Miss Bell Goldsmith, Mrs. Nettie Burns, Mrs. J. M. Monan, Mrs. Millie Snyder, and Mrs. Lon Shelton.

 

Mrs. and Mrs. W. H. Aldred, Mrs. Rolley Brown, Mrs. W. J. Milford, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bowles and Mrs. Frank Brown, attended the funeral of H. M. Britt, Sr., near Olmstead, Tuesday.

 

The people of this community are grieved to lean of the serious illness of their minister, Rev. Elmer Smith, of Ullin.  He was taken to Carbondale to Holden Hospital last Friday night and Saturday night Mrs. Smith’s father died at Buncombe.  (Beech Grove- left out last week)

             (Elmer Smith married on August 25, 1910, Nancy Jane Gourley. According to his death certificate, William Thomas Gourley, merchant, was born 1 Oct 1859, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Thomas Gourley and Nancy Simons, natives of Tennessee, died 29 Mar 1936, in Buncombe, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Rose Gourley, and was buried in Lick Creek, Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Lick Creek Cemetery reads:  William T. Gourley Oct. 1, 1859 March 29, 1936 Margaret Gourley his wife April 23, 1858 Dec. 19, 1922.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rider, Mrs. Cora Miller, and Mrs. Clyde Miller attended Mr. Garing’s funeral Wednesday afternoon.  (Beech Grove)

             (This is probably a reference to William Thomas Gurley, who was the father of their pastor’s wife.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Apr 1936: 

Mrs. Annie Yoakum Dies Monday Morning at Nine

       Mrs. Annie Yoakum passed away Monday morning, April 6, at nine o’clock at her home in this city.  She had been a resident of Mounds for more than thirty years and was born and reared in Pulaski County. Her birthplace was Grand Chain and her birth date, November 11, 1863.  Her age at death was 72 years, four months and 28 days.  She was a member of the Baptist Church.

       Surviving are three children, Mrs. Mary Raub, Mark Yoakum, and Mrs. Lula Essex of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; two sisters, Mrs. Ella Wilson of Mound City and Mrs. N. Glass of Rosebud, Ill.; one brother, Harry Barber of Grand Chain; also several grandchildren and other relatives.

       Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with the pastor, Rev. W. A. Gardner officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, James T. Ryan directing.

 

Well Known Resident Dies Early Tuesday Morning

       Nate Atherton, age 61, for many years a resident of this city, died early Tuesday morning, April 7, at his home.  He had been failing in health since 1934 when he was struck by an automobile in Jackson, Tenn.  For many years he was an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad, but had not been active since this accident.

       Mr. Atherton was born at Carlisle, Ky., on August 17, 1875, but had lived in this community the greater part of his mature life.  His wife died a number of years ago.  One son, Hazel Earl Atherton, and one brother, C. E. Atherton, of Poplar Bluff, Mo., survive him.

       Funeral services were held at the Ryan Funeral Home Wednesday, April 8, at eleven in the morning, conducted by the Rev. W. A. Gardner, pastor of the Baptist Church.  Interment was made in the Bardwell, Ky., cemetery.

 

H. M. Britt Sr. Dies Sunday Following Long Illness

       H. M. Britt, Sr., age 69 years, a prominent resident of this county, died Sunday, April 5, at 12:45 p.m. at his home near Olmstead, following a ten weeks illness.  He had suffered a third stroke of apoplexy.

       His brother, W. R. Britt of Ullin, died only four days before.

       Surviving are his wife, Anna; four children, Mrs. Ellen Hudson of Pulaski, H. M. Britt, Jr., of Mounds, G. H. Britt of Cairo and Olen Britt of Olmstead; also five grandchildren and many relatives less near.

       Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence with burial in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds.

 

Funeral Services for T. W. Baine Held Sunday Afternoon

       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church of Mounds for T. W. Baine of Pulaski, age 54, who died Wednesday night, April 1, in St. Anthony’s Hospital, St. Louis, where died suddenly from a clot in the blood.

       Rev. W. A. Garner, pastor of the church, officiated at the services.  Casket bearers were nephews of Mr. Baine and the flower girls were members of the Mounds Mothers’ Club of which his daughter, Mrs. T. M. Ridgeway, is president.  The floral offerings were many and beautiful.  The Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.

OBITUARY

       Thomas William, son of Thomas W. and Sarah Polk Baine, was born in Humboldt, Tennessee, January 23, 1882.  He came to Illinois with his parents in his early boyhood.  He was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth C. Weiskopf of Carmi, Illinois, on April 8, 1903, at Cairo, Illinois.  To this union were born five children all of whom survive him.

       He was converted in his early married life and united with the Tenth Street Baptist Church in Cairo, Illinois, in November 1907.

       He died in St. Anthony’s Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, at 10:20 p.m. April 1, 1936, at the age of 54 years, two months and nine days.

       Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Baine; two daughters, Mrs. T. M. Ridgeway of Mounds and Ruth Baine of Cuba, Mo.; three sons, Carl and Harold at home and T. W., Jr., of Jacksonville, Fla.; a half-brother, Isaac Horner; two sisters, Mrs. Alice Von Nida, Cairo, Mrs. A. G. Miller, Cairo; and a half-sister, Mrs. Rebecca Hendricks, Malden, Mo.; also four grandchildren.

       “The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord.”—Job 1:21.

       Out of town relatives who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Will Hendricks and family of Malden, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Ragsdale and family of Bismarck, Mo.; Mrs. Arthur Free of Chaffee, Mo.; Vernon Johnson of Cuba, Mo.; Mrs. Henry Goldsmith, Memphis, Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cockrum, Christopher, Ill.; Isaac Horner of Cairo; Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Miller and daughter of Cairo; Mr. and Mrs. Claude Horner of Carbondale; Mrs. May Baine and family of Tamms, and Mrs. Clara Glaab of Tamms.

 

Arthur Holbrook Dies Suddenly

       Just as we go to press this (Thursday) afternoon, we learn of the sudden death of Arthur Holbrook at his home at 10:15 this morning.  An employee of the Illinois Central Railroad, he performed his duties as usual last night in the Cairo Junction yards.

       No funeral arrangements have yet been made.

 

T. W. Baine, Jr., was called here last week from Jacksonville, Fla., on account of the death of his father.

 

WILLIAM L. METCALF MEETS DEATH IN ACCIDENT

       William L. Metcalf, age 43, a former resident of Grand Chain, whose home was at 2924 Lincoln Avenue, Chicago, was accidentally killed while at work in a lumber mill.

       He is survived by his wife, Lillie; a son, George Nathan, of Chicago; and three daughters, Frances, Eleanor, and Delores, all of Chicago; also his father, George Nathan Metcalf, of Grand Chain.

       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Christian church in Grand Chain, with the Rev. Atly officiating.  Burial was in Grand Chain cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directing.

 

WILLIAM R. BRITT

       William R. Britt of Ullin, age 75 years, died at his home west of Ullin Thursday, April 2, following an illness of several weeks.

       Surviving him are his wife and six sons, Earl and Frank of Ullin, Sam, Russell and Stillman of Elco and Hallie of St. Charles, Ark.; three daughters, Mrs. Ethel Jameson of Newark, N.J., Mrs. Lulu Maxwell of Ullin, and Mrs. Minnie Jackson of Mound City; two brothers, George and H. M. Britt of Olmstead (H. M. died four days later); also a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Elco with Mrs. Catherine Campbell officiating.  Burial was made in Ullin Cemetery with Crain and Parker directing.

 

CARD OF THANKS

       We wish to express our sincere thanks to our neighbors and friends for their kindnesses during the illness and following the death of our beloved mother and sister, Mrs. Annie Yoakum.  Especially do we desire to express appreciation for the consoling words of Rev. W. A. Gardner, for the music, the cars offered, the service of the casket bearers and the beautiful flowers.  Your kindness will never be forgotten.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Raub and Daughter

Mrs. Lula Essex and Son

Mrs. Ella Wilson

Harry Barber and Family

 

CARD OF THANKS

       We wish to express our sincere thanks to each and every one who gave their time, gifts, or thoughts to us during the illness and sudden death of our dear husband and father, Thomas W. Baine.  Especially do we thank Rev. W. A. Gardner for his consoling words and blessed prayer, the Wilson quartette for its lovely songs, Mrs. Luther Essex for the music, those who furnished cars, and the very beautiful flowers.  May God bless you all.

Mrs. Thomas W. Baine and Children

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Ridgeway and Children

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Apr 1936: 

Arthur Holbrook Funeral Held Sunday Afternoon

       Funeral services for Arthur Holbrook, who died suddenly of heart disease, Thursday morning, April 9, at his home in this city, were conducted Sunday afternoon at the residence by Rev. L. V. Close, Episcopal minister.  Burial was made in the National Cemetery between here and Mound City with the Masonic Lodge in charge, followed by a service by the Spanish-American War veterans.

       A firing squad from Cairo fired a salute which was followed by “Taps” by the bugler.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

       Surviving Mr. Holbrook are his wife, Mrs. Abby Sanderson Holbrook; and two brothers, Frank of Pittsburg, Pa., and G. G. of Newcastle, Pa.  The latter was here to attend the funeral service.

       Mr. Holbrook, whose age was 60, was born in Cedar Springs, Mich., but had, for the last 28 years been in the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad as switchman.  He was a member of the Trainmen’s Union, prominent in the Masonic lodge and a Knight Templar.

 

George Brown Loses Mother by Death Last Thursday

       Mrs. Minnie Brown, age 62, widow of the late Harris W. Brown and mother of George Brown of this city, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ward Eddleman of Carbondale early Thursday morning, April 9.  She had been ill only a short time, having suffered a paralytic stroke the previous Friday.

       Surviving are four children, Hester Eddleman of Carbondale, Lowell Brown of Jonesboro, George Brown of Mounds and Myra Miller of Anna, two grandchildren and also one sister, Mrs. Lizzie Coombs of Ewing.

       Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Mill Creek Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. T. C. Ury of Jonesboro officiating.  Interment was made in St. John’s Cemetery.

       (Harris Walter Brown married on 26 Apr 1894, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., Minnie Adel Dillow.  Her death certificate states that Minnie Brown was born 11 Sep 1873, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Levi Dillow and Lavina Poole, died 9 Apr 1936, Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., the widow of Harris W. Brown, and was buried in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Minnie A Brown Sept. 11, 1873 Apr. 9, 1936 Harrison W. Brown Sept. 11, 1867 Nov. 11, 1934.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. George P. Hartwell Dies Following Long Illness

       Mrs. Ann Elizabeth Hartwell died Friday afternoon about four o’clock at her home on Front Street, following a long illness.

       Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at two o’clock at the Methodist church, Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.  Karcher Brothers, assisted by James T. Ryan directed the funeral.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights.

OBITUARY

       Ann Elizabeth Stoddard was born September 18, 1880, in Villa Ridge, Ill., and died April 10, 1936, Mounds, Ill.  She was married to George P. Hartwell November 3, 1898.  To this union were born ten children, nine of whom survive their mother, namely:  Luther of Arcade, N.Y., Agnes, Ruth and Sarah Jane of Washington, D.C., William of Cairo, George Jr., Elizabeth, Minnie and Dewitt T. of Mounds.

       She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Mounds, always doing what she could.  She was a great lover of home, spending her life for her family and always trying to do something to help her friends and neighbors in time of sorrow.

       She had been a sufferer for six and one-half years, bearing her suffering patiently.  She was laid to rest in the family lot in Spencer Heights beside her granddaughter, Betty Jean Mench, who preceded her in death.  All nine of her children were here to attend her funeral.

       She also leaves five grandchildren, three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Dunham, of Arcade, N.Y., Mrs. Kate Aldred of Pulaski, and Mrs. James Hatcher of 823 Twenty-first St., Cairo, Ill., and a host of friends and relatives to mourn her passing.

 

T. W. Baine, Jr., returned to his studies at Jacksonville, Florida, Tuesday, after having been called here by the death of his father, Thomas W. Baine.

 

Mrs. Lula Essex has returned to her home in Poplar Bluff, Mo., after having spent several weeks here, called by the illness of her mother, Mrs. Annie Yoakum whose death occurred Monday of last week.

 

Mrs. Agnes Mench, Misses Ruth and Sarah Jane Hartwell, all of Washington, D.C., and Luther Hartwell of Arcade, New York, were called here by the death of their mother, Mrs. George P. Hartwell, all arriving on Sunday.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Apr 1936:

TIM O’SULLIVAN PASSED AWAY EASTER MORNING

Tim O’Sullivan died Easter morning in Cairo at the home of his daughter after an illness of two or more years.  He had spent a lifetime in this community.  For fifty years he was employed in the shipyards.

He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann O’Sullivan; and seven children, six daughters as follows:  Mrs. A. M. Mathis of Tamaroa, Mrs. F. W. Bailey of Los Angeles, Cal., Mrs. O. C. Cavanaugh of Shreveport, La., Mrs. DeWitt Kuykendall of Cape Girardeau, Mo., Mrs. E. J. Cowell and Mrs. H. M. Neff of Cairo; one son, F. A. Sullivan of Cleveland, Ohio; three brothers, Dan, James and William, all of Mound City; one sister, Mrs. Margaret Sweeney of Chicago; and many other relatives.

The body remained at the home of the daughter in Cairo until Tuesday morning when it was brought to Mound City for services at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.  Rev. Fr. Gilmartin officiated.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.  Pallbearers were:  Dan O’Sullivan, Jr., George Sweeney, Joe Lutz, Albert Boekenkamp, Charlie Campbell and George Neadstine.

(Timothy O’Sullivan married Mary A. Browner on 25 Oct 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Timothy O’Sullivan, ship carpenter, was born 18 Apr 1855, in Lexington, Ky., the son of Timothy O’Sullivan and Catherine Shay, natives of Ireland, died 12 Apr 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Mary Ann O’Sullivan, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. GEORGE HARTWELL DIED FRIDAY AFTERNOON

Mrs. Ann Elizabeth Hartwell passed away at her home in Mounds Friday afternoon at the age of 56 years.  She had been ill for several months prior to death.

Mrs. Hartwell was a woman of fine character and pleasing personality.  She had a host of friends who will miss her.  She was a member of the First M. E. Church of Mounds.

Surviving are:  her husband, George B. Hartwell, funeral director of Mounds; nine children, four sons and five daughters, as follows:  Luther Hartwell of Yorkshire, N.Y., W. E. Hartwell of Cairo, George H. Jr., of Mounds, D. T. of Mounds, Mrs. Agnes Mench, of Washington, D.C., Miss Elizabeth Hartwell of Mounds, Misses Ruth and Sarah Jane Hartwell of Washington, D.C., and Miss Minnie Hartwell of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Dunham of Arcade, N.Y., Mrs. Kate Aldred of Pulaski and Mrs. James Hatcher, of Cairo.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Methodist church in Mounds.  Rev. P. A. Glotfelty of the church officiated.  Interment was made in the Mounds cemetery.

(Her death certificate states that Ann Elizabeth Hartwell was born 18 Sep 1880, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of Edward B. Stoddard, a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Dora Chamberlain, a native of Eaton, N.Y., died 10 Apr 1936, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of George P. Hartwell, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Ann E. Hartwell Sept. 25, 1878 April 10, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER PULASKI RESIDENT DIED IN NORFOLK, NEBRASKA

Funeral services were held at Pulaski Saturday afternoon for Mrs. Rachel Craig, a former resident of that village.  Mrs. Craig died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Allice Maples in Norfolk, Neb.  Services were held at the Christian church with Rev. Hollman officiating.  Pallbearers were Roy, Henry and Charlie Moore, Owen Hughes, Chris Rife and Floyd Little.

(David G. Craig married Rachael E. Hoffman on 2 Mar 1873, in Harrison Co., Ind.  Her obituary in the Norfolk Dailey News states Rachel E. Craig died 8 Apr 1936, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alice Mapes, at 515 North Tenth Street.  She was born 21 Apr 1854, in Mauckport, Ind., and married David Groves Craig, a Civil War veteran, who died about 1933 in Danville, Ill.  Her children were E. L. Craig, an attorney in Evansville, Ind; Delia, who died in 1928; and Alice Mapes.  Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski, Ill., reads:  Rachel E. Craig April 21, 1853 Apr 8, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch Miller and Charles Rider attended the funeral of Jasper Woodney at Unity last Saturday.  (Beech Grove)

             (Jasper T. Woodney enlisted on 29 Apr 1918, and was discharged on 26 Apr 1919.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Jasper Woodney Illinois Wagoner 307 Field Arty 78 Div. April 9, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Carrie Jenkins was brought to Mt. Pisgah and buried last Thursday.  She will be remembered as Carrie Stoner.  (Beech Grove)

             (Moses Stoner married on 24 Feb 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Sarah J. Ward.  Amos Wiard married Sarah Jane Wright in 1864 in Pulaski Co., Ill.; the license was issued 27 Jul 1864.  Her death certificate states that Carry Edith Jenkins was born 6 Jan 1887, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Moses Stoner, a native of North Carolina, and Sarrah Wright, a native of Ohio, died 6 Apr 1936, in Toledo, Cumberland Co., Ill., the wife of L. B. Jenkins, and was buried in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., reads:  Father Lord Byron Jenkins 1873-1950 Mother Carrie Edith Jenkins 1887-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Apr 1936:

RUSSELL CALVIN ACCIDENTALLY KILLED NEAR CENTRALIA SATURDAY

Russell Calvin, age 32 years, formerly of Pulaski, was accidentally killed near Centralia Saturday morning when a truck he was driving was hit by an Illinois Central passenger train.  Owen Calvin, a brother of the deceased, is in the retail coal business at Centralia, and Russell drove a truck for him.  He was making a delivery when the accident occurred.

The body was brought to Pulaski for funeral services which were held in the Christian church Monday afternoon.  Rev. Holloman, pastor of the church, officiated.  Burial was made in Rosehill Cemetery.

Left to mourn the tragic death of the deceased are:  one son, Shirley Lee Calvin of Dongola; mother, Mrs. J. A. Calvin, of Pulaski; six brothers, Earl, Lawrence, and Leemon of Pulaski, Owen and Everett of Centralia, and Jim of Kansas City, Mo.; and two sisters, Mrs. Laura Mulkey of Cypress, Illinois, and Mrs. Myrtle Smith, of Colorado.

(D. Russell Calvin, 26, of Kansas City, Mo., married on 19 Aug 1930, in Jackson Co., Mo., Opal McKinney, 19, of 315 North Oakley, Kansas City, Mo.  James Calvin married Annie E. Eastwood on 23 Mar 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Dee Russel Calvin, truck driver, was born in January 1904 in Puaski Co., Ill., the son of James Calvin, a native of Grand Chain, Ill., and Anna Eastwood, a native of Olmstead, Ill., died 18 Apr 1936, in Sandoval, Marion Co., Ill., divorced, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Rose Hill Cemetery reads:  Chester Leamon Calvin 1906-1975 Laura Calvin Biggs 1887-1960 Lloyd Russell Calvin 1903-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

NORBERT W. ROACH DIED SUNDAY IN ST. LOUIS HOSPITAL

Norbert W. Roach, a member of the firm of Roach and Reichert, Ford dealers, of Anna, died Sunday morning at a hospital in St. Louis.  He was the son of J. C. and Maud Roach of Grand Chain.

Mr. Roach was only 26 years of age.  He was highly respected in Anna and was known to be a good business man.

Besides the parents at Grand Chain, there survives his wife, Mrs. Ruby Roach, of Anna; two brothers, Russell and Thomas Roach; and one sister, Miss Margaret Roach, all of Grand Chain.

The body was brought to the home of the parents so that his many friends could pay their last respects to the departed.  Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at St. Catherine’s Church, Grand Chain, with Rev. Fr. Manion officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.

Pallbearers were Delbert Badgley, Homer Badgley, John Reichert, Henry Britt, Robert Moore, and Roy Reichert.

(His marker in St. Catherine’s Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Norbert W. Roach 1909-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A WPA WORKER KILLS NEPHEW OF D. D. HARRIS

R. H. McFarlane of Burkburnett, Texas, was killed last week by an angry WPA worker.  Mr. McFarlane’s mother is a sister to ___Harris of Mound City.

According to a Texas daily newspaper, Mr. McFarlane was a boss on a WPA project.  When he released a man by the name of Allison, he became angry at losing his position later attacked McFarlane striking his neck.

(R. W. McFarland married Maggie P. Harris on 29 Nov 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Robert H. McFarlane of Avenue C, Burkburnet, Wichita Co., Texas, WPA foreman, was born 30 Apr 1891, in Arkansas, the son of R. W. McFarlane, a native of Texas, and Maggie Harris, a native of Illinois, died 10 Apr 1936, from fractured cervical vertrebrea and injuries to head and face, homicide from being attacked in a public place and being beaten with fists, buried in Graham Cemetery.  His marker in Oak Grove Cemetery in Burkburnett, Texas, reads:  Robert Harris McFarlane Apr. 29, 1891 Apr. 10, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOSEPH CRAWFORD, WELL KNOWN AUCTIONEER DIES

Joseph Crawford, known to many in this county because of his having auctioneered many sales, died last Friday night at his home in Belknap.  He was 65 years old.  Nine days before his death he was stricken with paralysis from which he never recovered.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at Belknap, Illinois.  Interment was made in the Masonic cemetery there.  The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Joseph Crawford, auctioneer at Belknap, Cache Precinct, Johnson Co., Ill., was born 8 Apr 1871, in Iroquois Co., Ill., the son of John Crawford and Mary Carey, natives of Illinois, died 17 Apr 1936, in Road District 10, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Beulah Taylor Crawford.  His marker in Belknap Masonic Cemetery reads:  Joseph Crawford Born Apr. 8, 1871 Died Apr. 17, 1936 Cynthia V. wife of Joseph Crawford Born Mar. 5, 1880 died Jun. 10, 1909.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOUIS SCHNEIDER, MOUNDS, DIED SATURDAY AT PADUCAH

Louis Schneider, for many years an Illinois Central clerk, died in the I. C. hospital at Paducah Saturday morning.  Mr. Schneider suffered a stroke of paralysis the latter part of last week.  He was rushed to the hospital where the best attention possible was given him, but all to no avail.

