Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

1 Jan. - 30 Dec. 1932

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Jan 1932:
Attended Funeral

A number of persons from Carbondale and other places attended the funeral of Mrs. Annie Kelsey Burgess, of America, which was held at Pilgrim Congregational Church, Mound City, Thursday, December 24.

The following members of the First Christian Church, Carbondale, were in attendance:  Prof. W. M. Bailey, Prof. W. G. Cisne, Prof. G. W. Smith, Prof. Charles J. Pardee, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Brown, Mrs. C. R. Stevenson, Miss Julia Erett, Frank Myers, Miss Gladys Smith, Roy Smith, and Miss Irene Treece.

Those attending the funeral from Cairo were:  Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Hook, Mrs. R. Dever, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Rife, Mrs. William Evans, and Mrs. Fannie Frazier, also Mr. and Mrs. William Milford, Mrs. Clarence Irby, and son Robert, of Unity.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Jan 1932:
CECIL CALVERT, AMERICA, MET DEATH WHEN CAR OVERTURNED

Cecil Walter Calvert, well known in community, having lived on a farm near America for some time, came to his death about 4:30 Friday afternoon of last week when the car in which he and his brother, Eugene Calvert, and a cousin, Eugene Prowless, were riding, overturned.  The accident occurred on the Upper Cut Road about four miles southwest of Mound City on the east side of the Illinois Central Railroad.  Immediately after the accident a doctor was summoned and an ambulance dispatched from St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo, but Calvert was dead.  His brother and cousin escaped serious injury.

The party were en route to Miller City where they intended to go coon hunting that night when the accident occurred.  They had just passed a car driven by Solomon Evans, colored, of Mound City, and it is thought that they were traveling at a rather brisk speed and in trying to bring the car back to the middle of the road the steering apparatus failed to function, the car sliding sideways straight ahead until it overturned.  Eugene Calvert and Prowless were pinned beneath the car, but escaped serious injury.  A dog that was in the car was not injured at all.  The car was a Model T Ford.

Mr. Calvert had been employed as a deck hand on the pile driver for Anderson-Tulley Construction Company.

Cecil Calvert was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Calvert and had resided in Miller City for many years, having moved to America several years ago with his parents.  He was 22 years of age and is survived by his parents, five brothers, Harry Jr., William, Raymond Earl, Leslie Leonard, and Eugene; and three sisters, Mrs. Robert Pate, Helen and Edna.

Funeral services were held Sunday at noon at the Calvert home. After the services the cortege left for Miller City, where interment was made in the Baumgartner Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

An inquest was held Tuesday afternoon under the direction of Coroner Dan Sullivan of Alexander County and the verdict was that he came to his death accidentally when his skull was crushed and neck broken as a result of his automobile turning over.

(According to his death certificate, Cecil Walter Calvert, deck hand pole driver, was born 23 Mar 1909, in Mounds, Ill., the son of H. A. Calvert, a native of Wisconsin, and Ella Childers, a native of Illinois, died 1 Jan 1932, in Road District 7, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Bomgard Cemetery.  His marker in Baumgard Cemetery reads:  Cecil Calvert 1909-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
AGED DONGOLA LADY PASSES ON TO THE GREAT BEYOND

Mrs. Hiram Hinkle, age 72 years, answered the final call which comes to all sooner or later, at her home near Dongola Saturday morning at about one o’clock.  Mrs. Hinkle had been ill for several weeks.
Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Mt. Olive Church and interment was made in the Meisenheimer Cemetery.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

She leaves to mourn her loss, besides a host of relatives and friends, her husband, Hiram Hinkle; one sister, Mrs. W. W. Karraker, of Dongola; and three children, Homer Hinkle, of Taylorville, Harvey E. Hinkle and Mrs. Mark Otrich, of Dongola.

(Hiram Hinkle, 23, married Mary P. Richardson, 17, on July 15, 1877, in Union Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary Parthenia Hinkle was born 10 Sep 1859, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Francis Richardson, a native of Georgia, and Elizabeth J. McCowen, a native of Tennessee, died 2 Jan 1932, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., wife of Hiram Hinkle, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Meisenheimer Cemetery reads:  Hiram Hinkle Father Born June 30, 1854 Died April 30, 1940 Mary P. Hinkle Mother Born Sept. 10, 1859 Died Jan. 2, 1932 Uri O. Hinkle Son Born June 15, 1878 Died April 1, 1893 Bertha L. Hinkle Daughter Born Nov. 8, 1882 Died Jan. 26, 1896.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MISS MARIE STEVENS PASSES AWAY IN DENVER, COLO.

Miss Marie Stevens, formerly of Mounds, but who had gone to Denver to recover from that dreaded disease, tuberculosis, passed away in Denver on Saturday.  Her mother, Mrs. Hattie Stevens, also of Mounds, was at her bedside when the end came.

Her body was brought to Mounds and funeral services were held Tuesday in the First Methodist Church with Rev. W. D. Richardson officiating.  Immediately following the services, the cortege left for Cape Girardeau and internment was made in the Cape Girardeau cemetery.

(Her marker in New Lorimier Cemetery in Cape Girardeau, Mo., reads:  Mabel Marie Stevens Dec. 21, 1913 Jan. 1, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Jan 1932:
MARIE STEVENS DIES FRIDAY IN DENVER
Services Here, Interment Made in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

             Marie Stevens, 18, died Friday, January 1, in Denver, Colorado, ___ several months’ illness.  At the time of her death, her mother, Mrs. Hattie Stevens, ____ Mrs. Sneeding in ____ were ___ her devoted ___ __ __cle Mrs. J. B. Jones and ___ of this city with whom she made her home since ___.
Services were held at the Methodist church of Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock with the Rev. W. D. Richardson ___ and a former pastor, Rev. ___ of DuQuoin assisting. ___ was composed of Mrs. George ____, Mrs. Chris H. Bauer, C. ____ and H. H. Shoaff sang ___tions.

Interment was made at the Cape Girardeau (Mo.) cemetery with funeral director G. A. James in charge.  A number of relatives and friends of Mounds drove to the ___.

The obituary read at the funeral follows:

“Miss Marie Stevens was born  ____, 1913, at Cape Girardeau, Mo., and departed this life Jan. 1st, 1932, at the age of 18 years and 11 days and was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Otto D. Stevens.  Marie was eight years old when her father departed this life.

“She was converted and united with ___ church of Mounds two ____.

“Completing the grade school in Cape Girardeau, she came to ___ with her uncle and __ and Mrs. J. B. Jones in the ___ 1927 and entering Mounds ___ this fall completed her ____ three years.  She spent ___ in college at Carbondale.

“She was of a sunny disposition ___ed Christian character, always of ___ and not ____.

“She leaves to mourn her death her mother, Mrs. Hattie Stevens; two aunts. Mrs. J. B. Jones, of Mounds, ___ R. Langston, of Cape Girardeau; one uncle, Harry Smith, also of Cape Girardeau.  Also a number of other relatives and a host of friends.
 
Sister of E. A. Stokes Dies near Mt. Pleasant

Mrs. Verna Stokes Kellar, wife of Relius Kellar, a prominent farmer living near the Mt. Pleasant district school in Union County, died at her home Sunday.  She is survived by her husband and three children, one an infant nine days old.

Mrs. Kellar was a sister of E. A. Stokes, of Coulterville, a former resident of Mounds.

(Her death certificate states that Verna Ellis Keller was born 8 Jun 1900, in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of James Stokes and Flora Thornton, natives of Illinois, died 2 Jan 1932, in Road District 2, Union Co., Ill., wife of Relis Keller, and was buried in Ebenezer Cemetery.  Her marker in Ebenezer Hall Cemetery near Lick Creek reads:  Verna E. Keller June 8, 1900 Jan. 2 1932 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mother of I. B. Rose Dies Monday Morning

Mrs. Matilda Ann Rose, 74, widow of W. T. Rose, died Monday morning, January 4, at her home in Arlington, Ky.  She was the mother of I. B., of this city.  She leaves two other sons, Louis and Alvin, both of Arlington; and four daughters, Mrs. Anna Harlan, of Los Angeles, Mrs. Marvin Jackson, of Detroit, Mrs. Elva Williams, of North Carolina, and Mrs. Nina Glenn, of Charleston, Mo.

Mrs. Rose was one of the oldest residents of Arlington and was greatly beloved by a large circle.

(Her death certificate states that Matilda Brummett Rose was born 4 May 1857, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Tom Brummett and Mahala Finley, a native of Graves Co., Ky., died 4 Jan 1932, of cancer of the stomach in Arlington, Carlisle Co., Ky., widow of W. T. Rose, and was buried in Arlington Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Former Pulaski County Resident Dies in West
Mother of Mrs. J. B. Mathis of Ullin Succumbs in Orange, Calif.

Mrs. Daniel W. Lentz, a former resident of Pulaski County, passed away Monday, December 28, at the home of her son, Wilbur S. Lentz, in Orange, Calif., following an illness of several months’ duration.  She is survived by this son, a daughter, Mrs. J. B. Mathis, of Ullin, another son, Fred V. Lentz, also of Orange, and eight grandchildren. She had reached the age of 70 years.

The Orange (Calif.) Daily News of December 28 had the following to say concerning Mrs. Lentz.

“Mrs. Lentz had lived in Orange for the past 28 years, during which time her kindly disposition, friendly manner and sterling traits had earned for her a host of friends who will be grieved to learn of her passing.

“Her husband, Daniel W. Lentz, passed away in 1918.  Born in Pulaski County, Illinois, on August 22, 1861, Mrs. Lentz, then Matilda J. Crippen, blossomed to womanhood in Illinois.  She was married to Mr. Lentz on September 18, 1881, forming a happy union that endured to the golden sunset of life.

“The young couple, after several years of residence in Illinois moved to Texas, where they lived for a number of years.  Coming to Orange County in 1903, they settled at El Modena where Mrs. Lentz operated a general mercantile store for several years.  They later moved to Orange, where Mrs. Lentz has resided ever since.

“An active church member until illness forced her to bed, she was a faithful member of the Methodist Church as well as a devoted W. C. T. U. worker as a member of the Orange chapter.

“She was also a member of the American Legion Auxiliary and was well known and beloved by all with whom she came in contact.”

(Daniel W. Lentz married Matilda J. Crippen on 18 Sep 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Santa Ana Cemetery reads:  Daniel W. Lentz 1851-1918 Matilda J. Lentz 1851-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Cecil Calvert Killed when Car Overturns
Accident Occurs Friday on Upper Cut Road North of Cairo

Cecil Calvert, of America, a youth of 22, met instant death Friday afternoon, January 1st, at about 4:30 o’clock when the car he was driving skidded and turned over upon him crushing his face and skull.  The accident occurred on the upper cut road four miles north of Cairo.

With him were Eugene Calvert, 16, a brother, and Eugene Powless, 16, of Miller City, a cousin of the Calvert boys.  They were pinned beneath the overturned car, but escaped serious injury.  A dog in the car was uninjured.  Rescuers were compelled to lift the car in order to free the young men.

The direct cause of the accident seems uncertain.  The car was a Model T Ford and there were indications that the steering wheel had locked.  A car going in the opposite direction had been passed shortly before and marks on the gravel showed that the Ford had skidded for some distance.  There was no embankment nor any ditch of consequence.  The young men had started to the home of Powless and from there had intended to go coon hunting that night.

Funeral services were held Sunday, January 3rd, at 12 o’clock noon, at the family residence on the Meridian Road near America, conducted by the Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Mounds.  Interment was made in the Bumgard Cemetery near Miller City, the former home of the Calvert family.

The following obituary was read at the funeral:

“Cecil Walter Calvert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Calvert, was born in Mounds, Ill., on March 23, 1909, and died January 1, 1932, at the age of 22 years, 9 months, and 7 days.  He leaves to mourn his going his father and mother, five brothers, Harry Jr., Eugene, Leslie Leonard, Billie, and Raymond Earl.  Three sisters, Mrs. Ruth Pate, Helen and Edna.

“While at home he attended church and Sunday school at the Methodist church at Olive Branch and took an active interest in the work of his church.

“Cecil was a young man of a fine personality, possessing an unusually happy disposition and numbered his friends in scores.  He was a devoted son and brother and his going leaves the first vacancy in a happy family circle.”
 
VIENNA TIMES—Frank Y. Harper, former teacher of Johnson County and son of Joe Harper, of Ozark, Ill., was almost instantly killed Christmas Day, one and one half miles south of Simpson, when he was struck by a southbound Illinois Central passenger train about 1:40 o’clock p.m.

After the train struck Harper, the crew stopped and picked up the body and took it on to Grantsburg, but the station agent was not at the depot and they took the body to Reevesville.

(According to his death certificate, Franklin Young Harper, school teacher, of Ozark, Ill., was born 29 Aug 1898, in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Joe Harper and Rachel Casey, natives of Johnson Co., Ill., died 25 Dec 1931, in Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in Reynoldsburg Cemetery in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker there reads:  In Memory of Frank Y. Harper 1898 1931 By Award Harper.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mayor and Mrs. J. B. Jones were called Friday to Denver, Colo., by the serious illness of their niece, Miss Marie Stevens, who passed away before their arrival.
 
Appreciation

We desire to express our appreciation and extend our sincere thanks to all who have shown sympathy and kindnesses during the illness and following the death of our beloved daughter and niece. Especially do we wish to thank the donors of flowers, those who offered the use of cars, the ministers for their comforting words, and the singers for their appropriate music.  We shall hold all these kindly services in grateful remembrance.
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jones
Mrs. Hattie Stevens
 
Walter E. Kimbro, of Anna, died at his home Sunday, January 3.  Mr. Kimbro was a former sheriff of Union County and a prominent leader in the Democratic Party.  He was the father of State Representative Earl C. Kimbro.

(His death certificate states that Walter E. Kimbro was born 15 Mar 1864, in Lick Creek, Ill., the son of Johnson E. Kimbro and Amy Johnson, natives of Bedford Co., Tenn., died 3 Jan 1932, in Anna, Ill., husband of Lula P. Kimbro, and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  Walter E. Kimbro, 19, born in Union County, son of J. E. Kimbro and Miss Johnson, married on 2 Nov 1884, in Union Co., Ill., Lina W. Penninger, 17, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of A. L. Penninger and Miss Threet.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Daisy Palmer, Nita Summers, Dorothy Nicholides, Ogretia Chance, Katherine Harrell, Edna Holstenberg and Evelyn Simpson were here from Carbondale Tuesday to attend the funeral of Marie Stevens.
 
A number from here (America) attended the funeral of Cecil Calvert, which was held at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Calvert, Sunday afternoon.
 
Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Jan 1932:
Pioneer Resident of County Dies Thursday

James A. Barber, for more than 80 years a resident of Pulaski County, died Saturday night, January 5, at 10:15 o’clock at his home near Levings, following a gradual decline from afflictions incident to age.
Born in Kentucky 84 years ago, James Alexander Barber came with his parents to this country at the age of three years.  He was married July 3, 1881, to Miss Lizzie Calvin, also of Levings.

Surviving him are his widow, a daughter, Rose, and two sons, Robert and Harry, all at home.  He was one of the oldest men, if not the oldest in the community.  Having lived in a quiet, serene life, he bore his age well, retaining alert mental faculties until the hour of his death.

A few weeks before his death he united with the Southern Methodist Church at Olmstead.

Funeral services were held at the home Monday afternoon.  Burial was made in what is known as the Calvin Cemetery nearby.

Among those from Mounds who attended the funeral were Mrs. George T. Schuler, niece of Mrs. Barber, Mr. Schuler, H. C. Moore, and Mrs. Elizabeth Fischer.
 
Johnston City Man Kills Son-in-Law

George Gahm, 64, former banker of Johnston City, shot and killed Owen Stilley, his 26-year-old son-in-law, at his daughter’s home in Johnston City Saturday night.

The young couple, who have a three-year-old daughter, had separated Christmas and Stilley was staying at the home of his parents, Florist and Mrs. E. W. Stilley, of Marion. Young Stilley went to his former home Saturday night and, while he was there, Mr. Gahm arrived.  The tragedy soon followed.

At the inquest held Monday night, Mrs. Stilley, according to the Marion Post, testified that her father was not attacked by Stilley and that the young man had not seemed angry.

Mr. Gahm is out on bond and his friends are wondering what his line of defense will be.

(His death certificate states that Owen Higgins Stilley was born 28 Feb 1906, in Johnston City, Ill., the son of E. W. Stilley, a native of Illinois, and Annie Higgins, a native of Kentucky, died 10 Jan 1932, in Johnston City, Ill., a merchant in Marion, Ill., husband of Mary Stilley, and was buried in Johnston City.  He was buried in Lakeview Cemetery in Johnston City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
BABY DIED IN MOTHER’S ARMS

The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Stanley held in her arms during an automobile ride to her mother’s home her six weeks old baby.  The infant snuggled comfortably against her.

When she and her husband stepped from the car, she handed the baby to its grandmother, Mrs. Stanley, to hold.  The child was dead.

Physicians were puzzled today as to the cause.—Robinson
 
FALLS DEAD IN CHURCH

A sudden death occurred in the church services of the Pentecostal Church at Johnston City Sunday.
Charles Wesley Kelley, of Centralia, who was visiting his brother-in-law, Joe Gaddis, 1300 Pine Street, at Johnston City, went to the “Holy Roller” service and during the service, after Kelley had led in prayer, he arose from his position on the second seat from the pulpit, stepped around in front of the first seat and began to speak to the congregation in what that church calls the “unknown tongue” and shortly began to sink to the floor, finally collapsing.  He was lifted to a table and found to be dead.

An inquiry into his death was made Monday morning by Coroner Walter Clayton and after investigating report of the circumstances, a verdict of death from unknown causes was rendered.  It had probably come from apoplexy.—Marion Post

(According to his death certificate, Charles W. Kelly, machinist, of 330 Kent Ave., Centralia, Ill., was born 1 Feb 1871, in Washington Co., Ill., the son of Thomas Kelly, a native of Ireland, and Loucinda Green, a native of Illinois, died 3 Jan 1932, in Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Belle Kelly, and was buried in Hill Crest Memorial Park Cemetery in Centralia, Marion Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Jan 1932:
AGED FORMER RESIDENT DIES AT METROPOLIS

Word was received here Monday from Metropolis, Illinois, of the death of a former resident of this city, Mrs. Amanda McDaniels, Mrs. McDaniels, age 79, died Sunday afternoon at 5 o’clock at the home of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ira McDaniels, after a brief illness.

She leaves to mourn her loss, besides a host of relatives and friends, two sons, Ben McDaniels, of this city, and Daniel McDaniels, of West Frankfort, Illinois.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Ira McDaniels.  Interment was made in the Metropolis Cemetery.

Those from here who attended the funeral were Ben McDaniels and Mr. and Mrs. Mark Tally.  Mrs. Tally is a granddaughter of the deceased.

(Amanda Dexter was born 1 Nov 1846, in Alexander Co., Ill., the daughter of Jeremiah Dexter and Mary Ann Rhoades, and died 10 Jan 1932, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill.  She married on 30 Nov 1865, in Alexander Co., Ill., Francis H. “Franz” McDaniel.  Emma Arimina McDaniel married on 21 Sep 1911, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mark Tally.—Darrel Dexter)

 
JAMES A. BARBER DIES SATURDAY NEAR LEVINGS

James Alexander Barber, age 84 years, died Saturday night at 10:15 o’clock at his home near Levings, following a brief illness.  He had lived in Pulaski County, in the community in which he died, for 82 years, coming there with his parents from Kentucky when he was a small child.

Surviving Mr. Barber are two sons, Harry and Robert, and a daughter, Rose, all of Levings.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the family residence, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Scott, pastor of the Methodist Church, South, of Olmstead.  Interment was made in Calvin Cemetery with G. A. James directing the funeral.

(James A. Barber married Elizabeth Calvin on 3 Jul 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, James Alexander Barber, farmer, was born 25 Oct 1847, in Kentucky, the son of Isaac and Lizzie Barker, died 9 Jan 1932, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Calvin Cemetery near Olmstead, Ill.  His marker in Calvin-Barber Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  James A. Barber Oct. 25, 1847 Jan. 9, 1932 Lizzie R. Barber Jan 18, 1856 July 28, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OLD RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES IN DANVILLE

Many of the older residents of Mound City will remember Edward Fleck, who for some years operated a barber shop here.  Word was received Monday of his death.  Mr. Fleck was a Spanish-American War veteran.  He died in Danville, Illinois, Monday morning.  The funeral services were held Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at St. Frances de Sales Church at 2756 Ohio Avenue, in Danville.  He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Erna Koelhoffer.

(His death certificate reads:  Edward Fleck, a barber, was born 9 Sep 1872, in Illinois, and died 4 Jan 1932, in Vermillion Co., Ill., and was buried in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, Mo.  He enlisted on 27 Jun 1898, in St. Louis, Mo., as a private in Co. D, 19th U.S. Infantry and was discharged 21 Mar 1899, at Puerto Rico.  When he was admitted to Danville Soldiers’ Home on 29 Jan 1924, he was 51, 5’ 4 ½”, with a fair complexion, brown eyes and grey hair. He was married and his wife, Bertha Fleck, lived at 3828 Iowa Ave., St. Louis, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. CORA MAXWELL DIES MONDAY AT HER HOME

Mrs. Cora Maxwell, age 43 years, wife of James Maxwell, died Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock at her home on Commercial Avenue, following a prolonged illness.

Surviving Mrs. Maxwell are her husband, James Maxwell, and three sons, two by a former marriage.
The funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10:30 at the G. A. James funeral parlors, conducted by Rev. Ralph.  Interment was made at the Thistlewood Cemetery.

(Her death certificate states that Cora Maxwell was born 20 Jan 1888, in Illinois, the daughter of Will Lackey, died 11 Jan 1932, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of James Maxwell, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FISHED AROUND FOR THE REMAINS BUT THEY WERE GONE

Clem Baggett, of Dongola, and Sam Thompson, maintenance man on Route 2, were out in the little creek or branch between Wetaug and Dongola Wednesday, probing around in the water seeking the remains of a man they felt sure must have been killed in a wreck of a truck loaded with cotton bales.  But they found no remains or corpse having escaped alive with bruises and a bad cut, and so they did not locate him.

This truck, loaded with bales, went off the road for some distance, wither attempted to get back on or turn off, struck the railing and abutment, and did a fine crash that left it a twisted frame and wrecked motor and scattered bales of cotton for more than 100 feet from the wreck.  The cab of the car was carried far beyond the creek.

It was a complete wreck, if there ever was one, and how the driver escaped death, is hard to understand, unless he took a flyer through or with the cab and fell clear of the cotton bales.

Anyhow, Baggett and Thompson did not find a dead man.  He had run away.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Jan 1932:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR FRANK B. HITCHCOCK

Frank B. Hitchcock, age 89 years, died Friday morning, January 15, at 1 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. J. Mathis, near Olmsted, following a lingering illness.  He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. W. J. Mathis, with whom he has made his home for the past several years, and one son, Guy Hitchcock, of Karnak.

The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at Salem Church east of Grand Chain.  Interment was made in Salem Cemetery.  G. A. James was director in charge of the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Frank B. Hitchcock was born 2 Dec 1842, in Illinois, died 15 Jan 1932, in Road District 4 in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Salem Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill.  Wesley Jackson Mathis married Ida Francis Hitchcock on 8 Apr 1894, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DAMAGE SUIT OVER DEATH OF CHILD UP IN COURT

The damage suit against George Steger, of Cairo, for the death of the 5-year-old Longergan child of Mounds was to have started yesterday afternoon.  It was to have been up first thing Thursday, but the Reynolds vs. Hart case occupied more time than was expected and the delay took place.

This is a case wherein Steger is sued because the Longergan child was struck by the car he was driving and from those injuries died.  The child ran out into the street as Steger was passing, and the accident happened.

Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Jan 1932:
Frank B. Hitchcock Dies near Olmstead

Frank B. Hitchcock, age 89 years, died Friday morning, January 15, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. J. Mathis, near Olmstead.

Mr. Hitchcock is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Mathis, and one son, Guy Hitchcock, of Karnak.  Mrs. Harry Koonce, of Villa Ridge, formerly of Mounds, is a granddaughter.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at Salem, near Grand Chain.  Interment was made in Salem Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.
 
GORED BY BULL

Henry Bruner, aged sixty-five years, gored to death by a bull Thursday on the lawn of his farm home near Harvard.—Ogle County Reporter.
 
Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Jan 1932:
Eugene Yoakum Dies Friday at Anna Hospital

Eugene Yoakum, age 70, died Friday, January 22, at the Anna State Hospital, where he had been a patient for a number of years.

Mr. Yoakum, a former Illinois Central employee of Mounds, is survived by his widow, Mrs. Annie Yoakum, of West Frankfort; a sister, Mrs. Ellen Ellenwood, of Mound City; and a brother, William Yoakum, of Chicago.

Funeral services were held at the family residence Sunday afternoon conducted by the Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the First Baptist Church.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, with Hartwell & Ryan in charge.

(U. S. G. Yoakum, 30, of New Grand Chain, farmer, born in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of Jackson Yoakum, married on 25 Jun 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Anna Jacques, 35, born in Grand Chain, the daughter of John Barbour and Miss Cane.  A death certificate states that U. S. Grant Yokum was born 12 Aug 1868, in Illinois, the son of W. J. Yokum, died 22 Jan 1932, in Union Co., Ill., the husband of Barbara Yokum, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Prominent Union County Lawyer Dies Sunday

Attorney Charles C. Crawford, of Jonesboro, died suddenly Sunday morning at his home as the result of a heart attack.  His death was unexpected as there had been no indication of the trouble.

Mr. Crawford was a son of the late Judge Monroe C. Crawford, of Jonesboro, and was city attorney of Anna.  He had been mentioned as a probable candidate for lieutenant governor on the Democratic ticket.

(Charles C. Crawford married Emma Lence on 25 Sep 1904, in Union Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Charles Carroll Crawford was born 13 Sep 1872, in Jonesboro, Ill., the son of Monroe C. Crawford, a native of Benton, Ill., and Sarah I. Wilbanks, a native of Mt. Vernon, Ill., died 25 Jan 1932, in Jonesboro, Ill., husband of Emma Crawford, and was buried in Jonesboro Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Prominent Bardwell, Ky., Man Dies of Pneumonia

R. W. Roland, 68, of Bardwell, Ky., died at his home in that city Tuesday of last week after a short illness of pneumonia.  He was a prominent citizen of his community, active in church work and in the Odd Fellows Lodge and he had served as sheriff of the county in which he had always lived.

Mr. Rowland was a brother of the late Mrs. T. L. Somers and had been a frequent visitor in Mounds during his sister’s lifetime.

(His death certificate states that Robert Walter Rowland was born 9 Aug 1854, in Kentucky, the son of White Rowland and Elizabeth Harper, natives of Kentucky, died 19 Jan 1932, in Bardwell, Carlisle Co., Ky., of lobar pneumonia, and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Called to Tennessee by Death of Mother

Mrs. Hugh L. Atherton was called to Palmersville, Tenn., the first of the week by the illness and death of her mother, Mrs. Biggs, wife of Dr. Biggs, of that city.  Death came at 11 o’clock Monday night, January 25.

Mrs. Biggs was a sister of Mrs. Clem F. Melton, of Mounds, and her maiden name was McWherter.
Funeral services were delayed until the arrival of a brother from Washington, D.C., and were held Thursday morning.

(Her death certificate states that Martha C. Biggs, born in Tennessee in 1865, the daughter of Dallis McWherter and Sina Webb, natives of Tennessee, died 25 Jan 1932, in Palmersville, Weakley Co., Tenn., of mitral regurgitation, aged 66 years, 5 months, and 3 days.  She was buried in Palmersville Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Feb 1932:
MRS. ELIZABETH BADGLEY PASSES AWAY TUESDAY

Mrs. Elizabeth Badgley passed away Tuesday, January 26, about 11 o’clock at her home in Grand Chain.

Funeral services were held Thursday at the Catholic church with Rev. Fr. Orlett officiating and interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery by the side of her husband, who preceded his wife in death about a year ago.

Surviving Mrs. Badgley are two sons, Frank and Ray, and two daughters, Mrs. Clemson Roche and Mrs. Fritz Reichert.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(August Fournie, 24, farmer of Grand Chain, Ill., born in Belleville, Ill., son of Prosper Fournie and Addie Measenber, married on 12 May 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Indiana Fields, 17, born in New Grand Chain, Ill., daughter of Ezekial Field and M. B Metcalf.  Prosper Fournie married Adelaide Miamber on 8 Jan 1850, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Eliza Badgley was born in Illinois, the daughter of Prosper Faurnie and Adaline Meamber, natives of France, and was the wife of Henry August Badgley.  Her marker in St. Catherine’s Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Eliza Badgley Born Aug. 2, 1862 Died Jan. 26, 1932.  She is buried beside August Badgley Born Oct. 17, 1855 Died Jan. 3, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
RESPECTED COLORED CITIZEN DIES AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

Edward Greensbury (colored), of Grand Chain, age 56 years, passed away at his home Thursday about 9 o’clock.  He was the father of Mrs. A. C. Cochran and one of the best respected colored citizens of Grand Chain.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon and interment was made in a private cemetery.  G. A. James was the funeral director.

(His death certificate states that Edward Greensbury was born 11 Apr 1854, in Arkansas, the son of Lewis Grensbury, died 28 Jan 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Catharine Greensbury, and was buried in a private cemetery at Grand Chain, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

Mrs. Curmitt Stubblefield was born in Lee County, Arkansas, in 1909.  Later she confessed a hope in Christ at Hans, Ark., at the age of 13 and later moved to Ullin, Illinois, where she joined the Baptist Church and has lived a constant Christian life.  Everyone that has made her acquaintance had made a friend.

In 1927, she was united in marriage to Claudia Stubblefield at Ullin and then they moved to Perks and resided there until God saw fit to call her at rest.

She leaves to mourn her loss a mother and father, Mrs. and Mrs. Sam Harbor; a husband and a daughter, Samalpha Stubblefield; one sister, Lela Harper; one brother, Oscar Harbor; and other relatives and a host of friends.

The funeral was conducted in Perks Baptist church preached by Rev. Wilson of Cairo, assisted by Rev. Turner from Tamms.  The Knights and Daughters of Taborn had charge of the body and E. J. Ford of Dongola was the funeral director.

(Her death certificate reads:  Curmit Stubblefield, black, was born 18 Aug 1909, in Arkansas, the daughter of Sam Harper and Nancy Kimmins, natives of Tennessee, died 28 Jan 1932, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., the wife of Cloudie Stubblefield, and was buried in Cypress Grove Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER DONGOLA WOMAN DIED AT HER HOME IN NEW ORLEANS

The many friends of Mrs. Norman Casper, formerly of Dongola, will be grieved to learn that she died at her home in New Orleans at 1:30 o’clock a.m. Monday.  No further particulars as to the funeral arrangements were available.

Mrs. Casper is survived by her husband, and two young daughters, a sister, Mrs. Charles McAllister, of New Burnsides, besides many other relatives.

Before her marriage, she was formerly Miss Vivian Pritchett of Dongola.  She was well and favorably known and her death followed an illness of three years will bring much sorrow to all who knew her. She was a daughter-in-law of W. I. Casper, formerly of New Burnsides, but now residing in Cottage Hill, Fla.

(Her death certificate states that Vivian Pritchett Casper, 42, died 1 Feb 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Badgley spent last Friday in Grand Chain where they attended the funeral of the former’s aunt, Mrs. Gus Badgley.
 
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Titus have returned from Harrisburg, Illinois, where they were called by the death of Mrs. Titus’ mother, Mrs. Lewis.  (Mounds)

(Her death certificate states that Maud Clare Lewis was born 8 May 1863, in Dudley, Ohio, the daughter of Thomas Parker and Lucinda Gibbs, a native of Ohio, died 30 Jan 1932, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill., wife of A. W. Lewis, and was buried in Sunset Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Eliza Badgley, of Grand Chain, passed away at her home Tuesday, January 26, at the age of 69 years.  Funeral services were held at the Catholic church Thursday morning at 10 o’clock.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral. (Olmstead)
 
Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Feb 1932:
Called to Harrisburg

Dr. and Mrs. J. R. Titus were called to Harrisburg Saturday by the death of Mrs. Maud Lewis, wife of A. W. Lewis, former Saline County Circuit Judge, and stepmother of Mrs. Titus.  Funeral services were held Monday.  Mrs. Lewis was a member of the first library board at Harrisburg and had twice been president of the Women’s Federated Club of that city.
 
Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Armstrong have returned from Quincy, where they were called by the death of Mr. Armstrong’s stepfather, Mr. Patton.

(The death certificate states that John D. Patton was born 26 Feb 1843, in Pennsylvania, the son of Michael S. Patton and Sarah Ann Shopp, died 28 Jan 1932, in Riverside, Adams Co., Ill., husband of Margaret Patton, and was buried in Quincy, Ill.  He enlisted on 15 Feb 1865, at Sumner, Ill., as a private in Co. E, 154th Illinois Infantry and was discharged 31 Jul 1865, in Nashville, Tenn.  He was disabled because of hemorrhoids contracted in June 1865 at Talona, Tenn.  He was buried in Sunset Cemetery at Quincy.  He entered and left the soldiers’ home at Milwaukee, Wis., five times between 1904 and 1912.  His nearest relative was listed as his sister, Ellie C. White, 620 E. Locust St., Harrisburg, Ill.  John D. Patton was also a resident of the soldiers’ home at Leavenworth, Kan., between 1904 and 1915.  When he entered the soldiers’ home at Danville, Ill., he was described as 5’ 6”, with light complexion, blue eyes, and grey hair.  He was a Protestant, carpenter, widower, and had lived in Harrisburg, Ill.  He was admitted and left the home 11 times between 1906 and 1922.  His nearest relative was his brother-in-law, W. N. White, of Harrisburg, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Rev. and Mrs. T. C. Ury were called to Jonesboro on Tuesday of this week on account of the death and burial of an aunt, Mrs. J. W. Ury.

(D. Webb Ury, 27, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Thomas Ury and Leah Cruse, married on 23 May 1886, in Union Co., Ill., Sarah J. Brown, 27, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Henry Brown and Anna Cook.  Her death certificate states that Sarah Jane Ury was born 21 Feb 1856, in Jonesboro, Ill., the daughter of Henry Brown, a native of Jonesboro, Ill., and Anna Cook, and died 1 Feb 1932, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill., wife of Webb Ury.  Her marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Sarah Jane wife of Webb Ury 1856-1932 Norris & Son Service.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WISHED SHE DIE IN CHURCH AND DID

Mrs. Martha Carter, 71, who always wanted to die in church, dropped dead while attending church services at Bush Sunday night.  She has always expressed the idea that she wanted to die in church.—Herrin News
             (Don D. Carter married Martha J. Wall on 4 Sep 1877, in Franklin Co., Ill.  D. D. Carter married Martha Wall on 5 Feb 1879.  Her death certificate states that Martha Carter was born 11 Jul 1860, in Franklin Co., Ill., the daughter of William Walls and Lucinda McKee, native of Tennessee, and died 24 Jan 1932, in Bush, Williamson Co., Ill.  Her marker in East Fork Cemetery in West Frankfort, Ill., reads:  Martha Jane Carter July 11, 1860 Jan. 25, 1932 Don D. Carter 1850 June 29, 1927.—Darrel Dexter)


Edward McDonald returned Thursday from Eldorado, where he attended the funeral of his brother-in-law.  Mrs. McDonald remained for longer stay with the family of the deceased.  (Mound City)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Feb 1932:
COLORED WOMAN BURIED IN NATIONAL CEMETERY

An aged colored woman, Mrs. Annie Jenkins, of 823 Twenty-second Street, who died Tuesday at the age of 87 years, was buried Saturday in the National Cemetery near Mound City in the same grave with her husband, who was a veteran of the Civil War.  Her husband was buried there many years ago.

The law governing national cemetery permits the widow of a soldier to be buried in the grave of her husband.  Mrs. Jenkins leaves a daughter, Mrs. Ernestine Cole, of Cairo, and two granddaughters, Irene Malone, of Chicago, and Helen Taylor, of New York.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Attaway, pastor at Ward Chapel, Saturday, at 12:30 and the cortege proceeded to the national cemetery immediately after the services.

(Her death certificate states that Annie Jenkins, black, was born 10 May 1844, in Smithland Ky., the daughter of William Jones, died 2 Feb 1932, in Cairo, Ill., the widow of Captin Jenkins, and was buried in the National Cemetery at Mound City.  Her interment record states she was the widow of Milton alias Captain Jenkins, 1st class boy, U.S.S. Clara Dolsen, U.S. Navy under Gen. Lyon during the Civil War.  He enlisted 17 Jan 1863, to serve until the end of the war.  He received an invalid pension and she received a widow’s pension at his death.  Milton Jenkins married Anna Davis on 17 May 1866, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
COLORED TEACHER OF THIS COUNTY SLAIN BY HUSBAND

Pulaski County officials have been notified of the tragic death in Chicago of Ophelia Avant Cox, teacher, colored, for 12 years a teacher in the colored schools of Pulaski County.  Mrs. Cox was well known and highly respected and was born and reared in this county.  She was engaged in 1930 and 31 in the Hall Grove School near Wetaug, completing the 12th year in the county before moving to Chicago.
A letter received by officials from her brother stated that Mrs. Cox had been murdered by her husband, from whom she had separated.  Her husband then committed suicide.

(Her death certificate states that Ophelia Cox was the daughter of Multon Avent and Harriett Ferguson, the wife of Edward Cox, and died 29 Jan 1932, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill.  Her husband’s death certificate states that Edgar Cox, black teamster and iceman, was born about 1900 in Tennessee, died 29 Jan 1932, in Chicago, Ill., and was buried in Restvale Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Feb 1932:
WILLIAM RICE DIES AT HIS HOME IN GREENVILLE

William P. Rice, formerly of Mound City, but for the past three years residing in Greenville, Illinois, passed away at his home Monday according to word received in Mound City Monday evening.

Mr. Rice for many years made Mound City his home.  He was formerly a carpenter and then he embarked in the restaurant business which he conducted until he left for Greenville with his family about three years ago.

Mr. Rice was 58 years of age and had been in poor health for the last year of his life.  He was only confined to his bed about a week.  His son, Harry Rice, well known big league baseball player who for years appeared as an outfielder for the St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers, and New York Yankees.  At present he is with the Baltimore Orioles.

Mr. Rice is survived by his wife, Mrs. Minnie Rice, two sons, Harry and Lester, all of Greenville; and other relatives.

Funeral services were to have been held Tuesday, but owing to the inclemency of the weather the remains were taken to the home of his brother in Carterville and Wednesday they were taken to Makanda the birthplace of Mr. Rice, where interment was made.

Friends of the family in this community will hear of the passing of Mr. Rice with deep regret.  During his residence in this city he made many friends.

(W. P. Rice married Minnie Benson on 2 Oct 1898, in Jackson Co., Ill.  Joseph S. Rice married Margaret T. Smith on 23 Oct 1872, in Jackson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that William Perry Rice was born 6 Oct 1873, in Makanda, Ill., the son of Joseph S. Rice, a native of Illinois, and Margaret Smith, a native of Tennessee, died 15 Feb 1932, in Greenville, Bond Co., Ill., farmer and railroad gear carpenter, the husband of Minnie May Rice, and as buried in Evergreen Cemetery at Makanda.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SILAS E. BUCHER PASSED AWAY WEDNESDAY AT MOUNDS

Silas E. Bucher, lifelong resident of this county, died at his home about a mile and a quarter from Mounds Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock after an illness of a year.  A prominent man in the community, well liked and widely known, his many friends will grieve at his passing.

Mr. Bucher was born in Rafensberg, Wurtenberg, Germany, a little over 58 years ago and came to this county with his mother, two brothers and one sister in 1887, and settled near Mounds where he has always lived and farmed.

He continued in active life until about a year ago, when, following the extraction of many teeth, he seemed to fail and a general breakdown followed.  Influenza brought him to death’s door.

He was married to Miss Mary Valley in 1891 at Cairo.  She passed away on October 25, 1911.  The children who survive are Louis E. Sr., Mrs. C. C. Taylor, Mrs. Everett Taylor, and John Bucher, all of Mounds.  One daughter died in early childhood.

There are four brothers, Eberhardt Bucher, of Cairo, Joe and Carl of the same city, and Stephen of Freeport, Illinois; and one sister, Mrs. William Becker, of Freeport.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the St. Raphael’s Catholic Church and interment will be made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

(Frank S. Bucher married Mary Valley on 25 Nov 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Silas Bucher was born 6 May 1858, in Germany, the son of Aloysus Bucher and Marie Miller, natives of Germany, died 17 Feb 1932, in Pulaski, Illinois, the husband of Mary Bucher, and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker reads:  Silas Bucher 1858-1932 Father.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MISS VERA KARRAKER DIES AT HER HOME IN ULLIN

Miss Vera Karraker, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Karraker, passed away at her home here Saturday at 6:00 p.m. after an illness of twenty-two days with pneumonia and typhoid fever.  Vera, having moved here several years ago with her parents from Dongola, entered the Ullin schools and has attended them since.

Besides her parents, she is survived by two sisters, Bernetta and Sylvia Gail; also other relatives.
Funeral services were held at the Lutheran church of Dongola Monday afternoon.

(Her death certificate states that Vera Arama Karraker was born 10 Aug 1919, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Raymond Karraker and Gladys Lentz, natives of Dongola, Ill., died 13 Feb 1932, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Vera daughter of Raymond & Gladys Karraker 1919-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DR. WILL WHITEAKER SERIOUSLY ILL

Word has been received from Amos Compton that Dr. Will Whiteaker, who is practicing medicine at Dongola and who is in the Missouri Baptist Hospital, is suffering from cancer of the throat.  Friends in Mound City are very sorry to learn of Dr. Whiteaker’s condition.
 
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Rushing attended the funeral of Dr. Baker in Anna Sunday.  (Mounds)

(Miles D. Baker, 23, of Grassy Township, Williamson Co., Ill., married Rhoda J. Gallegly, 23, from Rich Precinct, Union Co., Ill., on 22 Mar 1877, at the house of Thomas Gallegly in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Miles David Baker was born 10 Dec 1853, in Williamson Co., Ill., the son of Johnathon Baker, a native of North Carolina, and Catherine Sanders, a native of Tennessee, died 11 Feb 1932, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Rhoda Jane Gallegly, and was buried in Anna Cemetery.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Dr. Miles D. Baker Dec. 10, 1853-Feb. 11, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
PULASKI WOMAN PASSES WAY

Mrs. Pleasant Roach, age 62 years, passed away at her home in Pulaski Wednesday following an illness of long duration.  Mrs. Roach was a well-known and highly respected lady in Pulaski and her death has brought much sadness to the community in which she lived.

Surviving Mrs. Roach are her husband and five children, Ala Eliston by a former marriage, Mamie Jean and Emma Skyles of Aurora, Illinois, and Edith Orvom and Sallie Roach, of Pulaski.

Funeral services were conducted Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. R. E. Cory of the Methodist Church, South, and interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.  W. J. Aldred directed the funeral.

(B. F. Eliston married Caroline Prater on 20 Jun 1889, in Effingham Co., Ill.  Pleasant Roach married Callie Prater on 26 May 1894, in Effingham Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Clara Roach was born 11 Sep 1869, in Mason, Ill., the daughter of Brice Prater, a native of Pennsylvania, died 10 Feb 1932, in Pulaski, Ill., wife of Ples Roach, and was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery.  Her marker reads:  Pleasant Roach Born May 22, 1869 Died Dec. 18, 1937 Clara Roach Born Sept. 11, 1869 Died Feb. 10, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Feb 1932:
Prominent Farmer Dies Wednesday Afternoon
Silas Bucher Passes after an Illness of Several Weeks

Silas Bucher, age 74, passed away at his home to miles west of Mounds Wednesday afternoon, February 17, at 1:30 o’clock.

He was born in Rafensburg, Württemberg, Germany, May 6, 1858.  Coming to this county in 1887, he settled near Mounds, where he engaged in farming.  In 1898 he was united in marriage to Mary Valle.  To this union were born five children, Augusta dying at the age of three, and Mrs. Bucher on October 25, 1911.

Surviving Mr. Bucher are four children, Louis E. Bucher, John Bucher, Mrs. Clarence Taylor, and Mrs. Everett Taylor; also ten grandchildren.  He is a brother of Eberhard Sr., Joseph Sr., and Karl Bucher, of Cairo, and Mrs. William Becker and Stephen Bucher of Freeport, Ill.

Funeral services will be held at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment will be made in St. Mary’s Cemetery with Funeral Director, G. A. James in charge.
 
Mrs. Clara Roach Dies

Clara Prater Roach was born in Effingham County near Mason, Ill., Sept. 11, 1869, and departed this life at her home in Pulaski, Feb. 10, 1932, at the age of 62 years, 5 months and 28 days.  She was first united in marriage to Frank Elliston.  To this union one son was born, Alvie Elliston, of Moline, Mich.
On May 24, 1894, she was united in marriage to Pleasant Roach, and to this union four children were born, Mrs. Mamie Dean, and Mrs. Emma Skyles, of Aurora, Ill., Mrs. Edith Ervin and Charles Roach, both of Pulaski.  The husband and five children, fifteen grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, one sister and one brother, besides a host of friends are left to mourn her departure.  She was converted and united with the M. E. Church South in 1927 and has been a faithful Christian since that time.  She was a faithful wife and a loving mother and will be sadly missed by all who knew her.

Funeral services were held at the M. E. Church South Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock with interment in the Rose Hill Cemetery.  Undertaker W. H. Aldred was in charge.


Father of Mrs. A. A. Thomas Dies in Tennessee

J. M. Leonard, father of Mrs. A. A. Thomas, of Mounds and long a resident of Dyersburg, Tenn., died Friday, February 5, at the home of a daughter, Mrs. C. W. Jarrell, of Humboldt, Tenn.

The following is taken from the Dyersburg paper:

“Stricken while on a visit to his daughter in Humboldt, J. M. Leonard, 79, well known and highly respected citizen of Dyersburg, died there late Friday at the home of Mrs. C. W. Jarrell.  Mr. Leonard had been visiting her since late in January.

“For a number of years Mr. Leonard was a leading Dyer County farmer.  Later he removed from the country to Dyersburg, where he was connected for about ten years with J. W. Curry and Son, undertakers.  He retired about two years ago.  Mr. Leonard was born at Lebanon, Tennessee, but had spent the most of his life in Dyer County.  He was a member of the Christian Church here.

“Besides Mrs. Jarrell he is survived by Mrs. Aaron Thomas, another daughter; a son, J. Fred Leonard, of Dyersburg; Mrs. Jesse Bradshaw, a niece, with whom he made his home; six other grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

“Services were held at the residence of Mrs. Bradshaw at 2:00 o’clock Saturday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. K. McCorkle, of Dyersburg and the Rev. Mrs. Jenkins of Humboldt.  Burial was in Fairview Cemetery with J. W. Curry and Son in charge of arrangements.
 
Former Pulaski County Teacher Murdered

Mrs. Ophelia Avant Cox, colored, for 12 years a teacher in the colored schools of Pulaski County, was slain recently by her divorced husband, according to word received by county school officials.

Mrs. Cox was well known and highly respected in this county where she was born and where she had lived until recently, when she joined her parents in Chicago.

Soon after killing his wife, Mr. Cox committed suicide.
 
Mrs. George Welch, of Karnak, attended the funeral of Mrs. Pleasant Roach Friday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Alvie Elliston, of Moline, Mich., were called here last week by the illness and death of the former’s mother, Mrs. Roach.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl McIntire spent Tuesday of last week in Metropolis, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. McIntire’s aunt, Mrs. Mary Anderson. (Mound City)

(Thomas R. Anderson married Mary C. Bonifield Brazeale on 9 Mar 1879, in Massac Co., Ill.  William H. Brazell married Mary C. Bonafield on 21 Feb 1869, in Massac Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Mary C. Anderson was born 1 Jul 1850, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of T. J. Bonifield, a native of Virginia, died 7 Feb 1932, in Metropolis, Ill., wife of Thomas Anderson.  She was buried in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Joppa, Ill.
 
Miss Vera Karraker passed away at her home in Ullin Saturday at 6:00 p.m. after an illness of twenty-two days with pneumonia and typhoid fever.  Vera is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Karraker.  Her parents having moved to Ullin several years ago from Dongola, she entered the Ullin schools and has attended them since.  Besides her parents, she is survived by two sisters, Bernetta and Sylvia Gail, also other relatives.

Funeral services were held at the Lutheran church of Dongola Monday afternoon.
 
Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Feb 1932:
William Mason Dies from Injury in Accident

Will Mason, colored, of this city, died Saturday afternoon, February 20, at St. Mary’s Hospital from injuries received when he attempted to catch a northbound freight train on the Illinois Central bridge approach in Cairo about 10 o’clock that morning and fell beneath the wheels of a moving car.  His left leg was severed from his body and he received other injuries.  He was unconscious when taken to the hospital, but was able later to give the attending doctor his name.  His mother, Mrs. Eliza Mason, was called to the hospital and was with him when he died.  Young Mason, who was 27, had been to the Barge Line to seek employment.

He was born in DuQuoin, but had spent most of his life in Mounds, receiving his education in the Douglas School.  He was unmarried.

Funeral services were held Monday at the home of his mother, the Rev. H. S. Lander, pastor of the C. M. E. Church, officiating.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery.
 
Pulaski County Pioneer Resident Dies Tuesday

Mrs. Rachel Adeline Gaunt, of Grand Chain, widow of J. W. Gaunt, died Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, a victim of pneumonia.

Rachel Adeline Porter was born April 29, 1848, in Texas, but drove through to Illinois with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Porter, when a little girl.  She died at the age of 83 years, 9 months, and 23 days, having lived in the Grand Chain neighborhood for more than 70 years.  Her husband, J. W. Gaunt, preceded her in death some 15 years ago.

Mrs. Gaunt is survived by three sons, W. P. Copeland, of Muskogee, Okla., son of a former marriage, and by Fred Gaunt, of Mt. Vernon, Ill., and Joe Gaunt, of Grand Chain.

Funeral services were held at the Congregational church of Grand Chain Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with the Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, in the pulpit.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery with Funeral Director G. A. James in charge.

(Her death certificate states that Rachel Adeline Gaunt was born 28 Apr 1848, in Texas, the daughter of David Porter, a native of Indiana, and Tursey Vandaver, died 23 Feb 1932, in Cairo, Ill., wife of J. W. Gaunt, and was buried in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
E. McReynolds Fatally Wounded by Revolver Shot
Woman Companion Held for Grand Jury Following Coroner’s Inquest

Passersby Tuesday evening shortly after 6 o’clock heard a woman’s scream coming from E. McReynolds’ apartment in the Nolte building on __rt Street and running up the stairway and into the room found McReynolds, wounded by a single shot and Ethel Reed in the room.  ___ O. T. Hudson and Dr. H. J. Elkins were called and McReynolds was given first aid and then removed to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he died about 9:30 o’clock following emergency operation.  The bullet had entered the abdomen near the right hip and had lodged under the skin of his left leg.

Before his death, the wounded man in the presence of Drs. Hudson and Elkins, made the statement that he had been shot by Mrs. Reed.  At the coroner’s inquest, held in Cairo Wednesday afternoon, the coroner’s jury gave the following verdict:

“We find one Ethel Reed to be the unlawful slayer of E. McReynolds” and Sheriff I. J. Hudson of Pulaski County was ordered to hold Mrs. Reed for the grand jury.  Mrs. Reed made no statement at the inquest, but has been quoted as saying earlier that it was suicide on the part of McReynolds.

McReynolds, whose age was 46, had lived in Mounds for a number of years.  He was a switchman for the Illinois Central, but at the time of his death was on the extraboard.  Early in 1931, he lost his wife and an infant daughter, Mary Faith, was taken into the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Bernaeur, of Madison, Ark., former residents of Mounds.  Report was made some two months ago that he had married Mrs. Reed, but it is claimed that she has stated since the shooting that she and McReynolds were not married.
Surviving him are two brothers and a sister.

The body was brought to the funeral home of Hartwell & Ryan.  At 1:30 o’clock Thursday it was taken to the home of Mrs. McReynolds’ parents, Mr. and Mrs. Engleert, of Paducah, Ky.  Funeral services were held Friday morning at the Catholic church in Paducah with interment in the Paducah cemetery.
 
Mrs. W. T. Curtsinger Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. W. T. Curtsinger, widow of the late W. T. Curtsinger, died Friday morning, February 19, at 5 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Carol L. Pulley after a lingering illness.

Mrs. Curtsinger’s maiden name was Addie Trimble.  She was the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. R. N. Trimble, her father having been a minister of the Church of Christ in Nashville and other points in Tennessee, and in Mayfield, Ky.  Her age was 68.

For many years Mr. and Mrs. Curtsinger made their home in Cairo, Illinois.  Since the death of her husband, she has lived with her daughter and family.

Surviving her are the one daughter, Mrs. Pulley, and four sons, U. L. Curtsinger, of New York City, Claude Curtsinger, of Fulton, Ky., Robert and A. J. Curtsinger, of Cairo; four grandchildren, Carolyn and Bill Pulley, of this city, Lillian and Betty Curtsinger, of Cairo; two sisters, Mrs. Nannie Welch, of Toledo, Ohio, and Mrs. Cora Neal, of Milan, Tenn.

Funeral services were held at the James Funeral Home Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Mr. McAnally, an elder in the Christian Church of Cairo, of which Mrs. Curtsinger was long a member.   Interment was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery, the grave being covered with a mound of beautiful flowers.

(Her death certificate states that Addie E. Curtsinger was born 6 May 1863, in Tennessee, the daughter of Robert Trimble and Loucinda Nance, natives of Tennessee, died 19 Feb 1932, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of William T. Curtsinger.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Daniels, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bundschuh and daughter, Katie, and Mrs. Edna Freeze attended the funeral of Silas Bucher, of Mounds, Friday.  (Ullin)
 
Oscar Atherton, Arthur Hemming, and Mrs. Jesse Cunningham of this city (Mound City), and Mrs. Olga Rice, of Mounds, went to Carbondale Tuesday to join the funeral party of Mr. Rice and were going to Makanda, but the roads were so bad that they were compelled to take Mr. Rice’s body to the home of his brother’s in Carterville and wait until the following day for the funeral.

 
Several from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral of Silas Bucher, which was held in Mounds Friday afternoon.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Hogendobler and Mrs. William Bride went to DuQuoin Friday, where they were called by the death of Mrs. D. W. Davis.  Mrs. Davis is the mother of L. R. Davis, whose wife was the former Miss Eloise Hogendobler. (Villa Ridge)

(Her death certificate states that Hattie Flora Davis, of Christopher, Ill., was born 21 May 1869, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Thomas Jefferson Eddleman and Ellen Jenkins, a native of Tennessee, died 18 Feb 1932, in DuQuoin, Perry Co., Ill., the wife of David W. Davis, and was buried in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at DuQuoin.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHILD CHOKES

The 18-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Stallings, of Carmi, choked to death Sunday morning.  It is believed something lodged in his throat, but he died before a physician arrived and in an examination later, the object could not be found.—Grayville Mer. Ind.

(His death certificate states that Victor R. Stallings was born 23 Aug 1930, in Illinois, the son of Emil Stallings and Flaura Henson, natives of Illinois, died 7 Feb 1932, in Carmi, White Co., Ill., and was buried in Asbury Cemetery, Ridgway, Gallatin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to our neighbors and friends for their kindness during the illness of our beloved father, Silas Bucher, and following his death. We are especially grateful to Father Gilmartin for his services.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Bucher
Mr. and Mrs. John Bucher
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Taylor
Mr. and Mrs. Everett Taylor
 
MOTHER AND SON BURIED

Word was received here of the death of Pat Adams, an old resident of Hurst.  Last Monday, Mr. Adams and his aged mother, Mrs. Hancock, were laid to rest in the Carterville cemetery.  While living here some few years ago, Mr. Adams passed on to the great beyond, thus leaving him all alone and since that time he has made his home with his mother at Carterville.  Their many local friends were grieved to hear of their departure and many from here attended the last rites.—Hurst News

(Sarah E. Peters, 18, of Hardin Co., Ky., married on 17 Oct 1859, in Hardin Co., Ky., John C. Adams, 22, of Hardin Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Sarah E. Hancock was born 6 Jan 1841, in Elizabethtown, Ky., the daughter of Abraham Peter and Miss Paul, natives of Kentucky, died 6 Feb 1932, in Carterville, Williamson Co., Ill., wife of Tom Hancock.  She was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Carterville, Ill.  Pat Adams is likely the same person as Richard Adams, railroad brakeman, whose death certificate states was born 9 Apr 1866, in Kentucky, the son of John Adams and Sarah E. Peters, natives of Kentucky, died 6 Feb 1932, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Carterville, Ill.  Richard Adams married Nannie Chamness on 1 Nov 1893, in Williamson Co., Ill.  His marker in Oakwood Cemetery was Richard G. Adams Born 9 Apr 1865 Died 6 Feb 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

I desire to thank the many friends for their expressions of sympathy and their kindness to me in my grief over the loss of my son, Will Mason.  Especially do I wish to thank those who gave the use of their cars and those who sent the beautiful flowers.  These deeds of kindness will ever be held in grateful remembrance.
Mrs. Eliza Mason

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Feb 1932:
AGED GRAND CHAIN WOMAN PASSES WAY

Mrs. Rachael Adeline Gaunt, wife of the late Joe W. Gaunt, Sr., passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo Tuesday morning.  Mrs. Gaunt was 83 years, 9 months, and 25 days old.

Mrs. Gaunt had made her home with her son, J. W. Gaunt, Jr., for several years.  She fell about three weeks ago and fractured her hip.  She was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary soon after her fall.  She contracted pneumonia which caused her death.

Surviving Mrs. Gaunt are three sons, Joe Gaunt, of Grand Chain; Fred Gaunt, of Mt. Vernon, Illinois, and W. P. Copeland, of Muskogee, Okla.; besides several grandchildren and a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church in Grand Chain.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.  G. A. James of Mound City directed the funeral.
 
MRS. J. R. CRAWFORD, FORMER VILLA RIDGE WOMAN, DIES

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. J. R. Crawford, of Sarasota, Fla.  She will be remembered as Miss Frances Tanner.  The early part of her girlhood being spent in Villa Ridge.  She left there eight years ago for Lakeland, Fla., where she met and married J. R. Crawford.  She had been a resident of Sarasota, Fla., for the past four years.

She leaves to mourn her loss her husband and two baby girls, Betty June, age three years, and Mary Frances, age two months; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Tanner, of Lakeland, Fla.; three brothers, Frank, Wiatt, and William; a sister, Mrs. J. E. Wyatt, all of Lakeland; and a sister, Mrs. J. W. French, of St. Louis.

Services were held at the Thacker Van Gilder Chapel with Rev. H. H. Reece of the First Baptist Church officiating.  Interment was made in the cemetery there.
 
COLORED MAN FATALLY INJURED

Will Mason, colored, of Mounds, fell beneath the wheels of a car when he attempted to catch a northbound freight train on the I. C. bridge approach above Sycamore Street about ten o’clock Saturday morning. His left leg was cut off and he suffered other injuries.

He was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo where he underwent an operation, passing away shortly afterward.  He became conscious long enough before the operation to mumble his name.

(His death certificate states that William Mason, black, single, was born 3 Feb 1905, in DuQuoin, Ill., the son of William Mason, a native of Columbus, Ga., and L. Ferguson, a native of Jackson, Tenn., died 20 Feb 1932, at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Mounds Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

MOUNDS WOMAN DIES

Mrs. W. T. Curtsinger, age 68 years, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. L. Pulley, in Mounds Friday morning, February 19.  Until two years ago, she had made her home in Cairo, but moved to Mounds at that time and made her home with her daughter.

Surviving Mrs. Curtsinger are her daughter, Mrs. Culley; and four sons, U. L. Curtsinger, of Cairo, besides other relatives. Four grandchildren, Lillian and Betty Curtsinger, of Cairo, Carolyn and Bill Pulley, of Mounds. She was a devout member of the Christian Church of Cairo.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 at the funeral home of G. A. James in Mounds, followed by interment in Spencer Heights Cemetery.
 
WOMAN HELD FOR KILLING McREYNOLDS

Mrs. Ethel Read Galbraith, 28 years of age, is held in the county jail on the charge of killing E. “Shorty” McReynolds, 45, at Mounds Tuesday night.  Their two accounts of the shooting are radically different.  The statement of the dying man made to two doctors was that she had shot him because he would not give her $3,000 and a coat.  Her statement was that he committed suicide.

McReynolds formerly a switchman, was working in a restaurant.  His wife died early in 1931 and he is said to have been living with Mrs. Ethel Read Galbraith in the Nolte apartments for three months.  The shooting took place about 6 p.m. Tuesday in their room.

Her version of the shooting is that he had been talking about his financial condition and had expressed his opinion that he would buy a farm in Kentucky and live there.  McReynolds had lost some money in the Paducah bank failure.  He is reported to be in failing health.  He picked up a revolver, a 38 caliber, pressed it to his side, saying, “Well, here goes,” and fired.  The bullet passed through his intestines, puncturing them a number of times, ranging downward and inflicted a wound that was fatal in some two hours.  The wound showed powder burns.

Her screams attracted the attention and Dr. O. T. Hudson and Dr. J. H. Wilkins were called and gave emergency treatment, rushing the man to the hospital, where he died two hours later under an emergency operation.

McReynolds lost his wife about a year ago and is said to have been living with Ethel Read Galbraith. His child, about a year old, is in the hands of friends or relatives.  He was a switchman, until laid off, and had been working in a restaurant where she worked, it is stated.

He was supposed to have close relatives, but his father-in-law claimed the body and funeral services are being held today in Paducah.  He left a will, it is further understood, disposing of his property by leaving it to his child.

(His death certificate states that E. McReynolds was born 12 Jan 1885, died 24 Feb 1932, at St. Mary’s Infirmary, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Paducah, Ky.  His wife, Rena McReynolds, was born 18 Feb 1894, in Paducah, Ky., the daughter of Thomas C. Glert and Sallie McMann, natives of Kentucky, died 21 Jan 1931, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Mount Carmel Cemetery.  A marker in Mount Carmel Cemetery in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky., reads:  Father Elbert McReynolds Jan. 11, 1885-Feb. 23, 1932 A kind husband and father.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Daniels, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bundschuh and daughter, Katie, and Mrs. Edna Freeze attended the funeral of Silas Bucher in Mounds Friday.  (Ullin)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Mar 1932:
WILLIAM T. SMOOT PASSES AWAY

William T. Smoot, age 83, passed away at the home of his son living about one mile east of Pulaski Friday morning.  Mr. Smoot was one of the oldest and best known men in Pulaski County.  He had resided in the country for more than a half century, his family being reared in this county.

He is survived by seven sons and one daughter.  The sons are Charles Smoot, Sikeston, Mo., W. O. Smoot, Mounds; Ollie and George Smoot, Villa Ridge; Frank Smoot, of Detroit, Mich.; Clyde Smoot, of Chicago.  The daughter is Mrs. Frieda Smith, of Detroit.  He also leaves one cousin, John Smoot, of Mounds, and a large circle of friends who held him in high esteem.

Funeral services were held at Liberty Church at 2:30 o’clock Saturday afternoon with Rev. Allen of Villa Ridge officiating.  Interment was made in the Liberty Cemetery.  W. H. Aldred directed the funeral.

(William T. Smoot married Malinda Kennedy on 12 Apr 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William T. Smoot, 47, born in North Carolina, son of Liphlet Smoot and Mary Holeman, married 2nd on 9 Jan 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Lucretia M. Lowe, 26, born in Pulaski, Ill., daughter of James H. Atherton and Susan McClellan.  His death certificate states that William Thomas Smoot was born 8 Oct 1848, in North Carolina, the son of Liflett Smoot and Martha Holden, a native of North Carolina, died 26 Feb 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Liberty Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SISTER DIED IN HERRIN

Mrs. Mary Ritz, sister to George Martin, of this city, and John Martin, of Olmstead, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Abe Wingett, in Herrin, on last Saturday at the age of 84.  She had been in failing health for some time and in critical condition for a week before her death.  Mrs. Piltz spent about a half a century of her life in Carterville.

John Martin attended the funeral Monday, but George Martin was in Decatur and the telegram reached him late and at a time when he was tied up in affairs and could not come.  Mrs. Piltz was their oldest sister by their mother’s first marriage.

(Her death certificate states that Mary Jane Piltz was born 5 Oct 1845, in Osage, Ill., the daughter of Jim Mannering and Narsish Russell, died 27 Feb 1932, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried in Carterville, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A Peculiar Death Reported at Olmstead

A peculiar death certificate has been filed with J. H. Harbison, village clerk at Olmsted, which bears the name of John Blume, and no one knows if that is the right name.

About January 28, or the day before, a farmer near Olmsted found a man in his barn so ill that he was unconscious.  No one knew who he was or anything about him and he was taken to the county farm by Frank Schults and on January 28 died.  His death certificate said that he died of locked bowels.

When he died, a small notebook with the name of John Blume, was found on him.  It was concluded that his name was that.  His age was about 70 and again, it was a mere estimation.  Where he lived, who he was, his parents, relatives or friends, no one knew.

He was just a hobo, who became so sick that he was unable to tell anyone who he was and in silence, unknown, unwept, and unsung, passed from among mortals.  An unusual death in this land. Someone’s brother or father or buddy is listed among the missing somewhere.

(The death certificate reads:  John Blume born about 1862 died 30 Jan 1932, in Road District 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at the county farm.—Darrel Dexter)
 
John Martin attended the funeral of his half-sister, Mrs. Phelps, at Herrin, Illinois, this week.  (Olmstead)

(Her name was recorded as Mrs. Piltz elsewhere in the same issue.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dr. Carraker’s father dropped dead at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Dilling, at Herrin, Illinois, Sunday night, at the age of 81 years.  Funeral services will be held at the M. E. church at Anna Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Mr. Caraker was well known at Olmsted and had many friends here (Olmsted).

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Mar 1932:
Old Pulaski County Resident Dies Friday

William Thomas Smoot, a longtime resident of Pulaski County, died Friday, February 26, at the home of a son near Villa Ridge.

Mr. Smoot, who had reached the age of 83 and spent 50 or more of those years in this county, is survived by six sons and one daughter.  The sons are Charles Smoot, of Sikeston, Mo., W. O. Smoot, Mounds; Ollie and George Smoot, Villa Ridge; Frank Smoot, Detroit, Mich.; and Clyde Smoot, of Chicago.  The daughter is Mrs. Frieda Smith of Detroit.  John Smoot of this city is a cousin.

Funeral services were held at Liberty Church at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon with the Rev. E. O. Allen, of Villa Ridge officiating.  Interment was made in Liberty Cemetery in charge of Funeral Director W. H. Aldred.
 
A number from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral of Thomas Smoot which was held at the Liberty Church near Pulaski Saturday afternoon.  Mr. Smoot was one of the oldest residents of Pulaski County.
  
The Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Mar 1932:
Old Resident of County Dies near Ullin Friday

F. W. Ledbetter, of near Ullin, brother of A. Ledbetter of this city, died Friday morning, March 4, at the age of 86 years.  He had been a resident of Pulaski County for more than 70 years.

In 1872 Mr. Ledbetter was married to Sarah Crippen.  To this union twelve children were born.  Mrs. Ledbetter died in 1897.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.  Interment was made in New Hope Cemetery with W. H. Aldred in charge.

(This is Stephen Wiley Ledbetter.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The little son born March 2nd to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Hopper passed away Monday morning at the home of Mrs. Hopper's mother, Mrs. Essie Rives.  The little body was laid to rest Tuesday afternoon in the Rose Hill Cemetery.  Mrs. A. G. Hopper of Pesotum is spending several days with her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest M. Hopper. (Pulaski)
 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Mar 1932:
MOTHER DIED

The mother of Bert Mann, of Ullin, died in Carterville early Wednesday morning at the age of 74 years of a paralytic stroke.  She was ill but a short time before her death.  The funeral will probably be today.

(Her death certificate states that Sarah Elizabeth Mann was born 12 Apr 1856, in Benton Co., Tenn., daughter of Joseph and Martha Elizabeth Green, died 9 Mar 1932, in Carterville, Williamson Co., Ill., wife of R. P. Mann, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Carterville, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
INFANT PASSES AWAY

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hopper passed away at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Jessie Reeves, Sunday.  The little one was only 5 days old.

Funeral services were held at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon with Rev. H. E. Vick, of Tamms officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.  W. H. Aldred directed the funeral.

The baby’s mother was Miss Olga Reeves before her marriage.

(His death certificate states that Charles Russell Hopper was born 2 Mar 1932, in Pulaski, Ill., the son of Ernest Mix Hopper and Olga Irene Reeves, died 7 Mar 1932, and was buried at Pulaski.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Charles Russell Hopper Born March 3, 1932 Died March 8, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 
CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIED AT HOME IN OLMSTEAD

Anthony Wayne Merwin, age 86 years, veteran of the Civil War, passed away at his home in Olmsted Saturday morning following a brief illness.  Mr. Merwin was active for his years and his jolly disposition had won for him many friends.  He had lived in Olmstead for over 40 years.  He was a retired merchant.

Mr. Merwin served as a private in Co. C, 184 Regiment, New York State Volunteers.  He enlisted August 25, 1864, and was discharged June 29, 1865, at City Point, W. Va.

Surviving him are three children he reared, Mrs. Edith Johnson, of Mound City, Mrs. J. W. Mathis, of America, and Mrs. O. A. Burdick, of Momence, Illinois; also several other nieces and nephews.  He was a half-brother of the late Mrs. Williamson of this city, and an aunt of the late A. W. Williamson, of Hollywood, California, but formerly of Mound City.  Another half-sister, Mrs. Wilcox, passed away some time ago in Paducah, Ky.  An own sister, Mrs. Taylor, passed away in California.  The late Wayne Johnson, son of Mrs. Edith Johnson, was named for Mr. Merwin.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist Church, South, Olmstead, with the Rev. E. O. Allen, pastor of the Union Church of Villa Ridge, officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic cemetery at Olmsted.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(Anthony W. Merwin, 19, native of Oswego, N.Y., engineer, with hazel eyes, dark complexion, 5’ 8 ½” high, enlisted 25 Aug 1864, as a private in Co. C, 184th New York Infantry, and was mustered out 29 Jun 1865 at City Point, Va.  A. W. Merwin married Nannie R. Davidge on 27 Mar 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Anthony Wayne Merwin was born 29 Jul 1845, in New York, died 5 Mar 1932, in Olmsted, Pulaski Co., Ill., retired merchant, husband of Nannie Merwin, and was buried at Olmsted.  His marker in Olmsted Masonic Cemetery reads A. W. Merwin Born July 23, 1845 Died March 6, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FATHER OF DR. O. CARAKER PASSED AWAY FEBRUARY 29

Mathias Caraker, of Anna, former Union County supervisor and father of Dr. Oscar Caraker, of Olmsted, died at his daughter’s home in Herrin Monday morning of last week at 6:30 o’clock.

His death was reported to have been caused by a heart attack.  He dropped dead while at the breakfast table.  Relatives here say he had been troubled with heart attacks for several years.

Mr. Caraker was a retired farmer.  He was the son of the late Daniel Caraker and was born and reared in Union County. He spent the larger part of his life in the vicinity of Cobden and Anna.  Born April 5, 1850, he had attained the age of 81 years, 10 months, and 24 days at death.

He was united in marriage to Venecia Jane Stout, at Water Valley, Illinois, September 18, 1878.  He was a member of the Methodist Church at Olmstead, Illinois.

Mr. Caraker served as county supervisor in Union County in 1910 and had served a number of years as justice of the peace and school director in his township.  In his younger days Mr. Caraker taught school in the vicinity of Anna.

His wife preceded him in death six years ago.  He is survived by three children:  Dr. Oscar Caraker, of Olmstead; Melvin Caraker, of Cobden, and Mrs. Clarence Dillard, at Herrin.

(Matthias Caraker, 28, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Daniel Caraker and Nancy Haire, married on 19 Sep 1878, in Union Co., Ill., Jane Stout, 22, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of William J. Stout and Manerva Clutts.  His death certificate states that Mathias Caraker was born 5 Apr 1850, in Union Co., Ill., died 29 Feb 1932, in Herrin, Williamson Co., Ill., and was buried at Anna, Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Matthias Caraker Born April 5, 1850 Died Feb. 29, 1932 Vineca Janey Caraker his wife Born July 23, 1856 Died Sept. 13, 1925 Lulu M. Caraker Adams Born Oct. 2, 1891 Died Aug. 9, 1915 Matthias D. Adams her son Born March 25, 1915 Died Jan. 13, 1916.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

Thomas Monroe Gunn, was born December 18, 1871, near Cobden, Illinois, and departed this life February 28, 1932.  He was 61 years, 2 months and 10 days of age.  Over a period of 61 years this community has known and loved the time honored citizen who has traveled down through the years from boyhood days to three score and one years.  On September 12, 1897, he was united in marriage to Miss Sula Johnson, of Tamaroa.  To this union two children were born.

Although Mr. Gunn had been in poor health for some time, he was always cheerful.  He professed faith in Christ and united with the First Baptist Church at Cobden.  He then removed his membership to Alto Pass Baptist Church where he remained a faithful member of the following lodges:  The Modern Woodman, the Royal Neighbors and the I. O. O. F.  Mr. Gunn was loved by all who knew him and will be greatly missed in his home church, lodge and community.

Funeral services were conducted from the Alto Pass Baptist Church by Rev. M. Wilson and W. W. Hunsaker.  Business places were closed and a large congregation paid tribute to the departed friend, who in passing has left behind beautiful footprints on the sands of time.  The beautiful floral offering bore their silent message of sympathy.  He was laid to rest in Cobden Cemetery.

Mr. Gunn is survived by his wife and two children, Norman Gunn, who resides on the farm, and Miss Margery, a teacher in the Alto Pass School; two grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Nellis Wright, Anna; and one brother, Theodore Gunn, Cobden; and a host of friends and relatives.

(Monroe Gunn, 25, son of Ellis Gunn and Miss Wallace, married on 12 Sep 1897, in Union Co., Ill., Sula Johnson, 21, born in Perry Co., Ill., daughter of M.W. Johnson and Miss Jones. The death certificate of Thomas Monroe Gunn, farmer, states he was born 18 Dec 1871, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Ellis Gunn and Lucinda Wallace, natives of Union Co., Ill., died 28 Feb 1932, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Cobden, Ill.  His marker in Cobden Cemetery reads:  Monroe Gunn Dec. 18, 1871 Feb. 28, 1932 Father.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Relatives here (Alto Pass) have been notified of the death Sunday night of Leo Mathis, of Burksville, who died in a St. Louis hospital following an appendicitis operation Thursday.  The body was consigned to Alto Pass for burial.

(His death certificate states that Leo Harrison Mathis, of Burksville, Ill., was born 31 Jul 1917, in Ellerton, Ill., son of Peter Harrison Mathis and Effie Hoyle, natives of Illinois, died 6 Mar 1932, in East St. Louis, St. Clair Co., Ill.  His marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Leo H. Mathis 1917-1932 Son.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Grandpa Ledbetter passed away Thursday morning at the age of 86 years at Eastwood town at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Eastwood. Besides this daughter are two sons, James and Charlie, and quite a number of grandchildren who are left to mourn his loss.  (Olmstead)

(Stephen J. Ledbetter married Sarah J. Crippen on 5 Dec 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Stephen Wiley Ledbetter was born 24 Apr 1849, in Tennessee, son of Isaac Ledbetter, a native of North Carolina, died 4 Mar 1932, in Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Sarah Jane Ledbetter, and was buried in Road District 3, Ullin, Ill.  Henry Eastwood, 24, born in Olmsted, Ill., son of Ab and Josephine Eastwood, married on 24 Dec 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Lottie Ledbetter, 18, of Ullin, Ill., born in Olmsted, daughter of S. W. and Sarey Ledbetter.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Rutherman, Mrs. George Parson, Mrs. Gordon and Mrs. McBride attended Mr. Caraker’s funeral at Anna last Tuesday.  (Olmstead)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Patrick and children, of Carterville, were called here (Ullin) Thursday on account of the death of Mrs. Patrick’s grandfather, S. W. Ledbetter.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Mar 1932:
Judge Wall Died at Home Saturday

Judge William A. Wall, a resident and prominent attorney of Mound City for 42 years, passed away peacefully last Saturday night about 9:30 o’clock.  His death was due to cancer of the mouth against which all the skill of medical science and his own remarkable courage and vitality availed nothing.

Judge Wall had grown weaker following his visit last fall to Mayo Brothers Hospital at Rochester, Minn., and since he had with him a nurse most of the time.  His troubles began in 1919 when he was attending the Constitutional Convention at Springfield, to which he was a delegate.  Operations and treatments followed, but it has only been the last two years that he had virtually abandoned active law practice.  His death had not been unexpected in the last few weeks.  A coma began Saturday morning and quietly his spirit passed without regaining consciousness.

Judge Wall was closely associated with Mound City and with this end of the state.  He was a man of great energy, winning his way upward into the ranks of lawyers.  His naturally genial nature gave him political advantages which he used at times.  He possessed a keen business mind and besides practicing law, farmed and was connected with banking.

Judge Wall was the son of James B. and Anna Elizabeth Wall, of Lick Creek in Union County and was born August 17, 1864.  His education was that of the district and then he attended Illinois Wesleyan College at Bloomington, Southern Illinois Normal University and the Union Academy at Anna.  He taught school some six years in Union County and two years in Pulaski County to further his studies.  He read law in the offices of some of the prominent lawyers in Union County and on April 15, 1890, he was admitted to the bar.

Very soon after this, or about this time, he came to Mound City to practice law.  Perhaps, while teaching at Villa Ridge, he saw an opening here, anyhow, he came, a young attorney.  Water was around Mound City and to reach here, he came in a boat.  The judge frequently referred to those early days when he began practice and of the few belongings he brought with him to open his office.

But his practice grew and in two years he was elected county judge of this county, which office he held from 1892 to 1896.  Governor Deneen appointed him to fill a vacancy in that office in 1909 and he was elected to serve from 1910 to 1914.  From 1896 to 1904 he was on the state board of equalization and in 1910 he began working in Springfield as a member of the Constitutional Convection as a representative of the 50th senatorial district.

Since that time he engaged in a general practice of law. He was a strong supporter of Roosevelt and had Roosevelt been elected in the Bull Moose Movement, Judge Wall would doubtless have gone to the federal bench.  He has always been a strong Republican and has taken many active parts in campaigns.
Judge Wall was first married to Louise Kaltenbach, of Mayfield, Ky., on January 18, 1892.  She passed away in 1897, leaving one son, Warner, who is now actively engaged here in practice of law since coming home last fall because of the declining health of his father and the needs of Judge Wall’s business.

On June 5, 1907, he married Miss Margaret Cecelia Browner, who with Warner Wall, are the two closest relatives.  There are four sisters, Mrs. Andy Wright, of Anna; Mrs. John Hathaway, of Johnston City; Mrs. William Pender, of Anna; and Mrs. Harry B. Adams, of Anna; and one brother, Sherman B. Wall, of Marion.

In 1896 he was converted at a revival in the Methodist church and became a member of the board of trustees.  He was baptized by Dr. Rice on May 20, 1929, at Rochester, Minn., and united with the Methodist Church here that summer.

He was a member of the Knights of Pythias, I. O. O. F. and Modern Woodmen of America.

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church by Rev. J. W. Ward of Dongola, a Baptist minister, and the one Judge Wall had requested.  Members of the bar associations of several counties were present and the church was crowded beyond capacity by the many who came to pay their respects  interment was at the Villa Ridge cemetery where the Knights of Pythias held their services.
Pallbearers were among the friends and bar associates of Judge Wall and were:  O. C. Trammell, William Bestgen, C. S. Miller, George R. Martin, Joseph O’Sullivan, and H. L. Spaulding.

(James Wall married Ann E. Wright on 4 Oct 1863, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, William Ambrose Wall, attorney at law, was born 17 Aug 1864, in Anna, Ill., the son of James B. Wall, a native of Tennessee, and Ann Wright, a native of Illinois, died 12 Mar 1932, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Margaret Wall, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS INFANT DIES

Caroline May Curther, six weeks old infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Curther, of Mounds passed away at the home of her parents Sunday morning.  The little one is survived by her parents, one sister, a grandfather, two grandmothers, and a great-grandmother, besides several uncles and aunts.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the First Baptist Church. Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

(The surname should be Curtner.—Darrel Dexter)
 
PULASKI COUNTY RESIDENT DIES NEAR MOUNDS FRIDAY

Henry Butler, age 73 years, passed away Friday morning at 6 a.m. at his home near Mounds, where he had resided for more than 60 years.

Surviving him are four sons, Fred, Arville, and Harley, of Mounds, and Dave, of Cache, Illinois.  He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Matilda Ray, of Royalton, Illinois, and 13 grandchildren.  His wife preceded him in death four years.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon in the funeral home of Hartwell and Ryan conducted by the Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

(His death certificate states that Henry Butler was born 30 Sep 1858, in Illinois, the son of Allen Butler, died 11 Mar 1932, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Cynthia Butler, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  Henry Butler married Cynthia Carpenter on 20 Aug 1882, in Franklin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHILD DIES AT VILLA RIDGE

Henry Wiesmeyer, age five years, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis Wismeyer, passed away at his home in Villa Ridge Monday.

Surviving him besides his parents are two brothers, Willie and James, and a sister, Thelma.  He also leaves an uncle, Charles Sanders.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the residence with Rev. Mr. Smith officiating.  Interment was made in Richmond Cemetery.  W. H. Aldred of Pulaski directing the funeral.
 
O. E. BURRIS, BROTHER OF MRS. JOE PRICE, DIES

O. E. Burris, age 70 years, passed away at his home in Vienna at 11 o’clock Wednesday morning.  Mr. Burris was serving his second term as county clerk of Johnson County.  He was very prominent there both as a citizen and a public servant.  Prior to his election as county clerk, Mr. Burris served a four-year term as county treasurer.  Before entering politics, he as a school teacher in Johnson County for many years.

He was a half-brother of Mrs. Joe Price of this city.  Besides Mrs. Price, he is survived by his widow, four children, and several other sisters and brothers.

Mrs. Price will be unable to attend the funeral, but her husband will attend.  Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon.

(Oscar E. Burris married Martha E. Whiteaker on 12 Jul 1885, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Oscar E. Burris was born 1 Dec 1861, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Thomas Burris, a native of Lexington, Ky., and Ruth Mulkey, a native of Illinois, died 16 Mar 1932, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., husband of Martha Burris, and was buried in Road District 5, Johnson Co., Ill.  T. R. Burris married M. Mulkey on 17 Nov 1858, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Lackey Heirs to Pay for Monument

The Lackey heirs must pay for the $10,000 monument Judge D. T. Hartwell ruled in circuit court Wednesday morning, after having the case under consideration for some time.

The case involved a number of points in law and it had bearing upon a number of the relatives.  The suit was to see whether the widow should share in payment of the monument out of her half or if the heirs should have to pay for it alone.

The Lackey estate, whose distribution was directed in a will, which is unusual, has been in court for snarls and disagreements are straightened out.  Judge Hartwell said the will lacked very little of being a valid will and that relatives could count themselves lucky to receive anything when it was the evident intention that they receive not a dime.

It will be recalled that the will directed the erection of the monuments, gave certain portion of the estate to his wife and planned with the residue or with all, in case his wife preceded him, to build a road from the cemetery towards Mounds.

The state built the road or most of it, although to reach the cemetery one must travel a gravel road a short distance and then cross a field up which there is little more than a trail for 200 yards.  The will was attacked and Judge E. A. Spiller construed the will.

In general the construction put on the will by Judge Spiller gave part of the estate to the relatives.  Mrs. Lackey renounced the will so that she might claim half of the personal and half of the real estate.
There is a provision about trusteeship in which officers of the First National Bank at Mounds should serve.

The monument has now been erected.  Close by it and hardly off the lot, if it is off the lot, is a stone which was first erected.  Part of the curbing of the lot is about gone.  The cemetery is old, having in it stones which date before the Civil War.  The big monument predominates the entire cemetery.

Then arose the argument as to how the monument should be paid and there appeared to be no specific instructions.  Should the widow pay half or did she have the right to the half before the expense of the monument was removed?  The court ruled that the heirs must pay out of their half.
 
Mrs. Jesse Lingle, son, Frank, and daughter, Faye, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Barkhausen, Mrs. Susie Dillow and daughter, Jeanetta, attended the funeral of Mrs. Lottie Hogue of Johnston City Sunday. (Swan Pond)

(Her marker in Ebenezer Hall Cemetery near Lick Creek reads:  Mother, Charlotte C. wife of D. S. Hogue Born Apr. 28, 1856 Died Mar. 10, 1932 Father, Daniel S. Hogue Born Feb. 11, 1841 Died Nov. 2, 1907.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Warner Wall, who has been in Chicago for several days, being called on account of the illness of her father, was called home by the death of her father-in-law, Judge W. A. Wall.  On Tuesday she received a message stating that her father had contracted pneumonia and she was compelled to leave Tuesday night for Chicago.
 
BALCOM MAN PASSES AWAY

James Howell passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. L. Corzine, near Balcom, Illinois at 6:30 ____ Saturday morning.  He fell and broke his hip almost three weeks ago and died from the effects of the fall.

He was a resident of Dongola for many years, having conducted a livery stable in his earlier days.  His wife passed away about 22 years ago and he made his home with his children since.

Funeral services were held at the Big Creek Baptist Church near Dongola at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. V. G. ____, pastor of the church. Interment was made in the McGinnis Cemetery near Mt. Pleasant.  H. J. Ford directed the funeral.

Mr. Howell is survived by five children, Mrs. E. E. Woodard, of Dongola, Mrs. T. H. Corzine, of Balcom, Mrs. H. Collier and Mrs. Charles Corzine, both of Taylorsville, and Joe Howell address unknown.

(Josiah Howell married Sarah J. Benson on 1 Sep 1870, in Union Co., Ill.  James B. Woodard, 21, born in Union Co., Ill., son of James W. Woodard and Manerva Boswell, married on 12 Dec 1890, in Jonesboro, Union Co., Ill., Elizabeth Howell, 19, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Joseph Howell and Sarah Benson.   Albert W. McGinnis, 30, born in Union Co., Ill., son of John McGinnis and Mary M. Ragsdale, married on 19 Oct 1898, at James Weatherly’s, in Union Co., Ill., Susan L. Howell, 21, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Josiah Howell and Sarah J. Benson.  His death certificate states that Josiah Howell was born 16 Jul 1851, in Union Co., Ill., the son of Susan Ingram Howell, a native of North Carolina, and died 12 Mar 1932, in Union Co., Ill., husband of Sarah Jane Howell.  A marker in McGinnis Cemetery reads:  Josiah Howell Born July 16, 1851 Died March 12, 1932 Sarah J. Howell Born May 3, 1851 Died March 9, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Mar 1932: 
Judge William A. Wall Dies Saturday Night
Egypt Loses Prominent Citizen and Leading Attorney

Judge William Ambrose Wall of Mound City, died Saturday night, March 12, at his home following a prolonged illness and a valiant fight to recover his health.

For many years a leading citizen and attorney of Southern Illinois and Pulaski County, and a member of the State Constitutional Convention, elected from the Fiftieth Senatorial District in 1919, Judge Wall had given long and faithful service to the community and state.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Margaret Browner Wall; a son, Warner Wall, born of a former marriage; four sisters, Mrs. Rhoda Pender and Mrs. Clementine Wright of Anna, Mrs. Minnie Adams of Centralia and Mrs. Maude Hathaway of Johnston City; also one brother, Sherman Wall, of Marion.
He was the son of James B. and Anne Wright Wall and was born at Lick Creek, Union County, about nine miles east of Anna, Ill., on April 17, 1864.

Completing the work of the common schools of Union County, he attended the Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondale and later took a law course at the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington.  He read law under prominent Union County lawyers and taught grade schools of the county for six years.  Coming to Pulaski County he taught two years at Villa Ridge then left the teaching profession to practice law.  In 1889 he was admitted to the bar in Illinois and accepted a partnership with the late Judge Joseph Robarts in Mound City.  Later he was admitted to practice in the United States Supreme Court.

Besides practicing individually, Judge Wall formed partnerships with the late Judge Robarts, the late Judge John D. Bristow, the late Judge Lyman G. Caster, Thomas Boyd, George E. Martin, and his son, Warner Wall.

In 1892 he was married to Miss Louie Kaltenback, of Mayfield, Ky., and to this union one son, Warner Wall, was born.  Mrs. Wall died in 1897 and in 1907 he married Miss Margaret Browner of Mound City.

Judge Wall was prominent in politics, a leading Republican.  He served two terms as county judge of Pulaski County and completed by appointment, the unexpired term of his partner in law, Judge Lyman G. Caster.  He served as chairman of the Cache River Drainage Commission, which supervised the survey of Cache River.

Elected to the State Board of Equalization form the Twenty-fifth Congressional District, he served eight years.  In 1919 he was elected as a member of the Constitutional Convention from the Fiftieth Senatorial District.

In the business life of his community, Judge Wall occupied a prominent place.  He invested heavily in real estate, was interested in the building and loan and in banking.  He was a member of the Methodist Church of Mound City, the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 197, the I. O. O. F. and the Modern Woodman.  He was a veteran of the Spanish American War.

Within the last year, his son, Attorney Warner Wall, gave up his law practice in Chicago and returned to Mound City in order to assume full charge of the business interests of his father.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the Methodist church of Mound City with Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola and Rev. Mr. Humphrey, pastor, conducting.

Fellow members of the Judiciary of Central and Southern Illinois were there to pay their last respects.  Friends from far and near came to bid a silent adieu to one they had known and loved.

The burial was in the Villa Ridge Cemetery with the beautiful rites of the Knights of Pythias Lodge.  Funeral Director G. A. James was in charge.
 
Infant Daughter Dies

Carolyn May, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Curtner, was born January 27, and died March 13, at the home of her parents on South Front Street at the age of 1 month and 15 days.

Surviving her are her parents, one sister, a grandfather, two grandmothers, and a great-grandmother, besides other relatives.  Mrs. Curtner is the former Miss Cecil Boren.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the residence, the Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with Hartwell and Ryan in charge.

(Her death certificate states that Caryln May Curtner was born 27 Jan 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Carl and C. Curtner, and died 13 Mar 1932, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Henry Butler Dies Friday at His Home near Mounds

Henry Butler, well known farmer residing west of this city, died early Friday morning, March 11, at the home where he had lived for more than 60 years.  His wife preceded him in death some four years ago.

He was born in Franklin County, Illinois, in 1856 and died at the age of 75 years, 5 months and 11 days.  In 1882 he was united in marriage to Miss Cynthia Carpenter.  To this union were born eight children, seven sons and one daughter.

Surviving Mr. Butler are four sons, Fred, Orville, and Harley, all of Mounds, and David of Cache, Ill.; thirteen grandchildren and a sister, Mrs. Matilda Ray, of Royalton, Ill.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the funeral home of Hartwell and Ryan, the Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.
 
Lester and Milo Mann were called to Carterville Wednesday on account of the death of their grandmother, Mrs. Robert Mann.  (Ullin)
 
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Parrott passed away at their home Sunday morning.  The little one was only four days old.  After a short service at the home, conducted by Rev. E. R. Cory, pastor of the M. E. Church South, interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery. (Pulaski)

(His death certificate states that Melvin Lee Parrott was born 10 Mar 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Eugene Parrott, a native of Pulaski, Ill., and Lydia J. Mike, a native of St. Louis, Mo., died 13 Mar 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Pulaski, Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Marvin Lee Parrott Mar. 10, 1932 Mar. 13, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MAN DROWNS IN RIVER AT FERRY

MT. CARMEL—One man was drowned and four others had narrow escapes today when a heavily loaded truck skidded off the cable ferry over the Wabash River two miles north of here.

William E. Simpson, 40, Dayton, Ohio, was drowned.  His body has not been recovered.

The other passenger on the truck, Thomas Harrison, Chicago; Norman Bossle, Louisville; and Rex Stallings, Louisville; were saved by John Langford, who lives on the river bank.

Langford also dragged Frank Keepes, the ferry operator, out of the river to safety.

The truck, en route to St. Louis from Louisville, drove onto the ferry from the Indiana side about 8 a.m.

It skidded off onto the engine boat of the ferry, overturning into the river and sinking the engine boat.
The ferryman and all the truck passengers were thrown into the chilly waters.  Their cries attracted Langford who came to the rescue.

Simpson was not seen after the truck spilled into the river.  He and Stallings were passengers on the truck, which was operated by Harrison and Bossle.

It was owned by a New Albany firm and loaded with miscellaneous merchandise, Harrison said.
It was still in the river at noon today, as was the ferry engine boat.

The stream was being dragged for Simpson's body.
  
The Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Mar 1932:
Mrs. Ida Hopson Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. Ida Hanenberg Hopson died Tuesday, March 22, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. A. Curtner.  Her age at death was 65 years, 11 months and 17 days.

Surviving her are her husband, three daughters, Mrs. John Graham of Dowell, Ill., Mrs. H. R. Burt, of Covington, La., Mrs. W. A. Curtner of this city; two sons, John Hanenberg and Walter Hanenberg, both of New Orleans; eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, one brother, James Barnes of Moorehouse, Mo.; and one sister, Mrs. Ellen McRoney, of Caruthersville, Mo.  She was a member of the German Baptist Church of Hanenberg, Mo.

A short service was held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church, after which the funeral cortege left for Sikeston, Mo., where interment was made, the Rev. Mr. Duncan of Sikeston officiating.  Hartwell and Ryan were the funeral directors.

(Her death certificate states that Ida Farrenburg Hopson was born 5 Apr 1866, in Charleston, Mo., died 22 Mar 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of Jesse Hopson, and was buried in Sikeston, Mo.  A marker in Sikeston City Cemetery reads:  Ida Farrenburg 1866-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Arvle Sowers, Mrs. Frank Sowers, and Mrs. F. Fagan attended the funeral of Mrs. Lute Wilson in Ullin Monday afternoon.
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to thank our friends and neighbors for their sympathy and kindness during the illness and following the death of our darling baby girl, Carolyn May.  Especially do we thank Rev. T. C. Ury for his services and those who sent flowers and offered the use of their cars.  We shall hold these kindnesses in grateful remembrance.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Curtner

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 March 1932:
ULLIN WOMAN DIES AT HOME SATURDAY NIGHT

Mrs. Minnie Wilson, wife of Luther Wilson, passed away at her home in Ullin Saturday night.
Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock with the Rev. Mr. Loar officiating.  Interment was made in the Ullin cemetery.  W. J. Rhymer directed the funeral.

Surviving Mrs. Wilson besides her husband are a son, Floyd, of Medical Lake, Wash.; a daughter, Mary Jane Wilson, of Ullin; her mother, Mrs. Amilda Ledbetter; a brother, Wesley Ledbetter; and three sisters, Mrs. Ida Sichling and Mrs. Mary Stull, of Ullin, and Mrs. Julia Gray, of Mounds.

She was a resident of Ullin and had been sick for a long period.