The body was brought to Mounds for funeral services, which were held Monday afternoon at the Congregational church.  Rev. S. C. Benninger officiated.  Interment was in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Surviving the deceased are his wife and two sons, Richard and Lawrence, all of whom have the sympathy of the entire community in their bereavement.

             (His death certificate states that Louis Schneider, railroad clerk for the I. C. R. R. Co., born 31 Jul 1875, in Waterloo, Ill., the son of Valentine Schneider, a native of Germany, and Caroline Dakin, a native of Waterloo, Ill., died 18 Apr 1936, in Illinois Central Railroad Hospital in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Louis Schneider 1875-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HENRIETTA BANGOR MASON PASSED AWAY THURSDAY

Mrs. Henrietta Bangor Mason died at 9:45 p.m. Thursday of last week from an illness which lasted about four weeks.  She had lived in Mound City since the age of ten and she had many friends here who are mourning her departure.

The closest relative that survives is Mrs. W. I. Connell of Mounds.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the M. E. church in Mound City.  Rev. Everett Hayden officiated and Rev. P. R. Glotfeltty of Mounds assisted him.  John Trampert, Robert Burns, James Finley, I. J. Huckleberry, Ed Schuler and George R. Martin acted as pallbearers.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of funeral arrangements.

(In 1880 in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., Margaret Mason, born about 1826 in Alsace, was head of the household.  Two daughters lived with her, Sarah Mason, born about 1861 in Missouri, and Henrietta Bangor, born about 1853 in Kentucky, a dressmaker.  Henrietta is in the 1900 census of Walnut Street, Mound City, as Henrietta B. Mason, born March 1850 in Kentucky, a dress maker.  Her mother, Margaret Mason, born January 1823 in Germany, lived with her.  Frederick Schoenfeld married Sarah C. Mason on 22 Sep 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The head of the household in 1910 census of Poplar Street, Ward 1, Mounds, Ill., was Sarah Schoenfield, born about 1850 in Missouri, divorced.  In the household was Sarah’s mother, Margaret Mason, born about 1835 in Gemany, a widow, and Sarah’s divorced sister, Henrietta Mason, born about 1853 in Kentucky.  In 1920, Henrietta Mason, a widow, born about 1850 in Kentucky, lived with her niece and her niece’s husband, W. I. and Maryetta Connell, in Mounds, Ill.  Her death certificate states that Henrietta Bingor Mason was born 18 May 1850, in Missouri, the daughter of Margaret Mehl, a native of Germany, died 16 Apr 1936, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Henrietta Bangor Mason 1850-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AUNT OF S. W. FREY DIED

             Mrs. Angeline Book, aunt of S. W. Frey, high school principal of Mound City, died Wednesday at her home in Aviston, Illinois.  Mr. Frey had only two living relatives on his mother’s side in this country and this aunt was one of them.  Mr. and Mrs. Frey drove to Aviston Thursday after school returning in time for school Friday morning.

             (Her death certificate states that Angeline Book was born 20 Sep 1859, in Schlagen, Holland, the daughter of William Book and Anna Maria Knah, natives of Holland, died 21 Apr 1936, in Aviston Village, Clinton Co., Ill.  She was buried in St. Francis Cemetery in Aviston, Clinton Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Apr 1936: 

Norbert W. Roach

       Norbert W. Roach, 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Roach of Grand Chain, died Sunday morning, April 19, at 4:15 o’clock in the Missouri Baptist Hospital, St. Louis, where he had been taken from his home in Anna for an appendicitis operation.

       Mr. Roach was born in Grand Chain July 21, 1909.  For some time he was a resident of Mounds and was employed in the office of the Britt Motor Co.  Later he purchased an interest in the Britt Motor Co., of Anna, the firm changing to Roach and Reichert.  Only a few months ago he was married to Miss Ruby Richey of Olmstead.  He was a nephew of Mrs. H. M. Britt of this city.

       Surviving are his wife, his parents, two brothers, Russell and Thomas Roach; and one sister, Miss Margaret Roach.

       Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock at St. Catherine’s Church, Grand Chain, of which he was a member, the Reverend Father Manion officiating.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery, James T. Ryan directing.

 

Pulaski Man Killed in Highway Accident

       Russell Calvin of Pulaski was killed Saturday morning, April 18, when a truck he was driving collided with an Illinois Central train at a railroad crossing south of Centralia.

       Surviving are a son, Shirley Lee Calvin of Dongola; his mother, Mrs. James Calvin of Pulaski; two sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Ellen Smith of Housington, Kan., and Mrs. Laura Mulcahy of Cypress; six brothers, Earl, Lawrence and Leamon of Pulaski, Olen and Owen of Centralia and James of Independence, Mo.

       Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at two o’clock at the Christian church in Pulaski, the Rev. Holloman, pastor officiating.  Interment was in Rose Hill Cemetery.

 

Mrs. Henrietta Mason

       Mrs. Henrietta Bangor Mason of Mound City died at her home there Thursday night April 16, at 9:40 o’clock following an illness of about four months.  She had lived in Mound City for many years having gone there, at the age of 10.  She is survived by one niece, Mrs. W. I. Connell of this city.  Mrs. Mason had many friends and acquaintances here, having visited frequently at the home of Mrs. Connell.

       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First M. E. Church in Mound City, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Everett Hayden, assisted by Rev. Glotfelty of Mounds.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds, with G. A. James directing.

       The casket bearers were John Trampert, Robert Burns, George R. Martin, Ed Schuler, James Finley and I. J. Huckelbury.

 

Louis Schneider Dies in Paducah Hospital

       Louis Schneider, for twenty-five years an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad at Mounds, died early Saturday morning, April 18, in the Illinois Central Hospital at Paducah, Ky., where he had been taken on the previous Wednesday.  He had been ill one week.

       Mr. Schneider was born July 31, 1875, at Waterloo, Ill.  He was married in St. Louis, April 18, 1901, to Louise Kurt.  His death occurred just 35 years from that day.  They lived at Chester three years and had lived in Mounds twenty-five years.  He was a member of the I. O. O. F. and the M. W. of W. lodges and was an attendant of the Congregational Church.

       Surviving are his wife, two sons, Richard and Laurence, both of Mounds; and five brothers, Judge Henry Schneider, Adam and William Schneider of Waterloo, Ill., Jacob Schneider of East St. Louis, Ill., and Peter Schneider of Columbia, Ill.  All except Adam, who is now 85, were here to attend the funeral.  Two sisters preceded him in death.  Louis was the youngest member of the family.

       Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Congregational Church, the pastor, Rev. S. C. Benninger, officiating.  The church choir sang one number and Mrs. Jesse Hall of Cairo sang a solo.  The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

       Burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, L. Hodge, Joe Esterman, Charles Austin, J. B. Jones, George Sitter, and W. R. Crisel, serving as casket bearers.  James T. Ryan directed.

       Among those from out of town attending the funeral were Judge Henry Schneider, Mrs. and Mrs. William Schneider, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Schneider, Mrs. Earl Wolfe, Mrs. Ernestine Feldmeyer, Mrs. Anna Shifler, Mrs. Otto Kurt, Mrs. Oscar Law, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Koenigsmark and Robert Feldmeyer, all of Waterloo; Peter Schneider of Columbia, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schneider of East St. Louis, and Charles Kurt of St. Louis.

 

Joseph Crawford

       Joseph Crawford, age 65, died Friday night, April 17, at his home in Belknap following a nine days illness of paralysis.  He had resided in Belknap community for 47 years where he had identified himself in politics.  He also had a wide acquaintance throughout the state, especially among the farmers as he had been an auctioneer for almost 50 years.

       Surviving are his wife, Beulah Crawford; and the following children:  Mrs. Bessie Conrad of Calumet City, Ill., Mrs. Mae Ebernathie of Herrin, John Crawford of Belknap, Mrs. Bonnie Burnham of Harrisburg, Mrs. Wilma Huckleberry of Belknap, Joe Crawford of Belknap.  He also leaves stepchildren as follows:  Rolly Tapley of Livermore, Calif., Virgil Tapley of Belknap and Mrs. Edith Richards of Hutsonville; the following brothers and sisters:  Cleveland, Frank and Harve, Mrs. Ron Donough, and Mrs. Sarah Davis.

       Funeral services were held in the Methodist church at Belknap Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Day, assisted by Rev. Browning.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service, directing.

 

FRANK BAKER FOUND DROWNED

       Frank Baker, who wandered away from home last Sunday and whose disappearance is noted on another page of the Independent, was found dead Thursday morning, drowned, in a small creek or stream near America.  He had evidently stumbled as he tried to cross the water.  It is thought he had been dead two or three days when found.  His body was brought to the Hartwell undertaking room on First Street.

       (According to his death certificate, James Franklin Baker, retired farmer, was born 7 Jun 1870, in Tennessee, died 23 Apr 1936, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Rosie Baker, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Frank Baker Disappears from Home Sunday

       Frank Baker of North Mounds, disappeared Sunday afternoon and his relatives are asking aid in tracing him in order to bring him home.  This is the second time within the year that he has wandered away.

       Baker, age 65 and feeble minded, was last seen at Villa Ridge.  He walks with a stoop, is about five feet, five inches, in height and light complexioned.  At the time he left his home he was wearing a black coat and trousers and overalls, with a light felt hat.  He is reported to be quite harmless.

       Sheriff Carl G. McIntire and his aides are assisting in the search and it is reported that anyone seeing a man of this description telephone or send word to the sheriff’s office.

 

Mrs. Agnes Mench, Ruth and Sarah Jane Hartwell, who were called here by the death of their mother, Mrs. George P. Hartwell, have returned to their home in Washington, D.C.  They were accompanied by Misses Elizabeth and Minnie Hartwell, Dewitt T. Hartwell and Frederick Mench, who will also make their home in Washington.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 May 1936: 

Loses Mother by Death

       Mrs. Florence Matlock, widow of the late James W. Matlock, died Wednesday, April 29, at her home in Cairo, following a long illness.  Mrs. Matlock was the mother of Mrs. Harry Dishinger of this city.  Four other daughters survive her, namely:  Mrs. Stella McGill of Mound City, Mrs. E. J. Zinser of St. Louis, Miss Grace Matlock and Mrs. J. C. Moore of Cairo.

       Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at New Liberty Chapel near Kevil, Ky., with G. A. James directing.

 

Roy Palmer Dies as Result of Automobile Accident

       Roy Palmer, Illinois Central switchman, died early Wednesday morning, April 29, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, as a result of injuries received Wednesday, April 22, when the automobile in which he and three other I. C. employees were returning home from work, was crowded off the highway, hitting a tree.  The accident occurred near the old Interurban crossing north of Cairo.  Mr. Palmer sustained a broken pelvis and internal injuries.

       Surviving Mr. Palmer are his wife, Ethel Helman Palmer; eight children, Clifton, Gerald, Mrs. Daisy Calhoun, Mrs. Muriel Reeves, Eva, Lela Ruth, Marjorie and Jimmy; his mother, Mrs. Charles Wilson; two brothers, Ernest Palmer of Pulaski and Harvey Palmer of East St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Jack Croxton of Fayette, Miss.; a half-brother, Charles Wilson of California; and a half-sister, Mrs. Mary Agnes Wilson of St. Louis; one grandchild, born the day after Mr. Palmer was injured; many other relatives and a host of friends.

       Mr. Palmer was the son of the late Pleas Palmer.  He had reached his 45th year on April 21, 1936.

       Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church, Rev. S. C. Benninger, officiating.  Casket bearers were E. B. Adams, A. R. DeCrow, M. M. Shifley, John Travers, H. L. Shaffer, and John Newell.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

CARD OF THANKS

       We wish to express our sincere thanks for acts of kindness from friends at the death of our husband and father, Frank Baker.  We especially thank those who furnished cars, gave flowers and offerings, and the Rev. Miss Hyde and Sister Bois for their consoling words in the sad hour.

Mrs. Frank Baker

Collie Baker and family

Lemmie Beegle and family

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 May 1936:

GEORGE W. MARTINDALE DIED AT DONGOLA

             George W. Martindale, age 75, died at the home of his son, Oscar Martindale, near Dongola last Saturday.  He had been ill for some time, but a stroke Friday was the immediate cause of death.

He leaves five children, C. D. Martindale, H. A. Martindale, and Mrs. L. D. Richardson, all of E. St. Louis, and Oscar Martindale and Mrs. Carrie Jessup, both of Dongola; also 13 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at the First Baptist Church in Dongola, with Rev. H. W. Karraker officiating.  Interment was in Hinkle Cemetery.

(His death certificate states that George W. Martindale was born 24 Nov 1860, died 25 Apr 1936, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., husband of Christena Martindale, and was buried in Hinkle Cemetery near Dongola.  His marker there reads:  George W. Martindale Nov. 24, 1860 Apr. 25, 1936 Mary A. Martindale June 10, 1865 Nov. 8, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. FLORENCE MATLOCK DIED AT CAIRO WEDNESDAY

Mrs. Florence Matlock died at her home in Cairo Wednesday morning at 1:15 o’clock after a lingering illness.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at New Liberty Church near Kevil, Ky.  The cortege will leave the home at Cairo at 11 a.m.  Interment will be made in New Liberty Cemetery.  G. A. James has charge of funeral arrangements.

Mrs. Matlock is survived by five daughters:  Mrs. Stella McGill of Mound City, Mrs. Harry Dishinger of Mounds, Mrs. E. J. Zinser of St. Louis, Miss Grace Matlock and Mrs. J. C. Moore of Cairo; one brother, Dr. M. M. Thompson, of Logan, N. Mex.; one sister, Mrs. Carrie Brown of Wickliffe, Ky.; and several grandchildren.

(Her death certificate states that Florence Iona Matlock was born 9 Jan 1870, in Kentucky, the daughter of Samuel Thompson and Ann E. Waltman, natives of Kentucky, died 29 Apr 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the widow of James Matlock, and was buried near Kevil, McCracken Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER RESIDENT DEAD

Mrs. Juliette Hunter Rouse died at her home in Memphis, Tenn., on last Sunday.  She was the widow of the late Captain James Rouse of this city.  She was, before her marriage, a Miss Hunter, and grew up in this city.

She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Florence Allen; and son, Hunter, of Memphis; and another son, Walter B. of Battle Creek, Neb.; and a grandson and granddaughter of Battle Creek.  Two sisters also survive, Mrs. John Rhine of Charleston, Mo., and Mrs. J. T. Armstrong of Carterville.

Mrs. Rouse was very near 80 years of age.  She had been in failing health for several years with cancer of the stomach.

(Her death certificate states that Juliett Hunter Rouse, of 417 LaClede Ave., Memphis, Tenn., was born 31 Dec 1856, in Staunton, Va., daughter of Elijah Hunter, a native of Virginia, and Sarah Ann Cale, a native of Pennsylvania, died 26 Apr 1936, of gastric carcinoma, widow of Capt. J. W. Rouse, and was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery in Memphis.  Her marker there reads:  Juliett H. Rouse 1856-1936.—Darrel Dexter).

 

ROY PALMER OF MOUNDS DIES OF CAR WRECK INJURIES

Roy Palmer, 45 years old, of Mounds, died Wednesday a little after midnight in St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo of injuries he had received a week earlier while returning towards Mounds from his work.  The car in which he was rising was forced from the pavement and crashed into one of the trees of this “death avenue” just north of Cairo.

Palmer was not thought to be so seriously injured at first, but it soon developed that while his pelvis was broken, he was injured internally and perhaps a kidney had been punctured.  He grew worse and the end came almost a week after the accident.

Eight children and his wife survive.  The children are:  Clifton, Gerald, Mrs. Leon Calhoun, Mrs. Carl Reeves, Eva, Lela Ruth, Marjorie and Jimmy.  His mother, Mrs. Christine Wilson; two brothers, Ernest Palmer of Pulaski and Harvey Palmer of East St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Jack Croxton, of Fayette, Miss.; a half-brother, Charles Wilson in California; and a half-sister, Mrs. Mary Agnes Wilson of St. Louis, are other surviving relatives.

Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the Congregational church at Mounds.  Many were present, for Mr. Palmer was well known and his death was a tragedy and a shock for that community.  Pallbearers were E. B. Adams, A. R. DeCrow, Marion Shifley, John Travers, Horace Shafer, and John Newell, all switchmen.

(Pleas Palmer, Jr., married Christiana Clanton on 26 Aug 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Roy Sylvester Palmer, switchman, was born 21 Apr 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Peas Palmer, a native of Pulaski Co., Ill., and Christiana Clanton, died 29 Apr 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Ethel Palmer, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Father Roy S. Palmer Apr. 21, 1891 Apr. 29, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MAN WHO WANDERED AWAY FROM HOME DROWNS IN DITCH

Frank Baker, of Mounds, 65 years of age, in poor health and his mind wandering, was found last Thursday afternoon in a ditch north of America, drowned.  Feeble and unable to care for himself, it is presumed that he fell into the water and, being too weak, soon drowned.  He had been gone from his home since Sunday.

The verdict of the coroner’s jury was accidental death by drowning.

The tragedy was rather pitiful in nature.  Relatives spread the alarm after he had wandered away and every report that came in was too late.  He probably suffered considerable hardships before he fell into the ditch and drowned.

His wife and several children survive, two brothers, Lee Baker of Mounds and W. W. Baker of Pulaski, and a number of other relatives.

Funeral services were held Saturday.

 

A MONUMENT

Now that Ray Palmer of Mounds is dead, we suggest that the state highway department erect a white cross at the scene of the accident down on the Avenue of Death leading into Cairo.  In fact, crosses should be erected for all the people who died as a result of those stately beautiful and majestic trees.

Perhaps someday, when sense instead of sentiment rules us, those trees will become a WPA project and be grubbed out.  There is no more dangerous drive in southern Illinois than down Death Avenue, that shady road leading into Cairo.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 May 1936:

MRS. JESSE CLANAHAN DIED SATURDAY AT PULASKI

Mrs. Cassie Doris Clanahan died Saturday evening at her home in Pulaski after an illness of two years.  She was 48 years of age.

Mrs. Clanahan was a member of the Methodist Church.  She had lived in Pulaski for twenty-five years.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at Center Church with Rev. J. T. Smith officiating.  Interment was in Rose Hill Cemetery.  The Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

Surviving the deceased are:  her husband, Jesse Clanahan; three daughters, LaVerne, Pauline and DeLois; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. White, of Pulaski; two brothers, Ira White of Pulaski and Ralph White of Cairo; and four sisters, Mrs. Stella Woodward of Mounds, Mrs. Lora Wallace of Pulaski, Mrs. Effie Britt of Olmsted, and Mrs. Chloe Lentz of Harrisburg.

(Her death certificate states that Cassie Dawn Clanahan was born 27 Mar 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of J. W. White and Rosa Drake, died 2 May 1936, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Jesse Clanahan, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski.  Her marker there reads:  Cassie Clanahan 1888-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

EDITOR OF ENTERPRISE LOSES MOTHER BY DEATH

Mrs. Georgiana Ledbetter of Farmington, Mo., mother of Frank Ledbetter, editor and publisher of The Enterprise, passed away Wednesday evening at 6:15 o’clock according to word received in Mound City Wednesday night.  Mr. Ledbetter was called to the bedside of his mother Sunday and was there when she died.

Death was due to a stroke which Mrs. Ledbetter suffered Sunday.  She had been in failing health for some time.  She was 76 years of age.

Besides Mr. Ledbetter, there are two children of the deceased who survive, one son and one daughter.  The father passed away a number of years ago.

The Enterprise staff and the community join in extending heartfelt sympathy to Mr. Ledbetter in his bereavement.

(She was buried in Knights of Pythias Cemetery in Farmington, St. Francois Co., Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OBITUARY

Cassie Doris Clanahan was born March 27, 1888, and departed this life May 2, 1936, age 48 years, 1 month and 5 days.

She was married on May 6, 1908, to Jessie Clanahan and to this union were born three daughters, LaVerne, Pauline and DeLois, all of whom survive her.

Besides her husband and daughters, she leaves to mourn her loss, a father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. White of Pulaski; four sisters, Mrs. Harry Britt of Olmstead, Mrs. Stella Woodard of Cairo, Mrs. A. F. Lentz of Harrisburg and Mrs. Joe Wallace of Pulaski; two brothers, Ira White of Pulaski and Ralph White of Cairo; besides a host of friends and other relatives.

She was a loving wife and beautiful mother and spent her entire life in loving sacrifice for her family and the church.  She was converted in early life and taught the Bible class for many years and never was happier than when at work in the Master’s Garden, and only gave up when her failing health would not permit her to go on.  Then, as she lay on her bed, though suffering was intense, she always had a smile for everyone and a word for the Master.

She often wished she might go on home to be with Jesus, where there is no sickness, suffering or pain, however, always expressing a willingness to stay as long as there was any possibility of helping others.

She looked for and could always see the good in others and those knowing her best can best appreciate what her going means to the community where she spent her life.

Dear wife, mother, sister and daughter

Although your going brings us pain,

We would not ask you back to suffer this again.

And He, who from day to day,

Guided your footsteps by His might,

In the long way that we must go

Will guide our steps aright.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 May 1936: 

Mother of Earl Smith Dies at Knoxville

       Mrs. Annie Smith, mother of Earl C. Smith, president of the Illinois Agricultural Association, died April 23, following a brief illness at her home near Knoxville, Tennessee.

       Mr. Smith received word of his mother’s serious condition while at the IAA offices in Chicago.  He left immediately for Knoxville.  Mr. Smith’s father, W. T. Smith, died about a year ago.

       (Her death certificate states that Annie Clemmons Smith, born 23 Nov 1853, in Detroit, Ill., the daughter of W. A. Clemmons and Sarah Williams, natives of North Carolina, died 23 Apr 1936, at Iukip, Tenn., of influenza, and was buried in Lynnhurst Cemetery in Knoxville, Tenn.  Her marker there reads:  Annie Clemmons Smith wife of William Thomas Smith Born Nov. 23, 1853 Died April 23, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Jesse Clanahan

       Mrs. Cassie Doris Clanahan, wife of Jesse Clanahan, died at her home near Pulaski Saturday evening, May 2, at 5 o’clock, following a long illness.  Her age was 48 years.

       She is survived by her husband, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. White of Pulaski; three daughters, La Verne, Pauline and DeLois; two brothers, Ira White of Pulaski and Ralph White of Cairo; four sisters, Mrs. Effie Britt of Olmstead, Mrs. Stella Woodard of Cairo, Mrs. Chloe Lentz of West Frankfort, and Mrs. Lora Wallace of Pulaski.

       She was a member of the Methodist Church and had resided in the same community for twenty-five years.

       Funeral services were held Monday afternoon a 2 o’clock at Center Church, the Rev. J. T. Smith of Pulaski officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery, the Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 May 1936: 

Pioneer Teacher Unexpectedly Called by Death

       E. E. Butler, prominent resident and pioneer teacher of Pulaski County, died very suddenly Monday morning of heart disease.

       Edward Everett Butler was born in Southern Indiana, July 19, 1860, and died in Mounds, Illinois, May 11, 1936, age 75 years, nine months and twenty-two days.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Butler and came with his parents to Grand Chain, Illinois, at the age of nine years.

       Mr. Butler began teaching school in Pulaski County in 1879, at the age of 19, teaching first at America and later at Valley Recluse, Villa Ridge, Pleasant Valley, Crossroads, Mounds, and Mound City, continuing to teach for 33 years with the longest tenure of 16 years at Villa Ridge.

       He and his family have lived in Mounds for the last twenty years where he has been in the insurance business.  His health had been failing during the last year, but his death from heart trouble was sudden and quite unexpected.

       Several generations of his old pupils have called at the residence to pay their last respects to his memory and have brought to the attention of his family, their lasting indebtedness to his influence.

       He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Louie Meisenheimer Butler; two sons, Glenn Butler of New York City and Edward Butler of Mounds; one daughter, Mrs. Daisy Powell of Vienna; and a granddaughter, Winifred Butler of East St. Louis.

       Funeral services were held at the family residence, corner of Delaware Avenue and Thistlewood Street at two o’clock Wednesday afternoon, the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty, pastor of the M. E. Church, officiating.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing.

       (E. E. Butler married Louie E. Meisenheimer on 30 May 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Edward E. Butler, insurance agent, was born 19 Jul 1860, in Indiana, the son of Alva and Lonie Butler, died 11 May 1936, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Edward Butler 1860-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of Editor Ledbetter Dies at Missouri Home

       Mrs. Georgiana Ledbetter of Farmington, Mo., mother of Editor Frank Ledbetter of the Pulaski Enterprise, died Wednesday of last week at the age of 76 years.  She had been in failing health for some time.

       Mrs. Ledbetter is survived by two sons and one daughter.

       (Georgiana Ledbetter, widow of Hartwell Brown Ledbetter, was born 24 Dec 1859, died 6 May 1936, and buried in Knights of Pythias Cemetery in St. Francois Co., Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Charles Griffith

       Charles Griffith, age 71 years, died Saturday afternoon, May 9, at 1:30 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Beulah Woods, where he and his wife made their home.  He had been ill about two weeks.

       Surviving are his wife, Mary Ellen Griffith; five daughters, Mrs. Hettie Lemke of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Fern Anderson of Peoria, Mrs. Beulah Woods of Mounds, Mrs. Ellen Gore of Marshall and Mrs. Clara Dawson of Chrisman; two sons, Harry Griffith and Roger Griffith of Mound City; two brothers, Taylor Griffith of Terra Haute, Ind., and William of Pana; one sister, Mrs. Callie Hunt of Pana.

       Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Methodist church of Belknap, the Rev. W. E. Browning officiating.  Burial was in Masonic cemetery, Belknap with the Odd Fellows in charge and Wilson Funeral Service directing.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 May 1936:

CHARLES GRIFFITH DIED SATURDAY AT MOUNDS

Charles Griffith, age 71 years, died Saturday at his home in ___ after an illness of about ___ weeks.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at Belknap.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.

He is survived by his wife, Mary Griffith and the following ____, Mrs. Hettie Lemke of Decatur, Mrs. Fern Anderson of Peoria, Mrs. Beulah Woods of Mounds, ___ Griffith of Mound City, ___ Griffith , Mrs. Ella Gore of ___, Ill., and Mrs. Clara Daws___ of Chrisman, Ill.; two brothers, ___ Griffith of Terre Haute, Ind., and William Griffith of Dana, Ill.; ____ Mrs. Callie Hunt of ____.

(His death certificate states that Charles T. Griffith, farmer, was born 4 Jul 1864, in Illinois, the son of George Griffith, a native of Pennsylvania, and Eleanor Adams, died 9 May 1936, in Road Distict 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mary Ellen Griffith, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Belknap, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Charles T. Griffith July 4, 1864 May 9, 1936 Mary E. Griffith Oct. 24, 1874 Nov. 1, 1947 At Rest.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOSEPH L. BROWN, DONGOLA, DIED FRIDAY MORNING

Joseph L. Brown, age 72 years, passed away Friday morning at his home in Dongola.  He had been ill about five weeks.

He had been a resident of Dongola a greater part of his life with the exception of about 15 years, which were spent in Jonesboro, Ark.  For the past ten years he had been sexton of the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  He was a member of the Dongola I. O. O. F. Lodge.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Laura Brown; three sons, W. A. Brown, of Jonesboro, Ark; Joe and John Brown of Dongola; two stepsons, Paul D. Seaman of St. Louis and Herman Seaman of Jonesboro.  He also leaves one sister, Mrs. A. J. Brown of Balcom, with other relatives and a number of friends.

Funeral services were held in the First Baptist Church in Dongola Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Grant Whitesides.  Interment was made in the Dongola cemetery.

(Joseph L. Brown, 22, farmer at Anna, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., the son of John Brown and Julia Penninger, married on 24 Dec 1885, in Union Co., Ill., Mary S. Dillow, 16, born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Jeff Dillow and Malinda Lentz.  John A. Brown married Julia Penninger on 13 Feb 1859, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Joseph Lawson Brown, a cemetery sexton, was born 4 Aug 1863, in Union Co., Ill., the son of John L. Brown and Julia Penninger, natives of Illinois, died 8 May 1936, in Dongola, Ill., the husband of Laura Brown, and was buried in Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  His marker in the cemetery reads:  Joseph L. Brown 1863-1936 Laura C. Brown 1868-1958.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Fred Pfaff and Frank Dexter attended Joe Brown’s funeral in Dongola Sunday afternoon.  (Beech Grove)

 

Mrs. Beets was killed on the slab somewhere near Vienna.  Others were hurt.  (Perks)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 May 1936:

PULASKI COUNTY MAN FATALLY INJURED NEAR E. ST. LOUIS

While fixing a tire just this side of East St. Louis, Albert Brown, known as “Brownie” to his many friends in this county, was fatally injured Saturday night when he was stuck by an automobile.  He was traveling from Mounds to St. Louis.

He died at St. Mary’s hospital in E. St. Louis three hours after the accident.  The driver of the other machine immediately stopped after the accident and rendered all the assistance that he could.  He took Brown to the hospital at E. St. Louis.

Mr. Brown had been working for the Peerless Cleaning and Pressing establishment for the past week.  He was born and reared in Dongola and has lived at Dongola and Ullin. For The past several years He has been a merchant at Ullin, recently closing his store there.

His body was brought to Dongola and taken to the E. J. Ford Funeral Home, where services were held Monday afternoon at the First Baptist Church at 2 o’clock and interment was made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Dongola.  Rev. W. J. Ward officiated at the funeral.

He is survived by his widow, Mae Brown; and one son, Billie of Dongola; one brother, George Brown of Havana, Illinois; three sisters, Lorene Murphy and Gertrude Burd, both of Mounds and Alice Ledbetter of Ullin.

(George B. Brown, 25, from Ullin, Ill., lumber man, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of A. W. Brown and Margaret A. Jones, married on 2 Sep 1897, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., Emma M. Resh, 21, from Dongola, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of George Resh and Rachel Hobrooks.  The death certificate states that Albert Brown, store owner, was born 20 Feb 1902, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Bert Brown and Jennie Resh, natives of Illinois, died 17 May 1936, in East St. Louis, Ill., husband of Mae Brown, and was buried in Dongola, Ill.  His marker reads:  Albert W. Brown Feb. 20, 1902 May 16, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Roscoe Bird and Mrs. Lorene Murphy attended the funeral of their brother, Allen Brown, at Dongola Monday.  Brown was on his way to East St. Louis and white repairing a tire on his car he was hit by an automobile.  The man who hit him took him to a hospital in St. Louis and he died soon afterwards.  His body was brought to Dongola and Rev. Ward, pastor of the Baptist Church, preached the funeral Tuesday afternoon.  (Mounds)

 

Funeral services for Mary Atherton were held at the Methodist church Saturday 2 p.m. sermon by Rev. Bob Shelton, assisted by Rev. Kazee.  The Wilson Funeral Service was in charge.  Interment was at Liberty Cemetery.  (Olmstead)

(James H. Atherton, 37, agriculturalist in Pulaski, Ill., born in Davis Co., Ky., the son of J. W. Atherton and Elizabeth Morgan, married 2nd on 23 Jun 1881, in Union Co., Ill., Margaret “Maggie” Casper, 27, from Anna, born in Rowan Co., N.C., the daughter of David Casper and Amelia Troutman.  According to her death certificate, Mary Josephine Atherton was born 6 May 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of James H. Atherton and Margaret Casper, natives of Illinois, died 13 May 1936, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., and was buried at Olmstead, Ill.  Her marker in New Liberty Cemetery reads:  Mary J. Atherton Apr. 6, 1883 May 13, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 May 1936: 

Albert Brown Killed by Passing Automobile

       Albert W. Brown of this city, formerly of Ullin and Dongola, was fatally injured Saturday night, south of East St. Louis when struck by a passing automobile as he was repairing a tire on his car in which he was driving from Mounds to East St. Louis.

       The driver of the machine which struck him stopped and rendered help, taking Brown to St. Mary’s Hospital in East St. Louis where the unfortunate man died three hours later.

       “Brownie,” as he was known to his friends, was an employee of the Peerless Cleaning and Pressing establishment.  He was born and reared in Dongola and for several years has been in business in Ullin, coming here only recently.

       Surviving are his wife, Mae Brown; and one son, Billie, of Dongola; one brother, George Brown of Havanna, Ill.; three sisters, Alice Ledbetter of Ullin, Lorene Murphy and Gertrude Burd, of Mounds.

       Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the First Baptist Church of Dongola, the Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Burial was in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.

 

PROMINENT CAIRO INSURANCE MAN DIES WEDNESDAY

       Leo J. Kleb, 54, head of the L. J. Kleb Insurance Agency of Cairo, died at 12:15 o’clock Wednesday, following a heart attack suffered Sunday night.

       Mr. Kleb’s nephew, Clifford Vincent, died suddenly only a few weeks ago and the shock seemed to weaken Mr. Kleb.  The two were connected in business.

       (Leo John Kleb, 28, married on 24 Apr 1911, in Jackson, Cape Girardeau Co., Mo., Nell Ewing Saunderson, 22.  According to his death certificate, Leo J. Kleb, insurance agent, was born 26 Jun 1882, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Leo Kleb and Louisa Zimmerman, native of Germany, died 20 May 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Nell Kleb, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Pulaski Co., Ill.

 

ALVA H. KARRAKER

       Alva H. Karraker, age 46, died in the U. S. Veterans Hospital in Lexington, Ky., May 15th, where he had been a patient for about three months.  His home was on a farm near Lexington.

       His body was returned to Dongola, his former home and the funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock at the home of his father, Rev. H. W. Karraker.  The Rev. W. J. Ward and Rev. D. H. Smith conducted the service.  Interment was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery under the direction of Elmer J. Ford.

       He leaves his wife, Charlene Karraker; two sons, James and Gene; his father, Rev. H. W. Karraker; two sisters, Mrs. John H. Goodman, of Dongola, Mrs. Preller C. Douglas of Dongola; and three brothers, Perry and Jacob Karraker of Lexington, Ky., Lowell Karraker of Dongola; and other relatives and friends.

       (When he registered for the World War I draft, he signed his name as Alvan Hugo Karraker and listed his occupation as soil surveyor for the State Agriculutre Experiment Station.   The application for a military headstone states that Alva H. Karraker, corporal, Co. F, 309 Engrs., 84th Illinois, died 15 May 1936.  His death certificate states that Alva H. Karraker, farmer, of Route 2, Anchorage, Ky., was born 25 Jul 1889, in Illinois, the son of Rev. H. W. Karraker and Ina A. Davis, natives of Illinois, died 15 May 1936, at the Veterans’ Administration facility in Lexington, Ky., of suicide by jumping from a high  place on a water tower and fractured of both legs, left wrist, ribs, and concussion of brain, manic depressive psychosis, husband of Charlene Karraker, and was buried at Dongola, Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., reads:  Charlene A Karraker his wife 1897-1956 Alva H Karraker Corp. 309 Engrs. 84 Div. W. W. I 1889-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 May 1936: 

Two Fatally Injured, Many Hurt in Terrible Accident

       One of the most horrible accidents of recent date occurred on Saturday night about 10:30 o’clock in Cairo at Sycamore and Union streets, on U. S. Highway 51, just south of the Big Four Subway.  Edward J. Walder, Jr., 24, of Cairo, and Robert Merritt, 29, colored, of Mounds, were fatally injured and a number of others slightly injured.

       Leo Kinnison of this city, driving a northbound car containing his wife and Robert Merritt with Kinnison in the front seat and Fred Curd, John Lyles and Richard Mims, all colored and some of the group ball players in the Memphis Blues team, in the back seat, crashed into a truck belonging to John Kierce which was parked at the east side of the highway without a rear light.  The car driven by Kinnison was owned by Allen Johnson.

       Merritt was so badly hurt that he died at the scene of the accident within a few minutes after the collision.  Mrs. Kinnison and Mims were injured severely.  The other occupants suffered minor injuries.

       A crowd collected in the street and while efforts were being made to extricate Merritt from the wreck, a car containing some prominent young people of Cairo, on their way to Belleview Park, stopped and the young men offered aid.

       At this stage of affairs a car driven by Charles Butler, a paroled convict, and occupied by Violene Brown, Floyd Williams and Pauline Marshall, all colored, driving north, ran into the crowd assembled at the scene of the accident.

       Edward J. Walder, Jr., 24, of Cairo was fatally injured, William Pennick and Miss Virginia Mae Parker, both of Cairo were seriously injured, as was Curtis Lewis, colored, of Cairo, and a number of others were slightly injured by the roving car over which Butler seemed to have little control.

       Young Walder died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, shortly before one o’clock Sunday morning.  He was a graduate of Notre Dame College, a musician of note and held a position in the First Bank and Trust Co., of Cairo.

       The coroner’s jury at the inquest held Monday night found that Charles Butler was responsible for the fatal injuries to Walder.  An open verdict was returned in Merritt’s death, the jury finding that he died from injuries received when the car in which he was riding struck the truck of John Kierce parked at the east curb of Sycamore Street.

       (His death certificate states that Edward Joseph Walder, Jr., bank clerk, of 2801 Park Place Cairo, Ill., was born 5 Feb 1912, in Cairo, Ill., the son of E. J. Walder and Mary Galligan, natives of Cairo, Ill., died 24 May 1936 in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

      

Former Mound City Man Killed in Auto Accident

       Fred Settlemoir, 41, was killed Monday afternoon in an automobile accident at Evansville, Ill., according to word received by relatives at Mound City, his former home.

       He is survived by his wife, Lucille; and two daughters of Evansville; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Settlemoir of Mound City; five brothers, Lloyd, Harry and Walter of Mounds City, Chester of Vienna, and M. B. of Evansville; a sister, Mrs. Mae Broadwell of Evansville.

       Funeral services were held in Evansville Wednesday.

 

J. E. Wright

       John Frederick Wright, age 54 years, died Friday morning, May 22, at one o’clock at his home in Ullin, where he had lived the past four years.  Mr. Wright had been a miller for 30 years and had formerly resided in Dongola.  His illness had been of 17 months duration.

       Surviving are his wife and one daughter, Jessalyn.

       Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10 o’clock at the family residence, the Rev. W. E. Cummins of Cypress officiating.  Interment was made in Masonic Cemetery at Vienna with the Masons in charge, members of the order serving as pall bearers.  Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

 

Zachary T. Almon

       Zachary T. Almon, age 76, a well-respected farmer, who had been a resident of Pulaski County for many years, passed away at his home five miles east of Ullin near Friendship School, Saturday morning at 6:20 o’clock.  He had resided at this last place of residence only four years but during this time had formed a very close friendship with his many neighbors.

       He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Ella Almon, and had he lived only a few months longer they would have enjoyed the happiness of a Golden Wedding anniversary.  He is also survived by a son, W. D. Almon, of Champaign; and a daughter, Mrs. Fay Kraatz of Ullin; three sisters, Mrs. Mattie Gowdy of St. Louis, Mrs. Emma Fields of East St. Louis, and Miss Lizzie Almon of McLeansboro; one brother, J. L. Almon of Independence, Oregon; and two grandchildren.

       Funeral services were conducted at Cache Chapel Church Monday at 2:30 o’clock by Rev. O. F. Culver under whose ministry Mr. Almon was converted 44 years ago. Rev. Culver was formerly pastor of the First M. E. Church here and is now located at Epworth.

 

A. J. Schoenborn

       A. J. Schoenborn, age 60, died Wednesday, May 27, at his home in Grand Chain, following a long illness.  His birthdate was January 29, 1876.

       Surviving are his wife, one daughter, Cecilia Tennis of Grand Chain; two brothers, Ben and Robert of Grand Chain; four sisters, Mrs. Kate Kirschner of Olmstead, Mrs. Lena Gruen, Miss Pauline Schoenborn and Mrs. Rex Ulrich, all of Grand Chain.

       Funeral services will be held this morning at St. Catherine’s Church, Grand Chain, the Rev. Father Manion officiating.

       Interment will be made in St. Catherine’s Cemetery, J. T. Ryan directing.

 

Paul Hohnke, 31 years old, of Milwaukee, collapsed the other day from what doctors called “sun toxemia.”  He was going to his home after a two-hour sunbath in a city park, which was too much for him.—Anna Talk

 

DIES AT 100

       Benton—In the passing of Uncle Ike Little at his home on the McLeansboro Road shortly after noon today, Franklin County has lost its oldest citizen.

       On Feb. 17, last, Uncle Ike observed his 100th birthday, a privilege that is accorded but few persons.  The occasion was celebrated at the Community Building on North Main Street amid his kin and those who had lived near him many years.

       Little was born in Scott County, Illinois, in 1836, coming with his parents to Franklin County in his nineteenth year, settling in what is now known as the Mt. Zion community.  In 1855 he came to Benton and had since resided here.

       Little, a brick mason by trade, helped to erect most of the brick houses in Benton, including the courthouse, laid the foundation for the boilers of Benton’s first mine, made the brick and laid them for Ewing College and, at the age of 80, built his own home on Webster Avenue.

       His first presidential vote was cast for Franklin Pierce and Uncle Ike often boasted of having voted for only one Republican for president, Horace Greeley, and he was defeated.—Standard

       (His death certificate states that Isaac Peyton Little was born 17 Feb 1836, in Winfield, Ill., the son of John Little and Matilda Brown, natives of South Carolina, died 23 May 1936, in Benton, Franklin Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Benton, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INFECTION PLACES LIFE OF RALPH JUNGERS IN JEOPARDY

       Anna—Ralph Jungers of Cobden was admitted to the Hale-Willard Hospital this week for an amputation of the right leg at the knee.  A horse fell on him in the barn lot at his home Monday morning, fracturing his ankle.  The infection which started, spread rapidly and the amputation was found necessary in an effort to save his life.  Not much encouragement for his recovery is held out to his family.

       (His death certificate states that Ralph J. Jungers, teamster, was born 19 Apr 1911, in Jackson Co., Ill., son of W. M. Jungers and Blanche Shepherd, natives of Union Co., Ill., died 22 May 1936, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Ralph J. Jungers 1911-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DR. F. W. WILLARD DIES

       Anna—The remains of Dr. Francis W. Willard, who died in Francis Hospital in Chicago, last Thursday evening, May 14, was brought to Anna for interment last Tuesday morning.  Dr. Willard was only ill for a short time.  His funeral was held at the First Presbyterian Church, Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock conducted by Rev. R. C. Patterson, followed by interment in Anna Cemetery.

       He is survived by his wife, one son, Frank H. Willard, celebrated cartoonist; and one daughter, Mrs. Mary Lewis McLain, both of Tampa, Fla.; two grandchildren, Priscilla and Frank H. Willard, Jr.; and two sisters, Mrs. T. N. Perrine and Miss Lucy Willard of Anna; and one nephew, Willard Perrine of Denver, Colorado.—Democrat

             (His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Francis William Willard Aug. 25, 1864 May 14, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 May 1936:

___ Drowns at Dam at Annual School Picnic

____ Duncan, 18 years of age, ___ of Johnston City Township High School was drowned at ___ Friday afternoon about ____ when he leaped from a ____ into the river to retrieve an ___ came to the surface once, ____ and sank and did not rise again.  A second oar, tossed ___ he cried out, failed to ____.  Those in the boat were ___ bar and could not turn ____.  A power boat at the ____ the run, but could not ____ reach in time.