(Lute Wilson, 23, of Ullin, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Solomon C. Wilson and Matilda Sichling, married on 25 Dec 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Minnie V. Ledbetter, 17, of Ullin, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of W. P. Ledbetter and Armilda Dillon.   Joseph Sichling, 26, married Ida Ledbetter, 19, on 25 Dec 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.   Minnie Victoria Wilson was born 2 Mar 1884, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Perry Ledbetter, a native of Tennessee, and Armilda Dillon, a native of Texas, died 19 Mar 1932, in Road District 3, Ullin, Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in New Hope Cemetery is illegible.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MR. AND MRS. WARNER WALL LOOSE FATHERS WITHIN WEEK

Less than a week after the death of Judge William A. Wall, of this city, word was received here that the father of Mrs. Warner Wall had died in Chicago.

Mrs. Wall’s father is Joseph Scheck.  She had been in Chicago for some time because of his illness and returned here when Mr. Wall died.  Soon after she reached a telegram to return that her father had become ill again and death came Friday morning.  His death was due to pneumonia and thus, in less than a week, had she lost her father and Mr. Wall had lost his father.

Warner Wall went to Chicago to join his wife on Saturday.  Mrs. Wall is also an only child and both have been called on in so short a time to part with one of life’s best friends, their father.  Mr. Wall returned home yesterday.

(His death certificate states that Joseph A. Scheck was born 21 Sep 1874, in Chicago, Ill., the son of Frederick Scheck, a native of Munich, Germany, and Justine Esberger, a native of Detroit, Mich., died 17 Mar 1932, in Chicago, Ill., husband of Catherine Scheck, and was buried in St. Boniface Cemetery in Chicago.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DONGOLA WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Ina A. Karraker, wife of Rev. H. W. Karraker, passed away at her home in Dongola Friday morning, March 18, following an illness of several months.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward, pastor of the church.  Interment was made in Dongola in the I. O. O. F. cemetery.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

Left to mourn her passing are her devoted husband, Rev. H. W. Karraker, and the following children, Mrs. Elsie Goodman, Mrs. Bertha Douglas, Jake and Lowell Karraker, all of Dongola; Perry, of Lexington, Ky., Alvin, of Louisville.  One sister, Mrs. Dora Dillow, one half-sister, Mrs. Charles Lynn, and the following half-brothers, Homer Garrott, Lester Garrott, Jessie Garrott, and George Garrott, besides a number of grandchildren.

(Henry W. Karraker, 25, school teacher from Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of Jacob Karraker and Mary Peeler, married on 25 Mar 1883, at the house of George Dillow in Union Co., Ill., Ina A. Davis, 17, from Dongola, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of T. H. Davis and Martha Dillow.  Ina’s mother Martha Dillow Davis Garrott gave her permission.  Her death certificate states that Ina Arminta Karraker was born 5 Oct 1865, near Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Tilman Davis and Martha Dillow, natives of Illinois, and died 18 Mar 1932, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., wife of Henry W. Karraker.  Her marker in American Legion Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Ina A. Karraker Oct. 5, 1865 Mar. 18, 1932 Henry W. Karraker Mar. 13, 1858 Jan. 17, 1947.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHARLES DOVER PASSES AWAY AT GRAND CHAIN

Charles Dover, father of Mrs. Sylvia Ferguson and Mark Dover, of Mound City, passed away at his home in Grand Chain, at 6:30 Wednesday evening.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church with the Rev. Mr. Benninger officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

Surviving Mr. Dover are his widow, Mrs. Susie Dover; four sons, Jasper, Earl and Dewey, of Grand Chain, and Mark of Mound City; and one daughter, Mrs. Sylvia Ferguson, of this city.  He also leaves one brother, Ed Dover, of Campbell Mo.; and one sister, Mrs. Braden, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; and several grandchildren.

(According to his death certificate, Charles Dover was born 5 Apr 1869, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of Nicholas Dover, died 16 Mar 1932, in Rod District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Susie Dover.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Charley Dover Born 5 Apr 1869 Died 16 Mar 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Those from this city who attended the funeral of Charles Dover, which was held at the Congregational church in Grand Chain Friday afternoon were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cheek, Mrs. Oscar Atherton, Mr. and Mrs. Carl McIntire, Mr. and Mrs. S. F. McIntire, Mrs. Imon Bankson, Mrs. W. H. Crain, Mrs. C. C. Keller, Miss Evelyn Cagle, Mrs. Pearl Salmon, and Miss Cora Fullerton.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Apr 1932:
LITTLE DAUGHTER PASSES AWAY SUNDAY

Ella May, the five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Atkinson, passed away Saturday morning, March 26, at 7:30 o’clock at the home of her parents following a brief illness.

Besides her parents, she is survived by two brothers and one sister.

Funeral services were held at the residence Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Osmond, of Cairo. Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

(Her death certificate states that Ella May Atkinson was born 4 May 1927, in Barlow, Ky., the daughter of George Atkinson, a native of Charleston, Mo., and Pearl Hatton, a native of Brookport, Ill., died 26 Mar 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
INFANT EATS POISON

The infant of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wilkins, while playing unnoticed for just a moment Wednesday afternoon, obtained poison from somewhere and as is natural for a baby, put the poison in its mouth.  Mrs. Wilkins and baby were visiting with the former’s aunt, Mrs. Ed Fox at the time.  As soon as those present noticed what had happened, medical aid was summoned and due to the hurried response of physicians and the aid of friends, it is believed that no fatal effects will result.
 
DONGOLA WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Sarah Amanda Lingle, age 73 years, passed way near Dongola Saturday morning with pneumonia.

Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon at the Christian church near Dongola, the Rev. F. W. Gould, of Vienna, officiating.  Interment was made in the Chapel Cemetery by E. J. Ford, funeral director.

Surviving Mrs. Lingle are five children, Leroy Lingle, of St. Louis, Andrew Lingle, Mrs. Henry Corzine, Mrs. Ralph Ledgerwood, and Mrs. Fred Davis, all living near Dongola, besides a host of other relatives and friends.

(J. W. Lingle married Sarah A. Calhoon on 24 Sep 1876, in Johnson Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Sarah Amanda Lingle was born 20 Oct 1858, near Vienna, Ill., the daughter of George Calhoun and Bethany Rossen, natives of Tennessee, died 26 Mar 1932, in Union Co., Ill., the wife of John Willis Lingle, and was buried in Chapel Cemetery.  Her marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Sarah A. Lingle Born Oct. 20, 1858 Died March 26, 1932 John W. Lingle Born Dec. 24, 1848 Died Jan. 5, 1917 W. A. Calhoun Lingle Born April 30, 1851 Died Sept. 23, 1924.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Apr 1932: 
MARTHA BUCK ONCE PROMINENT TEACHER DIES IN CALIFORNIA

CARBONDALE—Miss Martha Buck, who was one of the members of the first faculty of the Southern Illinois Normal Teachers' College at Carbondale, died in February at her home in California where she had lived for many years.  She was a teacher of grammar and was the author of a text book which was once widely used.  Particulars concerning her death are not known to her southern Illinois friends.  She was over 80 years old.
 
MINISTER KILLED WHEN TRAIN HITS COAL TRUCK

ELDORADO—The Rev. Jess Mick, minister of the Church of God here was instantly killed today when a coal laden truck he was driving was struck by a Big Four southbound passenger train at the Ogara No. 1 mine crossing, three miles south of here.  He was 45 years old.  The body of the minister was thrown more than 400 feet while the wreckage of the truck was found 1,500 feet from the scene of the accident.  The Rev. Mick is survived by his widow and eight children.  The minister engaged in the trucking business in addition to his ministerial work.

(His World War I draft registration states that Jesse Mick was born in Dale, Ill., had a wife and four children and claimed an exemption from service due to a rupture.  His death certificate states that Jesse Mick, truck driver, was born 20 Jun 1886, in Illinois, the son of James Mick and Amanda Stacy, natives of Kentucky, died 23 Mar 1932, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill., the husband of Minta Mick, and was buried in Hamilton Co., Ill.  His marker in Digby Cemetery in Dale, Hamilton Co., Ill., reads:  Jesse Mick 1886-1932 Minta Mick 1887-1949.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARMI MAN ASKS TO HANG WINNIE JUDD

CARMI—Phil Hanna, bank director and wealthy farmer, is awaiting word from Phoenix, Ariz., as to whether he will be called upon the hang Winnie Ruth Judd on April 11 at Phoenix.

Hanna, who has conducted sixty-one executions, applied for the job of executing Mrs. Judd and was advised that his application was under consideration.

Hanna points out that he follows his strange hobby for purely humane reasons, pointing out that nervous and inexperienced officials "bungled" an execution recently and caused the victim to be subjected to a slow death by strangulation, instead of being put to his end quickly.

He retired as a hangman four years ago, after executing Charles Birger, terror of Herrin during the bloody mine massacres there.  Birger was the sixty-first man to be executed by Hanna, and sixteen have dangled to their death from his specially made rope.

Hanna is widely known in southern Illinois.  He operates the 2,200 acre Cloverland Farms with a brother and is director of the First National Bank of Carmi.

 
The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Apr 1932: 
Mrs. R. J. Johnson Dies Saturday, April Second

Mrs. R. J. Johnson, passed away at St. Mary's Infirmary, Cairo, Ill., Saturday, April 2, 1932, after an illness of ten days.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at Shiloh Church, Villa Ridge, Illinois, with the Rev. W. J. Ward, officiating.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery, west of Villa Ridge.  Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

Mrs. Johnson is survived by her husband, R. J. Johnson, of Villa Ridge; two daughters, Miss Susie Johnson and Mrs. J. N. Jackson of Dupo, Ill.; three sisters Mrs. Charles Minton of Mounds, Ill., Mrs. Sam Atherton and Miss Ethel VonNida of Villa Ridge; four brothers, John Von Nida of Cairo, Seth and Charles VonNida of Mounds, and Philip VonNida of Villa Ridge; also a number of other relatives and a host of friends.

Members of Mrs. Johnson's Sunday school class served as casket and floral bearers.

"Sarah J. Vonnida, daughter of Sarah and John Vonnida, was born west of Villa Ridge, Illinois, March 22nd, 1883.  She departed this life April 2nd, 1932, at the age of 49 years, and 10 days.

"She was united in marriage to R. J. Johnson, of Villa Ridge, Ill., Nov. 3rd, 1901, with the Rev. Ridge officiating.  To this union two children were born, Miss Susie Johnson and Mrs. J. N. Jackson of Dupo, Ill.

"She was converted and united with the Shiloh Baptist Church in the autumn of 1905, to which church she remained a faithful and devoted member."
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to our many friends for their kindness to our beloved wife and mother, Mrs. R. J. Johnson, during her illness and for their expressions of sympathy to us after her death.  Especially do we thank Rev. Ward and other ministers for their consoling words, the choir, those who sent flowers, and those who gave use of their cars.
R. J. Johnson and Daughters
 
Pulaski Resident Dies

Mrs. W. M. King, of Pulaski, died Saturday morning, April 2, at her home.  She had reached the age of 58 years.

Surviving her are her husband, William King, and one son, Charles Pritchett, of Kankakee, Ill., besides other relatives.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Christian church in Pulaski, the Rev. H. E. Vick of Tamms conducting.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery in this city with W. H. Aldred of Pulaski directing.
 
Mrs. Marion Waterman Dies Friday in Alton

Mrs. Addie May Waterman, formerly of this city, died Friday night at 11 o'clock at her home in Alton, Ill., after a lingering illness.

Addie May Albright was born in Dongola, Ill., November 13, 1878, and died April 1, 1932, aged 53 years, 4 months and 18 days.

The greater part of her life was spent in Dongola and Mounds.  For the past six years the Waterman family has resided in Alton.

She accepted Jesus Christ as her personal savior at an early age and united with the First Baptist Church of Mounds, where she remained a member until her death.  She leaves her husband, Marion Waterman, one son, Fred Paff and one daughter, Myrle Waterman.  A son, Ernest Waterman, preceded her in death.  She also leaves four grandchildren.

Funeral services were conducted at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist church of Mounds by the pastor, Rev. T. C, Ury.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with G. A. James as undertaker.
 
MINER CRUSHED BETWEEN CARS

JOHNSTON CITY—Frank Ozello, 30, trip rider, was fatally injured early Saturday afternoon at Old Ben No. 18 mine when his body was crushed between two coal cars.  He lived only a short time following the accident.

Coroner W. E. Clayton conducted an inquest Saturday afternoon and the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

(His death certificate states that Frank Ozella, coal miner, was born 23 Mar 1903, in Illinois, the son of Frank and Mary Ozella, natives of Russia, died 26 Mar 1932, in Johnston City, Williamson Co., Ill.  He was buried in the Lithuanian Cemetery in Shakerag, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Miss Susie Johnson and Mrs. J. N. Jackson of Dupo, Ill., who were called to Villa Ridge by the illness and death of their mother, Mrs. R. J. Johnson, were Mounds callers Tuesday.
 
Several from here (Pulaski) attended the funeral of Mrs. R. J. Johnson at Shiloh Monday afternoon.  Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of Mrs. William King Sunday afternoon were Mrs. J. F. Lentz, Mrs. Blanch Smith, Mrs. George Roach and children and Mrs. Clyde Bowles and daughter, Betty Jean of Mounds, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore and Mrs. Imon Bankston of Mound City, Mr. and Mrs. George King of Grand Chain and Mrs. Earnest Edwards and son and Rev. Scott of Olmsted.
 
Mrs. Glenn Kiestler and children of Hillsboro were called here (Pulaski) last week by the illness and death of her stepmother, Mrs. William King.
 
Julia Bryant Dies

Mrs. Julia Bryant, well known colored resident of South Mounds, died last week after a short illness of pneumonia following the flu.

She is survived by a son and an aunt.  She was the daughter of Emma Webb, who died a year or more ago.

(Her death certificate states that Julia Bryant was born 10 Jan 1887, in Olmstead, Ill., the daughter of Henry and Mattie Miller, died 21 Mar 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the widow of Albert Bryant, and was buried in Mounds, Ill.  A death certificate for Emma Webb, black, states that she was born 31 Jul 1864, in Kentucky, the daughter of Henry Kelly, died 6 Jul 1928, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of Simon Webb.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. George Williams Dies at Home North of Mounds

Mrs. "Jimmie" Williams (col.), wife of George Williams, died Saturday evening, April 2, at her home north of the Illinois Central viaduct.  She had been ill for some time and had recently undergone an operation at the Cairo hospital.

Mrs. Williams was born in Greenwood, South Carolina, before the Civil War.  She had lived in Mounds for many years.

Surviving are her husband and four sisters.  One sister, Mrs. Alma Muscovaley of Pontiac, Mich., was here to attend the funeral.  The other sisters could not come.

Funeral services were held Wednesday, Hartwell and Ryan having charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Jimmie Williams was born 4 Mar 1874, in Abbeville, South Carolina, the daughter of Luke McGee, died 2 Apr 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of George Williams, and was buried in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of Old Resident

Samuel Swanson, age 76 years, died Tuesday morning, April 5, at his home west of this city.  Surviving him are his widow and a stepson, Will Delaney.

Born in Stockholm, Sweden, Mr. Swanson came to this country when in early manhood.

Funeral services were held at the family residence Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, the Rev. T. C. Ury of the First Baptist Church officiating.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery under the direction of Hartwell and Ryan.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Apr 1932:
OLD MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIES

R. C. Magill received a message Wednesday stating that Q. A. McCracken had passed away at his home in New Albany, Ind.

Funeral services will be held Friday and burial will be Friday afternoon in a cemetery at Brazil, Indiana, by the side of his wife, who passed away several years ago.

Mr. McCracken and family were prominent in this community a number of years ago.  He was interested in the milling and lumber business both in Mound City and Kentucky.  He was associated with the McDowell Lumber Company, a very prominent industry a few years ago in this city.  The Bartlett Hamper Works and Hoop Mill is in the building formerly occupied by the McDowell Co.

He left Mound City with his family for Covington, Ky., where he entered the lumber business with his sons, later moving to New Albany.

He leaves three sons, Ralph, Archie, and Frank, all prominent in the business world.

(Quincy A. McCracken married Mattie E. Lutt on 18 Dec 1873, in Coles Co., Ill.  His marker in Cottage Hill Cemetery in Brazil, Ind., reads:  Quincy A. McCracken 1841-1932 Mattie E. McCracken 1844-1928.—Darrel Dexter)
 
VILLA RIDGE WOMAN PASSES AWAY IN CAIRO

Mrs. R. J. Johnson, aged 49, of Villa Ridge, passed away in St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo at 8:45 p.m. Saturday.

Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon in Shiloh Baptist Church, the Rev. Ward officiating.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery by Hartwell and Ryan, funeral directors.  Casket bearers were Mr. Jerrell, Mr. Nicholson, Claude and Dillard Horner, Alvin Smith, and Marcus Biggerstaff.

Surviving Mrs. Johnson are her husband, two daughters, Miss Susie Johnson and Mrs. J. M. Jackson, of Dupo, Illinois; four brothers, John Vonnida, of Cairo, Phillip Vonnida, of Villa Ridge, Seth and Charles Vonnida, of Mounds; and three sisters, Mrs. Charles Minton, Miss Ethel Vonnida, of Mounds, and Mrs. Sam Atherton, of Villa Ridge,  She also leaves an aunt, Mrs. Emma Stewart, and a niece, Mrs. P. G. Bride, and other relatives and a large circle of friends.

(R. J. Johnson, 23, of Villa Ridge, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of R. J. Johnson and Susan Mills, married on 3 Nov 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Sallie Vonida, 19, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of John Vonida and Sarah Little.  Charles Minton, 26, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of B. Minton and Julia Graddy, married on 17 Nov 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Kate Vonida, 19, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of John Vonida and Sarah Little.  John Vonnida married Sarah J. Littell on 25 Feb 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SAMUEL SWANSON DIES AT HOME NEAR MOUNDS

Samuel Swanson, age 76 years, passed away at his home west of Mounds at 6:15 Tuesday morning.
Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence with Rev. T. C. Ury officiating.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery, with Hartwell and Ryan directing the funeral.
Mr. Swanson is survived by his widow and a stepson, Will Delaney.

Mr. Swanson was born in Stockholm, Sweden, coming to this county when only a young man.
 
MRS. FRANCIS KING DIES AT HOME IN PULASKI

Mrs. Francis E. King, wife of William King, passed away at her home in Pulaski at 12:30 o’clock Saturday morning, following a lingering illness.  Deceased was 58 years, 1 month and 25 days old.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Christian church in Pulaski with Rev. H. E. Vick, of Tamms, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery by W. A. Aldred, undertaker in charge.  Casket bearers were H. E. Reeves, Henry Bowles, Carl Davis, Arthur Reeves, Fred Davis and John Moore.

Surviving Mrs. King are her husband, one son, Charles Pritchett, of Kankakee, Illinois; four brothers, Ed Milford, Oscar Milford and William Milford, of Pulaski, and Wes Milford, of Arkansas; and one sister, Mrs. Bell Anglin, of Alton, Illinois.  She was a member of the M. E. Church, and she leaves a host of friends in the church and community who will be grieved to know of her death.
 
MRS. JOSEPH BARRY DIES IN MEMPHIS, TENN.

Relatives received a message Wednesday that Mrs. Lilly Barry, wife of Joseph Barry, had passed away at her home in Memphis, Tenn., at 5 o’clock Wednesday morning.

Mrs. Barry was born and reared in Mound City and was a daughter of the late Capt. and Mrs. Hamilton. The Hamilton family were pioneers of this city and Capt. Hamilton was superintendent at the navy yards here.

Mrs. Barry was survived by her husband, one daughter, Miss Josephine Barry, of Denver, Colo.; one sister, Mrs. I. B. Huckleberry, of this city; and one brother, Alfred Hamilton, who resides in the South; a number of other relatives and a wide circle of friends.

Mrs. Huckleberry left Tuesday for Memphis and was at the bedside of her sister when the end came.
Funeral services had not been completed at this time as they were awaiting the arrival of the daughter.

(James H. Weaver married Lillian Hambleton on 6 Jul 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Lillian Barry, of 640 Keel St., Memphis, Tenn., was born about 1869 in Illinois, the daughter of Mr. Hambleton and Sarah Elizabeth Barry, natives of Illinois, died 6 Apr 1932, in Memphis, Tenn., and was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of Colored Man Reveals Life

The death of Elijah Whitener, 78 years of age, a colored man, member of the 18th Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Spanish-American War, brought to light the strange adventure which befell this man in the far south.  Whitner, who was born in Fredericktown, Mo., in 1854, came to Mound City from Kentucky with the pump handle works and enlisted under G. V. Lane on June 28, 1898, and went to Cuba with the company and regiment, returning to be mustered out in Chicago on April 3, 1899.

About 1901, he left here.  He was a fireman and followed saw mills or ferryboats, and it was not until some six months or more later that his wife came to Capt. Lane and asked that he help hunt for her husband.

A brief note sent to Whitner’s son in South Bend, Ind., gave a clue as to his whereabouts.  In fact, Whitner’s son and son-in-law was once at the same place.  But it was not until long after that this was found out.

Capt. Lane enlisted the aid of M. F. Browner in 1930, who wrote to the postmistress at Matthews, La., and from her he received a note that she knew nothing about him, but suggested that they write the South Coast Company.

Whitner was then located, for the company thought, so Capt. Lane thinks, that his letter came from a white man who was captain of the company and was investigating for pension claims.  The letter from this company came back and the amount of railway fare to send Whitner home was asked and Whitner was sent home a little over a year ago, an old and broken man who had toiled for 30 years on this island.
Whitner could not read and a tag directed that he be helped to Mound City.

On arriving here he told of his adventure on the island and how it was guarded.  An armed overseer rode among the negroes, some 600 of them, and they were compelled to work, he said.  Unruly negroes were shot down and rolled into a hole.  Escape from the island was virtually impossible unless one was an expert swimmer, according to Whitner, who told his story to Captain Lane.  Even when he was sent off, he was hidden until he arrived in New Orleans, he told Captain Lane.

Funeral for Whitner was conducted yesterday and he was buried in the National Cemetery. The funeral was in charge of G. A. James.

This story of Whitner is similar to the one which came to light near Sikeston, Mo., when swamp land was being cleared.  One white man was sent to the penitentiary for conducting what was commonly called little more than an enforced system of slavery.

(According to his death certificate, Elijah Whitener was born in 1854 in Fredericktown, Mo., the son of George Whitener, died 4 Apr 1932, in Mound City, Ill., husband of Lizzie Whitener, and was buried at Mound City.  His interment record states he was a corporal in Co. L, 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry and was honorably discharged 3 Apr 1899.  He filed for a pension 27 May 1930, in Louisiana and Lizzie filed for a widow’s pension on 18 Apr 1932 in Illinois.  His wife died 21 Jul 1946.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY IN ALTON

Mrs. Addie Waterman, passed away Friday night at 11 o’clock at her home in Alton, Illinois.  Mrs. Waterman formerly resided in Mounds and her body was brought to her former home, arriving in Mounds Monday evening at 6 o’clock, and was taken to the home of Mrs. Ledbetter, a relative.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist Church in Mounds with Rev. T. C. Ury, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, G. A. James directing the funeral.

Surviving Mrs. Waterman are her husband, a daughter, Mrs. Muriel Thurman, and a son, Fred Path, who were at her bedside when the end came.  Mr. and Mrs. Waterman resided in Mounds until seven years ago.

(According to her death certificate, Addie May Waterman, of 2356 State Street, 1st Ward of Alton, Ill., was born 13 Nov 1878, in Dongola, Ill., daughter of Daniel Albright, died 1 Apr 1932, in Alton, Madison Co., Ill., wife of Marion Waterman, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wanura attended the funeral of Mrs. Johnson at Shiloh Monday afternoon.  (Mounds)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Apr 1932:
HOMER BEAVER DIED AT HOME IN PERKS

Homer Beaver passed away at his home in Perks Saturday, April 9, following an illness of tuberculosis.

Left to mourn his passing are his widow, one son, one daughter, a mother, three sisters and two brothers, all of whom were at his bedside when the end came.

Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church with Rev. Mr. Langston officiating.  Interment was made in the Mt. Olive Cemetery by Mr. Ford, undertaker in charge.

(Jesse H. Beaver, 22, farmer at Dongola, Ill., born in Union Co., Ill., son of Moses Beaver and Anna Seemore, married on 27 Mar 1881, in Union Co., Ill., Malinda Casper, 16, born in Union Co., Ill., Moses Casper and Anna Hoffner.  His death certificate states that Homer Beaver was born 30 Oct 1891, in Illinois, the son of Jesse Beaver and Malinda Casper, natives of Illinois, died 1 Apr 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Manda Beaver.  His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads Homer Beaver Born Oct. 30, 1891 Died April 1, 1932 Amanda Beaver Born Dec. 13, 1890 Died April 21, 1942 Cletus Beaver Born June 1, 1920 Died April 7, 1977.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WELL KNOWN COLORED MAN PASSES AWAY

J. T. Chenault, a well-known and highly respected colored man, passed away Saturday night at 10:30 o’clock at his home in this city, following a lingering illness.

He was 67 years of age and had lived in this city a number of years.  He was employed by the late W. A. Montgomery, funeral director who was succeeded by G. A. James, continuing in the employ of Mr. James until the time of his death.

He was known to everyone as Jimmie Chenault and had many friends among both the white and colored.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the A. M. E. Church and was in charge of the Knights of Tabor Lodge of which he was an active member.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

Surviving him are his wife and several stepchildren.

(According to his death certificate, James T. Chenault was born 10 Jul 1864, in Kentucky, died 9 Apr 1932, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Belle Chenault, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Apr 1932:
The funeral service of Mrs. R. J. Johnson, who passed away at St. Mary's Hospital in Cairo Saturday night after several days’ illness, was held at the Shiloh Church Monday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Ward of Dongola, an old friend of the family conducted the services. (Villa Ridge, crowded out last week)
 
Mrs. Adah Stone and daughter, Mrs. Ward Garrett, of Mounds, attended the funeral of Mrs. R. J. Johnson here Monday. (Villa Ridge, crowded out last week)
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to express our thanks to our friends and neighbors for their kindness during the illness of our beloved husband and father, Samuel Swanson, and for their expressions of sympathy following his death.  Especially do we thank Rev. T. C. Ury for his comforting words, those who sent flowers and those who gave the use of their cars.
Mrs. Sarah Swanson
William T. Delaney.

 
The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Apr 1932:
Brother of Mrs. Ray Lemons Dies in Chicago

Dillard Wilkerson, formerly of Anna, died Saturday, April 9, at his home in Chicago.  Mr. Wilkerson was a brother of Mrs. Ray Lemons of this city.  He also leaves his widow, two children, his parents, three other sisters and two brothers.

(His name and signature on his World War I draft registration is Dillard Wilkinson and his birth is given as 21 Mar 1889, in West End, Ill.  His death certificate states that Dillard Wilkerson, janitor, of 1459 E. 72nd Place, Chicago, Ill., was born 21 Mar 1890, in Saline Co., Ill., the son of A. J. Wilkerson, a native of Saline Co., Ill., and Martha Spane, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., died 9 Apr 1932, in Chicago, Ill., the husband of Elsie Wilkerson, and was buried in Anna, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Aaron T. Atherton Dies Friday Night

Aaron Thomas Atherton was born near Villa Ridge in Shiloh community, September 4th, 1859, and passed away at his home near Mounds, Ill., April 15, 1932, at the age of 72 years, 7 months and 11 days.  He was the son of Lansing and Susan A. Atherton.  He grew to manhood and spent his whole life in the community where he was born.

He was united in marriage first to Miss Mary Conyers and to them were born two children, a son and daughter, the son dying at about two years of age.  The wife and mother died a few years later.  He was married the second time to Mary McDaniel and they spent eleven happy years together when she was called away by death April 27, 1932.

He professed faith in Christ a number of years ago and later united with the Shiloh Baptist Church and was baptized September 27, 1920, by Elder H. B. Atherton.

He was a good man and a consistent Christian.

He was devoted to his church and was faithful in attendance at services.  He was a deacon and a trustee and has been treasurer of the church for several years.  He was loved and held in high esteem by the church.  He was a great lover of home and enjoyed his friends.

He is survived by his only daughter, Mrs. Blanche VonNida, seven grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Sarah James, who of late has made her home with him, one half-brother, R. J. Johnson, of Villa Ridge, two half-sisters, Mrs. Edythe Parker of Pulaski and Mrs. Frances Watson of Miller City, also Jerry Larry of Cairo, who when a boy spent a number of years in the home, a large circle of other relatives, the whole church and a host of true friends.

Funeral services were held at Shiloh Church Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward, the Villa  Ridge choir furnishing the music and the body was laid to rest in the family lot in Shiloh Cemetery.—Rev. W. J. Ward
 
Mrs. G. M. Quarles Dies in Rochester, Minn.

Death Follows Operation for Sinus Trouble of Long Standing

Friends of Mrs. G. M. Quarles were deeply grieved Tuesday evening when a message came from Mr. Quarles stating that she had died that afternoon following an operation for sinus trouble Monday morning at the Colonial Hospital, Rochester, Minn.

Mr. Quarles bringing all that was mortal of his beloved companion, arrived in Mounds Thursday morning on Number Nine, which made a special stop here.

Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Congregational church with Rev. S. C. Benninger, the pastor in the pulpit.  G. A. James will conduct the funeral.

Bertha Walker Quarles, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Walker, natives of the state of Tennessee, was born March 2, 1875, in Mound City, and was reared there, graduating from the Mound City High School in 1893.

Surviving her are her husband, adopted son, Bobby, a sister, Mrs. Belle Pollock of Cairo, and two brothers, Thomas Walker of Mobile, Ala., and Robert Walker, of Richland, Mo.
 
Sister of Mrs. Clyde Gholson Dies in West

Mrs. Toby Mathias, sister of Mrs. Clyde Gholson, died in California Friday night, April 15.  Miss Mathias was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Mathias of Carmi and funeral services were held in that city Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Baptist church.
 
The funeral services of Aaron T. Atherton were held from this Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday afternoon, Rev. Ward of Dongola conducting the service.  The deceased, an old resident of this county, was ill only a short time passing way at his home west of town Friday night.  He leaves only one daughter, Mrs. O. O. Vonnida, of his immediate family, several grandchildren and a host of other near relatives to mourn his passing. (Villa Ridge)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Apr 1932:
MRS. BERTHA MADALINE RUSSELL PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Bertha Madaline Russell passed away at the home of her mother, Mrs. Frank Wilday, Tuesday morning after a prolonged illness.

Funeral services were held Thursday morning at the Methodist church conducted by the pastor, Rev. Edward Cory.  Immediately following the services the remains were taken to Benton for interment.

(Her death certificate states that Bertha Madeline Russell was born 29 Jan 1908, in Anna, Ill., daughter of Raleigh Mill and Ida Shoja, natives of Anna, Ill., died 12 Apr 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of Elbert Russell, and was buried in Benton, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS WOMAN’S SISTER PASSED AWAY IN CALIFORNIA

Miss Tobby Mathis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Mathis, of Carmi, Illinois, passed away in California Friday night according to word received Saturday. She was a sister of Mrs. Clyde Gholson of Mounds.

Funeral services were held in Carmi Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Baptist church, the Rev. Herman Daily, pastor of the church officiating.  The body arrived there Wednesday morning.
 
FORMER MOUND CITY LADY PASSES AWAY AT ROCHESTER

Mrs. G. M. Quarrels, age 57 years, passed away at Rochester, Minn., at Mayo’s Hospital at 5 o’clock Tuesday evening following an operation on Monday for sinus trouble.  Mr. Quarrels was at her bedside when she passed away.

Mrs. Quarrels was formerly Miss Bertha Walker, of Mound City, and was born and reared here.  After her marriage she moved to Mounds, where she has since made her home.  She was a graduate of the Mound City High School and was a member of the Class of 1893, under Professor M. W. McCartney.

Surviving Mrs. Quarrels are her husband, G. M. Quarrels; her adopted son, Bobby, who is a sophomore in high school; one sister, Mrs. Belle Pollock, of Cairo; two brothers, Thomas Walker, of Mobile, Ala., and Robert Walker, of Rickland, Mo.  Another sister, Mrs. Ollie Livesay preceded her sister in death on February 4, 1930.