____ threw dark shadows over the entire party at the school ___  about 96 in all, and the ___ principal, J. Lester Buford, ____ some in trucks and who ____ a good time.  They ____ to help and many ____ tragedy, hardly realizing ____ moments that Bill was ___ in a few moments, all ____ grief and some were crying ____ happiness and mirth, ___ was one of sorrow.

____ with four others, was in ____ regulation yawl, which is ___ boat.  They were nearly ___ below the dam, out from ___ wall nearly 500 feet.  The ___ was about 20 feet deep ___ from currents.  The dam ___ the wind, however, had ___ about a foot high which ____ing and slapped the wide of the boat.

___ the oar was lost, Duncan, ___ swimming trunks, leaped ___ bring it back.  He had ___ing and was presumed ___ to swim well.  He came ____ and was immediately ___ and the second oar was ____ and the only oar the ____.  This did not reach him, ___ never came up ___ presumed that when ____ the surface from the ___ struck him in the face, ___ him very badly.

____ with mussel brails ___ immediately.  Backwater ____ Mississippi gave rivermen ___ that his body was very ___ where he sank and that ___ low currents to carry it ___ dressed in swimming ___ little hope of being able ___ the body.

___ of the boy was notified ___ came to the scene and ____ from Johnson City ____.  The body should float ___ very soon.  Search is still ____.

___ was valedictorian of ___ and the entire graduating ___ at the school will be over ___ by this tragedy.  Had the ___ jumped out of the boat ____ or had those in the ____ their only oar and turned ___ to him, all might have ____.

             (The death certificate states that William Bengamin Duncan, Jr., student, was born 19 Jul 1915, in Johnston City, Ill., the son of William Duncan, a native of Kentucky, and Hazle Bullington, a native of Johnston City, Ill., died 26 May 1936, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

_____ WRIGHT PASSES AWAY AT HOME IN ULLIN

Mr. Frederick Wright, age 54 years old, passed away at 1 o’clock Friday morning at his home in Ullin.  ___ had been ill for over a ___ had been a miller for 30 years ___ formerly residing in Dongola. 

Surviving him are his widow and ____ Jessalyn.  Mr. Wright was a member of the Masonic fraternity which had charge of his funeral.  Interment at the Vienna Cemetery and members of the order acted as pallbearers.

Funeral services were held at one ___  ___day morning at the ___ with W. E. Cummins of ___ officiating.  The Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that John Frederick Wright, miller at Ullin, Ill., was born 28 Feb 1882, in Vienna, Ill., the son of John Franklin Wright, a native of Illinois, and Omega Mary Marks, a native of Canada, died 22 May 1936, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Emma Wright, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery at Vienna, Ill.  His marker there reads:  J. Fred Wright 1882-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OBITUARY

Z. T. Almon was born in Wortonville, Ky., June 17, 1859.  He came to Illinois when a young man and made this state his home.  He married Ella Hood on September 5, 1886, who survives.  Two children were born to this union, W. D. Almon, Champaign, Illinois, and Mabel Faye Kraatz, Olmstead.  Two grandchildren, Mrs. Helen Albright, Karnak, and Carla Don Kraatz, survive.  He leaves three sisters and one brother, Miss Emma Fields, East St. Louis, Mrs. Mattie Gowdy, St. Louis, Miss Elizabeth Alma, McLeansboro, and J. L. Almon, Independence, Iowa.

He was converted at Asbury Chapel M. E. Church near Enfield, Illinois, in the winter of 1893 and joined the church and has been a devout member since.

Mr. and Mrs. Almon were planning to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary on September 5, 1936.

Funeral services were conducted at Cache Chapel Church May 25, 1936, by the Rev. O. F. Culver, Epworth, Illinois, assisted by Rev. Roy Shelton and Rev. J. T. Smith.  Music was furnished by Cache Chapel Choir.  Special music was furnished and Mr. and Mrs. Alva Wilmoth and son, Howard, of West Frankfort.  Pallbearers were Raymond Calvin, Dewey Beggs, Roy Kraatz, Olen Davis, Elmer Ford, and John Evers.  Interment was made at Cache Chapel Cemetery directed by G. A. James.

(Zachariah T. Almon married Ella Hood on 5 Sep 1886, in White Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Zachary Taylor Almon, farmer, was born 17 Jun 1859, in Hopkins Co., Ky., the son of J. L. Almon, a native of Kentucky, and Nancy Appleton, a native of Tennessee, died 23 May 1936, in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ella Almon, and was buried in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Z. T. Almon 1859-1936 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER MOUND CITY BOY FATALLY INJURED

Fred Settlemoir of Evansville, Ind., son of Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Settlemoir of Mound City, was fatally injured in an automobile accident about nine o’clock Sunday night.  He was removed to the hospital in Evansville immediately after the accident where he lived until three o’clock Monday afternoon.  He was 40 years, 11 months, and 25 days of age.

He was born and reared to young manhood near Grand Chain, Illinois, and received his education in the Grand Chain schools.  During the years of 1917 and 1918, he resided in Mounds, Illinois, where he was manager of Rhodes and Burford’s Furniture Store.  Later he moved to Cairo where he spent about two years and from there he returned to Mound City where he spent several years.  He then went to Evansville where he with his family have since made their home.  He was a painter and paper hanger by trade and while in Evansville he worked for a contracting company.

Left to mourn his passing are his widow, Mrs. Lucille Settlemoir; two daughters, Marion Lee, age 8, and Betty Lou, age 6; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Settlemoir; five brothers, Harry, Lloyd, and Walter of Mounds City, Chester of Vienna, and Blair of Evansville; and one sister, Mrs. George Barnwell, of Evansville; besides many other relatives and a host of friends in this community.  He was a man of a wonderful personality and wherever he went he made many friends.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at one o’clock at the Zeimer Funeral Home in Evansville and interment was made in the Oakland Cemetery.  The funeral was conducted by a Baptist minister and his son and the music was furnished by a pipe organ and the minister and son sang a duet, entitled “Shadows.”

The five brothers, Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir and Mr. and Mrs. James Slaughter of Cairo attended the funeral.  The five brothers and Mr. Slaughter acted as casket bearers.

(His marker in Oak Hill Cemetery in Evansville, Ind., reads:  Fred E. Settlemoir June 23, 1896 May 25, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Settlemoir, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Settlemoir, H. L. Settlemoir, and Joe Crain were called to Evansville by the death of the former’s son, Fred Settlemoir, which occurred Monday afternoon.  Mr. Settlemoir and Mrs. Crain returned home Tuesday morning and Tuesday night he and his brother, H. W. Settlemoir, left for Evansville where on Wednesday morning they attended their brother’s funeral.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Jun 1936:

FORMER MOUND CITY GIRL’S MOTHER-IN-LAW DIES

Word has been received in Mound City of the death of the mother of William McFarland, which occurred at Vevay, Ind., Monday evening.  Mrs. McFarland was, before her marriage, Miss Pauline Ashworth of this city, daughter of Mrs. Lottie Ashworth.  Mr. McFarland was employed on the dredge boat, C. B. Harris.

(Elijah J. Ashworth, 20, of Mound City, Ill., married on 20 Sep 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Lottie Guinn, 18, of Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PASSES AWAY AT QUINCY

Marguerite Browner, wife of ___ Browner, a former resident of Mound City, passed away several days ago at her home in Quincy, Illinois.  Surviving her are her husband, four sons and one daughter.

Funeral services were at  ____.

(John W. Myers married Agnes E. Reynolds on 12 Feb 1885, in Adams Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Marguerite Bliss Meyers Browner was born 19 Aug 1894, in Quincy, Ill., the daughter of John W. Meyers, a native of Triplett, Mo., and Agnes Reynolds, a native of Quincy, Ill., died 30 May 1936, in Quincy, Ill., the wife of William W. Browner, and was buried in Graceland Cemetery at Quincy.  Her marker there reads:  Marguerite nee Myers Browner 1895-1936 William W. Browner 1885-1942.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL OF REV. AUBREY

Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 11 o’clock at the home in Olmstead for Rev. Aubrey, who passed away at his home Thursday morning following a stroke of apoplexy.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted.

He is survived by his wife, one sister, Mrs. Emma Crutcher, of Kevil, Ky.; and three nieces.  G. A. James was the funeral director in charge.

(According to the death certificate, George Russell Aubrey, minister, was born 29 Mar 1856, in Illinois, the son of Russell Aubrey, died 28 May 1936, in Olmstead, Ill., the husband of Mary Aubrey, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TWO SONS KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT IN CALIFORNIA

Word has been received in Mound City that Mr. and Mrs. Walter Walker had lost two sons in an automobile accident.  The boys were 18 and 20 years.  The accident happened several days ago, but word has just been received in Mound City.

Mr. and Mrs. Walker resided near San Francisco, Calif., but before his marriage Mr. Walker resided in Mound City.  He was a brother of Mrs. Glen Willard a former resident of this city.  Mr. Walker and the Willards will be remembered by a number of people in Mound City.

 

PULASKI COUNTY MAN DIES AT ODD FELLOWS’ HOME

Frank Gatton, age 74 years, passed away Friday at the Odd Fellows’ Home in Mattoon, Illinois, where he had made his home the past four years.

He was born at Old Caledonia, near Olmsted, and had been a lifelong resident of Pulaski County until he entered the home at Mattoon.  His wife preceded him in death fifteen years ago.  He was a railroad man and resided in Mounds for a number of years, later making his home with his sister, the late Mrs. George Hayden of Valley Recluse.

Surviving him are one sister, Mrs. Ira Holden, of Murphysboro; several nieces and nephew.  Rev. Everette Hayden, pastor of the M. E. Church at Mound City, and Mrs. Thomas Moyers of Valley Recluse are a nephew and a niece of the deceased.  He also leaves two foster children.

He had been a member of the Odd Fellows since early manhood.  He was also a member of the Methodist Church at Mounds.

The body arrived in Mounds Saturday evening and was taken to the funeral home of G. A. James, and funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church, conducted by Rev. Glotfelty.  Services at the grave were conducted by the Odd Fellows.

Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with Undertaker G. A. James in charge of funeral arrangements.

(Ira Holden, 22, of Valley Recluse, Ill., farmer, born in Randolph Co., Ill., the son of Fred Holden and Maria Davis, married on 8 Dec 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Cora Gatton, 18, of Valley Recluse, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of William Gatton and Mary Powers.  William F. Gatton married Mary Powers on 26 Feb 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.   His death certificate states that Thomas F. Gatton, of the I. O. O. F. Home, was born 8 Mar 1862, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of William F. Gatton,  native of Kentucky, and Mary B. Gatton, a native of Illinois, died 30 May 1936, in Mattoon, Coles Co., Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Thomas F. Gatton 1862-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Jun 1936: 

Former Mounds Resident Dies at Odd Fellows Home

       Frank Gatton, 74, for many years a Mounds resident, died Friday, May 29, at the Odd Fellows Home in Mattoon, Ill., where he had resided for four years.

       Mr. Gatton was born March 8, 1862, at the Old Caledonia, near Olmstead.  He had always resided in Pulaski County until he entered the Odd Fellows Home, his parents were William and Mary Gatton.  His home in Mounds was what is now the Hase home on South Blanche Avenue.  His wife died some fifteen years ago.  He was for years an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad Company.  Following the death of his wife, he made his home with his sister, the late Mrs. George Hayden of Valley Recluse.  He had been an Odd Fellow since early manhood and was a member of the Mounds M. E. Church.

       Surviving are a sister, Mrs. Ira Holden of Murphysboro, several nieces and nephews, and two foster children, one of them, Frieda Gatton Smith.

       Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Mounds Methodist Church, the Rev. P. R. Glotfelty officiating.  Services at the grave were conducted by the Odd Fellows.  Burial was in Oak Grove Cemetery with G. A. James directing.

 

Grandmother of Mounds Woman Leaves 103 Descendants

       Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Stearns of Carbondale, who died June 1, at the age of 87 years, following her first serious illness, leaves 103 direct descendants—six children, 35 grandchildren, 61 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

       Mrs. Clarence Beedle of this city is one of her 35 grandchildren.

       (Her death certificate states that Mary Elizabeth Stearns, of Boskeydell, Jackson Co., Ill., was born 27 Apr 1849, in Alto Pass, Ill., the daughter of William Millikin and Isabelle Thompson, a native of Ohio, died 30 May 1936, in Makanda Township, Jackson Co., Ill., widow of David Stearns, and was buried in Stearns Cemetery near Makanda.  Her marker there reads:  Mary E. Stearns 1849-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Brother of Mrs. B. A. Braddy Dies in California

       Harrison Cunningham of San Francisco, Calif., brother of Mrs. B. A. Braddy of this city, died Sunday, May 31, in the Veterans Hospital, Los Angeles, following a protracted illness.

       Mr. Cunningham, who formerly resided at Jonesboro, Ill., was Superintendent of the Navy Y. M. C. A. at San Francisco, having been transferred there after serving five years in the Panama Canal Zone.  He leaves a wife and daughter in San Francisco, where interment was made.

 

L. K. McAlpin

       L. K. McAlpin, prominent banker of Metropolis, died suddenly Friday night, May 29, of a heart attack.

       Mrs. McAlpin is well known by Federated Club members and by members of the Daughters of the American Revolution in which organizations she is a devoted worker.

       (His death certificate states that Lyman K. McAlpin, bank cashier, of 204 East 4th St., Metropolis, Ill., was born 27 May 1867, in Allendale, Ill., the son of Angus McAlpin and Martha Cooper, natives of Mississippi, died 30 May 1936 in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill., husband of Anne Cook McAlpin, and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Metropolis, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PICNIC ENDS IN TRAGEDY

       Vienna—A picnic by the senior class of the Johnston City High school being held Tuesday at Dam 53 near Grand Chain ended in tragedy, when Billy Duncan, 18, drowned near the dam.  Young Duncan was valedictorian of his class.  Commencement was to have been held Saturday evening with the youth leading his class.

       Two truckloads of happy young people had gathered at the beautiful dam for a day of picnicking which is an annual custom.  In the afternoon a number of the boys secured a yawl and while out in the river, an oar was lost.  Duncan stood up in the boat and dived into the water for the car.  He came up once, seemed to struggle and struggle, screamed for help and disappeared again.  His classmates threw him the other oar, but he never came up the second time.

       All of the members of the class stood on the bank of the river and saw their classmate drown.  Many were hysterical, others with tear stained faces stared at the place where they last saw their friend alive.  Efforts were made for a number of hours to locate the body, but the search was of no avail.

       Young Duncan was clad only in swimming trunks and was said to have been a fair swimmer.  It is thought that a cross current dragged him to his death.—Times

 

INMATE POOR FARM KILLED BY CRUTCH BLOW OVER HEAD

       James M. Gibbs, 88, formerly a Herrin man, suffered blows Saturday morning at six a.m. at the Williamson County poor farm from which he passed away at the Herrin hospital at 4:30 p.m. of the same day.  He had been hit over the head and about the body with a crutch in the hands of Albert Drury, 67.  Both were inmates of the county farm.

       A coroner’s jury held Drury to await the action of the grand jury.  It is said he holds a criminal record, having shot a fellow earlier in life between the eyes and having served time for the misdeed.  This came to The Post from T. R. Pulley, caretaker of the farm.

       The two elderly people had quarreled over some spilt molasses.  It seems Gibbs had taken his plate to the bench outside and accidentally spilt some molasses and Drury came along and sat down in the sticky substance.

       Luie Millegas, 66, resident of the home, too, heard the noise of battle in the men’s section and was an eye witness to the blows.  She testified before the inquest. After the fight, Drury is said to have thrown his crutch under the porch, but it was found by the caretaker.  Drury was in the county jail today and will probably remain there until indicted and tried for the fatal attack.—Marion Post

       (His death certificate states that James E. Gibbs, retired farmer at the county poor farm in Road District 9-2, Williamson Co., Ill., was born 24 Aug 1847, in Illinois, the son of John Gibbs and Purscilli Ferges, died 30 May 1936, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Gibbs Cemetery in Blairsville, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Schuler and Mr. and Mrs. William L. Toler were among those from Mounds who attended the dedication of the marker to Lt. Col. David Strong at the site of Old Fort Wilkinson Saturday afternoon.

       (The 1934 application for a military headstone states that Lieut. Col. David Strong, 2nd Infantry, died 19 Aug 1801, and was buried at Fort Wilkinson Soldiers’ Cemetery near Grand Chain, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

       We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to our friends for their kindness following the death of our kinsman Frank Gatton.  Especially do we desire to thank the members of the Odd Fellows Lodge for their services, also Sylvester Clanton and E. G. Wildy.  All service rendered is sincerely appreciated.

       The Relatives

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Jun 1936: 

W. W. Eddleman

       W. Wilford Eddleman, age 58 years, of Perks, died of heart trouble Wednesday night, June 3, and was buried Saturday afternoon with funeral services at the Dongola Lutheran Church, conducted by Rev. Roy Shelton of Karnak.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola with the Wilson Funeral Service in charge.

 

Negro Berry Picker Dies Following Assault

       Tom Jones, age about 65 years, who was assaulted and severely injured in a cabin on the Frank Biggerstaff farm near Villa Ridge sometime between Thursday night and Friday morning of last week, died in St. Mary’s Hospital annex, Cairo, Friday afternoon without regaining consciousness.

       He had been beaten on the head by parties unknown and evidently had been robbed of a sum between $15 and $25 he was known to possess.

       Three young negroes from Hickman, Ky., had been rooming with Jones, but presumably had departed for Michigan the day before.

       Coroner C. E. Dille of Cairo held an inquest at which time the jury reached a verdict to the effect that Jones came to his death as the result of blows inflicted by a blunt instrument, and by a party or parties unknown.

 

Attorney William H. Warder Dies at Home in Marion

       Attorney William H. Warder, age 77, died suddenly at his home in Marion Monday afternoon at 5:20 o’clock.  He suffered an attack of acute indigestion at five o’clock and his heart gave way twenty minutes later.

       He is survived by three daughters, Miss Laura Belle Warder, Mrs. Fred Stotlar and Mrs. H. V. Ferrell, all of Marion; three grandchildren, Warder Stotlar, Evelyn and William Hosea Ferrell, also of Marion; one brother, Walter Warder of Cairo.

       A life-long Democrat, Mr. Warder held the attendance record at Democratic National conventions along with Ex. Governor Urey Woodson of Kentucky.  Mr. Warder had attended every Democratic convention for the last fifty-four years. He had been sent a special invitation to sit on the platform and have the freedom of the floor at the next convention in Philadelphia.

       (His death certificate states that William H. Warder, attorney at law, was born 21 Aug 1859, in Illinois, the son of Joseph Warder, a native of Kentucky, and Ann Kirkham, a native of Mississippi, died 8 Jun 1936, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., the widower of Mettie G. Warder, and was buried in south annex of Rose Hill Cemetery, Marion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOEB’S KILLER ACQUITTED

       James Day, slayer of Richard Loeb in Joliet prison was acquitted June 4, of the charge of murder and is now eligible for a parole from the prison where he was sent for larceny.

       Circuit Judge Edward L. Wilson commended the jury on their verdict.  When the jury went to the jury room, the first vote taken showed a vote of 11 to 1 for acquittal and in 53 minutes a ballot was cast for acquittal.

       (His death certificate states that Richard Loeb was born 11 Jun 1905, in Chicago, Ill., the son of Albert H. Loeb, died 28 Jan 1936, in Lockport, Will Co., Ill., and was buried in Oak Woods Cemetery in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill.  Loeb was murdered by his cell mate in Joliet Penitentiary, where he had been sentenced for the murder of Bobby Franks, a 14-year-old boy.  Day claimed Loeb had made sexual advances towards him.—Darrel Dexter)

 

YOUTH DROWNS IN ATTEMPT TO SAVE A GIRL

       Clyde Veach, 17, who graduated last week from Christopher High School, drowned Monday afternoon while attending a class picnic at the Isaak Walton League grounds, a short distance south of Christopher.

       It was stated that Miss Martha Alice Jones of Christopher went down in about twelve feet of water and Veach hearing her cries for help went to her assistance.  It is believed that Veach became exhausted in trying to save the girl’s life, and drowned.  Dean Turner, another member of the party, succeeding in rescuing Miss Jones.

       Veach’s body was recovered 22 minutes after it disappeared in the water and doctors worked three hours trying to restore life.

       Coroner D. J. Clayton conducted an inquest Tuesday morning and the jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning.

       Besides the parents, Clyde is survived by one brother, Herschel, and two sisters, Virginia and Aileen.

       Funeral services were held at the First Christian Church in Christopher Wednesday afternoon. Interment was made at Vienna.—Benton Standard

       (His death certificate states that Clyde A. Veach, Jr., was born 20 Oct 1917, in Christopher, Ill., the son of Cyde A. Veach, S., and Effie Vaughn, natives of Illinois, died 1 Jun 1936, in Tyrone Township, Franklin Co., Ill., and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER BUNCOMBE MAN TORTURED, DIES

       Suggestive of the manner of Michigan’s notorious “Black Legion” horrors, a gang of eight or more tavern loafers on West Frankfort’s Main Street subjected their victim to a beating so severe that death resulted in the Union Hospital there at 12:45 a.m. Sunday, May 31.  The crime was committed late in the evening of Friday, May 29.

       Walter Pearce, 28, the murder victim, was a son of C. A. Pearce of Buncombe, and a son-in-law of W. D. (Winker) Thomas of Camp Ground, Union County.  He moved to West Frankfort about three years ago, and at the time of the tragedy, was employed as a WPA workman.—Vienna Times

       (The 1918 World War I draft registration of Walter Pearce states he was born in Goreville, Ill.  His death certificate states that Walter Pearce, coal miner, was born 6 Mar 1897, in Buncombe, Ill., the son of Calvin Pearce and Lucy Cook, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 31 May 1936, in West Frankfort, Franklin Co., Ill., husband of Meta Pearce, and as buried in Denning Cemetery in Denning Township, Franklin Co., Ill.  His marker in the Odd Fellow’s Cemetery in West Frankfort, ranklin Co., Ill., reads:  Walter B. Pearce Mar. 6, 1893 May 31, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FATHER OF REV. T. C. URY DROWNED NEAR DONGOLA

       Walter H. Ury, 78, father of Rev. T. C. Ury, a former pastor of the Mounds Baptist Church, was drowned in a small creek near his home in Dongola community Friday morning, June 5, when he tried to cross the stream on a foot log and lost his balance.

       Mr. Ury leaves his wife, Sarah; four sons and two daughters, also three brothers.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Jun 1936:

COUNTY JUDGE, UNION COUNTY, DIED FRIDAY

County Judge E. S. Alden, of Anna, passed away suddenly last Friday night in the city hospital where he had gone for treatment of a carbuncle.  He was serving his third term as county judge and had served as mayor of Anna two terms.

(The death certificate states that Ernest S. Alden, Union County probate judge, was born 20 Mar 1866, in Jonesboro, Ill., the son of Oliver Alden, a native of Bracton, Mass., and Sarah C. Tripp, a native of Jonesboro, Ill., died 6 Jun 1936, in Anna, Ill., the husband of Virginia Kroh.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Judge Ernest S. Alden 1866-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MURDER CHARGE LODGED AGAINST ASSAILANTS

If and when the assailants of Tom Jones, aged negro, are apprehended, they will find a charge of murder to answer.  Officers of the county know who the two men are, but so far have been unable to find them.  It is known that they left the county immediately after the incident.

Jones was a berry picker on the Frank Biggerstaff farm east of Villa Ridge.  He was found Friday morning unconscious and taken to the hospital.  He had been badly beaten about the head.  The victim did not regain consciousness before he died.

The motive for the beating was thought to be robbery.  It is known he had from $15 to $25 and this was not on his person when he was found.

(His death certificate states that Tom Jones, farm hand, was born about 1876, died 5 Jun 1936, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Lincoln Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR W. W. EDDLEMAN HELD

Funeral services were held for Willie Wilford Eddleman, age 53 years, who died at his home in Perks Wednesday night of heart trouble, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Roy Shelton of Karnak conducted the funeral services at the Lutheran church at Dongola.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.

The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that Willie Wilferd Eddleman, farmer, was born 28 Sep 1878, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Jasper Eddleman and Josephine Douglas, natives of Union Co., Ill., died 3 Jun 1936, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mary Stella Eddleman.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Will W. Eddleman 1878-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FATHER OF FORMER MOUNDS PASTOR DROWNED

Walter H. Ury, father of Rev. T. C. Ury, formerly pastor of the Baptist Church at Mounds, drowned in a small creek near Dongola last Friday morning.  Mr. Ury was 78 years old and a prominent farmer of the Dongola vicinity.

The aged man has been partially paralyzed from a stroke suffered about six years ago but had managed to get about very well.  But while crossing a foot log over the creek, he evidently fell into the water and drowned.

(Walter H. Ury, 25, a merchant from Jonesboro, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Thomas Ury and Leah Cruse, married on 25 Feb 1883, in Union Co., Ill., Lena Schneider, 20, born in Jonesboro, Ill., daughter of Charles Schneider and Theresia Kohler.  His death record stated that Walter Henry Ury, farmer, was born 10 Sep 1857, in Jonesboro, Ill., the son of Thomas Ury and Leah Ury, a native of Illinois, died 5 Jun 1936, in Union Co., Ill., the husband of Sarah A. Ury, and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  W. H. Ury Sept. 10, 1856 June 5, 1936 Sarah “Annie” Ury May 23, 1877 Oct. 10, 1961.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Will Eddleman passed away Thursday night at 9 o’clock.  He died suddenly.  He leaves two daughters and one son and several brothers and sisters.  The funeral was conducted by Mr. Wilson of Karnak and burial was made in the Dongola cemetery beside his parents.  (Perks)

 

Several attended the funeral of Fred Ramage, Sr., which was held at the Mt. Zion Church.  Mr. Wilson of Karnak officiated.  (Perks)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hase attended Walter Ury’s funeral Sunday.  (Beech Grove)

 

Mrs. Hugh Williams has received word from her sister, Mrs. Belle Richey, of St. Louis that her husband, A. Richey, is in a serious condition in a hospital.  He has tumor on the brain and there is little chance for his recovery.  She also received a message that her daughter, Mrs. Hazel McCormick, is very ill in St. Louis.

 

Mrs. Joe Price and daughter, Miss Helen, spent Friday in Vienna, where they attended the funeral of Joe Burris.

 

NEPHEW OF MOUND CITY WOMAN DIED LAST WEEK

Joe Burris, 32, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Burris, deceased, died at a St. Louis hospital June 1st and the remains were brought to Vienna Tuesday evening.  Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Vienna Friday afternoon at 2:00.

Mr. Burris is a former resident of Johnson County.  He made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Ed I. Veach following the death of his parents.  He received his education in the Oliver School near the Veach home attended the Vienna Township High school.  After leaving school he went to St. Louis and held a responsible position in a garage until failing health caused his resignation. His health had been failing for several months.  Joe has a great number of relatives and friends to mourn his untimely passing.

He is survived by his widow, Frances Emmer Burris; one brother, Hubert of Vienna; and three sisters, Lena Dowe, Chicago, Mabel Dexter, Peoria, and Helen Burris of Buncombe.  He also leaves three aunts, Mrs. Ed Veach, Mrs. Lib Cates of Vienna and Mrs. Mabel Price of Mounds City.—Vienna Times

(His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads:  Joe T. Burris 1904-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Jun 1936:

DIES AT HOME NEAR KARNAK

Adrian Spraggs, age 69 years, passed away at 6 o’clock Friday morning at his home near Karnak following a brief illness.

Surviving him are his widow, three children, Van, Alonzo, and Mrs. Hazel Mitchell; two brothers, Robert and G. W.; two sisters, Gertie and Isa, all of Karnak.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the family residence, Rev. Ford of Karnak officiating.  Interment was made in West Eden Cemetery.  Wilson Funeral Service directed the funeral.

(According to his death certificate, Adrian Spraggs, farmer, was born in 1867 in Marshall Co., Ky., the son of John Spraggs, died 12 Jun 1936, in Cache Precinct, Johnson Co., Ill., the husband of Mollie Spraggs.—Darrel Dexter)

 

INQUEST FOR WILLIAM BIRNEY OF OLMSTEAD

An inquest into the death of William Birney of Olmstead, who died Thursday morning at St. Mary’s hospital annex, returned the verdict of unavoidable accident.  Birney was injured when falling gravel in a pit near Olmstead injured his leg so seriously that it had to be amputated.

He was a WPA worker and was digging gravel from a pit when injured.  He is survived by a wife and two children.

 

REV. WALTER SPOONER DIES IN NEW JERSEY

Word has been received in Mound City of the death of Rev. Walter Spooner, former associate superintendent of the Illinois conference.  Rev. Spooner passed away at Mountainside Hospital in New Jersey.  He had many friends among the members of the Pilgrim Congregational Church, he having visited this church while working in Illinois.  He held some very splendid meetings in Mound City.

Funeral services were held in the Glen Ridge Congregational Church with Rev. William W. Patton officiating.  Interment was made at Elizabethtown, New Jersey.

 

DEATH CAME WITHOUT WARNING TO TRAMMELL

____ warning unless a ___ two weeks ago might ____ one, death stole upon George Trammell last Monday ____ about 10:30 as he sat ____ at his home.  Mrs. Sam _____, with her husband, ____ ___ died in the Trammell ____ him slumped over as _____ and summoned a ____.  The physician proclaimed ___ dead upon arrival and ___ that death came instantly.  Heart trouble was _____.

Trammell had spent a large ___ morning attending to business.  He had made a trip to the courthouse, to the ____ Cooperage Co. mill of ____ president , to the First ____ where he chatted with associates and then home.  ___ few minutes after he ____ that death overtook him.

____ed was born at Stonefort ____ at death had reached ____. His wife, to whom he ____ preceded him in death ____ on July 3, 1933.  It ____ there are no immediate relatives of the deceased.

Eight years ago Mr. Trammell accepted the position of ___ cashier of the First State Bank _____ to that time he had _____.  There are a number ____ this vicinity who were ____ of Mr. Trammell.  After ____ two years as assistant cashier he was promoted to cashier.  ___with the death of Charles ___ held the job of cashier ___ six years, resigning the ____ month.

____ of 1916, Mr. Trammell ____ Glenn organized the ____ Trammel Company for the _____ of staves.  They ____ until a fire consumed the ____ years ago.  Following ___ company known as the _____ Cooperage Co., of ____ Trammell was made ____ was organized and ____ Bartlett interests.  Mr. ____ had been to the mill ____ coming shortly before his _____.

The deceased was a member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge.  He ____ always identified with ____ and had served as city ____ a time or two.  He was a member of the Mound City ___ and Loan for years.  In ___ was identified with the Congregational Church, having ____ trustee.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church with ___ ___rth Lyon, pastor officiating.  Interment was made in the _____ City Cemetery by the ____ wife.  George E. Tharp, ______ W. W. Waite, C. L. _____, George Martin, and A. J. ____ were pallbearers.  G. A. James directed the funeral.  Out ____ to the departed, the business houses of Mound City ____ing during the funeral.

(His death certificate states that George C. Trammell, bank cashier, was born 24 Jun 1874, in Illinois, died 15 Jun 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the widower of Clara B. Trammell, and was buried in Vienna, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William Eddleman, a twin brother, is very ill at his home.  No hope is entertained for his recovery.  (Perks)

 

Sam Roberson, who has employment at Meridian, Miss., has arrived in Mound City to attend the funeral of George Trammell.  He was accompanied back to Meridian by his wife and son, Jimmie.  They left for their new home Wednesday afternoon.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Jun 1936: 

George Trammell Dies Suddenly in Mound City

       George Trammell, 62, prominent banker and businessman of Mound City for 28 years, died suddenly about 10:30 o’clock Monday morning, June 15, while sitting in a chair in the living room of his home.  He had been ill, but had seemingly rallied and was able to give some attention to business, having been at the bank and in other business houses that morning.

       Only a few weeks ago Mr. Trammell had resigned as cashier of the First State Bank, planning to give his entire time to the Mound City Cooperage Company of which he was president and co-owner with W. W. Waite and John Glenn of Mound City and Hugo Chambliss of Mounds.  Previously he had been a partner in the old Glenn and Trammell stave mill.  He had served the bank as cashier for more than 28 years and the long and close confinement to his work had taken its toll.

       Mr. Trammell was born at Lick Creek, Union County, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Milo Trammell.  His mother’s maiden name was Whitnell.  He taught school a number of years in Union and Pulaski counties, teaching here in Mounds before entering the Mound City Bank.  After becoming a resident of that place he married Miss Clara Beauman of Tunnel Hill, who preceded him in death July 3, 1933.  He leaves no relatives nearer than cousins.

       Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Pilgrim Congregational Church, which organization he had served as a trustee.  The Rev. Ellsworth Lyon, pastor, officiated, and the choir, of which Mrs. Trammell was long a valued member, rendering the music.

       Interment was made in the Vienna Cemetery by the side of his wife, G. A. James directing.

 

Father of Rupert Wilson Found Dead in Auto

       Thomas W. Watson, age 64, of Cairo, died Saturday evening at the wheel of his car while driving between Jonesboro and Ware on a return trip from Carbondale.  He was the father of Rupert Watson of this city.

       Mr. Watson’s car was headed east and was only a short distance from Jonesboro when two young men, pedestrians on the highway, saw the car swerve in the road and then come to a stop.  They went to the car and, finding the driver unconscious, they drove him to Jonesboro to a doctor who pronounced him dead.

       Surviving are his wife and three children; Rupert of Mounds, Mrs. Frank Miller of Atlanta, Ga., and Thomas J. Watson of Cairo.

       A native of Evanston, Ill., he has been in business in Cairo since 1912.  In parternship with Ray L. Hosmer he operated a brokerage business for several years then entered the sugar storage business under the name of the Cairo Warehouse and Forwarding Co., in which he was active at the time of his death.  He was a Mason and a Knights Templar and had twice been exalted ruler of the Cairo. B. P. O. E.

       Funeral services were held at Karcher Brothers Funeral Home in Cairo Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock Rev. Father Kloss of the Episcopal Church officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

 

A True Story Ends in Local Setting

       Long years ago, when Tom was only 24 years of age, he left his home in Toledo, Ohio, left his father and mother, a brother and sister and wandered afar to make his fortune in Australia.  Amid the new and distracting events of the Old Hemisphere, separated by so many miles from the scenes of his childhood, he entered into the wandering life of the show business and cut entirely loose from all things past.  In the year 1936 he began to think again of the old home and to wonder what had become of his own kin whom he had not seen for forty years.  Storing the paraphernalia of his show, he headed toward the land of his birth, in search of his brother, Perry.  His only lead was that Perry was a machinist and might be found around machine shops, if still living.  Perry understood that Tom had died years ago in some eastern country.  Finally, rather by chance, Tom came into Cairo and by still greater chance, found his brother, Perry O’Keefe, in the machine stop of McCarty & Malinsky.  Here he learned that his father and mother had passed on 20 years ago.  After visiting his sister and again spending some time with Perry, he plans to return to Australia about September.  Perry owns property here, on South Elm Street where he has lived a large part of his time for a number of years.

 

AN ILL-FATED FAMILY

       Buckner—Mrs. Komella Kowlaki, wife of John Kowlaki, burned to death and an early hour Saturday morning when their home in Buckner, was destroyed by fire.

       According to the husband, they had retired at an early hour, when around 12 o’clock, Mr. Kowlaki awakened to find the house in flames.  She aroused him and would not leave the house until she endeavored to save part of their belongings.

       Kowlaki stated he failed to get her to leave so he ran out the back door.  By that time neighbors had arrived at the scene and through a window of the burning building saw the flames wrap around her and then she fell back into the fire.  When the fire had died down, about an hour later, her charred body was removed from the ruins.

       Only the husband survives, one son being killed 13 years ago when run over by a train and the other son being killed three years ago when struck by an automobile.—Zeigler News

 

Coroner’s Jury Decides Accident Unavoidable.

       A verdict of unavoidable accident was returned by the jury at the inquest held by Deputy Coroner Wallace Gore late Thursday into the death of William Birney, negro of Olmstead, who died Thursday morning at St. Mary’s Hospital annex, Cairo, from injuries received when falling gravel at a pit near Olmstead crushed one of his legs so badly that it had to be amputated.

        Birney was a WPA worker and was digging gravel on a WPA project when injured.  He is survived by a wife and two children.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Jun 1936: 

Betty June Miller

       Betty June, the seven months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of Villa Ridge, passed away at the family home Thursday, June 19, at about eight o’clock p.m. following a three weeks’ illness.  Surviving are her parents, a small brother, Bobby Joe; her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Miller of Ullin and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Essex of Villa Ridge.

       Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at Mt. Pisgah Church near Wetaug with Rev. W. J. Ward conducting.  Burial was in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

 

Colored Man Drops Dead

       Burton Clark, long a substantial colored resident of Mounds dropped dead Wednesday morning about ten o’clock.  He had spent the greater part of his life farming.  Recently he has lived in South Mounds.  He leaves a number of relatives including his wife, two daughters and a son.

 

Sister Dies in West

       Mrs. O. F. Lisher of Grand Chain has received word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Marion Gordon at Fresno, Calif., which occurred June ninth.  Mrs. Gordon, before her marriage, was Miss Marion Bondurant of Grand Chain.  She leaves three daughters and one son, her husband, Jackson Gordon, having died more than a year ago.

 

George Watson Dies at Home in Granite City

       George Watson, a former resident of Pulaski County, died Thursday, June 20, at his home in Granite City.

       Mr. Watson is survived by his wife, Bertha Buckle Watson; a brother, Ralph Watson of Villa Ridge; and a sister, Mrs. Thomas Aldrich, Sr., also of Villa Ridge.

       Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at Villa Ridge, the Rev. Ellsworth Lyon officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

       (The death certificate of George T. Watson, carpenter, states he was born 5 Oct 1865, in Mound City, Ill., died 18 Jun 1936, in Granite City, Madison Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill.  His marker there reads:  George T. Watson 1865-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SON KILLS FATHER

       Golconda—Acting in defense of himself and other members of the family, including his mother, whom his father had threatened to kill at the same time flourishing a pistol, 16-year-old Thomas Hogg shot his father, George Hogg, Monday morning.  The family lived 16 miles north of Golconda on Route 34 over the line in Hardin County.  The son used a shotgun, shooting his father five times, from which death resulted.  During the few hours intervening between the shooting and his death, the father requested that no charge of murder be preferred against his son—that he himself was to blame for the tragedy.

       Thomas is the second eldest in a family of six children.  Notwithstanding the father’s request, we understand the boy will be prosecuted.—Herald Enterprise

       (He signed his World War I draft registration as George Hogg, Jr., and stated he was orn 9 Dec 1895, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, George Hogg, coal miner and farmer, was born 9 Dec 1896, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of James Hogg and Susanna Steward, natives of Illinois, died 15 Jun 1936, in Hicks, Hardin Co., Ill., husband of Ruth Hogg, and was buried in Pope Co., Ill.  His marker in Hogg Cemetery in Pope Co., Ill., reads:  Geo. Hogg 1896-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

11-YEAR-OLD GIRL DIES OF HYDROPHOBIA

       Marjorie Ann Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Taylor, living north of Vienna in Bloomfield Township, died last night at 11 o’clock in a Harrisburg hospital from hydrophobia.

       Within a short time after reaching the hospital, so violent did Marjorie become that it was necessary to strap her to the bed and many doctors from the city were called in an effort to relieve her suffering, but medical aid was of no avail and she passed away.  Death from hydrophobia is one of the most horrible of deaths.

       Marjorie Ann was conscious until a few hours before her death.  She was questioned as to whether or not she had been bitten by a dog.  She said that she hadn’t, but told of playing with a cat, which had a number of kittens at the barn about six weeks ago, when the mother cat scratched her and ran away.  It is thought by the parents of the girl that this is the way she contracted rabies.

       (Her death certificate states that Margorie Ann Taylor was born 23 Aug 1925, in Bloomfield Ill., the daughter of Thomas Taylor and Della Harper, natives of Bloomfield, Ill., died 17 Jun 1936, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Taylor Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Marjorie Taylor 1925-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MAN DROWNS TO SAVE TWO

       Golconda—The drowning Friday night of Charles Whitlatch and the narrow—almost miraculous—escape of Mrs. Whitlatch and Henry Keetin, whom the couple employed to ferry them across the Ohio River, aroused the sympathy of our people to an unusual degree.

       The couple had driven here from Indianapolis, arriving about 9 o’clock Friday evening.  They were on their way to the home of Mr. Whitlatch’s cousin, Lynn Greer, living opposite this city.  Our ferry doesn’t run after dark and for that reason, Henry Keeton, engineer at the light and power plant, consented to take them across.  Using this small motor boat, the three set out for Kentucky, Mrs. Whitlatch protesting for fear of accident in the darkness, but Mr. Whitlatch insisted.  The craft had not gone far when it was discovered to be leaking fast and becoming alarmed, the occupants called for help.  Parties on the levee, heard the cries and noticed the sudden stopping of the motor.  Realizing that somebody was in distress, William Robinson and Troy Hassaker, the latter of Marion, Ill., responded.  About that time Gerold Kuebler, accompanied in his launch by Barnes Reinhardt and Fred Rottmann, who had been fishing on the dam wall, came ashore, and they immediately put out again, reaching Mrs. Whitlatch and Mr. Keeton, as they were ready to sink.  Mr. Whitlatch was said to be a good swimmer, and he insisted that he could make his way to land, and urged the rescuers to go for the others.  That was the last seen of him until his body rose Sunday afternoon.

       Mr. Whitlatch, who was 33 years of age, we are told by one who was intimately acquainted with the facts, was a man of brilliant intellect, having traveled extensively over this and foreign countries.  He married his companion, who accompanied him, in New York City, where her mother, and her two children live.  Mr. Whitlatch’s aged mother, now in feeble health, lives in Vancouver, B. C.

       (His death certificate states that Charles Raymond Whitlatch, advertisement salesman, of Forest Hills, Long Island, N.Y., was born 18 Apr 1904, in Olney, Okla., the son of Guy Whitlatch and Olive Weatehrford, a native of Weatherford, Texas, died 12 Jun 1936, in Golconda, Pope Co., Ill., husband of Pearl N. Whitlatch, and was buried in Indianapolis, Ind.  His marker in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis reads:  Charles R. Whitlatch 1906-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ONE KILLED IN AUTO-TRAIN WRECK

       Goreville—Melba Kelly, fourteen, was killed instantly, her father, Cheltsey Kelly, 39, lost his left foot, and another daughter, Irene, 12, was slightly injured when the Chevrolet sedan driven by Mr. Kelly was struck by a C. & E. I. northbound passenger train one and one-half miles north of Goreville around 7:30 o’clock Thursday a.m.