The body arrived in Mounds at 4 o’clock Thursday morning and funeral services will be held at 2 o’clock this afternoon at the Congregational church at Mounds and the choir from the Pilgrim Congregational Church of Mound City will furnish the music.  Rev. Benninger will officiate.  Interment will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery by Undertaker G. A. James.

(Charles E. Livasy married Ollie Walker on 30 Dec 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Bertha Walker Quarrels 1875-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A. T. ATHERTON DIES AT HOME NEAR SHILOH

Aaron T. Atherton, age 72 years, died at his home near Shiloh Friday night at 10 o’clock. His wife died a few years ago.

Surviving him are a daughter, Mrs. Blanche VonNida, of Mounds; a half-brother, R. J. Johnson, of Villa Ridge; two half-sisters, Mrs. Edith Parker, of Pulaski, and Mrs. Frances Watson, of Miller City; seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, besides other relatives and a large circle of friends.
Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Shiloh Baptist Church with Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Interment was made in the Shiloh Cemetery by Hartwell and Ryan, undertakers of Mounds.

(Aaron T. Atherton married Mary H. Conyers on 8 Nov 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Aaron T. Atherton was born 4 Sep 1859, in Villa Ridge, Ill., son of Lanson Atherton, a native of Kentucky, and Susan A. Mills, a native of North Carolina, died 15 Apr 1932, in Pulaski Co. Ill., husband of Mary Atherton, and was buried at Villa Ridge.  R. J. Johnson married Susannah A. Atherton on 29 Feb 1872.  R. J. Johnson, 23, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of R. J. Johnson and Susan Mills, married on 3 Nov 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Sallie Vonida, 19, of Villa Ridge, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of John Vonida and Sarah Little.  James H. Green, 24, of Anna, Ill., a brickmaker, born in Carbondale, Ill., son of Hiram Green and Elizabeth C. Edwards, married on 22 Oct 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Edith Johnson, 22, of Villa Ridge, Ill., born in Villa Ridge, Ill., daughter of R. J. Johnson.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUND CITY WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Eliza Oliver Snebley, daughter of William and Precilla Oliver, passed away at her home on North Main Street at 4:30 o’clock Monday morning following an illness of two weeks of pneumonia.  Mrs. Snebley had been an invalid for a number of years, but her illness was not thought to be serious until she contracted pneumonia.

She was born April 5, 1872, and was 60 years of age.  She was married to John Snebley, a number of years ago and to this union one daughter was born who preceded her mother in death some time ago.
Mrs. Snebly was converted to the Christian faith several years and united with the Methodist Church.
She leaves to mourn her loss two sisters, Mrs. Lela Brack and Mrs. Feba Taylor; one brother, Dave Oliver; and a number of nephews and nieces and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held at the residence at 12 o’clock and the remains were taken to the Hall Cemetery near Hinkleville, Ky., where interment was made.  An undertaker from Barlow had charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Eliza Oliver was born 5 Apr 1872, in Kentucky, the daughter of William Oliver, a native of Tennessee, and Priscilla Summers, a native of Illinois, died 18 Apr 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Bardwell, Carlisle Co., Ky.  She was divorced from John Snabley.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Apr 1932: 
Grand Jury Fails to Indict Ethel Reed

Miss Ethel Reed, who has been held in the Pulaski County jail at Mound City since February 23, in connection with the shooting of E. (Shorty) McReynolds, which occurred on that date, was released Monday afternoon after the grand jury chosen for the present term of circuit court, now in session at the county seat, failed to return a true bill against her.

It will be recalled that McReynolds died the night of February 23, from a bullet wound and that when passersby, who heard the shot, reached the apartment they found Miss Reed in the room with him.  McReynolds was taken to St. Mary's Hospital, Cairo, where he underwent an emergency operation, dying shortly thereafter.  At the coroner's inquest, evidence was given to the effect that McReynolds accused his companion of firing the shot that wounded him.  There were no eye witnesses to the tragedy and Miss Reed claimed that his wound was self-inflicted.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Apr 1932:
DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES VERY SUDDENLY SATURDAY

Miss Josephine Keller, age 72, died suddenly Saturday night about 10 o’clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. Edna Carlock, of Dongola.  She and her sister had retired for the night and after a short time Mrs. Keller became ill and died in a few minutes.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. J. Ward.  Interment was made in the Union School Cemetery near Dongola.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

She is survived by one brother, John Keller; four sisters, Mrs. Edna Carlock, of Dongola, Mrs. Octavia Frost, of Jonesboro, Mrs. Martha Frost and Mrs. Harriet Russell, both of Cypress.

(Samuel H. Frost, 23, a school teacher, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Samuel Frost and Talitha Davidson, married 15 Sep 1886, in Anna, Union Co., Ill., Octavia Desda Kelley, 25, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Daniel Kelly and Armirintha Ferguson.   John Frost, 31, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Samuel Frost and Talitha Davidson, married on 23 Oct 1898, at Daniel M. Kelley’s in Union Co., Ill., Martha A. Kelley, 28, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Daniel Kelley and Sarah A. Furguson.  According to her death certificate, Nancy Josephine Kelley was born 4 May 1859, near Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Daniel M. Kelley, a native of Indiana, and Sarah A. Ferguson, a native of North Carolina, and died 23 Apr 1932, in Dongola, Ill.  Her marker in Union Schoolhouse Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Josephine Kelley Born May 4, 1859 Died April 23, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
STATE DEPUTY DIES AT HOME IN PEORIA

Mrs. Dell Newton, state supervising deputy of the Royal Neighbors of America, passed away on Wednesday of last week at her home in Peoria.

Mrs. Newton had visited Speedway Camp No. 9471 R. N. of A. in Mound City on several occasions and while on these visits made many friends who are very sorry to learn of her death.  Mrs. Newton’s last visit to the Mound City camp was last November.

(According to her death certificate, Dell Newton was born 28 Dec 1864, in Ohio, died 20 Apr 1932, in Moline, Rock Island Ill., wife of Fred Newton, and was buried in Parkview Cemetery, Peoria, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WOMAN NOT INDICTED FOR McREYNOLDS KILLING

The suicide theory that “Shorty” McReynolds killed himself and that Ethel Reed had nothing to do with it, prevailed with the grand jury Monday and she was released from the county jail where she had been held since the killing at Mounds about two months ago.

A great deal of interest centered in this case.  Only she and McReynolds were in the room at the time.  McReynolds told in the hospital that she shot him and she insisted that McReynolds, in poor health and disappointed, killed himself and she clung to this version concerning his death.

Little or no outside evidence developed and the grand jury evidently considered it useless to hold Miss Reed longer and did not indict.
 
CHARLES FITZGERALD DIES AT HOME IN CHICAGO

Mrs. J. A. Lutz received a message Sunday morning stating her cousin, Charles Fitzgerald, died suddenly Saturday evening at 6:30 at his home in Chicago.  Mr. Fitzgerald was about 57 years of age and was born and reared in this city.  He graduated from the Mound City High School in 1893 under Prof. M. N. McCartney.

Mr. Fitzgerald’s death is the second to occur within the week of the members of the 1893 class, Mrs. G. M. Quarrels of Mounds having passed away at Rochester, Minn., on Tuesday, April 19.

Shortly after his graduation, he left Mound City and for several years was employed with a steel company in Birmingham, Ala., later locating in Chicago where he continued his interests in the steel works.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock and interment was made in a cemetery at Chicago.

He leaves to mourn his passing his wife and one daughter other relatives and a large circle of friends.

(His death certificate states that Charles P. Fitzgerald, of 7321 S. Shon Dr., Chicago, Ill., was born 7 Aug 1876, in Chicago, Ill., the son of William Fitzgerald and Lizzie McGiseron, died 23 Apr 1932, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., husband of Elizabeth P. Fitzgerald, and was buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Chicago.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 May 1932:
MRS. MARY HELMAN DIES IN FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Mrs. Mary Helman, who spent the early part of her life in and about Villa Ridge, passed away at Fort Worth, Texas, last Saturday at the age of 80 years.  The remains were brought to Villa Ridge, arriving there Tuesday noon.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge Cemetery.

(Her death certificate states that Mary A. Helman, of 504 Ryan St., Fort Worth, Texas, was born 2 Feb 1854, in Pennsylvania, daughter of William Betts and Elizabeth Metzer, a native of Pennsylvania, died 30 Apr 1932, in Fort Worth, Tarrant Co., Texas, of arterial sclerosis, and was buried in Villa Ride, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. SHELTON A. HARRIS DIES AT OAK PARK, ILL.

Word has reached Mounds City through the Pilgrim Outlook, a paper of the Congregational Church, of the death of Mrs. Shelton A. Harris, wife of the late Rev. S. A. Harris.  She passed from this life on March 30 at the home of her son, Rev. R. A. Harris in Oak Park, Illinois.

Mrs. Harris will be remembered by many here as her husband was pastor of the local church at one time.

(According to her death certificate, Marie Andre Harris was born 18 Feb 1851, in Switzerland, daughter of Samuel Andre, a native of France, and Miss Singer, a native of Switzerland, died 30 Mar 1932, in Oak Park, Cook Co., Ill., wife of Sheldon A. Harris, and was buried at Milburn, Lake Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
PASTOR INNJRUED IN EXPLOSION; DIES

Rev. James A. Lowe, who received severe injuries from an explosion while he was building a fire at his home in Olive Branch Monday, April 25, passed away Monday night.

A coroner’s jury was summoned after his death and returned the verdict to the effect that he came to his death from burns received from an explosion while he was building a fire.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon and interment made in the Olive Branch cemetery.

(His death certificate states that James A. Lowe was born 16 Apr 1903, in Knoxville, Tenn., son of D. Lowe, died 2 May 1932, in Cairo, Ill., husband of Sylvia Lowe, and was buried in Olive Branch, Ill.  His marker in Olive Branch Cemetery reads:  James A. Lowe Tennessee Pvt. 9 Inf. May 2, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 May 1932:

Former Villa Ridge Resident Brought There for Burial

             Mrs. Mary Helman, 80, formerly of Villa Ridge, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Howell, in Fort Worth, Tex., Saturday, April 30, was brought to Villa Ridge Tuesday for burial in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  Funeral services were held that day and interment made.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Evan Rushing accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hinemon, were in DuQuoin Thursday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Grace Marlow Cole.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 May 1932:

Mrs. William L. Dacus Called by Death

Expires Suddenly Wednesday Morning after Arising for the Day

Mrs. William L. Dacus, mother of the late Mrs. H. A. Melton, died suddenly early Wednesday morning at the Melton home where she had resided for twelve years.  Mrs. Dacus had been rather feeble for some time and especially since the shock of the sudden death of her only daughter, Mrs. Melton, which occurred December 5, 1931.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church, with the pastor, Rev. W. D. Richardson, in the pulpit.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, directed by G. A. James.

“Mrs. Tempy Holloway Dacus was born June 3, 1853, at Okaloona, Miss., and died at the home of her son-in-law, H. A. Melton, Mounds, Ill., May 11, 1932, at the age of 78 years, 11 months, 6 days.  In November 1876 she was united by marriage to William L. Dacus.  To this union there were born eight sons and one daughter.  Her husband, six sons and the daughter preceded her in death.  She leaves two sons, A. H. Dacus, Drew, Miss., and B. B. Dacus, Iverness, Miss.; two sisters, Mrs. Carrie Garner, Buena Vista, Miss., Mrs. W. R. Montgomery, Potts Camp, Miss.; one brother, E. P. Holloway, Holly Springs, Miss.; seventeen grandchildren and one great-grandchild.; also a host of distant relatives and friends.  She has been a member of the Liberty Presbyterian Church of Lafayette County, Miss., for 40 years.  She lived a devoted Christian life that will be long remembered by all who knew her.

 

LOSES LIFE IN RUMBLE SEAT AS CAR OVERTURNS

ROCKFORD—The life of a fifteen-year-old girl was the penalty paid in an automobile crash between two cars at Rockford Thursday afternoon, when Jule Haegg, junior student at Rockford High School, suffered a broken neck as the machine in which she was riding with three companions collided with a car driven by a Rockford man.  Miss Haegg and another girl were in the rumble seat of the car when the accident took place.  Both autos overturned.—Ogle County Reporter

(Her death certificate states that Jule Haegg, of 1112 17 St., Rockford, Ill.,  was born 10 Jul 1916, in Rockford, Ill., the daughter of E. C. Haegg and Julia Reid, natives of Rockford, Ill., died 28 Apr 1932, in Rockford, Ill., and was buried in Scandinavian Cemetery in Rockford.  Her marker in Cherry Valley Cemetery in Winnebago Co., Ill., reads:  Jule Marion Haegg  Honey 1916-1932.—Darrel Dexter)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 May 1932:
GRAND CHAIN RESIDENT PASSES AWAY TUESDAY

Elijah L. Harris passed away at his home in Grand Chain Tuesday morning.  He was born October 26, 1857, and passed away May 10, 1932, and was 74 years, 6 months, and 14 days of age.

The funeral was held Wednesday at 2 o’clock the Rev. McWherter officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery by G. A. James.

Mr. Harris was survived by three sons.  Guy Harris, cashier of the First State Bank at Grand Chain, was a son of the deceased.  His wife preceded him in death four years ago.

Mr. Harris was a highly respected citizen of Grand Chain and his death ash been a shock to the entire community.

(According to his death certificate, Elijah L. Harris was born 26 Oct 1857, in Round Knob, Ill., the son of A B. Harris, a native of Illinois, and Lucy May, a naïve of Tennessee, died 10 May 1932, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Ella Harris.  Abijah Harris married Lucinda May on 21 Feb 1850, in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Elijah Harris 1857-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS WOMAN DIES AT HOME OF SON-IN-LAW

Mrs. Tempy H. Dacus, age 79 years, died at 5 o’clock Wednesday morning at the home of her son-in-law, Herbert Melton, in Mounds, her death resulting from a heart attack.  She had resided in Mounds for 14 years, her daughter, Mrs. Melton died a few months ago.  She was born in Corinth, Miss.

Surviving Mrs. Dacus are two sons, B. B. Dacus, of Inverness, Miss., and A. H. Dacus, of Drew, Miss.; 17 grandchildren, a brother, E. T. Holloway, of Myrtle, Miss., and two sisters, Mrs. W. R. Montgomery, of Pottscamp, Miss.; and Mrs. Garner, of Cleveland, Miss.

Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon at the First M. E. Church with Rev. Richardson officiating.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(According to her death certificate, Tempy Dacus was born 5 Jun 1853, in Mississippi, daughter of James Holloway and Helen Henderson, natives of Virginia, died 11 May 1932, in Mounds, Ill., wife of William L. Dacus, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Joe W. Dacus 1894-1926 Tempy H. Dacus 1854-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

Billy Chesney passed away Saturday morning at 5 o’clock after an acute pneumonia siege of several weeks.  He leaves a wife and two daughters to mourn his loss.  He was laid to rest in the Chapel Cemetery.  The M. E. minister of that church preached his funeral.

(According to his death certificate, William Chesney, of near Perks, Ill., was born 7 Jan 1874, in Iva, Ill., son of William Chesney, died 7 May 1932, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Eddie Chesney, and was buried in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHARLES DUCKWORTH PASSES AWAY

Charles Duckworth died at his home Tuesday the 5th after a long illness of head trouble which ended in a series of hemorrhages.  Mr. Duckworth was in his 42nd year.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Justice Duckworth, of Ullin.  He leaves a wife, three daughters and one son to mourn their loss.  Also two sisters and three brothers besides a host of other relatives and friends.

Rev. Troutman preached the funeral services at the Baptist church with the Ullin choir to assist.  Interment was made in the Ullin cemetery.  Elmer Ford undertaker, directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Charley Allison Duckworth was born 13 Sep 1890, in Coles Co., Ill., son of J. Duckworth, a native of Indiana, and Angeline Moore, died 3 May 1932, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Della Duckworth.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Charlie Duckworth 1890-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Aged Colored Woman Meets Death by Fire

Mattie Talley, aged colored woman of this city, burned to death Wednesday night when the house in which she and her husband were residing, burned.  It is supposed the fire started from an overturned coal oil lamp.

The aged lady and her husband, Sol Talley, lived alone in the northeast part of town.  From all appearance they were just getting ready to retire for the night when the lamp was overturned setting fire to the house.  Whether she was sprayed with coal oil or was overcome by the heat and smoke while searching for valuables, will probably never be known.

Her body was found very near a window so it is thought she might have gone to the window, thinking it was a door.

Her husband was rescued by a volunteer who carried him out.

The couple were very old, up around the nineties, whose lives run back to the days of slavery.

(Her death certificate states that Mattie Talley was born in 1850 in Tennessee, died 11 May 1932, in Mound City, Ill., wife of Solomon Talley, and was buried in the National Cemetery.  Solomon Talley was a private in Co. B, 4th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, and was discharged 24 Feb 1866.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dale Sheerer, of Tamms, is here at the home of his grandfather, Ed Sheerer, and is very sick with blood poisoning.  He is the son of the late Sam Sheerer and his mother, Mrs. Blanche Parker, is at his bedside.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 May 1932:
Dale Sheerer, the son of Mrs. Blanche Parker, of Tamms, is very ill at the home of his grandfather, Ed Sheerer of this city.  Dale had a pimple on his lip which became infected and developed into blood poison.
 
Mrs. Nell Goodfellow and Mrs. H. C. Fellenstein left Monday morning for Nashville, Tenn., where they were called on account of the death of Mrs. Goodfellow’s brother-in-law, who died in Jacksonville, Fla., and was buried in Nashville Monday afternoon.  They returned to their home Thursday.  (Mounds).

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 May 1932:

East St. Louis Engineer Dies Suddenly Monday

John Neutzel of East St. Louis, aged 65 years, died suddenly on Monday.  He was stricken about 9 a.m.  An ambulance was called and he passed away on the way to the hospital.

Funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon at the Kurris Funeral Home in East St. Louis.

He has many friends in Mounds who will be grieved to learn of his sudden death—having made the run here for many years as an engineer on the Illinois Central.

 

Brother of G. P. Hartwell Dies in Marion

             J. L. D. Hartwell, 74, oldest teacher in Williamson County, died Monday, May 9, at his home in Marion after a long illness.

             Mr. Hartwell was a brother of George P. Hartwell of this city.  He had taught school in Williamson County for fifty-one years, beginning in 1876 at a salary of $11 per month.  For eight years he was principal of the Lincoln school in Marion and for three years was principal of the Jefferson school.  His last work as a teacher was as principal of the seventh and eighth grades in the Carterville schools.

             (William H. Hartwell married Mary A. Phenix on 16 Oct 1856, in Williamson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John Lorenzo Dow Hartwell, school teacher, was born 7 Mar 1858, in Lake Creek, Williamson Co., Ill., the son of William H. Hartwell and Adeline Phoenix, natives of Lake Creek, Ill., died 9 May 1932, in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., the husband of Elizabeth Doris Hartwell.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere thanks to the neighbors and friends who so kindly assisted us following the sudden death of our mother, Mrs. Tempy Holloway Dacus.  Especially do we wish to thank the minister, Rev. W. D. Richardson for his consoling words, those who sent flowers and those who offered the use of their cars.

H. A. Melton and Family

A. H. Dacus

B. B. Dacus

 

Mrs. W. A. Goodfellow and Mrs. H. C. Fellenstein were called to Nashville, Tenn., Monday on account of the death of a brother-in-law of Mrs. Goodfellow.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 May 1932:

Villa Ridge Man Slain with Axe

Nineteen-Year-Old Colored Girl Arrested on Murder Charge

Carrell Skinner, colored, of Villa Ridge, was murdered Saturday morning at 9:30 o’clock, the perpetrator of the crime using an axe and a pruning knife and hacking the victim horribly about the head and neck.  Skinner was struck at least three blows, one of which fractured his skull.

The wounded man either crawled or was taken from his house on the Roberson place to the yard of Robert Aldrich, Sr., nearby.  He was brought to the office of Dr. H. J. Elkins at about 10:30 o’clock that same morning and died there about 7 o’clock that evening.

Iola Bowden, nineteen-year-old colored girl, who was known to have been with Skinner a few hours before the attack, was trailed to Charleston, Mo., where she was arrested and brought to Pulaski County jail in Mound City.

A coroner’s jury at a hearing held Monday morning in the office of Coroner O. T. Hudson, this city, returned a verdict to the effect that Skinner met his death as a result of injuries inflicted by Iola Bowden.  The girl decline to make a statement before the jury, but at the inquest it developed the girl had confessed to the murder of her sweetheart, but had told conflicting stories.  She was quoted as having said she had known Skinner since 1928 and that each year she had come to southern Illinois during the berry season and had stayed with him:  that she had come to Illinois this year with another man and that Skinner had taken her away from this man and had taken her to his house where she had been forced to remain for two days and nights.  In her confession as reported by officials, she said she had been told by Skinner that she must either kill him or that he was going to kill her.  However, the facts are not clear.

Officials are investigating the possibility of some other person being implicated in the crime.

 

Charlotte Ann Akin

Charlotte Ann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Akin, was born Sept. 12, 1930, in Mounds, Ill., and departed this life May 23, 1932, at the age of 1 year, 8 months and 11 days,.

             The little one was sick for two weeks following a severe attack of whooping cough.

             She leaves her father, mother, one sister, Kathyrn; and four brothers, Howard, Dean, Max, and Larry, besides other relatives.

Funeral services were conducted at the home on Delaware Ave., at 11:00 a.m. May 24 by Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the First Baptist Church.  Burial was made at Bradford, Tenn.,   Undertaker G. A. James was in charge.

 

Charles C. Benton Dies Saturday Night

Charles C. Benton, age 74, died Saturday night, May 21, following a long illness.  He was born at New Albany, Ind., Sept. 27, 1857, and lived at New Albany until the years of early manhood.

He was united in marriage to Parmelia Thomas on Nov. 6, 1886.

             Surviving Mr. Benton are his widow, one daughter, Mrs. Lola Sadler, of Kankakee, Ill., and two sons, Arthur Benton, of Illmo, Mo., and Alvin Benton, of Mounds, Ill.  He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Sarah Baylor, of Springfield, Ill., and seven grandchildren.

Funeral services were conducted at the home on McKinley Ave., at 2:30 p.m., May 24, 1932, by Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the First Baptist Church.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with Undertakers Hartwell & Ryan in charge.

(His death certificate reads:  Charles C. Benton, plasterer, was born 27 Sep 1887, in New Albany, Ind., the son of George Benton, a native of Georgia, died 21 May 1932, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Permelia Benton, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Elias Exonerated

Mrs. Haroldine Elias was exonerated in Anna Tuesday by a coroner’s jury empaneled to investigate into the circumstances of the death of Otto M. Harpending of Anna, operator of the filling station at the junction of Route 2 and Route 146, caused by being struck by a car driven by Mrs. Elias Saturday evening.  The jury returned the verdict that death was due to an unavoidable accident, thus absolving Mrs. Elias from all blame.

Mr. Harpending, upon alighting from the car of a friend who was driving him home, walked directly in front of the car driven by Mrs. Elias.

 

Taps Sound for Another Civil War Soldier

Judge Horrace A. Hannon, one of the few remaining soldiers of the Civil war, in this county, joined the majority Tuesday morning, May 24, following an illness of only two days, at his home near Olmstead.

Judge Hannon was one of the most picturesque and interesting residents of Southern Illinois, and beloved by hundreds of men, women and children I this vicinity, says the Cairo Evening Citizen.  He resided in Cairo after the Civil war until 1915, when he located in Olmstead.  He was a native of Illinois, having been born in Springfield, June 14, 1843, and would have attained his eighty-ninth year next month.  He came to Cairo in 1857 and learned the business of printing in the Cairo Gazette, afterward becoming a salesman in the drugstore of H. B. Humphreys and Co.  On September 6, 1861, he enlisted in the United States Navy as “first class boy,” and mustered out in January 1866, as captain of a gunboat.  He participated in much of the active service of the Mississippi Squadron and was in the 17 engagements, receiving a wound at the Battle of Greenwood.  He was an ensign in the navy, serving on the S. S. Louisville, Chillicothe and Joliet.

At the close of the war he returned to Cairo and went into business.  He was married September 19, 1872, in Caledonia, Ill., to Mrs. Sallie Wood.  One son, Dr. Blake Hannon, of Chicago, survives.

 

INJURIES FROM AUTO RESULT IN DEATH OF J. A. FREEMAN

             COBDEN—J. A. Freeman, 67, a farmer and veteran school teacher of Benton, died Tuesday from injuries received when he was run down by an automobile, May 9.

             Mr. Freeman leaves a wife, one son, and four daughters.

Cobden people will remember Mr. Freeman as a candidate for the Republican nomination for state senator from this district at the last primary.  He spoke here one night to a fairly good crowd and was fairly well known to a number of our citizens.

(According to the death certificate, J. A. Freeman, retired teacher, was born 19 Feb 1865, in Shelby Co., Tenn., the son of Louis Freeman and Mary Green, natives of Tennessee, died 17 May 1932, in Benton, Ill., husband of Nancy Freeman, and was buried in M. & O. Cemetery in Benton, Franklin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

We take this method of extending our thanks and appreciation to our neighbors and friends for their kindness shown us during the illness and following the death of our dear baby, Charlotte.

Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Akin and family

 

Called away by Death of Father

Superintendent Allan R. Edwards of Mounds public schools, was called to Boulder, Ill., by the death of his father, which occurred Wednesday of this week.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 May 1932:
FATALLY INJURED IN FALL FROM TRAIN

____ Burutti, 19, of Johnston City, passed away Monday afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary from injuries he received when he was ____ or fell from a C. & E. I. train at the I. C. crossing Monday _____.  His skull was fractured.  He died within a few minutes after being taken to the hospital.

Dr. J. B. Mathis, of Ullin and Dr. ____dson, of Mounds, were called immediately and the youth was removed to the hospital.  One arm ___ were broken and a hole ___ in the back of his head.

After his death Coroner Dan Sullivan called an inquest and returned a verdict that the boy came to his death from a fractured skull sustained when he fell from a freight train.  The matter of how the boy ___red was not cleared up and ___ate where it was accidental or not.

Burutti and three other youths, ___ Whitecotton, Ernest Joridain, and Lester James, all of Johnston City, were with him when the accident occurred.  One of the boys said that he was sitting beside him and he felt his companion slip from beside him.  Whether his feet caught on something, pulling him ___ whether he lost his balance is unknown.

Burutti’s body was sent to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. ___ Burutti, Sr., at Johnston City ___ morning.
 
FATHER OF M. C. HUNT DIES THURSDAY

Walter Hunt, of Noblesville, Ind., father of Prof. M. C. Hunt, of this city, passed away at his home Thursday.  Mr. Hunt was 77 years of age.

Funeral services were held Saturday.

Mr. Hunt was struck by an automobile about two years ago and he never fully recovered from the accident.  His wife survives him.

Prof. and Mrs. Hunt and son, Mahlon have returned to their home in this city after being called to Noblesville on account of the illness and death of Mr. Hunt.
 
MOUNDS WOMAN KILLS MAN

Mancil D. Harpending, age 65 years, who operated the filling station at the junction of Routes No. 2 and 145 at Anna was killed when he stepped in front of the car driven by Mrs. Haldine Elias of Mounds.  Mrs. Elias was driving at a moderate rate of speed when the accident occurred.

Mr. Harpending had closed his station for the night and had caught a ride to his home.  Then in crossing the highway, he stepped direly into the path of the car which killed him.

(Mancil D. Harpending married on 10 Dec 1893, in Mt. Pleasant, Union Co., Ill., Alice M. Yost, 21, born in Mt. Pleasant, Ill., daughter of G. M. Yost and Luvina Casper.   His death certificate states that Mancil D. Harpending, oil station operator, was born 10 Nov 1870, in Buncombe, Ill., the son of James Harpending and Nancy Nobles, natives of Illinois, died 22 May 1932, in Anna, Ill.  His marker in reads:  Mancil D. Harpending Nov. 10, 1870-May 22, 1932 Alice M. Harpending May 18, 1871-May 5, 1939 Gone but not forgotten.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHARLES C. DENTON DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS

Charles C. Denton, age 74, an old and highly respected resident of Mounds, passed away at his home there Saturday night following a lingering illness.

He is survived by his widow and three children, Arthur Denton, of Illmo, Mo., and Mrs. Lola Sadler, of Kankakee, Illinois, and Alvin Denton, of Mounds.  He also leaves seven grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at the residence on North McKinley Avenue at 2:309 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, Rev. Ury of the Baptist Church officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, with Hartwell and Ryan directing the funeral.

Mr. Denton was a plasterer by trade and was a very popular man in the community in which he lived.

(The name should have read Charles C. Benton.—Darrel Dexter)
 
AGED VILLA RIDGE RESIDENT PASSES AWAY

Louis D. Smith, aged 70 years, passed away at the Anna State Hospital where he had been a patient five weeks, Thursday, May 19.

Mr. Smith had been a resident of Villa Ridge since the ager of seven years with the exception of a short time spent in St. Louis where he was married.

Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10 o’clock at Villa Ridge Congregational Church, Rev. Allen pastor of the church officiating.  Interment as made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

Surviving Mr. Smith are his widow, one child, Mrs. Fred Whelan, Kansas City, Mo.; two sisters, Mrs. Robert Aldrich, Villa Ridge, Mrs. Dollie Doe, California; two brothers, George G. Smith, Spokane, Wash., and Adelbert A. Smith, Mabton, Wash.; also two grandchildren.

Casket bearers were R. L. Spaulding, J. W. Buckle, M. J. McBride, W. M. Cheniae, H. T. Horsfall, and Charles Hogendobler.

(His death certificate states that Louis D. Smith was born 22 Feb 1862, in Cairo, Ill., the son of George Smith and Ruth Hesne, natives of England, died 19 May 1932, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., the husband of Catherine Smith, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHARLOTTE ANN AKIN DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS

Charlotte Ann, little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Akin, age 20 months, of Mounds, passed away at the home of her parents at 9:45 o’clock Monday morning.  She had been ill two weeks of pneumonia.
She is survived by her parents, four brothers and one sister.

Funeral services were held at 11 o’clock Tuesday morning and the remains were taken to Bradford, Tenn., for burial.  Rev. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church officiated.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Charlotte Ann Akin was born 12 Sep 1930, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of T. G. Akin and Lillian Featherstone, natives of Tennessee, died 23 May 1932, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Bradford, Tenn.—Darrel Dexter)
 
HUGH HAGARTY PASSES AWAY AT SISTER’S HOME HERE

Hugh Hagarty, age 73, passed away at the home of his sister, Mrs. James Dolan, Monday night at 7:30 o’clock.  Mr. Hagerty was born April 14, 1859, in McLeansboro, Illinois.  He had only been in Mound City six weeks.  He formerly resided in Howell, Ind., with another sister who passed away and he had come to Mound city to make his home with his sister here.  He was ill only a few days, but had been in failing health five years.

Surviving Mr. Hagarty are a brother, C. M. Hagarty, of Pontiac, Illinois, two sisters, Miss Margaret Hagarty, of Agnew, Calif., and Mrs. Dolan of Mound City, and several nieces.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, conducted by Fr. Lawrence Gilmartin.  Interment was made in St. Mary Cemetery by G. A. James who directed the funeral.

Casket bearers were Dan Hurley, Albert Lee, Tom Campbell, Andy Campbell, Ed O’Hare, and Charles Campbell.

(The death certificate states that Hugh Patrick Hagarty, a retired stationery fireman, of Howell, Ind., was born 8 Apr 1860, in Hamilton Co., Ill., the son of John Hagarty and Ellen Raferty, natives of Ireland, died 23 May 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Mounds, Ill.  His marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Hugh Hagarty 1859-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
PLACE WREATH ON GRAVE OF W. J. PERKS

Several members of the Princess Olga Shows which have been playing at Mounds the past week, visited St. Mary’s Cemetery Sunday morning and as has been their custom for the past three years, placed a beautiful wreath on the grave of the late W. J. Perks.  The company is playing Paducah, Ky., this week and before leaving they paid this tribute to the memory of one they highly esteemed and greatly miss on their return visits to this community.
 