       The accident happened at what is known as the Thornton Crossing, on the dirt road, about one-fourth mile east of the state slab, turning off at a barbecue stand this side of Goreville.  A young Holderfield girl was killed at the same crossing a few years ago while driving a buggy over the track.

       As a matter of fate, Tom Kelly, for years and years an engineer on the C. & E. I. and an uncle of Chelsey, was the engineer on the death train.  According to reports of the train crew, the auto had almost cleared the track, being hit about the middle of the auto.—Marion Post

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Jun 1936:

CHILD PASSES AWAY AT HOME OF PARENTS

Betty June Miller, age 7 months, passed away at the home of her parents near Villa Ridge Thursday at about 8 o’clock following an illness of about three weeks.

Surviving are her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller, and a ____, and both maternal and paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. ___ry Essex of Villa Ridge and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Miller of ____.

Funeral services were held at Mt. Pisgah Church near Wetaug Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. W. ____ officiating.  Interment was in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  E. ___ directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that Betty June Miller was born 20 Oct 1935, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Frank Miller and Elzada Essex, natives of Illinois, died 18 Jun 1936, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Betty June Miller 1935-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BRINGING NEGRO BACK TO FACE MURDER CHARGE

George McWherter, a negro, is to be extradited from the state of Tennessee and returned here to face murder charges in connection with the killing of Toms Jones on the Biggerstaff farm west of Villa Ridge.  McWherter was picked up near Greenfield, Tenn., by authorities.

Jones, about 60 years old, colored, was brutally beaten and robbed about June 4 and died later in the hospital at Cairo.  He was found in the morning in the shack near the Biggerstaff home when Mr. Biggerstaff went to hunt him after calling.  Jones was beaten about the head and his forehead was crushed in.  He was never conscious and had probably been struck while asleep and robbed of $15.

Jim Wilson, deputy, took over the case.  He went into the “jungles” near Villa Ridge station and there learned that Joe Nathan Kidd and George McWherter might have done the job.  Kidd knew Jones and knew he had a little money.  They were gone.

Letters were sent out of officers in counties where these men lived and McWherter has been picked up and will be returned here to answer trial for murder.

 

FORMER VILLA RIDGE RESIDENT DIES IN ALTON

James A. Smith, age 71 years, formerly of near Villa Ridge, passed away at his home in Alton, Ill., Friday, June 19.

Surviving him are his wife, one son, William, of Alton; one sister, Mrs. R. M. Jerrell of Mounds; two brothers, D. H. of Memphis and F. F. Smith of Hastings, Okla.

The body was brought to Mounds Sunday morning to the home of his sister, Mrs. Jerrell where it remained until Sunday afternoon.  The funeral cortege left the Jerrell residence and proceeded to Kentucky where the funeral was held at the Oscar Baptist Church near Barlow, Ky., at 2:30 o’clock.

(According to his death certificate, James A. Smith, farmer, was born 8 Dec 1864, in Hickman, Ky., the son of John Smith, a native of Kentucky, and Elizabeth Cargill, a native of Graves Co., Ky., died 19 Jun 1936, in Alton, Madison Co., Ill., the husband of Kate Smith, and was buried in Oscar, Ballard Co., Ky.  He was buried in Oscar Community Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ROW AT TAVERN IN CAIRO BRINGS DEATH TO MAN

A row at the Glad Hand Tavern in Cairo brought death to James T. Munsell, on June 16, just 10 days after he had been knocked down outside the tavern.

Munsell seems to have raised a row in the tavern because his wife, from whom he was separated, was dancing and started a fight.  He was ejected, and while outside was struck and fell to the sidewalk.  His skull was fractured and he died 10 days later.  The police were not called and those at the tavern did not aid him.  The coroner’s jury recommended that Jack Bryson, tavern employee, be held.

(His death certificate states that James T. Munsell, laborer, of 1802 Commercial, Cairo, Ill., was born 29 May 1911, in Carlisle, Ky., the son of M. Munsell, a native of Carlisle Co., Ky., and Vera Lee, a native of Kentucky, died 16 Jun 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Elsie Munsell, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  James T. Munsell May 29, 1911 June 16, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MARION GORDON DIES

Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Marion Gordon, of Fresno, Calif.  She leaves a devoted family of three daughters, one son and four grandchildren.  Also a sister, Annie Lischer, of Grand Chain, and a brother, Arthur Lyle of West Frankfort.  Her husband, Jack Gordon, passed away more than a year ago.  Mrs. Gordon was the daughter of the late Sarah Short who passed away six years ago.

(The California Death Index lists Jennie B. Gordon, who was born about 1863, died 20 Jul 1936, in Fresno, Calif., and was buried in West Selma Cemetery in Fresno.  Her husband, however, was listed as Stephen Young Gordon.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOUNDS COLORED MAN DIED

Burton Clark, an old and highly respected colored man of Mounds, dropped death Wednesday morning.  No details were learned.

(His death certificate states that Burton Clark, farmer, was born 2 Feb 1866, in Hickman, Ky., the son of Nelson Clark and America Clark, natives of Tennessee, died 24 Jun 1936, in Mounds Ill., husband of Fannie Clark, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of the baby girl of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Jul 1936:

Gasoline Burns Fatal to Stanley Campbell

Stanley R. Campbell, 42 years of age, was fatally burned by gasoline ____ Saturday morning while ___ filling a gasoline can on ____ ___vator.  Lowell Windings, ___ holding a lantern to see ___ gasoline was being poured ___d down by the explosion but was not hurt.  Campbell had ___ thrown on him and burned ___ as he fled away in the ___ rolled and fought the ____ died early Monday ___ at St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo.

____ was working for Bar___ McCoy Construction Co. ___ doing road work west of ___.  He was filling up a gasoline ___ and lantern was held ___.  There was a sudden explosion and the lantern ignited the ___ flames inside the chimney, ___ and the whole thing exploded.

___ was knocked down and ____ moment.  When he re____ Campbell was crying out ___ __ing, the flames burning ___ and burning him.  Windings ___ to him and told him to ____ ground and tried to beat ___ the flames.  The rolling on the ____ extinguished the fire, but ____ was so badly burned that ____ a matter of time until death came to end his suffering.

A coroner’s jury of Alexander County tried to find out why the ____ company did not provide lights for those who ahd ____ gasoline and testimony ____ forward that such had ____ rule.  Windings, however, ___ had never been warned ___ using a lantern and that ____ were used about the work ____.

___ lived near Mounds.  He is survived by his wife and six children, all of them very small.  The funeral was conducted at the M. E. church Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Glotfelty and interment was made in Anna Cemetery.  Casket bearers were Henry Gunn, Barney ____, Mr. Ewing, James Gamble, ____ton, and Raymond San____.  G. A. James had charge.

             (The death certificate states that Stanley Ray Campbell, laborer, of Mounds, Ill., was born 27 Sep 1894, in Delta, Ill., the son of Samuel M. Campbell, a native of Olney, Ill., and Martha Dick, a native of Delta, Ill., died 29 Jun 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Edith Campbell, and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Stanley R. Campbell 1894-1936 Father Edith M. Campbell 1896-1985 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AGED MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIED FRIDAY MORNING

One of Mound City’s oldest residents, Mrs. Lula Durning, age 78, died suddenly at her home last Friday morning.  She had been a resident of Mound City for 60 years and her death came as a shock to her many friends and will be felt by them.

Mrs. Durning is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Grace B. Quarrels, of Chicago, and four grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at her home on North Main Street with Rev. Everett Hayden, pastor of the M. E. Church, officiating.  Interment was made in the Beech Grove Cemetery.

Mark Capoot, W. M. Jones, Loren Stophlet, Willie Dooms, G. M. Quarrels, and Sam House, served as casket bearers.

G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.

(James M. Durning married Lula Michem on 27 Dec 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Lula Durning was born 18 Mar 1858, in Mt. Vernon, Ill., the daughter of Mr. Meacham, a native of Illinois, died 26 Jun 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of James Durning, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Lula Durning 1858-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TAVERN FIGHT BRINGS IN TRANSIENT FOR ASSAULT

Lottie Koen, white woman, and brought to Pulaski County the expense and trouble of the trial of Thad Sloat, 250-pound member of the transient camp, on the charge of assault with intent to kill.  The row was last week.

The fight was in the tavern operated by Ralph Sichling.  Sloat used a knife and slashed another transient camp member, Walter Polski, so severely that about 30 stitches were taken in his neck to stop bleeding.

Sloat was bound over to the grand jury Monday after a hearing before Judge Read of this city.  His bond was set at $1,000.

 

MRS. W. T. PARKER PASSES AWAY SUDDENLY SUNDAY

Mrs. Christinia B. Parker, age 65 years, wife of W. T. Parker, died Sunday afternoon at 12:30, her death being sudden and unexpected although she had been in failing health for some time.  She became ill while placing dinner on the table and lived scarcely an hour.

Mrs. Parker, better known as “Tinnie,” was born and raised in Mound City and has a wide circle of friends who will mourn her death.  She is held in the highest regard by all who knew her.  Surviving relatives are her husband, W. T. Parker; one daughter, Mrs. William A. Schneider of Lakewood, Ohio; one granddaughter, Merita Schneider; a stepson, S. A. Parker of Centralia; one sister, Mrs. Emma Tagmanie of New Jersey.

She was a member of the First M. E. Church, and up to the past few years had been an active worker and teacher of Class Nine.  She was also a member of Rebekah Lodge No. 322.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 in the First M. E. Church with Rev. Everette Hayden officiating.  Interment was made in the Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

Pallbearers were J. B. Blankinship, George Eichhorn, W. E. Shearer, J. R. Read, C. E. Richey, and Tom Steers.

             (The death certificate states that Tinnie B. Parker was born 24 Nov 1870, in Mound City, Ill., died 28 Jun 1936, in Mound City, Ill., wife of William T. Parker, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Tinnie B. Parker 1871-1936 W. Tweed Parker 1857-1938.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GENE HUGHES’ MOTHER DIES

Monday morning Gene Hughes received a telegram stating his mother was very ill at her home in Somerset, Ky.  Mr. Hughes left to go to her bedside soon after the news came.  She died Tuesday at one o’clock after a week’s illness.

 

BURIED AT GRAND CHAIN

Mrs. Leo Reichert, who passed away at the home of her sister at Freeburg, Ill., was brought back to Grand Chain Tuesday night.

Surviving her is a daughter, Mrs. Viola Turner, of Grand Chain; and a son, Russell, of Anna.

The Wilson Funeral Service of Karnak had charge of funeral arrangements.  Interment was made at the Grand Chain cemetery.

(The death certificate states that Elizabeth Reichert was born 31 Jul 1866, in Freeburg, Ill., the daughter of John Vogel, a native of Germany, and Marie Gansz, a native of Shiloh Valley, Ill., died 2 Jul 1936, in Freeburg, Ill., the widow of Leopold Reichert, and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Elizabeth Reichert 1866-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

RESPECTED BUSINESS MAN PASSES AWAY

Alfred Schuler, age 69 years, passed away at this home Friday, June 25.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at St. Mary’s Church in Mound City.  Services were conducted by Father Lawrence Gilmartin, assisted by Father Walter Mulroney, nephew of the deceased.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.

Mr. Schuler had been in failing health for the past year and had been confined to his bed since last April.

For the past 23 years he had been in the shoe business in Mound City, retiring last October because of ill health.  He was postmaster in Mound City for 12 years, a member of the city council for many years, and was elected a member of the board of education for several terms.  In all his public service and business dealings he won the respect and confidence of those with whom he had contact.

Mr. Schuler was married in 1891 to Miss Rose Anna Curren, sister of the late Hon. Charles Curren.  He was a man of deep religious convictions and a devout member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

He leaves his wife, two sons, Ralph Schuler of Chicago, and Leslie Schuler of Mound City; four daughters, Mrs. Mike Duggan of Mound City, Mrs. Alba Kobler of Cairo, Mrs. Tipton Keller of Sikeston, Mo., and Miss Lois Schuler of Mound City; four grandchildren, Rose Eleanor Dugan, Sara Sue Keller, Barbara Ann Kobler and Ralph Alfred Schuler, Jr.; one brother, George Schuler of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Nettie B. Perks and Mrs. Jennie Murphy of Mound City, and Miss Kate Schuler of Mounds; and many other relatives and a host of friends.

Nephews of the deceased acted as pallbearers:  Edward Schuler, Robert Murphy, Jack Murphy, Barney Burns, Albert Voekenkamp, Lawrence Mulroney, John Lloyd Curren, and Harold Curren.  Honorary pallbearers were I. J. Hudson, Harry Settlemoir, E. P. Easterday, Jim Rushing, Imon Bankson, Dave Harris, William Bestgen, F. J. Kuny, M. F. Browner, Harry Perks, Will Kennedy, Otto Betts, Ben Blankinship, Robert Hurst, J. M. Tucker, W. T. Garrett, Joe Lutz, Carl S. Miller, A. J. Ridings, Henry Nordman, Ed Dyas, and Oscar Atherton.

Berbling Funeral Service directed the funeral.

(George Schuler married Julia Kennedy on 24 May 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Alfred Schuler married Rose Curren on 17 Jun 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Alfred Schuler, merchant, of 137 Pearl St., Mound City, Ill., was born 26 Feb 1867, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of George Schuler, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Julia Kennedy, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 26 Jun 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Rose Anna Schuler, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  His marker there reads:  Alfred Schuler Feb. 26, 1867 June 26 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Walter Mulroney of Bi____, who was called here because of the death of his uncle, Al Schuler returned to his home Tuesday.

 

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for the many kindnesses shown us during illness and death of our death mother and grandmother.  Especially are we grateful to Rev. Hayden, the Methodist choir, those who furnished cars, all who sent flowers or assisted in any way.  Also Mr. James Funeral Service for his efficient services.

Grace Quarles, Daughter and Grandchildren.

             (Grace Quarles was a daughter of Lula Durning.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. MARY LINGLE DIES

Mrs. Mary Lingle died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Chris Egner, in Ullin.  Services were held at Cache Chapel at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon, with Rev. Frank Corzine of Centralia officiating.  Interment was made in the Cache Chapel Cemetery.  Mrs. Lingle was a devout member of the Methodist Church and her death will be felt by the community.

Surviving Mrs. Lingle are her husband, Adam Lingle; and two children, Mrs. Hattie Egner, and Mrs. Myrtle Kerr of Ullin.

Wilson Funeral Services conducted the funeral.

(Her marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin, Ill., reads:  Mary Lingle Mar. 22, 1863 June 28, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Jul 1936: 

Dies from Burns Caused by Explosion

       Stanley R. Campbell, 41, of Mounds, died at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo Monday morning about one o’clock from burns caused by an explosion of gasoline which occurred about two miles west of Mounds, where construction of a road is under way.  He was burned early Saturday morning and rushed to the hospital where every effort was made to save his life.

       He is survived by his wife and six children, Vuille, Arline, Myra, Leta, Velta, and Carlton; his mother and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Campbell; five brothers, John of Delta, E. E. and O. E. of Arlington, Ky., J. C. of Mounds and S. J. of Olive Branch; two sisters, Mrs. June Walker of Murphysboro and Mrs. Grace Gannon of Mounds.

       Funeral services were conducted at the First M. E. Church at Mounds Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. P. Glotfelty after which interment was made in the Anna Cemetery.

       The casket bearers were Henry Gunn, Barney Stalcup, Mr. Ewing, James Gamble, C. F. Melton and Raymond Saunders.

 

Mrs. Maude Casey Marland Dies in West Virginia

       Mrs. Maud Casey Marland of Glen Rogers, W. Va., daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Frank Casey of Johnston City and granddaughter of Dr. Casey, a pioneer resident of Mound City, died Thursday, June 18, at a Glen Rogers Hospital.  Her mother, Mrs. Grace Casey, sister of the late Mrs. William Brelsford of this city, died only a short time ago in Johnston City and Mrs. Marland had spent several months with her during her last illness.

       Mrs. Marland is survived by her husband and four children, William, Robert, Grace and Sarah.  She was buried at Glen Rogers.

 

KILLED BY LIGHTNING

       Dan Hart, 50, father of eight children, was killed instantly Monday morning about 9:30 o’clock by a bolt of lightning.  Hart was a WPA worker and lived near Mermet, Ill.  He, with three other workers, had sought shelter in a barn on the Anderson farm near Gabbtown during the electrical storm.

       According to Hart’s co-workers, he was sitting on the floor of the barn leaning against a post when the fatal bolt of lightning struck the barn.  He died without uttering a sound.  Besides being burned by the lightning, his neck was broken.  Two other workers, who were standing near him, were knocked to the ground, but quickly recovered from the shock.

       The lightning struck the roof of the barn and followed rafters to the post against which Hart was leaning.  The timbers of the barn were shattered in a number of places.—Vienna Times

       (His death certificate states that Daniel Hart, W. P. A. laborer, was born 28 Dec 1885, in Illinois, the son of Daniel Hart, died 22 Jun 1936, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Sadie Hart, and was buried in Berea Cemetery in Vienna, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FOUND DEAD IN AUTO

       Zeigler—At an inquiry held at 8:30 Tuesday evening at the Thompson Funeral Home in Zeigler by Deputy Coroner Bryfield of Sesser, the death of Mrs. Mattie Prudent was found to have been caused from a heart attack followed by suffocation from carbon monoxide fumes.

       Mrs. Prudent, one of Zeigler’s most highly esteemed ladies, was found dead in the front seat of her automobile in the garage of her home on South Main Street, Tuesday afternoon about 3:30.  Seated in the car beside her was her pet dog, a fox terrier, also dead.  The motor of the car was still running.

       Her husband, Ed Prudent, former mine manager at the Bell & Zoller Mine No. 1, stated that upon his return home from work, noticed that dinner was already placed on the table and when his wife failed to answer his call he went out into the yard and then heard the noise from the motor car.  Upon entering the garage he found his wife dead.

       Mrs. Prudent who had suffered from a heart ailment for some time was one of the most prominent members of the Zeigler Woman’s Club.  She was 57 years of age.—Benton Standard

       (According to her death certificate, Mattie Imogene Prudent was born 22 Dec 1879, in Oscaloosa, Iowa, the daughter of Robert Bashaw, a native of Virginia, and Martha Gebhardt, a native of Iowa, died 23 Jun 1936, in Zeigler, Franklin Co., Ill., wife of Edward Prudent, and was buried at Centralia, Marion Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Three Mound City Residents Die within the Week

ALFRED SCHULER

       Alfred Schuler, age 69 years, died Friday afternoon, June 26, at his home in Mound City.  A lifelong resident of Mound City, Mr. Schuler had retired only last year from the shoe business in which he had been engaged for the past 35 years.  He had also served as postmaster for twelve years, had been a member of the city council for many years and had served a number of terms on the board of education.  He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

       Mr. Schuler was married in June 1891 to Miss Rose Anna Curren, sister of the late Hon. Charles Curren.  Surviving are his wife, two sons, Ralph Schuler, of Chicago and Leslie of Mound City; four daughters, Mrs. Mike Duggan of Mound City, Mrs. Alba Kobler of Cairo, Mrs. Tipton Keller of Sikeston, Mo., and Miss Lois Schuler of Mound City; four grandchildren, one brother, George T. Schuler of Mounds; three sisters, Mrs. Nettie B. Perks and Mrs. Jennie Murphy of Mound City and Miss Kate Schuler of Mounds.

       Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at St. Mary’s Church in Mound City, Father Gilmartin, assisted by Father Walter Mulroney of Biloxi, Miss., officiating.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Mounds.

 

MRS. LULA DURNING

       Mrs. Lula Durning of Mound City died at her home Friday morning, June 26, at the age of 78 years.  She had not been well for some time, but was not critically ill and her death came unexpectedly.  She had lived in Mound City for more than sixty years.

       Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Grace B. Quarles of Chicago, and four grandchildren.

       Funeral services were held at her home in Mound City Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock Rev. Everett Hayden conducting.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

MRS. W. T. PARKER

       Mrs. Tinnie B. Parker, wife of W. T. Parker, of Mound City, died Sunday afternoon, June 28, at 12:20 o’clock at her home at the age of 65 years.  Her death came suddenly.  She had prepared dinner and had placed it on the table before she became ill.  She lived only one hour afterward.

       Surviving are her husband, one daughter, Mrs. William A. Schneider of Lakewood, Ohio; a stepson, B. A. Parker of Centralia; and one sister, Mrs. Emma Tagyme of New Jersey.

       Funeral services were conducted Tuesday at the First M. E. Church by Rev. Everett Hayden and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  The casket bearers were C. E. Richey, J. R. Boyd, J. B. Blankenship, George Eichhorn, W. E. Shearer, and Thomas Steers.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Jul 1936: 

Well Known M. E. Minister Dies at Home in Benton

       Rev. O. L. Markman, who had served many pastorates and also as Olney District Superintendent, died Monday night at his home in Benton, where he had lived since his retirement from the ministry.  An injury sustained in an automobile accident in June of 1930 was the cause of his failing health since that time.

       Rev. Markman began preaching at the age of 18 in the Evangelical Church of Grayville, but in 1904 transferred to the Methodist Episcopal Church.  His was a successful ministry and he was also a frequent contributor to religious magazines.

       He is survived by his wife, daughter and a son.