WOMAN ELIMINATES LOVER WITH AXE

Iola Bowden, 19 years of age, colored, of Wolf Island, eliminated one lover from her life on last Saturday at Villa Ridge, when she wielded an axe and gave him three vigorous wounds which proved fatal some eight hours later.  The unfortunate party in the case was Carrel Skinner, about 22 years of age.
Officers trailing Iola found her in Charleston, Mo., where she was arrested.  She is said to make no denial about hitting him with the sharp edge of the pole axe, merely maintaining that she had to kill him or he would kill her.

The row, it is generally believed, centered over the presence of “another man.”  Iola was Skinner’s gal when she came to Villa Ridge with the influx of strawberry pickers this spring and had been since 1923.  But this time she had another man it is said that the row began.  The eternal triangle was present and the opinion is that he threatened to kill her if she did not leave her man and that she feared he would make good his declaration and so became prepared and struck while Skinner was sleeping in his own house where they were staying.

Mortally wounded, his skull fractured, bleeding profusely, he crawled from the house after a time and out into the street and into the yard of someone living close by.  It was firs thought that an ice truck had hit him, but it later developed that it was an axe and possible a pruning knife that had inflicted the sounds of which he died about 4 o’clock that afternoon.

The room where the chopping had taken place was quite a bloody affair and the knife and axe were still there as witnesses of their part in the tragedy.

Naturally, Iola is in jail, awaiting action of the grand jury.

Skinner was buried Sunday.

There is no triangle now and in jail, lovers will be scarce.

(The death certificate states that Carell Skinner, black, born in 1910 in Mississippi, son of Tom Skinner and Estella Morgan, natives of Mississippi, died 21 May 1932, in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JUDGE HORACE A. HANNON DIES AT HOME NEAR OLMSTEAD

Judge Horace A. Hannon, one of the last surviving members of the Grand Army of the Republic, passes away at his home near Olmstead at four o’clock Tuesday morning at the age of 88 years, 11 months and 10 days.  Judge Hannon had been ill only two days.

Judge Hannon was one of the oldest and most high respected residents of this and Alexander County.  For many years he resided in Cairo and in 1915 he moved to Olmstead where he has since made his home.  He was beloved by hundreds of men, women and children in this vicinity. He was a native of Illinois, having been born in Springfield, June 14, 1843, and would have attained his eighty-ninth year next month.

He came to Cairo in 1857 and learned the business of printing in the Cairo Gazette, afterward becoming salesman in the drug store of H. B. Humphrey and Co.  On September 6, 1861, he enlisted in the United States Navy as “first class boy” and was mustered out in January 1866, as captain of a gunboat.
At the close of the war, he returned to Cairo and engaged win the book business, associated with W. J. Yost, under the name of Yost and Hannon, in which he continued the business until 1872, and sold to B. F. Parker.  He then entered the sewing machine and real estate business.  He was married September 19, 1872, in Caledonia, Illinois, to Mrs. Sallie Wood, who preceded her husband in death a number of years ago.  One son, Dr. H. B. Hannon, survives.

Mr. Hannon was a justice of the peace, a member of the Episcopal Church and a Master Mason and a member of the A. L. of H.  He was made an honorary member of Winifred Fairfax Warder post of the American Legion a few years ago, the honor being conferred upon him in return for his generosity in donating a beautiful evergreen tree to the Legion every year for a number of years.  The tree was used for the municipal tree on Christmas and every Christmas treats for the needy children were given out under this tree.

Judge Hannon never missed attending a patriotic gathering and only last year attended the laying of the cornerstone for the new Cairo armory.  He was present at the dedication of the flag pole and at the dedication of the armory.  He always enjoyed telling his experiences of the Civil War days and only about two months ago he was in his office telling of many happenings of those days.

His home is in a picturesque spot near Olmsted where he always welcomed his friends from Cairo and Mound City.  Judge Hannon was a true and loyal friend.

Funeral services were held on Thursday afternoon at the M. E. Church in Olmstead, Rev. Scott officiating and interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery there.

The American Legion took charge at the grave and after the body was lowered in the grave, taps were blown and the salute was fired in memory of one who loved his flag and his country.

G. A. James had charge of the funeral and casket bearers were taken from the ranks of the American Legion.

(The death certificate states that Horrace Allen Hannon was born 14 Jun 1843, in Springfield, Ill., son of Althena Ewel, a native of Massachusetts, died 24 May 1932, in Road District No. 4, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Sallie E. Hannon, and was buried at Olmsted, Ill.  His headstone application states that he was an acting ensign in Mississippi Company in the River Flotilla, U.S. Navy.  His marker in Olmsted Masonic Cemetery reads:  Horace A. Hannon, Actg. Ensign U.S. Navy.—Darrel Dexter)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 June 1932:

FATHER OF ALLAN R. EDWARDS OF MOUNDS DIES

Superintendent Allan R. Edwards, of Mounds Township High School, received a message last Wednesday stating that his father had passed away Wednesday afternoon at his home in Boulder, Ill.

He had been in ill health for some time and due to his age his death was not unexpected.

Mr. Edwards left Mounds early Thursday for Boulder, where he attended his father’s funeral.

 

BABY DIES AT GRAND CHAIN

Clinton Dale Koonce, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Koonce, passed away at his home in Grand Chain ___day night following an illness of about two weeks.  The little one was 13 months of age.

Funeral services were held Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the residence and interment was made at Mounds.

Mr. and Mrs. Koonce formerly resided at Villa Ridge.

             (His death certificate states that Clinton Dale Koonce was born 12 Nov 1930, in Mounds, Ill., the son of H. R. Koonce, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Letha Hitchcock, a native of Joppa, Ill., died 30 May 1932, in Road District No. 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery reads:  Clinton Dale Koonce Born Nov. 12, 1930 Died May 30, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. W. A. LACKEY DIES

Mrs. Lottie Lackey, 78, widow of the late W. A. Lackey, passed away ___day at her home near Pulaski.  Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the residence, Rev. Atherton officiating.  Interment was made in the Lackey Cemetery near Pulaski.

She is survived by one son, Ollie F. Lackey; a grandson, Frank Lackey; a sister, Mrs. George Lackey, all of Pulaski; a half-brother, Henry Essex; two half-sisters, Mrs. Frank ___ne and Mrs. William Chenaie, of Villa Ridge.

Mrs. L. C. Settlemoir, of Mound City, is a niece of the deceased.  W. Aldred had charge of the funeral.

(Wesley Lackey married Charlotta Essex on 1 Jan 1871, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George W. Lackey married Emma D. Essix on 3 Nov 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William M. Cheniai married Ida L. Essex on 2 Oct 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Laura Smoot, age 73 years, passed away at her home in Mounds Saturday morning at 5 o’clock.

Surviving Mrs. Smoot are her husband, John Smoot, two sons, Raymond Leeright, of Cairo; Minor Leeright, of Mounds; her daughter, Mrs. W. T. Miller, of Houston, Texas; a brother, F. J. Morris, of Cobden; three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Limestone Baptist Church near Cobden.  Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

(John Leeright, 26, married Laura J. Morris, 18, on 10 Dec 1874, in Union Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Laura J. Smoot was born 9 Jul 1859, in Cobden, Ill., died 28 May 1932, in Mounds, Ill., wife of John Smoot, and was buried near Cobden, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GEORGE M. LAMPKIN DIES AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

George M. Lampkins, age 58, passed away at his home in Grand Chain Saturday, May 28.  He was born in a farm in Hamilton County, Illinois, March 1, 1874. He was the eldest son of Robert J. and Teletha Aaron Lampkin, who preceded him in death a few years ago.

Mr. Lampkin came to Grand Chain in 1899 as a drug clerk for Jake Fellenstein, who he later succeeded in business as the community druggist where he remained until May 31, 1931, when he was compelled to retire.

Soon after coming to this county he was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Jones who survives him.  To this union three sons were born, Roy, of St. Louis, Harper, who passed away at the age of nine years, and Everett, of Grand Chain.  Besides his wife and two sons, he is survived by three brothers, William C., of West Frankfort, J. Orvil, of Mt. Vernon, and Walter C. , of Riverside, California; and five sisters, Mrs. Sarah Endicott, of West Frankfort, Mrs. Charlotte Endicott, of Eldorado, Mrs. Beplah Dillow, of Anna, Mrs. Iva Willis, and Mrs. Agnes Lindsey, both of Christopher, Illinois.

Some ten years ago, Mr. Lampkin united with the Congregational Church of Grand Chain and became one of its leading supporters and one of its most as active members.  As a citizen he was loyal and dependable.

Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock conducted by Rev. Benninger.  The casket bearers were Jesse Merchant, George Beshers, James Moore, W. A. McIntire, W. O. Talley, and Calvin Wilmonth.

G. A. James had charge of the funeral.

(George M. Lamkin, 37, of New Grand Chain, Ill., married Bessie Jones, 18, of New Grand Chain, Ill., on 22 Sep 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that George M. Lamkin, retired druggist, was born 1 Mar 1874, in Illinois, son of James Robert Lamkin and T Aron, died 28 May 1932, in Grand Chain, Ill., husband of Bessie Lamkin, and was buried at Grand Chain.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Jun 1932:

Mrs. Lottie Lackey of Pulaski Dies Saturday

             Mrs. Lottie Lackey, widow of the late W. A. Lackey, died Saturday, May 28, at her home near Pulaski.

             Mrs. Lackey had reached the age of 78 years.  She is survived by a son, Oliver F. Lackey; a grandson, Frank Lackey; and a sister, Mrs. George Lackey, all of Pulaski; a half-brother, Henry Essex; two half-sisters, Mrs. Frank Corzine and Mrs. William Cheniae of Villa Ridge.

Funeral services were held at the family home Monday afternoon, Rev. H. C. Vick and Rev. H. B. Atherton officiating.  Burial was made in the Lackey cemetery with W. H. Aldred directing.

 

Mrs. John Smoot Died Saturday Morning

Death Brings Relief after Many Months of Patient Suffering

Mrs. Laura Smoot, wife of John Smoot, of South Reader Ave., died Saturday morning, May 29, after a lingering illness.  Her age was 73 years.

Mrs. Smoot had lived in and near Mounds for many years, and had many friends and former neighbors who will miss her sadly.

Surviving her are her husband, two sons and a daughter by a former marriage, Raymond Leeright of Cairo, Minor Leeright of Mounds and Mrs. W. T. Miller of Houston, Texas; a brother, F. T. Morris of Cobden; three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Limestone Baptist Church four miles north of Cobden, Rev. T. C. Ury, of Mounds officiating.  Burial was made in the cemetery at the church.  Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

 

Clinton Dale Koonce

             Clinton Dale Koonce, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Koonce, died Sudan night at 11:50 o’clock at the family home near Grand Chain after an illness of two weeks.

Clinton Dale was born in Mounds, December 12, 1931, and died May 29, 1932, aged 18 months and 17 days.  Surviving him are his parents, three grandparents, a brother, Lindell, 5, and a sister, Janice, age 3, also many other relatives.

Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock with Rev. O. E. Allen, pastor of the Villa Ridge Community Church conducting.  Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Sarah Baylor, who was called here by the death of her brother, Charles Benton, left Wednesday for her home in Springfield.

 

Mrs. W. R. Thomas and daughter Miss Minnie Dell attended the funeral of Clinton Dale Koonce, small son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Koonce, of near Grand Chain, Tuesday morning.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Jun 1932:

R. P. Evers of Grand Chain Dies Sunday

             R. P. Evers, age 55, died Sunday morning, June 5, at his home in Grand Chain, Ill.  Mrs. Evers had lived in Grand Chain 30 years, having arrived there on June 4, 1902.  He was city clerk of Grand Chain at the time of his death.  He had been a barber there for many years.

             He is survived by his widow, his parents, four brothers and three sisters, also a number of other relatives, among them a cousin, Charles R. Evers, of Mounds.

             Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Grand Chain Congregational Church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. S. C. Benninger, who was assisted by the Rev. Mr. McWhirter, pastor of the Christian Church.

             The Masonic Order, of which Mr. Evers was Master, had charge of the services at the grave.  Burial was in Grand Chain cemetery.

 

Mrs. W. E. Vick Dies at Home in Karnak

             Mrs. W. E. Vick, of Karnak, age 40, died Saturday morning, June 4, at her home after an illness of several weeks.

Florence Hogendobler Vick was born in Villa Ridge where she lived until her marriage to W. E. Vick, merchant of Karnak.  She is survived by her husband, a son, Lewis, age 15; three sisters, Mrs. W. O. Graves, of Mounds, Misses Pearl and Oneita Hogendobler, of Villa Ridge, and three brothers, H. G. Hogendobler of Mounds, E. C. of Olmstead, and W. L. of Villa Ridge.

             Mrs. Vick was a member of the Order of Eastern Star, of the Villa Ridge Household Science Club and of the Baptist Church of Karnak.

Funeral services were held in the Baptist church Monday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Rev. William Carlton.

 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Schuler attended the funeral of Mrs. W. E. Vick of Karnak Monday afternoon.

 

DROPS DEAD AT DANCE

CARMI—While attending a dance at the home of Erwin Williams, six miles south of Carmi, Saturday night, Mike Doneghue, a young man of that community, fell from a chair and died of heart trouble.

             He was the son of Theodore Doneghue, lifelong resident of Carmi and vicinity.

             (His death certificate states that Robert Michael Doneghue, streetcar motorman and former military serviceman, was born 11 Feb 1889, in Illinois, the son of Theo Doneghue and Emma Ventrus, natives of Illinois, died 29 May 1932, in Heralds Prairie, White Co., Ill., divorced husband of Mattie Doneghue, and was buried at Carmi, White Co., Ill.  His application for military headstone states that he was born 11 Feb 1888, in Illinois, enlisted 17 Dec 1906, in Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, was a private in Battery F, 5th Regiment of Field Artillery, honorably discharged 16 Dec 1909, in Chicago, Ill.  He was buried in Newman Cemetery in Carmi Township, White Co., Ill.  His World War I draft registration also gives his year of birth as 1888 in Carmi, Ill., and states he was a teamer in Akron, Ohio.  When he was admitted to the soldiers’ home on 17 Nov 1931, he gave his nearest relative as Theodore Doneghue of 113 Cherry St., Carlyle, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Alto Pass Man Makes Human Torch of Self

Wilson Rodgers, of near Alto Pass, age 25, saturated his clothing with gasoline last Thursday evening and struck a match to light the blaze.  He immediately attempted to extinguish the flames, but too late to save his life.  He died in the Hale-Willard Hospital in Anna at 2 o’clock Friday morning.

             He is survived by his widow, the former Miss Bessie Pender, his father and a number of brothers and sisters.

             (His death certificate states that Frank Wilson Rodgers, farmer at Alto Pass, was born 6 Sep 1906, in Jackson Co., Ill., the son of W. S. Rodgers and Catherine Fletcher, natives of Jackson Co., Ill., died 3 Jun 1932, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Alto Pass Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A number from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral of Mrs. Flo Hogendobler Vick, which was held from her home in Karnak Monday.  Mrs. Vick, a former Villa Ridge resident, has lived in Karnak the past several years where Mr. Vick is engaged in business.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Jun 1932:

R. P. EVERS, GRAND CHAIN, PASSES TO GREAT BEYOND

             R. P. Evers, age 55 years, passed away at his home in Grand Chain Sunday morning at 3 o’clock following an illness of several months.

             Mr. Evers had lived in Grand Chain for the past 30 years.  He was city clerk at the time of his death.  He had been in the barber business since he was a young man.  He was a member of the Masonic Order and was Worshipful Master at the time of his death.  He was also clerk of the M. W. of A. Lodge.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Congregational church of which he was a member.  Rev. Benninger of the Congregational Church, assisted by Rev. McWherter of the Christian Church will officiate.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery.  The Masonic order had charge of the services at the grave.

             Surviving Mr. Evers are his widow, his parents, four brothers and three sisters.

             (His death certificate states that Rollie Porter Evers, a barber, was born 25 Jul 1877, in Illinois, the son of James R. Evers and Charlotte Copeland, natives of Illinois, died 5 Jun 1932, in Grand Chain, Ill., husband of Elizabeth E. Evers, and was buried at Grand Chain.  J. K. Evers married Charlott T. Copland on 15 Mar 1866, in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Rolla P. Evers Born July 25, 1877 Died June 5, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. VICK DIES AT HOME IN KARNAK

             Mrs. W. E. Vick, age 40 years, died Saturday morning at 10:45 o’clock at her home in Karnak, following an illness of several weeks.  Mrs. Vick was born in Villa Ridge and spent her girlhood there.  After her marriage she made her home in Karnak where she resided until her death.

             Surviving Mrs. Vick are her husband, a son, Lewis, age 15; three sisters, Mrs. W. O. Graves, of Mounds, Misses Pearl and Oneita Hogendobler of Villa Ridge; three brothers. E. C. Hogendobler, of Olmstead, H. G. Hogendobler, of Mounds, and W. L. Hogendobler, of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Baptist church of which she was a member, conducted by the pastor, Rev. William Carlton.  The casket bearers were Harry Lee, Ray Roller, Emra Ford, T. B. Hancock, Orland McBride, and William Bride.

             Mrs. Vick was a member of the Order of Eastern Star and of the Household Science Club at Villa Ridge.

             (Her death certificate states that Flora Lacede Vick was born 4 Feb 1892, in Villa Ridge, Ill., daughter of Henry M. Hogendobler, a native of Lancaster, Pa., and Emma Wright, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., died 4 Jun 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Henry M. Hogendobler married Emma M. Wright on 6 Sep 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Flora L. wife of W. E. Vick 1892-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Those from Mound City who attended the funeral of R. P. Evers whose funeral was held in Grand Chain Tuesday afternoon were Attorney G. E. Martin, Mr. and Mrs. S. F. McIntire, Mr. and Mrs. John Read, Mrs. W. F. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Atherton, Mrs. J. E. Beaver, and Mr. and Mrs. Carl McIntire, and children.

 

Those who attended Mrs. Elmer Vick’s funeral at Karnak Monday afternoon were Lester Kraatz and his mother and Mrs. Stella Chittick.  (Olmstead)

 

Extract from the Minutes of a Stated Meeting of Grand Chain Lodge No. 660 A. F. & A. M., 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 7, 1932

             WHEREAS:  The Supreme and Divine Ruler of the Universe has seen fit to call from labor to refreshment, our beloved brother and Worshipful Master, Rolla Porter Evers, and

             WHEREAS:  Our order has been enriched and exalted by the comradeship and association of Brother Evers, whose name has ever stood for trustworthiness, sympathy, gentle word and kindly deeds, and

             WHEREAS:  We realize and cherish the knowledge that we are born for a higher destiny than this earth, and that there is a realm of celestial peace where the rainbow never fades; where the stars will spread out before us like islands that slumber upon the sea and where brothers that have passed from life’s highway are restored to the golden dawning of eternal day, therefore

             BE IT RESOLVED:  That we, the offices and members of this lodge in loving tribute to his memory, shall ever treasure in our hearts the influence of the personality that will linger with us, the examples of Nobel deeds and kindly service and the endearing ties which have bound us in fraternal love.

             AND THAT our sympathy goes out to the bereaved relatives in the hope that there will be solace and comfort in the thought that the hand of the Supreme and Divine architect has beckoned and a sublime voice has called into the Grand Lodge above, our dear brother and Worshipful Master.

             AND THAT this resolution has been unanimously adopted and spread upon the records of this meeting and copies sent to the bereaved relatives and the local newspapers by order of

G. N. Boyd, acting master

W. V. Leidigh, Secretary

Grand Chain, Ill., June 7, 1932

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Jun 1932:

MRS. JOHN TAYLOR OF REYNOLDSVILLE DIES

             Mrs. John Taylor, Sr., of Reynoldsville, Illinois, near Jonesboro, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Everett Titter, of Perks Sunday, June 5, 1932, following several paralytic stokes, at the age of 72 years.  She was born at Stephenson, Ind.

             Left to mourn her passing are her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Ritter, of Perks, and Mrs. Lafe Christian of Lasaroa, Texas; three sons, John, of Dongola, Russell, of Sesser, and Arthur, of Evansville, Ind.

             Mrs. Taylor was a woman of beautiful Christian character and was a good wife and mother.

             Funeral services were held at the Pentecostal church, the Rev. Langston officiating.  Interment was made in the Cache Chapel Cemetery beside her daughter, Mrs. Artie Lentz.  Elmer Ford of Dongola had charge of the funeral services.

             (Her death certificate states that Delilah Taylor was born 1 Feb 1860, in Indiana, the daughter of Ed Lockwood, a native of New York, and Nancy Blackburn, a native of Indiana, died 5 Jun 1932, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of John Taylor, and as buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  John Taylor 1860-1939 Delilah Taylor 1860-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

AXEL HEIBERG, WELL KNOWN IN THIS COUNTY, DIES

             Word was received last week that Axel Heiberg, of Springfield, head of the Heiberg Auditing Co., which has audited the books of Pulaski County, had dropped dead at Lewiston, June 3.

             Glenn Storme, son of S. E. Storme, who was employed with the company and was here last fall, was with Mr. Heiberg when he fell near the courthouse of Fulton County.  Mr. Heiberg and Mr. Storme were auditing the books there.

             Mr. Heiberg was 62 years of age.  The cause of death was not announced here, but it is believed to have been a heart attack.

             He was the father of two sons, who were twins.  One of them died about two years ago.  All have been here and are known to county officials.

             Later information is that Mr. Heiberg fell dizzy and ill, probably with indigestion, and his skull was fractured when it struck the concrete steps.

             (Axel Heiberg, 28, married on 26 Nov 1895, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., Anna Evensen, 22.  A death certificate states that Axel Heiberg, accountant, of 721 S. 7th Street, Springfield, Ill., was born 6 Sep 1867, in Europe, the son of Jacob Heiberg and Marie Lund, natives of Europe, died 3 Jun 1932, in Canton, Fulton Co., Ill., husband of Anna Heiberg, and was buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery in Ottawa, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER PERKS MAN DIES

             Tom Barker, formerly of Perks, passed away at his home in Chicago Friday morning following a long illness.

             Funeral services were held at the Pea Ridge Church, the Rev. Crossland officiating.  Interment was made in the Pea Ridge Cemetery.

             He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Miss Florence, of Lovejoy, and two sons, in Chicago and many other relatives and friends.

             A Carbondale undertaker had charge of the funeral.

             (According to his death certificate, Thomas Barker, black, janitor, of 4410 Calmut Ave., Chicago, Ill., was born 10 Jan 1878, in Huntington, Tenn., son of Sam Barker, a native of Huntington, Tenn., and Mandy Greer, a native of Tennessee, died 9 Jun 1932, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill., husband of Ann Barker, and was buried at Carbondale, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN VISE DROPS DEAD AT HOME IN CAIRO

             John Harvey Vise, age 52 years, died suddenly at his home, 1315 ½ Washington Avenue, in Cairo, Monday evening at 8:30 o’clock following an illness of one day.  The cause of his death was heart trouble.

Mr. and Mrs. Vise moved to Cairo about six months ago and until then were residents of Mound City where he conducted the St. Charles Hotel.  A doctor was summoned three times during the day Monday.  Mr. Vise remarked that he would like to have a malted milk and his wife had gone to the kitchen to prepare it and when she returned, Mr. Vise was lying face down on the floor.  Upon examination it was found that he was dead.  Mr. Vise and his good wife had made many friends in Mound City who are grieved to learn of his death.

             Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Dollie Vise, two sons, Stanley and Harry Vise, of St. Louis; a sister and several brothers.

             The body was brought to the undertaking parlors of G. A. James in Mound City, where it was prepared for burial.  It was taken to Benton to the home of his brother, Dr. Vise at noon Tuesday.  On Wednesday, funeral services were held at the Baptist Church at 2 p.m. and interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Benton.  Rev. Mead of Benton officiated.  The Masons gave the beautiful Masonic rites at the grave.  G. A. James had charge of funeral arrangements.

             (His death certificate states that John Harvey Vise, salesman, was born 15 Mar 1880, in Macedonia, Ill., son of A. C. Vise and Matilda Placers, natives of Illinois, died 13 Jun 1932, in Cairo, Ill., husband of Dollie Vise, and was buried in Benton, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Jun 1932:

BARN BURNS, BONES FOUND

             ANNA—A barn on the Douglas farm north of Mill Creek burned not long since with a total loss of two mules, a quantity of corn and hay and some farm implements belonging to Elijah Knupp, the tenant who had no insurance.  The Douglass brothers carried $200 insurance on the barn.  The fire occurred at one o’clock in the night and its origin is unknown.

             Last week bones were found in the debris and it was reported they were bones of a human being.  The matter was reported to Coroner Taylor and Sheriff Blaylock.  The latter with H. E. Douglas of Anna, one of the owners of the farm went out to the scene to investigate.  They found that the bones which created a good deal of excitement and speculation were those of a dog.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Jun 1932:

Crawley Sanders Dies from Gunshot Wound

Whether Deed Was Accidental or Intentional Will Never Be Known

             Shortly after 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon the family of Crawley C. Sanders was startled to hear the report of a gun in the bathroom of the home.  Mrs. Sanders who was ill and in bed, arose and rushed into the bathroom where she found her husband dead from a gunshot wound which had penetrated the head near the right ear and had blown the top of the head completely off.

             Whether the deed was accidental or intentional will never be known. Mr. Sanders had a number of guns about the place and only a few days before had accidentally discharged one while handling it in the yard.

             Dr. O. T. Hudson, coroner, held an inquest later in the day and the verdict of the coroner’s jury was “Death caused by gunshot in the head, self-inflicted.”  The position of the gun seemed to indicate that it had either been accidentally discharged or that Mr. Sanders had pulled the trigger with his toe.

             C. C. Sanders was born near Paducah, Ky., June 25, 1888. He was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Robertson, Dec. 4, 1910.  He is survived by his widow and three children.  Russell, Marguerite and Robert Eugene.  He and his family have lived in Mounds for a number of years during which time he has been employed as electrician for the Illinois Central System.

             The funeral cortege will go to Paducah, Ky., today (Friday) leaving shortly after noon.  The funeral will be conducted by the Rev. Mr. McGregory of the Church of Christ.  Burial will be in the Paducah cemetery with Funeral Director G. A. James in charge.

 

Seven-Year-Old Boy Drowns in Pond

Steps in Hole and Playmates Were Unable to Save Him

             Bernard Graves, 7, of Rock Island, Ill., was accidentally drowned Saturday afternoon, June 18, when he stepped in a hole in a pond in which he and his brothers and sisters were playing on the farm of his grandmother, Mrs. Mary Graves, near Villa Ridge.  One of his small playmates passed him a pole, but he failed to get hold of it and was drowned before help was secured.  The body was recovered by a colored farm hand who was the first to reach the scene of the accident.

             With his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Graves, and his six brothers and sisters, Bernard was visiting at the home of his grandmother.

             Funeral services were held at 9 o’clock Tuesday morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Mound city with the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was made in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge.

 

S. L. Atherton Dies Friday Night

             S. L. Atherton, aged 53 years, for many years an engineer for the Illinois central Railroad Company on the Tennessee Division with headquarters at Mounds, died in the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, Ky., Friday night, June 17, at 9:15 o’clock.

             Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Jodie Atherton; a sister, Mrs. Magnolia Beegle of Mounds; a brother, Robert Atherton, of Tower Hill, Ill.; two nieces and a nephew.

             Mr. Atherton was a member of the Baptist Church at Arlington, Tenn., and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and was a highly respected citizen.

             Funeral services were conducted at Shiloh Baptist Church near Mounds by Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola and Rev. T. C. Ury of Mounds.  Burial was in the cemetery at Mounds with Hartwell and Ryan in charge.

             (According to his death certificate, S. L. Atherton, of Mounds, Ill., Illinois Central locomotive engineer, was born 7 Jun 1879, in Bardwell, Ky., the son of Willis Atherton, a native of Blandville, Ky., and Elizabeth Foster, a native of Tennessee, died 17 Jun 1932, at the Illinois Central Railroad Hospital in Paducah, Ky., of septic endocarditis and typhoid fever, the husband of Jodie Atherton, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  S. L. Atherton 1879-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. L. G. Shoder of Pulaski Dies Tuesday

Mrs. L. G. Shoder, 86, died Tuesday evening, June 21, at her home in Pulaski.  She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Robert H. Porterfield, of Chicago; and one grandson, John A. Porterfield.  Her husband, Charles Shoder, died a number of years ago.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Rose Hill Baptist Church, with Rev. Mr. Vick of Tamms officiating.  W. H. Aldred directed the funeral.

             (Charles Shoder married Mrs. Louise C. Lackey on 11 Feb 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery reads:  Charles Shoder 1834-1901 Loise C. Shoder 1845-1932.  Her husband was a Civil War soldier and pensioner and also has a military marker that reads Chas. Shoder Co. B, 2 Ky. Inf.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. E. F. Willis Dies at Rochester, Minn.

Had Undergone Second Operation This Year at Mayo Hospital

             Word of the death of Mrs. E. F. Willis in Rochester, Minn., Tuesday night reached her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hale Wednesday morning.

             Earlier in the year Mrs. Willis had undergone a successful operation for goiter in Rochester.  She had returned and on last Friday had been operated on for another trouble.  Her husband and young son, Eugene, were with her.

             Mr. Willis and son arrived Thursday on train number one bringing “all that was mortal” of wife and mother.

             We have not been able to learn of the funeral arrangements.

 

Mother of H. W. Pilaut Dies in Princeton, Ky.

             Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Pilaut were called to Princeton, Ky., last week by the illness of Mr. Pilaut’s mother, Mrs. Ida Blackburn Pilaut, who passed away Wednesday, June 15, following a stroke of paralysis a week earlier.

             The Princeton Twice-a-Week Leader of Friday, June 17, published the following article concerning her passing:

             Mrs. Ida Blackburn Pilaut, widow of the late Prof. John E. Pilaut, died at her home on Madisonville Street Wednesday morning, at 11:20, following a week’s illness from a stroke of paralysis received last Saturday morning.

             Mrs. Pilaut was one of Princeton’s best and most beloved women.  She was 71 years of age, and is survived by nine living children, six sons and three daughters, also three brothers and two sisters.  The brothers and sisters are:  Finas Blackburn, Grayesville, Illinois; Thomas Blackburn, Flat Rock; Sheriff Oress J. Blackburn, this city, Mrs. Laura Brown, Princeton, Rt. 1; Mrs. C. W. Moore, Fredonia.

             The children are as follows:  Hugh J. Pilaut, Cape Girardeau, Mo.; William W. Pilaut, Fredonia; James D. Pilaut, Herrin, Ill.; John R. Pilaut, Princeton; Herbert W. Pilaut, Mounds, Ill.; Raymond R. Pilaut, Louisiana; Mrs. Lule Bell Satterfield, Princeton; Mrs. Urey Jones, Fredonia; Mrs. E. G. Harris, Ashland, Ky.

             The deceased was married to Mr. John E. Pilaut, Sept. 3, 1879.

             She was a daughter of the late William and Bettye Stevenson Blackburn.  She had lived a true Christian life, and was a devoted wife, loving mother and kind neighbor.  We join her innumerable friends in extending the bereaved family heartfelt sympathy.

             (According to her death certificate, Ida B. Pilaut was born in 1862 in Caldwell Co., Ky., the daughter of William Henry Blackburn and Hannah Elizabeth Stevenson, and died 15 Jun 1932, in Caldwell Co., Ky., of hypostatic pneumonia, the wife of John Elbert Pilaut, and was buried in Rowland Cemetery in Caldwell Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter ).

 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Pilaut have returned from Princeton, Ky., where they were called on account of the death of Mr. Pilaut’s mother.

 

Mrs. Annie Lewis and daughter were called to Tamms Friday by the death of Mrs. Lewis’ sister, Mrs. Millie Minton.  Others from Mounds who attended the funeral of Mrs. Minton were Mrs. R. W. Wiedemann, Mrs. Fred Raub, and Miss Martha Fulkerson.

 

A.J. Williams of Fulton, Ky., was the guest of his son, Harry and family Monday.  Mr. Williams tells us that his grandchildren, children of the late Mrs. Golda Tosh, since January have had mumps, whooping cough, and chicken pox.  Mr. and Mrs. Williams are making their home with Mr. Tosh and are helping to care for the three motherless youngsters, two boys and a girl.

             (Golda Tosh died 9 May 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 June 1932:

Mounds Man Shoots Self with Shotgun

             Despondent, perhaps, over loss of work and because of failing health, Crawley A. Sanders, 44 years of age, railroad electrician, shot himself with repeating shotgun Wednesday afternoon at his home in Mounds.  The shot was head by his older son and by his wife, and the son quickly found his father, and summoned medical aid, but it was useless.  Sanders was dead when the echo of the gun had died away, the whole top of his head having been shattered.  About the small ___ in which he was, his brains were spattered on every wall.

             There is some chance that the shot might have been accidental, but the position of his body, the absence of cleaning materials, the position of the shot just behind the ear and ranging upward, indicate that it was self-inflicted, and the coroner’s jury so gave the verdict.

             No hint of the intention to kill himself was given at the inquest.  The shot was heard and Mrs. Sanders and Russell Sanders were puzzled at first, but Russell went to the little room on the back porch and there the body sprawled.

             A crowd gathered and Dr. J. H. ___kins was called, but Sanders was beyond any help.  The shot had torn away a great hole in his skull and fractured it into bits and had virtually driven all the brain from the cranial cavity.

             Sanders is survived by his wife and three children, Russell, who is a young man, Robert, a high school boy and Marguerite, who finished high school last year.

             Funeral services will be held in Paducah this afternoon and burial will be in Oak Cemetery there.  G. A. James has charge of the funeral. 

             This tragedy is one much regretted and which has aroused wide sympathy.

             (The death certificate states that Crawley A. Sanders, an Illinois Central Railroad electrician, was born 25 Jun 1888, in Hickman, Ky., the son of Joe Sanders, a native of Carbondale, Ill., and Emma Garrett, died 22 Jun 1932, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Nellie Lee Sanders, and was buried in Paducah, McCracken Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

BOY DROWNS ON GRAVES FARM

             Bernard Graves, seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Graves, of Rock Island, Illinois, who, with his parents and six brothers and sisters were visiting at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Mary Graves, living a mile east of Villa Ridge, was drowned in a pond on the Graves’ farm Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

             The children had gone to the pond to wade and not thinking the water was deep, waded out too far and went off in a hole.  The boy’s companions pushed a log out to him, but he could not get hold of it so they got a long pole, but it was too late.  The boy went down and never came up.  The body was recovered by a colored farm hand, who was first to arrive.

             The body was taken to the funeral home of Hartwell and Ryan and prepared for burial.  Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Mound City with Rev. Fr. Gilmartin officiating and interment was made in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.

             (The death certificate states that Bernard Lawrence Graves, of Rock Island, Ill., was born 10 Aug 1924, in East Moline, Ill., the son of S. H. Graves, a native of Illinois, and Rosalie Baur, a native of Wisconsin, died 18 Jun 1932, in Road District 1, Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge, Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge reads:  Bernard Graves 1924-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

REV. FR. GILLON, FORMERLY OF CAIRO, PASSES AWAY

             Rev. Fr. Gillon, formerly pastor of St. Joseph’s Church on the corner of Cross and Walnut streets, passed away Monday at Aviston, Illinois.  He was forced to resign on account of old age and his death occurred on the anniversary of his resignation.

             Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Perks, of this city, were married by Rev. Fr. Gillon nine years ago Monday and he passed away on their wedding anniversary.

             His age is not definitely known, but he is probably 73 years of age.

             Funeral services were held at Eviston on Thursday at 9:30 a.m. conducted by Most Rev. Henry Althoff D.D., Bishop of Belleville, Illinois.

             Rev. Fr. Gillen came to Cairo in 1902 as pastor of St. Patrick’s Church and two years later was transferred to St. Joseph’s Church where he served 22 years.  Catholics and non-Catholics found him a friend in time of trouble.

 

Mrs. Fred Raub, Mrs. R. W. Weideman, and Miss Martha Fulkerson attended the funeral of Mrs. Minton in Tamms Friday.  (Mounds)

             (Drew Minton married Millie A. Haymayer on 4 May 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.  A marker in Richwood Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill., reads:  Millie Minton Born Dec. 22, 1859 Died June 15, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Pilant have returned from Princeton, Ky., where they were called on account of the serious illness and death of the former’s mother.  (Mounds)

 

Mrs. Belle Chinault, widow of the late Jimmie Chinault, (colored), suffered a paralytic stroke.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Jul 1932:
JAMES V. WALKER PASSED AWAY AT ANNA HOSPITAL

James V. Walker, age 85, of this city, passed away Wednesday morning at 12:45 following a brief illness.  His death occurred at the Anna State Hospital, where he had only been three weeks.  Until he went to Anna he made his home in Mound City with his son, Al Walker, and wife.  He had always enjoyed excellent health for one of his advance age and his death was caused from the infirmities of old age.

Mr. Walker is survived by three sons, Al, of Mound City, Ira of Toledo, Ohio, and Luther, of St. Louis; and one daughter, Mrs. Etta Stout, of Cairo; besides grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews and a host of friends, who are grieved to learn of his passing.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock the Rev. W. C. Hart, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church of which he was a member, officiating.  Interment was made in the Dongola cemetery by the side of his wife, who passed away several years ago.

Mr. Walker was born in Hollow Rock, N.C., August 25, 1847, coming to Union County, Illinois, where he spent almost his entire life until he came to Mound City to reside.  Despite his advanced age he was active and could be seen coming downtown several times a day.  He had been a member of the Cooper’s Union for a number of years.

E. J. Ford had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(James V. Walker married Elizabeth Woodward on 25 Apr 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  James V. Walker, 50, of Cairo, Ill., married Stella Morris, 26, of Mt. Vernon, Ill., on 29 Oct 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that James V. Walker was born 25 Aug 1847, in Rowan Co., N.C., the son of Michael P. Walker and Sarah Garner, natives of North Carolina, died 29 Jun 1932, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Stella Walker, and was buried at Dongola, Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  James V. Walker 1847-1932 Father.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JAMES ANDREW CALVIN DIES AT HOME NEAR PULASKI

James Andrew Calvin, age 70 years, well known resident of Pulaski, passed away at his home at 11 o’clock Friday night.  He was one of the pioneer farmers of Pulaski County having lived near Pulaski for 544 years.  He had been a member of the Christian Church for 15 years and was a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows lodge.

Mr. Calvin is survived by his widow, Mrs. Anna E. Calvin; seven sons, James and Russell, of Kansas City, Mo., Everett and Orin, of Centralia, Earl, Lawrence and Lemen, of Pulaski.  He also leaves two daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Smith of East Horsington, Kansas, and Mrs. Laura Mulkey, of Cypress, Illinois; a sister, Mrs. Lucy Becker, of Pocatello, Idaho; fifteen grandchildren, two great grandchildren, and a number of nieces and nephews.  Mrs. Thomas Higginbothom, who was before her marriage, Miss Ona Calvin, and Iva Calvin, were a niece and nephew of the deceased.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Christian church of Pulaski with the Rev. Mr. Holmon, pastor of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.

(James Calvin married Annie E. Eastwood on 23 Mar 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that James Andrew Calvin was born in March 1862 in Illinois, son of Andrew Calvin, a native of Indiana, and Hellen Spence, a native of Illinois, died 24 Jun 1932, in Road District 2, Pope Co., Ill., husband of Anna Eastwood Calvin, and was buried in Pulaski, Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery in Pulaski reads:  James A. Calvin 1862-1932 Annie E. Calvin 1865-1948.—Darrel Dexter)
 
RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT

In Memory of Sister Addie Gaunt, Died February 23, 1932, Sister Flora Vick, Died June 4, 1932, and Brother Rolla P. Evers, Died June 5, 1932.

Death has again entered our Chapter Hall and called to the Eternal Home our dearly beloved sisters and brother who have completed their faithful labor here in ministering to the cry of the orphan, to the call of want and to the piteous wail of sorrow, and as a recompense, has received the welcome plaudit, “well done,” from the Great Master.

And Whereas the loving Father has called out beloved and respected sisters and brother home, and they having been a true and faithful member of our Mystic Order, therefore be it

RESOLVED, That Grand Chain Chapter, No. 710, Order of the Eastern Sat of Illinois in testimony of tis loss, drape its charter in mourning for thirty days and that we tender to the family our sincere condolence in their deep affliction and that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family.
E. D. Vaughan
Olive M. Victor
Gertrude, Moore, Committee
 
Those from this city who attended the funeral of Jim Calvin which was held in Pulaski Monday were Mrs. Iva Calvin, and children, Mrs. Kate Danby, Mrs. William Sprous, and Mrs. Imon Bankson.  Mr. Calvin was an uncle of Iva Calvin and Mrs. Thomas Higginbothom.

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 Jul 1932:

Mrs. Ernest F. Willis

Alice Pancy Willis, wife of Ernest F. Willis, and daughter of H. H. and Mollie Hale, was born Oct. 4, 1905, at Mounds, Ill., and departed this life at Rochester, Minn., at 10:10 p.m., June 21, 1932, at the age of 26 years, 8 months and 17 days.

             She was united in marriage to Ernest F. Willis, July 10, 1920, and to this union one son, Ernest Eugene was born.

             She first united and was baptized into the fellowship of Unity Baptist Church at Unity, later transferring her membership by letter to the First Baptist Church of Mounds, where she remained a member until death.

             Her illness dates back six years since which time she has undergone four operations surviving the last by three days.  During this time she was a constant sufferer and with an increasing faith that the Lord’s will would be done and that regardless of the outcome victory would be won.  Thus she became fully resigned to the Lord’s call and thus she passed out into the Great Beyond and into the prescience of Him who doeth all things well.

             She leaves to mourn her passing her husband, Ernest F. Willis, and one son, Ernest Eugene Willis; father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hale of Mounds; one brother, Melvin Hale of Mounds; one sister, Mrs. Ruth Yoakum of West Frankfort; one half-sister, Mrs. Marie Malley of Mounds; two half-brothers, Walter Ozee of Dupo and Miles Ozee of West Frankfort and other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were conducted at the First Baptist Church Friday June 24, at 2:30 p.m. by the pastor.  Rev. T. C. Ury and assisted by Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola followed by burial in Spencer Heights Cemetery with Undertakers Hartwell & Ryan in charge.

 

James Andrew Calvin

James Andrew, son of Andrew and Helen Calvin, was born near Grand Chain, Illinois, March 17, 1862, and departed this life June 24, 1932.  Age 70 years, 3 months and 7 days.  At the age of 16 he came with his mother into the vicinity of Pulaski where he has since resided.

             He was united in marriage to Annie Ellen Eastwood on March 23, 1884.  They lived on the farm where he died all their married life with the exception of one year.  Nine children were born into this home, all of whom are living.  Mrs. Myrtle Smith, of Hoisington, Kan., Mrs. Laura Mulkey of Cypress, Ill., James and Russell Calvin of Kansas City, Mo., Everet and Owen Calvin of Centralia, Ill., Earl, Lawrence and Leamon Calvin of Pulaski.  He also leaves 15 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, a sister, Mrs. Lucy Baker, of Emmett, Idaho, and host of other relatives and friends to mourn his departure.

             Fifteen years ago he united with the Christian Church with which was then located at the Christian Chapel and was later moved to its present location.  He was always faithful and loyal to the church.

He was affiliated with two fraternal orders, the Odd Fellows and the Masons.  Last year he was awarded a 25-year jewel from the order of Odd Fellows.  At the time of his death he was an active member of the Caledonia Masonic Lodge No. 47.  In his last hours he admonished his boys to live true and honorable lives.  He was a man that took an interest in civic life.  He was always a kind and thoughtful companion and a tender loving father.

             Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Pulaski Monday afternoon with interment in Rose Hill Cemetery.  Undertaker W. H. Aldred was in charge.

 

Father of Former Mounds Resident Dies

W. N. Bard, 84, pioneer resident of Bardwell, Ky., and father of W. G. Bard, former resident of Mounds, died suddenly Tuesday morning of a heart attack at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. W. Turk of Bardwell with whom he resided.  He is survived by two daughters. Mrs. Turk and Mrs. Laura Dougher, the latter of Detroit, Mich., and three sons, Hardin Bard of Tulsa, Okla., Will G. and Dick.

(According to his death certificate, Washington N. Bard, retired farmer, was born 10 Mar 1848, died 28 Jun 1932, in Bardwell, Carlisle Co., Ky., the son of R. W. Bard, of Kentucky, and Miss Taylor, a native of Kentucky, of chronic myocarditis, and was buried in Bardwell Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

I. J. Thurston of Pulaski Dies Tuesday

             I. J. Thurston of Pulaski, died Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at his home.  He was 77 years old.

             Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Minnie G. Thurston and seven children—four daughters, Mrs. Bessie Richards, Mrs. Della Palmer, Mrs. Nannie Troester, and Mrs. Tressie Burd; three sons, Harry, William and Rollie Thurston, all of Pulaski; also thirteen grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Christian church of Pulaski with the Rev. Mr. Holloman in the pulpit.  Burial was in Rose Hill Cemetery in charge of W. H. Aldred.

 

Rev. and Mrs. W. D. Richardson were called to Salem Saturday by the death of an uncle of the former.  Sec. J. C. Mench of the Y. M. C. A. filled the M. E. pulpit Sunday morning and Walter Billingsley Sunday night.

 

BLIND HORSE CAUSES DEATH OF THREE

STOCKTON—Two men were killed instantly and a third died without regaining consciousness Friday night, when a heavy truck and trailer struck a blind horse and plunged over a fifty-foot embankment on Route 5 near Stockton.  Two of the men were identified by cards found in their clothing as Charles Sandrock and Sam Manniana, both of Chicago.  The third man, who was still living when removed to a doctor’s office was unidentified.

             The truck was proceeding east on the highway and as the heavy machine neared the viaduct which crosses the Chicago and Great Western tracks, a blind horse stayed on to the pavement.  At his point the truck was traveling down a steep hill west of the viaduct.  The driver, probably Manniana, because his body was found in the cab of the truck, was apparently unable to bring the machine to a stop with the result that the truck struck the horse, the driver losing control of the machine which plunged down the embankment to the right of the road.

             The third man was later identified as Dermott Simmons, of Lena.  A jury at Galena rendered a verdict of accidental death.

             (According to the death certificate, Charles Sandrock, contractor, transient, was born 20 Apr 1893, the son of Charles Sandrock, Sr., and Christena Meng,  died 10 Jun 1932, in Stockton, Jo Daviess Co., Ill., the husband of Clarice Sandrock, and was buried in Chicago, Ill.  His death certificate states that Sam Mannina, truck driver and helper, of 1108 May St., Chicago, Ill., transient, was born 29 Apr 1911, in Brooklyn, N.Y., the son of Saveris Mannina and Rose Fincio, natives of Italy, died 10 Jun 1932, in Stockton, Ill., and was buried in Mt. Carmel Cemetery in Hillside, Cook Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Dermott Simmons, radio repairman, transient, states that he was born 22 Jun 1908, in Tipton, Iowa, the son of Frank L. Simmons, a native of Stephenson Co., Ill., and Lysle Cunningham, a native of Delhigh, Iowa, died 10 Jun 1932, in Stockton, Ill., and was buried in Lena Burial Park in West Point, Stephenson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FOUND DEAD IN FIELD ON HIS FARM

             GOLCONDA—Francis M. Williams, a well-known resident of the Blanchard neighborhood, was found dead in a field on his farm Tuesday morning.

             Mr. Williams had been ill for some months, but recently became so much better that he felt like going into his fields to do manual labor.  He had been “grubbing” stumps in a field near the farm home when some of the relatives happened to find him lying in the field.

             Mr. Williams was known all over the lower part of Illinois as a veteran fox hunter.  His only hobby was following the trail of the elusive fox and hearing his dogs bark along the trials.  Many persons of this and the adjoining counties have been on fox hunting trips with Mr. Williams.

             (F. M. Williams married Mrs. Cora Ethridge Perkins on 9 Nov 1912, in Pope Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Francis Marion Williams, farmer at Eddyville, Ill., was born 25 Jan 1867, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of Gordon Williams and Sarah Gibbs, natives of Pope Co., Ill., died 21 Jun 1932, in Road District 2, Pope Co., Ill., the husband of Cora Perkins, and was buried in Road District 2, Pope Co., Ill.  His marker in New Liberty Blanchard Cemetery in Eddyville, Pope Co., Ill., reads:  Francis M. Williams Jan. 25, 1867 June 21, 1932 Fany D. Williams Apr. 26, 1871 Sept. 26, 1907.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Calvin and son and Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Calvin and son of Centralia, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Calvin and James Calvin of Kansas City, Mo., and Mrs. Myrtle Smith of Hoisington, Kan., and Mrs. Laura Mulkey of Cypress were called here the last of the week by the death of their father, James Calvin.  Mr. Calvin passed away at his home Friday night after being ill only a few hours.   Funeral services were held at the Christian church Monday afternoon with interment in Rose Hill Cemetery. (Pulaski)

 

Mrs. Charles Wesenberg and daughter Edith, and Mrs. John Stewart and sons, Johnnie and Billie, of Mounds, left Saturday for Nebraska where they were called by the death of Mrs. Wesenberg’s mother. (America)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 Jul 1932:

Jacob Isom Thurston

(contributed)

             Jacob Isom, son of Robert and Susan Ann Thurston, was born March 16, 1855, in Franklin County, Illinois, and died at his home near Pulaski, Ill., June 28, 1932, at the age of 77 years, 3 months and 12 days.

             He was united in marriage with Minnie E. Steers, of Grand Chain, Ill., March 13, 1889.  This union was blessed with 7 children, namely:  Mrs. Bessie Richards, Mrs. Della Palmer, Harry, Mrs. Nannie Troester, Willie, Rollie, and Mrs. Tressie Bird, all of Pulaski, Illinois.

             He is survived by his widow, seven children, 13 grandchildren, one great-grandchild, 2 half-sisters, and many other relatives and friends.

             He, with his wife, united with the Christian Church at Grand Chain in the year of 1899, later moving his membership to the Christian Chapel Church, which is now located in Pulaski.

             Although Brother Thurston’s last months here were filled with pain, he passed many hours singing, as he loved to sing.  He lived a clean life and only a few days before he passed away he told his boys to always live clean as he had done, that they would be ready to go, too.’

             He passed away very peacefully.

             Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Pulaski, Thursday afternoon, the pastor, Rev. T. J. Holloman, officiating.  Burial was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.  Undertaker W. A. Aldred was in charge.

             (His death certificate states that Jacob Isom Thurston, farmer near Pulaski, Ill., was born 16 Mar 1855, in Benton, Ill., the son of Robert Thurston and Frances Ann Moyer, died 28 Jun 1932, in Road District 2, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Minnie Thurston, and was buried in Pulaski, Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski, Ill., reads:  Jacob I. Thurston Mar. 16, 1855 June 28, 1932 Minnie E. Thurston Feb. 22, 1871 Dec. 22, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Thomas Roche Dies Early Thursday Morning

Thomas Roche, well known farmer of Villa Ridge neighborhood, died Thursday morning, July 7, at 5 o’clock at his farm home following a month’s illness.  He had been in failing health for some time and his sister-in-law, Mrs. F. B. Emmert and Mr. Emmert were living with him.

Mr. Roche was born Nov. 20, 1852, and had reached the age of 79 years, 7 months and 17 days.  He was united in marriage to Miss Rose Buckle in 1906.  Mrs. Roche passed away four years ago last May.

             Among the surviving relatives are a cousin, James S. Roche, of Thebes, three sisters-in-law, Mrs. Emmert, Mrs. George Watson, of Granite City, and Mrs. F. D. Houghland, of Cairo, and a brother-in-law, William Buckle of Villa Ridge.

             Funeral services will be held this (Friday) afternoon at 3 o’clock at the home with J. C. Mench officiating, assisted by Rev. O. E. Allen, pastor of the Villa Ridge Community Church.  Burial will be made in Villa Ridge Cemetery in charge of G. A. James.

             (Frank B. Emmert, 30, of Villa Ridge, Ill., married on 11 Oct 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Alferretta Buckle, 28, of Villa Ridge.  The death certificate states that Thomas H. Roach, farmer, was born 20 Nov 1852, died 7 Jul 1932, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co, Ill., the husband of Rose Roach, and was buried in Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Jul 1932:
INFANT PASSES AWAY

Joseph, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Van Meter, passed away Tuesday night soon after birth.

Short funeral services were held at the family residence conducted by Mr. Ralph of the Pentecostal Church.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A., James, funeral director.
 
Dale Sheerer, of Tamms, who has for the past five weeks been confined to the home of his grandfather, Ed Sheerer, by illness, was on Wednesday removed to the home of his grandmother, in Ullin.  His mother, Mrs. Blanche Parker, who has been his constant attendant, was called to Ullin Sunday by the serious illness of her mother.
 
FATHER OF MOUND CITY WOMAN DIES IN CAIRO

William Jordan, age 73, father of Mrs. Bessie Buie, of this city, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. T. Thomas, in Cairo Thursday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock following an illness of several weeks.  He came to Cairo from Vienna about a month ago and had been at his daughter’s home since that time.

Surviving Mr. Jordan, besides his daughters in Mound City and Cairo, is another daughter, Miss Mildred Jordan, of St. Louis; three sons, Berse, of Cairo, Barney, of Belleville, and Bartlett, of Detroit, Mich.

Funeral services were held at 11 o’clock at Pleasant Grove Cemetery near Vienna and interment was made in the cemetery there.  Karcher Brothers directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that William Jordan was born 25 Dec 1858, in Tunnel Hill, Ill., died 30 Jun 1932, in Cairo, Ill., husband of Mary D. Jordan, and was buried at Vienna, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. HENRY J. KESLER DIES NEAR DONGOLA

Mrs. Henry J. Kesler, age 65, passed away at her home on a farm near Dongola Thursday evening about 3 o’clock.  For some time she had been ailing.

She leaves her husband, two daughters, Mrs. D. H. Hogue and Mrs. Della Keller, both of Dongola; three brothers, Rufus Lingle, and Jesse Lingle, of Dongola, and Adam Lingle, of Ullin.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Mt. Olive Church near Dongola, conducted by Rev. D. E. Williams.  Interment was made in the Mt. Olive Cemetery.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

(Henry J. Kesler, 24, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of Miles Kesler and Lucinda Davis, married on 18 Feb 1892, in Union Co., Ill., Ellen D. Lingle, 25, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of Monroe Lingle and Amy Beaver.  The death certificate states that Ellen Delilah Kesler was born 9 Jan 1867, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Monroe Lingle and Amy Beaver, natives of North Carolina, died 30 Jun 1932, in Union Co., Ill., Her marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Henry J. Kesler Jan. 12, 1868-June 9, 1954 Ellen D. Kesler Jan. 9, 1867-June 30, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Jul 1932:
INFANT SON PASSED AWAY

Calvin Wilson, Jr., the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Wilson, of Mounds, died at their home Monday afternoon.  Funeral services were conducted from the residence Tuesday afternoon at 2 p.m. and interment made in Thistlewood Cemetery.
 
MAN WHO SAW LINCOLN KILLED, RETURNS HOME

Harrisburg, Ill.—John W. Epperson, 79, who says he witnessed the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth, has come back from Washington, D.C. to his native home in southern Illinois to spend the remainder of his days.

Epperson, who was 12 years old when he saw Lincoln shot, is not a believer of one theory that Booth escaped and later killed himself.  Epperson says he saw Booth’s body the morning after the assassin was supposed to have been killed as he emerged from a barn where he had been hiding and which had been fired by the posse searching for Lincoln’s slayer.

Epperson, who was born in Johnson County, Ill., went at the age of 9 to Washington, becoming a newspaper boy there and says he occupied a gallery seat in Ford’s theater the day Lincoln was assassinated.  He claims to have known Booth, to whom he sold hundreds of newspapers.—Vienna Times
 
MRS. ELLEN LINGLE KESLER PASSES TO HER REWARD

On June 30, 1932, God in his wise providence saw fit to send his death angel to the home of Mrs. H. J. Kesler, and took therefrom the companion and mother, Mrs. Ellen Lingle Kesler.  Mrs. Kesler was born to Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Lingle, near Dongola, Illinois, on January 9, 1867, and at her death was aged 65 years, 5 months and 21 days.

She was united in marriage to Mr. H. J. Kesler on Feb.18, 1892, and to this union was born two children namely, Mrs. Mina Hogue and Mrs. Della Keller, both of whom survive their mother.  Mrs. Kesler had three brothers and one sister who preceded her in death, Amy, Henry, and Otto Lingle, died in early infancy, and Mr. John Lingle died nearly six years ago.

She leaves to mourn her departure three sisters and five brothers, namely, Mrs. Mary Mulcahy, Mrs. Della Sowers, both of Dongola, Mrs. Susie Clutts, of Concord, N.C., Rufus Lingle, Daniel Lingle and Jesse Lingle, all of Dongola, Adam Lingle, of Ullin, and Eli Lingle, of Piggott, Ark.; four grandchildren, Lorese Keller, Don, Irleen and Veral Hogue, all of Dongola.  Also a large number of other relatives and a host of friends.

The funeral services were held at Mt. Olive Church conducted by Rev. D. E. Williams, of Bethany, Ill., and interment was made in the Meisenheimer Cemetery nearby.—Anna Democrat
             (John C. Clutts, 22, born in North Carolina, son of Charles Klutts and Miss Kesler, married on 24 Sep 1891, in Dongola, Union Co., Ill., Susie A. Lingle, 16, born in Dongola, daughter of Monroe Lingle and Miss Beaver.—Darrel Dexter)


George W. Cowles Dies at His Home in Florida

George W. Cowles, age about 56, passed away suddenly at his home in Haines City, Fla., Friday morning early.  Death came some time during the early morning and Mrs. Cowles passed through the room and, thinking he was sleeping soundly, went over and lowered the blind.  The next time she went into the room, she went to him and discovered he was not breathing.  She summoned a physician and he stated he had been dead about six hours.

Mr. Cowles had not been in good health, but his condition was not thought to be serious, and his death has been a great shock to his family and friends.

Mr. Cowles was for many years superintendent of the Polk Canning Company, now Sears Nichols Canning Company.  While in this position he made many friends among his employees.  He was actively identified with all social and civic movements of the city.  He was at one time a member of the Cairo Rotary Club.

Surviving Mr. Cowles are his widow, three sons, James, of Detroit, Mich., George W., Jr., of Haines City, and Charles, of Mound City; two daughters, Mrs. George Thomas Muscovalley and Mrs. Joe Huckleberry, of Mound City, a sister of Columbus, Ky., and three grandchildren.

The remains were brought to Columbus, Ky., Sunday, Mrs. Cowels’ former home and was taken to the home of Brown Marie, a brother-in-law of the deceased.  At four o’clock the remains were removed to the cemetery at Columbus where a short services was held and interment was made.

(George Wesley Cowles died in 1932 in Polk Co., Fla.—Darrel Dexter)
 
GRAND CHAIN WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Susie Dover, widow of the late Charles Dover, passed away at her home near Grand Chain, at 2:30 p.m. Monday, July 11.

Mrs. Dover was 57 years of age.  She had been in failing health for several months.  She was a patient at St. Mary’s Infirmary about three months ago, but upon examination it was found that her disease was incurable.  Mrs. Dover was born near the place of her death.  She had spent her entire life near Grand Chain.

Surviving her are five children, Jasper, Earl, and Dewey, of Grand Chain, and Mark and Mrs. Otho Ferguson, of Mound City.  Two sisters and several grandchildren also survive.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at the Christian church.  Rev. McWhirter, pastor of the church, officiated, assisted by Rev. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational Church.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(According to her death certificate, Susie Dover was born 22 Jan 1875, in Grand Chain, Ill., the daughter of Jonce Reed and Elizabeth Culbertson, and died 11 Jul 1932, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Charles Dover.  Her marker in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Susie Dover Born Jan. 23, 1875 Died July 11, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
THOMAS ROCHE DIES AT HOME AT VILLA RIDGE

Thomas H. Roche, age 80 years, passed away at his home at Villa Ridge Thursday morning at 5 o’clock.  He had been ill for some time.  He had been a resident of the Villa Ridge community all his life and he had many friends in the community who were grieved to learn of his death.

No near relatives survive him with the exception of a cousin, James Roche, of Thebes.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock, Mr. J. C. Mench of the Y. M. C. A. of Mounds officiating.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of funeral arrangements.

 
Mark Dover and Mrs. Otho Ferguson were called to Grand Chain by their serious illness and death of their mother, Mrs. Susie Dover.
 
James Cowles, of Detroit, Mich., was called to this city by the death of his father, George W. Cowles. He was accompanied by his friend, Miss Dorothy Graham, also of Detroit.

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 Jul 1932:

Mrs. Susie Dover Dies at Home near Grand Chain

Mrs. Susie Dover, 57, a lifelong resident of the Grand Chain community, died at her home Monday afternoon, July 11, following a three months’ illness.  Her husband, Charles Dover, died a little more than two months ago.

             Mrs. Dover is survived by five children, Jasper, Dewey, and Earl, all of Grand Chain, Mark and Mrs. Otho Ferguson, both of Mound City.  She leaves also two sisters.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the grand Chain Christian Church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Mr. McWherter, assisted by Rev. S. C. Benninger of the Congregational Church.  Interment was in Grand Chain Cemetery in charge of G. A. James.

 

Wife of Illinois Central Superintendent Dies in Chicago

             Mrs. J. W. Hevron, wife of J. W. Hevron, former superintendent of the St. Louis division of the Illinois Central System with headquarters at Carbondale, but now superintendent of the northern lines, died Sunday night, July 10, following an illness of five months. Interment was made in Chicago Tuesday.

             Mrs. Hevron is survived by her husband and three children, John Hevron, of New Orleans, Misses Catherine and Helen Hevron of Chicago.

             (Her death certificate states that Nellie E. Hevron was born 25 May 1883, in Richland, Spencer Co., Ind., the daughter of Ellis Wilson, a native of Caneyville, Ky., and Mary Levina McKenney, a native of Richland, Ind., died 10 Jul 1932, in Chicago, Ill., wife of Joseph W. Hevron, and was buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Chicago.—Darrel Dexter)

 

T. C. Clendenen of Cairo Dies

             Taylor C. Clendenen, for 35 years superintendent and superintendent emeritus of the public school system of Cairo, died Wednesday evening of last week at his home at the age of 77 years.

             In the auditorium of the Cairo High School which bears his name the last tributes of respect were paid.  Upon the casket were his Knight Templar chapeau and his sword.  Interment was made in Mounds Thistlewood Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Taylor C. Clendenen, professor and public school superintendent, was born 13 Feb 1855, in Ross Co., Ohio, the son of Sylvester Clendenen and Bathsheba Jones, natives of Ohio, died 6 Jul 1932, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Taylor C. Clendenen 1855-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Baby Lillian Essex Dies

Lillian, six months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Essex, passed away Wednesday evening, July 13, at the family home after a short tallness.  Surviving are the parents and an older sister.  Mrs. Essex will be remembered as Miss Anna Catherine Slaughter.

             Funeral services will be held at the residence this (Friday) afternoon with burial in St. Mary’s Cemetery.  Hartwell and Ryan will direct the funeral.

             (Her death certificate states that Lillian Ruth Essex was born about 1932 in Mounds, the daughter of Paul Essex, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Anna Slaughter, a native of Mound City, Ill., died 13 Jul 1932, in Mounds, and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.  Her marker there reads:  Lily Ruth Essex Jan. 21, 1932 July 13, 1932 Rosemary Volner Jan. 20, 1932 July 15, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Infant Son Dies

Calvin Wilson, Jr., infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Wilson, died Monday afternoon at the family home.

             Funeral services will be held at day afternoon at the residence, conducted by Miss Opal Shaffer.  Rev. Mr. Peppersack officiated at the grave in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Funeral Director James was in charge.