       (Otto Lewis Markman, of 231 E. Chestnut, Olney, Richland Co., Ill., registered for the World War I draft in 1918.  His death certificate states that Otto L. Markman, minister, was born 20 Nov 1876, in West Salem, Ill., the son of William Markham, a native of Germany, and Mary Brian, a native of Illinois, died 6 Jul 1936, in Benton, Franklin Co., Ill., husband of Hulda Markman, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLED BY AUTOMOBILE

       David Winters, a retired farmer, who was in Harrisburg last week marveling at the growth of automobile transportation and at that time remarked that “one never knows when they will be hit by one,” was hit by one Monday night at Cave-in-Rock.  Both legs, his right arm and his neck and back were broken.  His skull was crushed and he died instantly.—Register

       (His death certificate states that David Winters, farmer, was born 28 Jan 1861, in Sparks Hill, Ill., the son of George Winters, a native of Indiana, and Margarette Jane Ozee, a native of Kentucky, died 29 Jun 1936, in Hardin Co., Ill., husband of Della Dunaway, and was buried in Road District 1, Hardin Co., Ill.  He was buried in Adams Cemetery in Cave-in-Rock, Hardin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Jul 1936:

DESCENDANT OF DR. N. R. CASEY DIED IN W. VA.

Mrs. Maude Casey Marland, of Glen Rogers, W. VA., passed away recently in a hospital in that city.  Mrs. Marland was the granddaughter of the late Dr. N. R. Casey of this city and great-granddaughter of Moses M. Rawlings who laid out the lower section of Mound City in 1854.  Mrs. Marland’s father, Frank Casey, was born here in the old brick house which was recently purchased by Jos. O’Sullivan and later torn down.  Mr. Casey and his wife, Grace Casey, passed away a few years ago in Johnston City, where they had resided since leaving Mound City about forty years ago.

(The West Virginia Death Index states that Maude Hicks Marland, the daughter of Frank R. Casey and Grace Garner, died 18 Jun 1936, in Raleigh, West Virginia.  She was buried in Sunset Memorial Park in Beckley, Raleigh Co., W. Va.—Darrel Dexter)

 

R. C. “BOB” MAGILL SUCCUMBS TO STROKE

R. C. Magill, known to his many friends as “Bob,” succumbed to a stroke Wednesday evening about 8 o’clock.  Death was not unexpected as for several years he had been in failing health and recently it had become necessary for him to take to his bed.  Just one week before death came, he slipped into a coma from which he never rallied.  It was known then that it would be only a matter of time before the end.

Mr. Magill was born on April 29, 1859, in Patrickburg, Ind., one of ten children.  Of the ten he was the last to die.  He has a host of nieces and nephews living in various parts of the country.  Because of the size of the family he early in life learned to make his own way.

The deceased migrated to Mound City in 1883 with sixty other families when the Mound City Furniture Factory was established.  He had been an employee of the factor at Spencer, Ind.  He has spent his entire life since in this city.  For many years he was employed with the furniture factory as secretary.  About thirty years ago he went into the retail furniture business from which he retired in 1932.

Mr. Magill never married.  When he first came to Mound City he made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Fullerton, who were very dear friends to him.  Later the deceased furnished a home for the Fullerton family who had with them the present Mrs. Charles Griffith, a niece of Mr. and Mrs. Fullerton.  Mr. and Mrs. Fullerton, daughter, Miss Cora, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Griffith and family have made their home together for a number of years.  Mr. Magill was known affectionately to all of them as “Bobba.”

The departed was a kind and thoughtful person always placing the interests of his “family” and friends before himself.  He has a host of friends who are saddened by his departure.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 4 o’clock at the Congregational church with Rev. Ellsworth Lyon in charge.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Robert Throgmorton, Joe Crain, Carl Bode, Harry Settlemoir, George E. Martin, Herman Hirsch, Albert Parker, and J. L. Wall.  Honorary pallbearers are W. N. Moyers, E. P. Easterday, Thomas Boyd, M. F. Browner, Mark Capoot, Martin McBride, Fred Hoffman, and Frank Campbell.

(His death certificate states that Robert Casper Magill, furniture dealer, was born 29 Apr 1859, the son of John Carmen Magill and Christene Yockey, died 8 Jul 1936, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Robert Casper Magill “Bobba” 1859-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Frank Bour, Sr., received a message Friday that her niece was killed in an automobile wreck in Chicago.  Her niece was married and left two children.  She was before her marriage Miss Lottie Pope and was formerly a Pulaski County girl.  Interment was made near Chicago.

             (Her death certificate states that Charlotte Pope Searle, of Fulton Township, Edgerton, Rock Co., Wis., was born 27 Oct 1910, in Levings, Ill., the daughter of Charles Pope, a native of West Frankfort, Ill., and Bertha Vance, died 3 Jul 1936, in Norwood Park, Cook Co., Ill., the wife of Howard F. Searle, and was buried in Clarendon Hills Cemetery in Downers Grove, DuPage Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Jul 1936:

WORLD WAR VETERAN SUCCUMBS TO HEAT

Charles A. Von Nida, age 44, died at his home three miles west of Mounds Monday afternoon at 4:45 o’clock.  Mr. Von Nida was apparently the first victim in this county of the heat wave which enveloped the nation.  He was ill only a few hours.

The deceased was born and raised in the vicinity of Mounds and was engaged in farming for a number of years.  He served in the World War and was sent overseas for several months.  Surviving him are his wife Stella; three sisters, Mrs. Kate Minton, Mrs. Sam Atherton, and Miss Esther Von Nida; two brothers, Phillip and Seth, all of Mounds; and other relatives and many friends.

A military funeral was held at 2:30 Wednesday afternoon under the direction of the Louis Phares Post of the American Legion.  Services were held at the Shiloh Baptist Church with Rev. W. J. Ward conducting the services.  Burial was made in Shiloh Cemetery with members of the American Legion as pallbearers.

G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His application for a veterans’ marker states that Charles A. Vonnida, a private of Co. M., 132nd Infantry, 33rd Illinois Division, enlisted 3 Oct 1917, honorably discharged 31 May 1919, and died 13 Jul 1936.  The death certificate states that Charles Adam Vonida, farmer, was born 5 Aug 1891, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of John Vonida, a native of St. Louis, Mo., and Sarah Littell, a native of Kentucky, died 13 Jul 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Stella Vonida, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Charles A. Vonnida Ill. Pvt. 132 Inf. 33 Div. July 13, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SERVICES FOR SAMUEL SEXTON

Samuel Sexton, age 54, passed away at his home 3 o’clock Wednesday afternoon after a stroke of apoplexy which struck him at his work in the tie yards adjacent to the Ohio River levee.  Mr. Sexton was ill only a few hours before he passed away.

He had been a resident of Mound City for 26 years and had been employed by the Big Four Railroad as buyer of cross ties.

Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. Lizzie Sexton; one son, Aaron; two brothers, Rudolph, of Centralia, Ill., and Monroe of Boaz, Ill.

Funeral services will be conducted this afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Pentecostal church in Mound City.  Rev. Robert Shelton will officiate.  Interment will be made in the Anderson Cemetery at Boaz.

G. A. James will direct the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Samuel Sexton, buyer of ties, was born 10 Dec 1871, in Illinois, the son of Richard Sexton, a native of Illinois, died 15 Jul 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Lizzie Sexton, and was buried in Anderson Cemetery in Boaz, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ALBERT MURPHY DIES, THE RESULT OF MARINE SERVICE

Albert Lyle Murphy, 29, passed away Monday after a long illness following his release from the U. S. Marine Corps several years ago.  Prior to his release from the Marines, he did duty in China as a member of the American Expeditionary Force.  While in this service he was stricken with fever and was overcome by the heat and his health had never been regained after this sickness.

The glamor of travel and the lure of distant lands caused Albert to leave high school before completing his senior year.  He joined the U. S. Marine Corps and in the American Expeditionary Forces saw service in China.  While in service in China he was overcome with heat and stricken with a fever from which he only temporarily regained his health.  In 1927 while ill in the U. S. Marine Hospital on Mare Island, Calif., his grandfather secured Albert’s release.

His three years’ experience had taught him to appreciate a high school education.  On returning home he re-entered high school and completed the course, graduating from the Mound City Community High School in 1929.  In high school he was popular and active as a basketball player.  After finishing high school he completed a business course at the Gem City Business College.  While there he was interested in social activities and assisted in choir work of the Episcopal Church.

At the close of his college work, he returned to Mound City, prepared to do clerical work.  Due to his experience abroad, he was interested in military affairs and he became a member of Company K.

Albert Murphy was well known and well thought of in this city by all who knew him, and has scores of friends who will mourn his passing.  He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Jennie Murphy, of Mound City; grandfather, G. J. Murphy, of Mound City, who fostered Albert from infancy; three brothers, Raymond, Jack and Robert, all of Mound City; one sister, Mrs. Barney Burns of Cairo.

Funeral services were held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mound City Thursday morning at 9 o’clock with Rev. Fletcher of Paducah, Ky., in charge of the services.  Interment was made at the National Cemetery.  Company K of Cairo of which Albert had been a member, did him military honors.

G. A. James directed the funeral.

Pallbearers were Fred Burkstaller, Charles Campbell, Paul Stout, Joe Huckleberry, Phil Rushing, and Leslie Schuler.

(His death certificate states that Albert Lyle Murphy, bookkeeper, was born 5 Dec 1905, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Lyle Murphy and Jennie Schuler, natives of Illinois, died 14 Jul 1936, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Mound City National Cemetery.  The interment record for Mound City National Cemetery states that Albert Lylle Murphy served as a private in the U. S. Marine Corps, enlisting 16 Sep 1925, and died 14 Jul 1936.  He was honorably discharged 18 Sep 1928, and was buried in Grave 4456-A.—Darrel Dexter)

 

COLORED MAN DIES FROM BEATING WITH IRON PIPE

George E. Edwards, of Grand Chain, colored, was beaten to death with an iron pipe by Ed Greensbury, colored, also of Grand Chain.  Edwards was attacked Tuesday night of last week and died Thursday in St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo without ever regaining consciousness.

The assault happened near the hard road at Grand Chain.  It is presumed that the difficulties between the two originated in rivalry for the attentions of a woman.  Edwards is said to have worked and have had a little money while Greensburg had less money.  Edwards, with the money, probably had the advantage, both in buying drinks and in the attentions of the woman in the case, and this may have engaged Greensbury.

Some little argument, possibly exchange of blows, preceded the fatal chapter when Edwards, who was so drunk he was nearly helpless, left and Greensbury followed.  Later Edwards was found not far off, his head badly beaten and crushed.

The coroner’s jury in Alexander County recommended that Greensbury be held.  No complaint or attest or attempt to arrest had been made and Greensbury had gone.  There is some agitation in Grand Chain to find a way to have a city marshal.

(His death certificate states that George Edwards, farmer at Grand Chain, Ill., was born in 1898 in Butler Co., Ala., the son of Pete Edwards and Alice Tillman, natives of Bulter Co., Ala., died 9 Jul 1936, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Maudie Edwards, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

___ and George Caton of Terre Haute, Ind., have returned to their homes after being called here by the death of their uncle ____ ___ll.

 

Mrs. E. A. Goodman attended the funeral of her son-in-law’s mother, who died in Jonesboro Tuesday.

             (This refers to Francis E. Hileman, of Jonesboro, Ill., whose death certificate states she was born 29 Apr 1858, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of William H. Corbin and Rebecca Cover, died 15 Jul 1936, in Jonesboro, Ill., the wife of Lorenzo D. Hileman, and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The people of this community (Beech Grove) were sorry to learn of the death of their old neighbor, Mrs. Eunice Lentz, that passed away in Herrin Friday morning and she was brought to Mt. Pisgah Sunday afternoon.  Rev. Henry Karraker preached her funeral, assisted by Catherine Crenshaw.  The Mowery quartet sang several beautiful songs.

             (Eunice Lacretia Williamson was the wife of Henry Adam Lentz.  Her death certificate states that Eunise Lentz was born 26 Jan 1886, in Pope Co., Ill., the daughter of Lawrence Williamson, died 10 Jul 1936, in Road District 8, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery at Wetaug, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Several from here (Grand Chain) attended the funeral of Tom Hacker which was held at Vienna Sunday.

             (A marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads:  Father H. Thomas Hacker 1869-1936 Mother Mary J. Hacker 1873-1945.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our sincere appreciation to our friends and neighbors for their many kindnesses during the illness and at the death of our beloved friend, R. C. Magill.

We are deeply grateful to Rev. Lyon, members of the choir, those who sent flowers to those who gave the use of their cars and all who assisted in any way, also to Mr. and Mrs. George C. Crain funeral directors, for their efficient service.

Mrs. Charles Griffith and daughters, Margaret, Roberta, and Dorothy Lou

Mrs. Cora Cullerton

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Jul 1936: 

Negro Shot by Wife Died Wednesday Evening

       Jesse Murray, North Mounds negro, was shot by his wife early Monday morning at their home when, according to reports, he came in intoxicated and hit her over the head with a skillet and also attacked her with a knife.  Her condition showed that she had been severely beaten and had suffered a number of gashes on her cheek and neck.  He was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital annex, Cairo, where it was found he had been seriously wounded in the abdomen.  He died Wednesday evening.

       Mrs. Murray surrendered to Pulaski County authorities and is being held in jail.

 

Albert L. Murphy

       Albert L. Murphy of Mound City died Tuesday morning, July 14, at the age of 29 years, following a long illness which began while he was in the U. S. Marine Corps Service.  He served in China and was active in the American Expeditionary Forces and while in service was overcome with heat and stricken with fever from which he never entirely recovered.

       He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Jennie Murphy of Mound City; a grandfather, G. J. Murphy of Mound City, who had been as a foster father to him since infancy; three brothers, Raymond, Jacob and Robert, all of Mound City; one sister, Mrs. Barney (Miriam) Burns of Cairo.

       Funeral services were held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mound City Thursday morning at 9 o’clock.  Interment was made in the National Cemetery with military honors by Company K, of which he had been a member.  G. A. James conducted the funeral.

       (His death certificate states that Albert Lylle Murphy, bookkeeper, was born 5 Dec 1905, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Lyle Murphy and Jennie Schuler, natives of Illinois, died 14 Jul 1936, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in the National Cemetery at Mound City, Ill.  His interment record states that he enlisted on 16 Sep 1925, as private in the U. S. Marine Corps and was honorably discharged 18 Sep 1928.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Another Fatal Auto Accident near Cairo

       Two persons were killed and three injured Sunday night about 7 o’clock when a coupe occupied by four young people crashed into a taxi after being sideswiped or sideswiping another car driven by E. Travis, a negro, on the three-lane road at the north end of Future City just north of Cairo.

       Mrs. Mary Wright Miller of Cairo, age 33, and C. W. Rytter of Charleston, Mo., age 25, were killed, Miss Virginia Coombs and Clarence Haden of Cairo were seriously injured, and Lloyd Hoffner, driver of the taxi, suffered less serious injuries.  The four first named were riding in the coupe of young Haden.  Both Mrs. Miller and Rytter died at St. Mary’s Hospital shortly after being taken there.

       Mrs. Miller was manager of a dress shop in Cairo, Rytter operated a jewelry store in Charleston, Mo., Miss Coombs is an employee of the Cairo Evening Citizen and Haden, an employee of the Federal barge line.

       (Her death certificate states that Mary Joannette Miller, manager of the Ready to Wear, was born 10 Sep 1902, in Newton, Ill., the daughter of H. L. Wright, a native of Illinois, and Gertrude Mann, a native of Effingham, Ill., died 12 Jul 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the divorced wife of Roy A. Miller, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker there reads:  Mary Wright Miller 1902-1936.  The death certificate of Charles William Rytter states he was born 16 Mar 1911, in East Prairie, Mississippi Co., Mo., the son of C. W. Rytter, a native of Charleston, Mo., and Mary Anderson a native of East Prairie, Mo., died 12 Jul 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Lucille Rytter, and was buried in Dogwood Cemetery in East Prairie, Mississippi Co., Mo.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery in Charleston, Mo., reads:  Charles W. Rytter Jr., Mar. 16, 1911 July 12, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Mounds Resident Dies in Arkansas

       Mrs. Ella McKimm, widow of the late W. J. McKimm, for years a prominent resident of Mounds, died Thursday night, July 9, at the home of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Anita McKimm Nassan in Hardy, Ark., at the age of 76 years.

       Besides her daughter-in-law she leaves one grandson, Harry McKimm, Jr., her husband and son having preceded her in death some time ago.

       Mr. and Mrs. McKimm were residents of Mounds for many years.  Their son, Harry, was married while they lived here and his parents built for him and his bride the bungalow now the home of Dr. and Mrs. H. J. Elkins.

       The body was brought to Cairo to Karcher Brothers Funeral Home Sunday morning.  Funeral services were held that afternoon at 2 o’clock at the grave in Villa Ridge cemetery, the Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Cairo Lutheran Church officiating.  Casket bearers were G. M. Quarles and George Sitter of Mounds, Roy Hill, Edgar Walker and Harry Wright.

 

R. C. Magill

       R. C. Magill, age 77 years, died Wednesday evening, July 8, at his home in Mound City following a long period of failing health.  Mr. Magill, familiarly known as “Bob” had lived in Mound City since 1883 when he arrived with sixty other families to work in the newly established Mound City Furniture Factory.  About thirty years ago he went into the retail hardware business from which he retired in 1932.

       Mr. Magill never married but lived with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Griffith and other members of the Fullerton family, near and dear friends.

       Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock at the Congregational church, Mound City, the Rev. Ellsworth Lyon officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.

 

Charles Adam VonNida

       Charles Adam VonNida, age 44 years, died at his home three miles west of Mounds Monday afternoon at 4:45 o’clock, having been ill only a few hours.  The extreme heat seemed to be the cause of a stroke suffered that day.

       Mr. VonNida was born and reared in the neighborhood in which he died.  He had been engaged in farming for a number of years.  He was a veteran of the World War, having served overseas.

       Surviving are his wife Stella; three sisters, Mrs. Kate Minton, Mrs. Sam Atherton and Miss Ethel VonNida; two brothers, Phillip and Seth VonNida.

       A military funeral was held under the direction of the Louis Phares Post of the American Legion, with the Rev. W. J. Ward officiating at the church services at Shiloh Baptist Church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  Interment was made at Shiloh Cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Dies from Heat Prostration

       Mrs. Matilda Graves, age 71 years, died at her home in Belknap Monday afternoon at 4:45 o’clock of heart failure brought on by heat prostration.

       Funeral services were held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church in Belknap, with Rev. Camp officiating.  Interment was made in Masonic Cemetery at Belknap.

       Surviving Mrs. Graves are her husband, W. R. Graves; one brother, Jim; three children Ed of Breckenridge, Colo., Irvin of Belknap and Mrs. Mamie Murphy of St. Louis.

       Wilson Funeral service of Karnak directed the funeral.

       (Her death certificate states that Matilda Graves was born 10 Jan 1865, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of John Keys, a native of Louisville, Ky., and Mary Harris, a native of Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., died 13 Jul 1936, in Belknap, Johnson Co., Ill., wife of W. R. Graves. and was buried in Masonic Cemetery in Belknap.  Her marker there reads:  William Riley Graves 1858-1937 Eda Matilda Graves 1865-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MURDERED

       The Springfield Illinois State Journal of July 6th says in part:

       “W. Roy Keller, 35, of 209 North Douglas Avenue, a clerk in the auditing division of the Central Illinois Public Service Company in this city, was shot to death at about 10:30 p.m. yesterday (Sunday) amid circumstances that have police officials completely baffled.  The shooting occurred in the driveway of the Keller home.  Although several theories were advanced by police as to the cause of the shooting, the one that remained foremost in the minds of authorities was that Keller was shot by one of two men who were attempting to steal his automobile, which he was backing out of his garage, it was thought, to drive downtown to get some ice.  Only a small bit of ice was found in the refrigerator.  He had left his coat and hat on a chair in the house and went out the side door, it is assumed.” 

       He had just returned from a visit in Jonesboro and L. W. Brown, in whose car he rode back to Springfield, had left him at his home on Douglas Avenue, where the murder occurred later.  Brown’s home is also in Jonesboro, but he is employed in the old age pension assistance division office in Springfield and lives at the St. Nicholas Hotel.

       (His death certificate states that William Roy Keller, statistical clerk, was born 9 Sep 1901, in Jonesboro, Ill., the son of Ernest Keller and Augusta Poole, natives of Jonesboro, Ill., died 5 Jul 1936, in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Ill., husband of Gladys Keller, and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  W. Roy Keller Sept. 9, 1901 July 5, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOSES LIFE TRYING TO SAVE HER BROTHER

       Grayville—Helen Lomas, 17-year-old wife of Ernest Lomas, was drowned in the Wabash River about 10 miles south of Grayville at 3 p.m. Monday as she attempted to rescue her brother, Clyde Elliott, 14, commonly known as “Pete.”

       According to information told at an inquest, she and her brother, with two younger boys, went to the river near her home to wade and to secure relief from the intense heat.  Her father, James Elliott, had warned the children against going into the river.

       Clyde waded out to a log in the river and in attempting to climb on top of it slipped and fell into a deep hole that had been cut out under the log by the action of the river.

       His sister jumped into the water to help him out, but was pulled under by his frantic efforts.  Several men who were working in the wheat harvest nearby pulled both out of the river.

       Helen could not be resuscitated, but Clyde soon recovered.  H. Q. Allison, local physician, made a hurried trip to the scene of the tragedy, said the girl was dead when he arrived and that her brother had recovered.—Mercury Independent

             (According to her death certificate, Helen L. Lomas was born 27 Nov 1917, in Edwards Co., Ill., the daughter of James M. Elliott and Myrtle Mitchell, natives of Illinois, died 6 Jul 1936, in Phillips, White Co., Ill., wife of Ernest Lomas, and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Edwards Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jul 1936:

SEVEN-MONTH-OLD SON DIES

Roy Thelbert, the seven-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ora C. Hughes, died at the city hospital at Anna Saturday morning.  Mr. and Mrs. Hughes had formerly lived near Villa Ridge, but for the past four years have made their home in Dongola.  Besides his parents he is survived by three sisters.

Funeral services were conducted at Shiloh Church Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock by Rev. Reeves of Dongola and interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Roy Thelbert Hughes was born 5 Jan 1936, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Ora C. Hughes and Alice Buckels, natives of Illinois, died 18 Jul 1936, in Anna, Ill., and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge, Ill.  His metal marker in Shiloh Cemetery reads:  Roy T. Hughes 1936-1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DALLAS WINCHESTER SLATED FOR SLAIN DETECTIVE’S PLACE

Dallas Winchester, who has been special agent for the Illinois Central at Mounds, for many years, is slated to take the place of Roy Zerfass, who was slain in a gun battle with a criminal.  Winchester will probably go to Du Quoin.

(According to the death certificate, Roy Dale Zearfoss, ICRR special agent, was born 14 Mar 1892, in St. Louis, Mo., died 17 Jul 1936, in Carbondale, Ill., the husband of Lula Zearfoss, and was buried in Arlington Cemetery in Arlington, Carlisle Co., Ky.  The application for a military headstone states that Roy Zearfoss enlisted 3 Jun 1918, and was discharged 8 Feb 1919.  He was a sergeant in HQ 48th Infantry, 20th Illinois Division, and died 17 Jul 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

L. D. STOPHLET, LONG IN BUSINESS, PASSES AWAY

Loren D. Stophlet, 86 years of age, passed away at his home 8 o’clock Sunday evening.  Mr. Stophlet was among the oldest of Pulaski County residents, having lived here all his life.  For the past 60 years he had been engaged in the grocery business, being obliged to retire about two years ago because of ill health.

Mr. Stophlet was a well-known and highly respected citizen, and had a very prominent place as a Mound City business man.  He had been a devout member of the Pilgrim Congregational Church for many years.

He is survived by one son, Loren Stophlet, of Mound City; one daughter, Mrs. Florence Rice, of Chicago; three grandchildren, Lorena Rice, of Chicago, Morris Stophlet of Chicago and Bill Stophlet of Detroit, Mich., a number of nieces and nephews.  There are many friends who will mourn his passing.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock at the Congregational church.  Business houses in Mound City closed out of respect for the departed.  Rev. Ellsworth Lyon conducted the services.  Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

The casket bearers were:  C. F. Bode, C. S. Miller, Joe Lutz, George Eichhorn, M. F. Browner, and George R. Martin.

(Loren Stophlet married Annie Fair on 28 May 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Loren Dow Stophlet, retired merchant, was born 8 Sep 1849, in Olmstead, Ill., the son of P. W. Stophlet, a native of Pennsylvania, died 19 Jul 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the widower of Anna Stophlet, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CORONER’S JURY RELEASES WOMAN WHO KILLED HUSBAND

Annie Murray, colored, of Mounds, shot her husband with a .22 caliber single-shot pistol when he beat her with a skillet because she was slow about breakfast.  When the coroner’s jury heard her story and saw the lumps on her head, they exonerated her.  Husbands who beat on wives with skillets because they are slow cooks are inviting resistance and trouble, and if they are hurt, it is their own fault.

(The death certificate states that Jesse Murray, laborer, was born about 1901 in Mississippi, the son of Jade and Mary Murray, died 15 Jul 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Anna Murray, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

LOSES MOTHER

Ray Varner and family were called to Naylor, Mo., Friday night because of the illness and death of the former’s mother.  Funeral services were held there Sunday afternoon and the Varner family returned to Mound City Monday night.

(This may be Nancy J. Varner, who was born 24 Oct 1861, died 18 Jul 1936, and was buried in Antioch Cemetery in Oxly, Ripley Co., Mo.—Darrel Dexter)

 

NIECE OF MOUND CITY WOMAN DIES IN MISSOURI

Mrs. Mary Marble, age 48 years, a niece of Mrs. John Read of this city, passed away recently in a hospital at Cape Girardeau, Mo., following a very serious operation.  Mrs. Marble had been ill a week before going to the hospital.

She is survived by her mother, Mrs. S. A. Cauble; one son, Dewey Marble; three sisters, Mrs. Mattie Henry of Cape Girardeau, Mrs. Harry Holshouser of Cape Girardeau and Miss Allie Cauble of Portland, Ore.; four brothers, Herbert, William and John Cauble of Portland, Ore., and Alfred of St. Louis; and aunt, Mrs. John Read, Mound City; an uncle, James A Black of Denver, Colo.

Funeral services were held in Cape Girardeau Monday afternoon and interment was made in the Cape Girardeau cemetery.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Jul 1936: 

Cairo Pioneer Dies

       James E. Rennie, age 89 years, died July 15, at his home in Cairo following an illness of several months.

       Mr. Rennie was born in the State of Louisiana July 29, 1846, but spent practically all his life in Cairo.  He was married October 31, 1869, to Frances Chrest at St. Paul, Minn., who survives him.  He is also survived by a daughter, Mrs. P. T. Langan of Cairo.  One son, John T. Rennie died last November.

       Funeral services were held Friday morning at 9 o’clock with interment at Villa Ridge.  Pall bearers were his grandsons, James, P. T., George and John Langan, John Clarke and Ellis Minton.

       (According to the death certificate, James Edward Rennie was born 29 Jul 1846, in Louisiana, the son of John Thompson Rennie, a native of Ayr, Scotland, and Margaret McFern, a native of Ireland, died 15 Jul 1936, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., the husband of Frances Rennie, and was buried in Villa Ridge.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  J. E. Rennie July 29, 1846 July 15, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Roy Thelbert Hughes

       Roy Thelbert, the 7-months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ora C. Hughes, died at the City Hospital in Anna Saturday morning.  Mr. and Mrs. Hughes had formerly lived near Villa Ridge, but for the past four years have made their home in Dongola.  Besides his parents he is survived by three sisters.

       Funeral services were conducted at Shiloh Church Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock by the Rev. Reeves of Dongola.  Interment was made in the Shiloh Cemetery with G. A. James directing.

 

Exonerated

       Mrs. Martha Murray, colored, who shot and fatally wounded her husband Jesse Murray on Monday, July 13, the wound proving fatal the Wednesday following, was exonerated by a coroner’s jury which decided that the deed was done in self-defense.

 

Loren Dow Stophlet

       Loren Dow Stophlet, age 86 years, passed away at his home in Mound City Sunday night at 8 o’clock.  He had been a resident of Mound City for the past 70 years and for more than 60 years had been in the grocery business.  Due to his lifetime here it was very interesting to hear him tell of the many changes he had seen.

       He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Florence Rice of Chicago; and a son, Loren C., of Mound City, who is continuing his grocery business.  He also is survived by three grandchildren and many other relatives and friends.

       Funeral services were conducted from the Congregational church in Mound City, of which he was long a member, by the pastor, Rev. Lyons, at 4:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by the side of his wife who preceded him in death about 20 years ago.

       The casket bearers were C. F. Bode, C. S. Miller, Joe Lutz, George Eichhorn, M. F. Browner, and George R. Martin.

 

Mark Walton

       Mark Walton, age 70 years, died at his home near Ullin on Monday, July 20.

       Funeral services were held at the home Wednesday, July 22, at 2:30 o’clock, with Rev. Elmer Smith officiating.

       Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.

       (Mark Walton married Ruth Robertson on 13 May 1889, in Fulton Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Mark Walton, farmer, was born 13 Mar 1866, in Browning, Ill., the son of John Walton, a native of Ohio, and Mary Ann Frankford, a native of Frederick, Ill., died 20 Jul 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Ruth Walton, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  His marker there reads:  Mark Walton March 13, 1866 July 20, 1936 Ruth Walton Nov. 12, 1865 April 15, 1944.—Darrel Dexter)

 

R. J. Lee was called to Carrollton last week to attend the funeral of is grandfather.  He was accompanied by D. T. Clancy.

 

HEARS OWN OBSEQUIES

       The East St. Louis Journal of recent date carried a picture of Hickman Holloman, 83, who wanted to be sure the right text was used and a proper service was rendered at his funeral.  So, he chose Revelation 14:13, “And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth; Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors and their works do follow them.”

       Mr. Holloman, who formerly lived in this county, where he is well known talked the matter over with his pastor, who agreed to conduct such a service, although he had never heard of such in all his experience.  The date was set, the unusual service was announced and a capacity crowd was present to hear it, including Mr. Holloman, a son and a number of nephews and nieces.

       And yet there are those who say, “There’s nothing new under the sun.”—Golconda Herald-Enterprise

       (His death certificate states that Hickman Holloman, farmer, was born 25 Dec 1852, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of Hickman Holloman, a native of Kentucky, and Elizabeth Harper, a native of Pope Co., Ill., died 3 Nov 1946, in Washington Park, St. Clair Co., Ill., widower of Amanda Holloman, and was buried in Mount Zion Cemetery in Cave-in-Rock, Hardin Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  Hickman Holloman 1852-1946 In Memory Elizabeth “Betty” Wake Holloman 1871-1896 and children Hickie 1899, Minnie 1896.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 31 Jul 1936:

TWO HEAT DEATHS IN HERRIN

The heat wave which was only broken by southerly breezes here last Wednesday and a little rain, took two lives and was indirectly responsible for several others.

Although the temperature record of 112 was not broken, it was perhaps the first time in history that the weather was so hot for some many days in succession.—Herrin News

 

Mr. Thomas attended his mother’s funeral the last of the week.  (Perks)

 

KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT

Samuel H. Pewett of Hickman, Ky., driving an eight-ton truck, bearing Tennessee license plate, was killed about 1 o’clock Wednesday morning on Route 146 between West Vienna and Vienna when the truck left the highway and the trailer at the rear of the truck in some way broke loose, veered around to the front, causing the death of the driver.  The truck was of the Blake Truck Lines and was loaded with general merchandise.

Pewett was known as a careful driver, but possibly fell asleep and lost control of the truck.—Anna Democrat

(The death certificate states that Samuel Herman Pewett, truck driver, was born 9 Mar 1901, in Clayton, Tenn., the son of Seth Pewett, a native of Mt. Pleasant, Tenn., and Annie George, a native of Jordan, Tenn., died 21 Jul 1936, in Union Co., Ill., the husband of Clara Pewett, and was buried in Hickman Cemetery in Hickman, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BOY RUN OVER, KILLED BY FATHER’S COAL TRUCK

Victor Eugene Hale, Carbondale, eight years of age, met his death Wednesday afternoon when he was run over by a coal truck driven by his father, Henry D. Hale, near their home in Carbondale about 4:00 o’clock.

He was playing with his little brothers and sister and neighbor children, when seeing his father coming home, ran to meet him and hopped on the running board of the truck.  His hand grip failed and he fell under the coal truck, which carried several tons of coal.  The truck ran over him.  The boy was rushed to Holden Hospital where he died 45 minutes later.—DuQuoin Daily News

             (His death certificate states that Victor Eugene Hale, school boy, was born 4 Jun 1928, in Carbondale, Ill., the son of Henry D. Hale, a native of Kentucky, and Miss Elkins, a native of Illinois, died 22 Jul 1936, in Carbondale, Ill., and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale.  His marker there reads:  Victor Eugene Hale June 14, 1929 July 23, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 Jul 1936: 

Find Skeleton on Island in Mississippi

       Tuesday morning Coroner C. E. Dille of Alexander County held an inquiry into the finding of a skeleton on Bumgard Island in the Dog Tooth Bend area.  The inquiry failed to reveal any kind of identification.

       Only a part of the bones were left, the legs, arms, skull, upper jaw and part of the bones of the upper body, the rest were missing.

       There was enough clothing clinging to the body to obtain a fair description of how the man was dressed.  He wore a heavy ribbed cotton undershirt, summer weight shorts as drawers, gray trousers that had a wide stripe with black diagonal lines in the stripe, known as herring bone.  There were no teeth in the upper jaw.

       Mr. Dille thought the body had possibly been floated onto the island last spring during the high water and that death had occurred not long before, as the bones were still green, as if the flesh had not long been gone from them.  They were not bleached as they would have been when exposed to wind and rain.

 

SUNSTROKE FATAL TO MURPHYSBORO MAN

       Elkville—Funeral services were held at Murphysboro Sunday afternoon for F. I. Ward, 39, owner and proprietor of Ward’s Park on Route 13, east of Murphysboro, victim of sun stroke, suffered several days before.  Interment was made at Marion, former home of the Ward family.  Mr. Ward became over heated Tuesday afternoon while at work and was rushed to St. Andrew’s Hospital in a critical condition.  It was thought for a time he might recover.

       For several years, Ward and his sister, Mrs. Edith Fox, operated Ward’s Park, a popular tourist camp.  He was known to many Elkville people.—Journal

 

NO EXCUSE FOR DRUNKEN DRIVER

       Elizabethtown—A young boy was killed and another faces probable charge of manslaughter, as a result of trying to drive a car while drunk.

       The seriousness of the menace of drunks driving cars is being brought home slowly.  More and more people are beginning to realize that they may be the next victims of drivers whose brains are befuddled with alcohol.

       How can it be prevented?  Some suggest more severe penalties for drunken drivers and better enforcement of the present laws concerning drunks on the highways.

       But enacting laws will not help as long as the silly attitude exists in courts that it is hard to prove that a man is drunk.

       This attitude exists, when in fact, anyone after a casual observation knows when a person is drunk.  The attitude persists to such an extent that two weeks ago part of a jury in this county would not believe a doctor’s evidence that a man was drunk—and a hang jury resulted.

       What kind of perverse reasoning went through the minds of these members of the jury?

       As long as this attitude of mind exists amongst jurors, laws on the statute books will not stop drunken driving.

 

ZEARFOSS SLAYER PREDICTS DEATH IN LETTER HE CARRIED

       A plea that his grave be dug eight feet deep, as my wife, Marie, wants to be buried in it also, was made by Harry “Blackie” Steyer, slayer of Roy Zearfoss at Carbondale, and was later killed by West Frankfort officers, in a letter found on his body after he was slain.

       The letter outlined detailed instructions for the disposition of his body and its burial, revealing a peculiar request that his body be buried in a grave eight feet deep in order that his wife be buried with him.

       The letter was released by the coroner and was as follows:

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

       “My grips, etc., are at 4234 Maryland Avenue, St. Louis, Mo.  In the event of my death notify the Rottaman Undertaking Co., at Golconda, Ill., to take charge of my grave, to be dug eight feet deep as my wife, Marie, wants to be buried in it also.

       “If in St. Louis District have Edith Armbuster take charge until Mrs. Rottaman arrives.  Also keep expenses as low as possible.

       “Wire Ira D. Lawrence, 710 Smith Tower, Seattle, Wash., Carrie Steyer, mother, 421 Tenth Avenue, North Apt., Seattle, Wash.

       “Notify John M. Karns, attorney, 604 Spivey building, East St. Louis, Ill., so he can notify my Mrs. Marie Steyer, of my demise.  Also, Mr. Karns please try to arrange so Mrs. Steyer can attend my funeral.

       “With deepest gratitude to my friends, and thanks gentleman for doing this.”

HARRY STEYER

       A coroner’s jury returned a verdict that Steyer was killed by West Frankfort police in the performance of their duties.  He was shot and his two companions wounded when they fled to this district after the Carbondale killing.—Elkville Journal

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Aug 1936: 

Frederick T. Horsfall Dies at Home of Son

       Frederick T. Horsfall died Thursday evening, July 30, at the home of his son, Harry Horsfall, of Villa Ridge, of the infirmities of age.

       His son, Harry; two daughters, Mrs. Flora Howel of London, England, and Mrs. Bessie Randall of Morencie, Arizona, survive him.

       The body was brought to the Ryan Funeral Home, this city, from whence on Saturday morning at 7 o’clock it was taken to St. Louis, accompanied by the family. Services were held from the Pleitsch Funeral Chapel at 2:30 o’clock.  Interment was made in St. Peter’s Cemetery, St. Louis.

 

Miss Mary Crozier

       Miss Mary Crozier of Mound City died Tuesday morning, August 4, at her home following an illness of several months duration.

       Miss Crozier was a teacher in the Pulaski County schools, having at one time taught the Lufkin School west of Mounds.  She was also a talented musician.

       She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Mary Crozier; a sister, Miss Elizabeth Crozier, both of Mound City; a brother, Joseph Crozier of Truman, Ark.; a foster brother, Fred Coleman Crozier of Mound City; a half-sister, Mrs. Charles Herzfeldt of Oshkosh, Wis.; and a half brother, Frank Crozier of Washington, D.C.

       Funeral services were held Thursday morning at 9:30 o’clock at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mound City, conducted by Rev. Fletcher of Paducah, Ky.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, with a short service at the grave.  The Mound City Junior Woman’s Club members served as flower bearers.

 

Mrs. M. R. Karraker

       Mrs. M. R. Karraker, 75, widow of the late S. Karraker, died at her home near Dongola Monday morning, August 3, following an illness of two years.

       Surviving her are three sons, John E., Ellis and Ado Karraker; two daughters, Mrs. Sherman Sivia and Mrs. Etta Sheffer, all of Dongola; a brother, Tom Goodman of California; a sister, Mrs. Dosia Verble of Piggott, Ark.; 21 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

       Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at Christian Chapel Church with Rev. F. W. Gould of Mt. Vernon officiating.  Interment was made in Chapel Cemetery.

       (Sandy Karraker, 20, son of Dennis Karraker, married Margaret R. Goodman, 17, daughter of Kezire Goodman, on 2 Nov 1879, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Margarette R. Karraker was born 22 Mar 1861, in Illinois, the daughter of Henry Goodman, a native of North Carolina, died 3 Aug 1936, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., the wife of Sandy A. Karraker, and was buried in Chapel Cemetery.  Her marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Sandy Karraker Sept. 14, 1859 April 24, 1934 Margaret R. Karraker Mar. 22, 1861 Aug. 3, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mother of Mrs. R. C. Moore Dies at Home in Cairo

       Mrs. Jessie Holderfield, age 47, wife of W. O. Holderfield, died Thursday evening, July 30, at 5:40 o’clock at her home in Cairo after a lingering illness.

       Surviving are her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Juanita (Robert C.) Moore of Mounds, Miss Minnie Holderfield and Mrs. Helen Yoakum of Cairo; one son, Raymond Holderfield at home; her mother, Mrs. Minnie Hall; and one brother, Oscar Phelps, both of Cairo; an aunt, Mrs. Frances Hazel of Anna; also many friends.

       Funeral services were held at Karcher Brothers Funeral Home Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with a Christian Science reader in charge.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Mounds.  Casket bearers were John Hamilton, Hugh Grace, Ike Davis, John Hightower, Tim Casey, Adolph Lewis, H. L. Yates, and Rex Everett.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Aug 1936:

MRS. JOHN HOLDERFIELD DIES

Mrs. John Holderfield, 27 years of age, passed away Thursday afternoon at her home west of Mounds.

Surviving her are her husband, five children, the oldest ten years of age, and the youngest a few days old; her father, John Carp; and two sisters, Mrs. Pearl Martin of New York and Mrs. Ruby Coleson of Mounds.

Funeral services were held at Diswood Saturday in the Pentecostal church.  Interment was made in the Diswood cemetery.  George Hartwell was in charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Elsie Holderfield was born 21 Nov 1908, in Cache, Ill., the daughter of John Harpe, a native of Rome, N.Y., and Myrtle Potts, died 30 Jul 1936, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of John Holderfield, and was buried in McCrite Cemetery in Diswood, Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MISS MARY CROZIER SUCCUMBS TO ILLNESS

Miss Mary Crozier passed away Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock at her home on Pearl Street after an illness of several months.  Miss Crozier was a well-known and highly respected woman.  She was a graduate of Mound City Community High School and Southern Illinois Teachers College at Carbondale.  She had been employed as a teacher for several years before her illness and subsequent death.  Miss Crozier was a talented musician and had been called several times to entertain the Mound City Junior Woman’s Club of which she was a member.  She was a devout member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church of this city.

Surviving relatives are mother, Mrs. Mary Crozier; a sister, Miss Elizabeth Crozier, of Mound City; a brother, Joseph Crozier of Truman, Ark.; a foster brother, Fred E. Coleman-Crozier; a half-sister, Mrs. Charles Herzefeldt of Oshkosh, Wis.; and a half brother, Frank Crozier of Washington, D.C.

Services were held Thursday morning at 9:30 o’clock at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mound City with Rev. Fletcher of Paducah, Ky., officiating.  Burial was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, George Crain directed the funeral.

The Mound City Woman’s Club paid their respects to their deceased member by attending the funeral in a group.

(The death certificate states that Mary Agnes Crozier, school teacher, was born 12 Feb 1905, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Joseph Crozier, a native of Wisconsin, and Mary Agnes McDonald, a native of Milan, Tenn., died 4 Aug 1936, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOTHER OF MOUND CITY BOY DIES SUDDENLY

Mrs. Dora Merideth died suddenly Saturday noon at the home of her son, Carlos Meridith.  Mrs. Meridith is a resident of Mt. Vernon, Ill., but had been visiting with her sons in this city.  She had been here one week.

Surviving her are her husband, George Meridith; two daughters, Mrs. Flossie Alley of Mound City and Mrs. Clara Adcock of Houston, Tex.; four sons, Charles, Ralph and W. C. Meridith of Mound City and H. N. Meridith of Mt. Vernon; and seventeen grandchildren and one great-grandchild, and many friends.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Pentecost church in Mound City.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Martha Dora Merideth, of Mount Vernon, Ill., was born 22 Dec 1876, in Arkansas, the daughter of Mr. Williford, a native of Arkansas, died 1 Aug 1936, in Mound City, Ill., the wife of George C. Merideth, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

METROPOLIS BOY DROWNS

Ashley Meyers, 17, son of Charley Meyers of East Metropolis, was drowned in the Ohio River recently.  The accident occurred on the sand bar about two miles below the Burlington Bridge.

Reports of the accident are a little conflicting.  The most probable story is that Meyers with several other boys was in