 

BLIND MUSICIAN PASSES

             GRAYVILLE—Lawrence Schaich, 67, who had been blind virtually all of his life, died at his home in this city Tuesday morning.

             For the last 12 years he had been in failing health and in the last few years, his condition had become so critical that he could not leave his home.

             He was the son of John and Dorothy Lange Schaich, born in Harrison, Ohio, January 18, 1865.  He came with his parents to this city in 1869.

             He had considerable musical talent, though handicapped by blindness, and was fond of music.  His mother, a native of Germany, was a cousin of the Lange who wrote, “The Flower Song” long a native of that country.

             (His death certificate states that Lawrence Schaich was born in January 1865, in Harrison, Ohio, the son of John Schaich and Dorathe Lange, natives of Germany, died 5 Jul 1932, in Grayville, White Co., Ill., and was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery at Granville, Edwards Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. John Stewart and two sons, Misses Bertha and Edith Wesenberg and Mrs. C. Wesenberg have returned from Carney, Neb., where they were called on account of a death in the family.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 Jul 1932:

Mrs. C. E. Richey of Mound City Dies Tuesday

             Mrs. Ruby Richey, wife of C. E. Richey, of Mound City, died Tuesday morning, July 19, at the age of 46 years.  She had been ill for six weeks with an attack of typhoid fever.

             Mrs. Richey was born in Mound City and had lived there all her life.  Surviving her are her husband, her aged father, R. H. Hawley who made his home with his daughter one child, Mrs. Averill Baccus; a granddaughter, Patsy Ruth Baccus, besides many other relatives.

 

Baby Volner Dies Friday

Rosemary Volner, baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Volner, of Route One, died Friday, July 15, at the home of her aunt, Mrs. Lee Griffin, on North Oak Street.  Her age was five months and twenty-three days.

             Surviving are her parents, a brother, Roy Jr., age six, and a sister, Bernadine, age three.

             Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Griffin the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery with Hartwell and Ryan in charge.

 

Ila Walston Succumbs to Heart Trouble

             Ila Walston, young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oran M. Walston, died Friday night, July 15, at 8 o’clock at the family home on North Front Street following a long illness from heart trouble.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock at the Methodist church with Rev. W. D. Richardson, the pastor, officiating.  The casket bearers were playmates of Ila—Evelyn Boyles, Claudine Combes, Lucy Belle Ellis, Minnie Hartwell, Mildred and Hazel Laws.  The flowers girls were members of her Sunday school class.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with Hartwell and Ryan directing.  Miss Opal Shaffer offered prayer at the home and at the grave.

OBITUARY

             Ila Lea Walston was born in Mounds, Ill., January 6, 1921, and died in Mounds, July 15, 1932, at the age of 11 years, 6 months and 9 days.  She leaves her father and mother, three brothers, Malcom, Carlos and Raphael; two sisters, Mrs. John Graves of Villa Ridge, and Miss Bertie Lou Walston; two uncles, Zon Walston of Mounds and Lon Walston of Bardwell, Ky.; three aunts, Mrs. Bertie Evers of Chillicothe, Ill., Mrs. T. H. McCallister of Fulton, Ky., and Mrs. Walter Reynolds of Toledo, Ohio; also many other relatives and friends.

             Ila was baptized into the Methodist Church about a month before her passing.  She was an ardent lover of Sunday school and according to her own testimony, desired to attend more and learn more about Jesus.  During her days of illness she was remarkably sweet and patient and as the days went by her Christian experiences grew deeper.

             A few hours before her death, a saintly and heavenly look overspread her face and just before her soul took its flight, she began to pray.  The prayer was unfinished, but it shall be finished over yonder on the eternal shore of the blest.

 

EIGHTEEN-YEAR-OLD GIRL IS KILLED BY LIGHTNING

             OREGON—Standing under a tree in the yard at her farm home near Rockton, Miss Hazel Garetson, eighteen, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Garetson, was killed when a lightning bolt struck the tree Wednesday afternoon.  Hearing her screams, her brother, Lyle, twenty, ran to her assistance to find her clothing on fire.  He threw his coat around her to extinguish the flames, but his efforts to revive her by artificial respiration proved of no avail.  She had been burned about the arms and body from the lightning bolt.  The severe shock caused her death.

             (According to her death certificate, Hazel Garetson was born 16 Jul 1914, in Fayette, Iowa, the daughter of C. C. Garetson, a native of Linn, Iowa, and Edna M. Welch, a native of Fayette, Iowa, died 6 Jul 1932, in Rockton, Winnebago Co., Ill., and was buried at Rockton, Ill.  Her marker in Rockton Township Cemetery reads:  Hazel Garetson 1914-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

We desire to express our sincere thanks to the friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and following the death of our beloved daughter and sister.  Especially do we thank those who sent flowers and who offered the use of their cars.  We shall hold all kindnesses in grateful remembrance.

             Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Walston and Family

  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Jul 1932:
ROBERT L. YOUNG OF DONGOLA DIES

Robert L. Young, age 68, passed away at his home on his farm near Dongola Sunday afternoon at five o’clock.  Mr. Young moved to Dongola several years ago from Indiana and had lived in this community for 22 years.  He was a highly respected citizen.

Funeral services were held at Mr. Pisgah Lutheran Church near Wetaug at ten o’clock Wednesday morning conducted by Rev. F. L. Cress, pastor of that church.  Interment was made in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

Surviving Mr. Young are his widow, Mrs. Carrie Young; and the following children:  Mrs. Margaret Dulsen and Walter Young of St. Louis; L. M. Young, of Cairo; Mrs. Homer Miller, of Dongola, and Edwin and Edgar Young, both at home; five grandchildren and five sisters and brothers, Mrs. Mary Jameson, Mrs. Laura Goldsmith, Mrs. Catherine Swope, and Charles S. Young, all of Evansville, Ind.

(His death certificate states that Robert Lawrence Young was born 25 Nov 1863, in McCutchenville, Ind., the son of Benjamin S. Young, a native of England, and Harriet Lawrence, a native of North Carolina, died 17 Jul 1932, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads Robert L. Young 1863-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. G. V. LANE DIES

Mrs. G. V. Lane, colored, passed away at her home in this city Tuesday night at 7:30 o’clock and funeral services will be held this afternoon at the A. M. E. church, the Rev. Cole officiating.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A. James.

Mrs. Lane is survived by her husband, G. V. Lane.  They are well known and highly respected colored citizens.

(Her death certificate states that Ellen Lane, black, was born 4 Jul 1870, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Alfred Gibson and Eliza Riley, died 19 Jul 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
LILLIAN RUTH ESSEX DIES

Lillian Ruth Essex, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Essex, of Mounds, passed away at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Slaughter, west of Mounds Wednesday.  The baby is survived by her parents, one sister and he grandparents.

Funeral services were held at the family residence at 2 o’clock Friday afternoon followed by interment in St. Mary’s Cemetery.  Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

 
MRS. C. E. RICHEY PASSES AWAY AT HER HOME

Mrs. Ruby Inez Richey, wife of C. E. Richey, age 46 years, passed away at her home on South Third Street, Tuesday morning at 7:50 following a lingering illness of typhoid fever.

Mrs. Richey was born in Mound City and had resided here all her life.  She received her education in the Mound City High School.  She was a devout member of the First M. E. Church and was affiliated with all its organizations and activities.  She was a woman of beautiful character and had a genial disposition.  She was greatly beloved by all who knew her.  Her family have the deepest sympathy of the entire community.

Surviving Mrs. Richey are her husband, one daughter, Mrs. Paul Baccus, a granddaughter, Patsy Ruth Baccus, and her aged father, R. H. Hawley.  She is also survived by several aunts and cousins and a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First M. E. Church, Rev. George W. Humphrey officiating.  His remarks are very impressive.  The choir sang three beautiful hymns, “The Old Rugged Cross,” “Haven of Rest,” and “In the Hour of Trial.”  Mrs. Eva Travis, of Cairo, sang a very beautiful solo, “The Golden Bells.”  The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

Immediately after the services the cortege left the church for Spencer Heights Cemetery where interment was made.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

Casket bearers were G. C. Trammell, S. I. Dunn, Charles McCartney, Mike Winkler, George Gunn, and Earl Karraker.

(The death certificate states that Ruby Inez Richey was born 8 Nov 1885, in Genoa, Ill., the daughter of R. H. Hawley, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Mary A. Boren, a native of Mounds, Ill., died 19 Jul 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.  Robert H. Hawley married Mary A. Boren, on 6 Sep 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Ruby Richey 1885-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DAUGHTER OF MR. AND MRS. ED POWELL DIES TUESDAY

Julia Powell, colored, age 24, passed away at her home in this city Monday morning at 6:50 o’clock.
She is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Powell, and many friends.

Funeral services were held Wednesday at the Main Street Baptist Church, the Rev. Copeland officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(Her death certificate states that Julia M. Powell was born 7 Jan 1908, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Edward Powell, a native of Tennessee, and Lemma J. Foster, a native of Illinois, died 18 Jul 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
INFANT DAUGHTER OF MR. AND MRS. ROY VOLNER DIES

Rosemary Volner, age five months and 23 days, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Volner, passed away at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Griffin, on North Oak Street, Friday night at 10:45 o’clock.

Besides her parents, she is survived by one brother, Roy, Jr., age six years; one sister, Bernadine, 3.
Funeral services were held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Griffin, Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Fr. Gilmartin of St. Mary’s Catholic Church officiating.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.  Hartwell and Ryan were funeral directors.

(According to her death certificate, Rosemary Volner was born 20 Jan 1932, in Mounds, Ill., and died 15 Jul 1932, in Mound City, Ill., daughter of Roy Volner, a native of Anna, Ill.  Her marker in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Rose Mary Volner Born Jan. 20, 1932 Died July 15, 1932 Lily Ruth Essex Born Jan. 21, 1932 Died July 13, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MISS ILA WALSTON PASSES AWAY FRIDAY

Ila Walston, age 11 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orin Walston, of Mounds, passed away at the home of her parents, Friday night at 8 o’clock following a prolonged illness of heart trouble.

She is survived by her parents, two sisters, Mrs. John Graves and Miss Bertie Walston; and three brothers, Malcom, Corles and Raphael.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock at the Methodist church in Mounds with the Rev. Mr. Richardson officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Hartwell and Ryan had charge of funeral arrangements.

The casket bearers were playmates of Ila, Evelyn Boyles, Minnie Hartwell, Lucy Belle Ellis, Mildred Laws, Hazel Laws, and Claudine Combs.  Members of Ila’s Sunday school class served as flower girls.

(Her death certificate states that Ila Lea Walston was born 6 Jan 1921, in Mounds, Ill., died 15 Jul 1932, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of O. M. and Laura Walston, natives of Kentucky and Grand Chain, Ill.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Ila Lea Walston Born Jan. 6, 1921 died July 15, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Jul 1932:
SISTER OF MRS. A. L. COMPTON DIES AT VIENNA

Mrs. John W. Mathis, age 53 years, sister of Mrs. A. L. Compton, and the late Dr. Hall Whiteaker, formerly of this city, passed away at her home in Vienna at 8 o’clock Thursday night, July 21.  Miss Mathis was a member of a prominent pioneer family, being the daughter of the late Capt. Mark Whiteaker.  Other members of her family who survive are her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Luther Cherry, and Miss Catherine Mathis; her aged mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Whiteaker, now 93 years of age; one grandson, John Thomas Cherry; three sisters Mr. O. E. Burris, county clerk of Johnson County, Mrs. Geneva Brown, of Alton, and Mrs. Arista McElroy, of Vienna; and one brother, Dr. Will Whiteaker, of Dongola.  Dr. Hall Whiteaker died a few days before Thanksgiving.

Funeral services were held at 3 o’clock Saturday afternoon at the M. E. church in Vienna, with the Rev. A. A. Hagler officiating.  Interment as made in the Vienna cemetery.

(According to her death certificate, Lizzie Mathis was born 15 Oct 1878, in Illinois, the daughter of Mark Whitteaker, a native of Illinois, and Elizabeth Deaton, a native of Alabama, died 21 Jul 1932, in Vienna, Ill., the wife of John P. Mathis.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. BELLE CHENAULT PASSES AWAY WEDNESDAY

Mrs. Belle Chenault, a highly respected colored woman of this city, passed away at her home Wednesday at 5 p.m.  She was 69 years of age and had been ill several weeks.

She was the widow of James Chenault, who was formerly employed with G. A. James, undertaker, of Mound City.

Surviving Mrs. Chenault are two daughters, one son, her mother, one brother and a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed, but it will be held at the First Free Will Baptist Church of this city with Rev. Jackson officiating.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James has charge of funeral arrangements.

(Her death certificate states that Belle Chenault was born 6 Feb 1863, in Kentucky, daughter of George House and Amy Ball, died 27 Jul 1932, in Mounds, Ill., wife of J. T. Chenault, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
KARNAK MAN PASSES AWAY

Melvin Theodore Carpenter passed away Tuesday at his home in Karnak, following an illness of about two years.

Mr. Carpenter was the son of William and Rebecca Ann Carpenter.  He was born May 9, 1883, in Franklin County, Illinois.  He came with his family to Pulaski County when six years old and spent practically all his life in Karnak.

He was united in marriage to Jesse Field.  Seven children were born to this union, two of whom preceded their father in death.  He became a member of the Grand Chain Christian Church about 23 years ago and about ten years ago he moved his membership to Karnak to the M. E. Church.  He was a useful citizen of his community and an active member of his church and lodge and in all community movements.
Surviving Mr. Carpenter are his widow, five children, Claretta Marion, Norbitt Melvin, Paulin Adeline, Halloween Kathleen and Kenneth William, besides several other relatives and a large circle of friends.
Funeral services were held Thursday conducted by Professor Roy Shelton of Lebanon, followed by interment in the cemetery at Karnak.

(His death certificate states that Melvin T. Carpenter was born 9 May 1883, in Franklin Co., Ill., the son of William Carpenter and Elizabeth Brouney, natives of Tennessee, died 19 Jul 1932, in Karnak, Ill., husband of Jessie Carpenter.  His marker in Ohio Chapel near Grand Chain, Ill., reads:  Melvin T. Carpenter 1883-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Richey of Leesburg, Ind., and Mrs. Granville Richey, and Mrs. William Breen, of Indianapolis, Ind., and Mr. and Mrs. James Richey, of Greenwood, Ind., who were called here by the serious illness and death of Mrs. C. E. Richey have returned to their homes.
 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 Jul 1932:

M. T. CARPENTER OF KARNAK DIES TUESDAY

             Melvin Theodore Carpenter of Karnak, died Tuesday of last week at his home, following an illness of two years.

             Mr. Carpenter was born in Franklin County, Ill., May 9, 1883, and moved with his parents to Pulaski County when he was six years old.  HE was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Field December 19, 1909.

             Surviving are his widow and five children, Claretta, Marion, Norbitt Melvin, Pauline, Kathleen and Kenneth William.

             Funeral services were conducted by Professor Roy Shelton and interment as made in the Karnak Cemetery.

 

Ray R. Karraker Dies

Ray R. Karraker, cashier of the St. Louis National Bank, died Wednesday evening at 6:40 in a St. Louis hospital.  He had been a patient in the hospital for ten days.

             Mr. Karraker was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Karraker of Dongola.  Surviving also are his widow, the former Miss Pearl Heilig, of Pulaski; three sons, Richard, Robert and John; three brothers, Orville, cashier of the First National Bank of Harrisburg, Ira, cashier of the First National Bank of Jonesboro, Guy, employed in the St. Louis National Bank, of St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. Fred Johnson, of Bloomington, Ill.; and many other relatives among whom are two cousins, Henry Karraker of this city and T. N. Karraker, former cashier of the First State Bank of Mounds, now president of the St. Louis National Bank.

             (William W Karaker, 24, from Dongola Precinct, Union Co., Ill., married on 6 Jun 1875, at the house of F. M. Richardson, Union Co., Ill., Sarah E. Richardson, 22, from Dongola Precinct.  His World War I draft registration stated he lived at 6136 Waterman, St. Louis, Mo., was born 22 Feb 1891, in Dongola, Ill., and worked for Central National Bank at 7th and Olive St., St. Louis.  His marker in Oak Grove Cemetery in Bel-Nor, St. Louis Co., Mo., reads:  Ray R. Karraker 1891-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

Among those from here (America) who attended the funeral of Mrs. C. E. Richey Thursday in Mound City were Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schnaare, Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Baccus, and daughter, Miss Hazel; Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Brelsford, and Mrs. Walter Jackson.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Richey of Leesburg, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. Granville Richey and Mrs. William Breen of Indianapolis, Ind., and Mr. and Mrs. James Richey of Greenwood, Ind., who were called here (Mound City) by the serious illness and death of Mrs. C. E. Richey, have returned to their homes.

 

Johnston City Man Gets 45-Year Sentence

             George Gahm, a former banker and merchant of Johnston City, was found guilty of the murder of his son-in-law, Owen Stilley, and received a sentence of 45 years in penitentiary.

             Mr. Gahm claimed that he shot Stilley in self-defense.  His daughter, Mrs. Mary Gahm Stilley, who had separated from her husband before the tragedy, was the principal witness in the case.

             A motion for an appeal has been filed.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Aug 1932:

Ellis Geveden Dies Tuesday in Paducah

             Ellis Geveden, track foreman for the Illinois Central system in Mounds for 15 years, died Tuesday afternoon, August 2, at 3 o’clock at the company hospital in Paducah, Ky., following an illness of two weeks.  His age was 48 years.

             Surviving are his widow, three children, Georgia Lee, Ella Mae, and Billy Bob; two brothers, William and Armon Geveden, of Bardwell, Ky.; three sisters, Mrs. Zora Ellin of Bardwell, Ky., Mrs. Pearl Snow of Crutchfield, Ky., and Mrs. Mary Urby, of Columbus, Ky.; also other relatives among who are Howard and Ray Geveden, cousins.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First Baptist Church of this city with Rev. T. C. Ury officiating.  Interment was made in the Bardwell City Cemetery, directed by G. A. James.

 

J. B. Troeter Called after Long Illness

J. B. Troeter died at his home on South Delaware Avenue Tuesday afternoon, August 2, at 2:15 o’clock, following an illness of two years or more.

             For many years Mr. Troeter was an engineer for the Illinois Central and some time ago he was pensioned by the company.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.  His service with the Illinois central covered 28 years.

             Mr. Troeter is survived by his widow, two daughters, Miss Dorothy Troeter, of Indianapolis, Ind., and Miss Mary Troeter of Mounds; three sons, George of Mounds, Nicholas of Pulaski, and John of Cleveland, Ohio; and one brother, O. R. Troeter of Beaver Falls, Pa.

             Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the residence with the Rev. T. C. Ury officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, directed by Hartwell & Ryan.

 

Little Rosemary Lynch, age 2 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Lynch, passed away at her home Tuesday night at ten fifteen.  Funeral service was held at the M. E. church Thursday afternoon at 2:30. (Ullin)

 

AGED FARMER LOSES LIFE IN BURNING HOME

             ALBION—Seeking to save his furniture from destruction, Hubbard M. Baskett, aged farmer living three miles southwest of Albion, was burned to death about 8 o’clock as he rushed into his blazing home.

             Neighbors who had gathered as the fire was discovered telephoned to Albion for the fire department.  Water was pumped into the building in a vain attempt to rescue Baskett from death.  His body was not recovered until it had burned to a crisp.

             The aged farmer discovered the fire as he returned after feeding the chickens.  He had built a fire in the kitchen stove, leaving Mrs. Baskett to prepare breakfast as he went.

             (Hubbard M. Baskett married Arminta Harvey on 31 Oct 1894, in White Co., Ill.  The death certificate of Hubbert M. Baskett, farmer, states he was born 27 May 1855, in Kentucky, the son of Henry Baskett and Miss Bishop, natives of Kentucky, died 24 Jul 1932, in Road District 6, Edwards Co., Ill., husband of Martha Baskett, and was buried in Leach Township, Wayne Co., Ill.  His marker in Graceland Cemetery in Albion, Edwards Co., Ill., reads:  H. M. Baskett 1855-1932 Minta Baskett 1854-1946.—Darrel Dexter)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Aug 1932:
_. M. TROETER PASSED AWAY AT HOME IN MOUNDS TUESDAY

J. B. Troeter, age 66 years, died at home in Mounds Tuesday afternoon at 2:15 o’clock, following a prolonged illness of more than two years.

Surviving him are his widow and two daughters, Miss Dorothy Troeter, of Indianapolis, Ind., and Miss Mary Troeter, of Mounds; and three sons, George, of Mounds, Nicholas, of Pulaski, and John, of Cleveland; and a brother, O. R. Troeter, of Beaver Fall, Pa.

Mr. Troeter was a pensioned engineer, having been employed by the Illinois Central Railroad Company for 28 years prior to receiving his pension.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the residence, with the Rev. T. C. Ury officiating.  Interment was made in Spence Heights Cemetery by Hartwell and Ryan, undertakers in charge.

(The application for a military headstone states that James B. Troeter enlisted 12 Oct 1886, and was discharged 16 Sep 1890, as a private in the hospital corps.  He enlisted 2nd on 22 Dec 1895, and was discharged 18 Jul 1896, as a sergeant in Co. G, 11th U. S. Infantry.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery in Mounds, Ill., reads:  James B. Troeter 1865-1932 Dora E. Troetter 1871-1943.—Darrel Dexter)
 
ELLIS GEVEDEN, MOUNDS, DIES

Ellis Geveden, age 48 years, of Mounds, passed away Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the I. C. hospital at Paducah, Ky., following an illness of about two weeks of typhoid fever.

Mr. Geveden is survived by his widow and three children, George Lee, Ellen A. and Billy Bob; and three sisters, Mrs. Zora Ellin, of Bardwell, Ky., Mrs. Pearl Snow, of Crutchfield, Ky., and Mrs. Mary Urby, of Columbus, Ky.; besides two brothers, William and Arnon, of Bardwell.  All of the relatives have arrived in Mounds and attended the funeral which was held Thursday at 2 o’clock at the Baptist church.  Immediately after the service the cortege left for Bardwell where interment was made.

G. A. James directed the funeral.  Mr. Geveden had been employed with the I. C. Railroad Company fifteen years.

(His death certificate states that L. Ellis Geveden, of Mounds, Ill., married, husband of Ludie Geveden, railroad track foreman, was born 2 Aug 1884, in Kentucky, daughter of William Geveden and Mahala Elles, natives of Kentucky, died 2 Aug 1932, of dysentery at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, Ky., age 47 years, 11 months, and 15 days.  He was buried in Bardwell Cemetery in Carlisle Co., Ky.—Darrel Dexter)
 
INFANT SON OF MR. AND MRS. COY CARRINGTON PASSES AWAY

William Jean, the one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Coy Carrington, passed away Friday morning at 8:30 o’clock at the home of his parents in this city, following a brief illness.

Funeral services were held at the residence Saturday morning at 10 o’clock conducted by Rev. George W. Humphrey, pastor of the First M. E. Church.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

(His death certificate states that William Jean Carrington was born 11 Jul 1931, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Coy Carrington, a native of Vienna, Ill., and Edna Modglin, a native of Cobden, Ill., died 29 Jul 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter) 
 
MRS. JOSIE CULBERTSON DIES AT HER HOME NEAR OLMSTEAD

Mrs. Josie Culbertson, age 67 years, passed away at her home near Olmsted Tuesday morning.  Mrs. Culbertson is the mother of Mrs. Frances Hooppaw, of this city.  Besides Mrs. Hooppaw, she is survived by her husband, J. Culbertson; a son, Ray Culbertson, of Olmsted; and two daughters, Mrs. Della Burns, of Olmstead, and Mrs. Elsie Sharp, of West Frankfort, Ill.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock at Center Church with the Rev. Mr. Cory of Pulaski officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.  W. H. Aldred had charge of the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Josie Culbertson was born 5 Apr 1865, in Olmstead, Ill., daughter of Joseph Downs and Sarah Russell, died 2 Aug 1932, in Road District 4, Pulaski, Ill., wife of J. J. Culbertson.  Her marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Joseph J. Culbertson 1860- Josephine Culbertson 1865-1932.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BENJAMIN H. McDANIELS DIES AT HIS HOME IN THIS CITY

Benjamin Harrison McDaniels, age 65 years, a resident of Mound City for more than 20 years, died at his home on North Commercial Avenue Thursday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock following an illness of but three days.

Mr. McDaniels is survived by his widow, three sons, Charles McDaniels, who resides in the south; Ben McDaniels, of Mound City, and Wilson McDaniels, of Chicago.  He also leaves four daughters, Mrs. Emma Talley, Mrs. Lily Maxwell, and Mrs. Lizzie Calvin, all of Mound City; and Mrs. Corinne Smith, of Chicago, besides other relatives.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the residence at 4 o’clock following by interment in Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(Benjamin Harrison McDaniel was born 14 May 1867, in Illinois, the son of Francis McDaniel and Amanda Dexter, and died 28 Jul 1932.  He married Nettie Bell Gilmore, who was born 31 Aug 1873, in Illinois, and died in 25 Sep 1923, in Mound City, Pulaski Co., Ill., of paralytic construction of the throat, the daughter of Joseph Gilmore and Nancy Ford.  He married 2nd Anna “Annie” Gray, who was born about 1889 in Illinois.—Darrel Dexter) 
 
RAY KARRAKER PASSED AWAY AT HOME IN ST. LOUIS

Ray Karraker, aged about 43 years, of St. Louis, and well known in this vicinity, passed away Wednesday, Aug. 27, at 6:40 o’clock p.m. in a St. Louis hospital.  He formerly lived in Dongola, being a member of a prominent family there.  He was a cousin of Earl Karraker, of this city.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilford N. Karraker, who survive him, reside in Dongola, and he also leaves a widow, and three sons, Richard, Robert, and John, of St. Louis.

Mr. Karraker belonged to a family of bankers.  He was cashier of the St. Louis National Bank.  He also was a cousin of Thomas N. Karraker, formerly cashier of the First State Bank of Mounds, Illinois, now president of the St. Louis National Bank.  Three brothers, who survive him, also are in the banking business as was Earl Karraker, who was former cashier of the First National Bank of this city.  His brothers, Orville Karraker, is cashier of the First National Bank of Harrisburg; Ira Karraker, cashier of the First National Bank of Jonesboro; and Guy Karraker, an employee of the St. Louis National Bank.  He leaves a sister, Mrs. Fred Johnson, of Bloomington.  His wife was formerly Miss Pearl Heilig, of Pulaski.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at Alexander Chapel, 6125 Delmar, St. Louis.

 
Mrs. Otho Ferguson and Mark Dover attended the funeral of Mrs. Culbertson, which was held at Olmsted Wednesday morning.  Mrs. Culbertson was an aunt of Mrs. Ferguson and Mr. Dover.
 
Mrs. Francis Hooppaw has been in Olmsted at the bedside of her mother, Mrs. Josie Culbertson, who has been ill for some time.  Mrs. Culbertson passed away Tuesday morning.
 
C. E. Kendall and wife attended the funeral of Ben McDaniels at Mound City Saturday afternoon.  (Olmstead)
 
Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of little Rose Mary Lynch, last Thursday afternoon in Ullin.

(Her death certificate states that Rosemary Lynch was born 2 Sep 1929, in Ullin, Ill., daughter of William A. Lynch, a native of Ullin, Ill., and Edith Young, a native of Alexander Co., Ill., died 26 Nov 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., A marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Rosemary Lynch 1929-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Aug 1932:

HENRY FISHER DIES SUDDENLY AT HIS HOME IN THIS CITY

             Henry Fisher, age 63 years, died suddenly at his home in this city Saturday night at 9:45 o’clock.  He was apparently in the best of health when he left his home Saturday evening.  About three blocks from home he was seized with a heart attack and passed away a few hours later, after being taken to his home.

Mr. Fisher had resided in Mound City for about ten years and the past three years had been employed as janitor of the M. C. C. H. S.  He was highly respected and very capable in his work.

             Surviving Mr. Fisher are his widow, Mrs. Ida Fisher; and five stepchildren, Thomas and William Smithey, Mrs. Alberta Morehead and Mrs. Elsie Apple, all of Mound City, and Mrs. Zada Ronnenbeck of Miller City.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the residence, conducted by the Rev. L. J. Peppersack, pastor of the First Baptist Church.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.  Casket bearers were high school boys, Paul Hickman, George McNeile, Billy Stophlet, James Kennedy, James Atherton and Roderic Capoot.

(His death certificate states that Henry Fisher, a janitor, was born 30 Aug 1869, in Union Co., Mo., died 6 Aug 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOTHER HAS FEAR OF ACCIDENT; HER SON KILLED

             Mrs. I. Elliott appealed to the police in Cairo to find her son, Fred A. Scheler, 20 years old, Monday evening about 7 o’clock after suffering for some time under the apprehension that something had happened to him and while she was in the police office, word came that he had been killed in an automobile accident that not only had taken his life, but also had taken the life of Lamon Belangee, 19 years of age, also of Cairo.

             The car grazed one of the trees on the drive into Cairo, where they line the road too close for safety, and the two men on the running board were killed, their skulls fractured and necks broken.

             Scheler was trying to sell a Dodge car to A. _. _lder, a colored man, and they came to Mound City, on the return, _lder was driving and Sceler was on the running board, watching the engine and making adjustments.  Scheler saw two friends, Thomas Slaughter and Lamon Belangee, and had _lder stop the car for them.  Slaughter got inside the car, but Belangee stayed on the running board with him.

             Either bad driving or a suddenly accelerated motor due to Sceler adjusting the carburetor, caused the car to swerve and brush against one of those trees near the interurban track with fatal results.  The car itself was not badly damaged, for Slaughter had grabbed the wheel from _lder and turned back onto the road and he and _lder were not injured.

             The apprehension of the mother had been right.  Her son had met with an accident and was dead.

             (The death certificate states that Fred A. Scholer was born about 1912, died 8 Aug 1932, on Route 7, Alexander Co., Ill., son of Fred Scholer and Miss Patterson.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A. A. BARTLESON PASSES AWAY AT HOME IN GRAND CHAIN

             August Alonzo Bartleson, age 76 years, passed away at his home near Grand Chain Tuesday, August 9, at noon, following an illness of but a few days.  Mr. Bartleson was born near his present home and has lived in the community all is life.  He had a large circle of friends in this vicinity we are grieved at his passing.

             Surviving Mr. Bartleson are his widow, Mary Bartleson; and son, Warren Bartleson.  Other relatives and a host of friends also survive him.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at __ p.m. at the residence.  The Rev. McWhirter officiated.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of funeral arrangements.

(His death certificate states that Augustus Alonzo Bartleson was born 23 Feb 1856, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of Robert Bartleson, a native of Ohio, and Elza Youngblood, a native of Illinois, died 9 Aug 1932, in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mary Bartleson.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Augustus A. Bartleson 1852-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Aug 1932:

Mrs. Florence Childs Dies

             Mrs. Florence Childs, wife of James Childs, died Sunday morning, August 7, following a lingering illness.

             Funeral services were held at the St. Paul A. M. E. church Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock, the Rev. P. S. Dick officiating.  Two lodges to which Mrs. Childs belonged conducted services at the grave, the Daughters of the Tabernacle and the Court of Calanthe.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

             She is survived by her husband and a foster daughter.

             (Her death certificate states that Florence Childs, of N. McKinley, Mounds, Ill., was born 31 Oct 1878, in Martin, Ill., the daughter of Joe Williams, died 7 Aug 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of James C Childs, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.

 

Allen D. Wilson Dies in Denver

             Allen D. Wilson, husband of the former Miss Mary Agnes Wilson, of Mounds, died Monday, August 1, in the Presbyterian Hospital of Denver, Colorado, where he had been a patient for a number of weeks.

             Mr. Wilson was born in Chicago, August 13, 1897.  He and Miss Wilson met in Champaign while he was studying for his master’s degree and was working in the University library as librarian.  They were married in Champaign July 27, 1930.

             Mr. Wilson accepted a position as librarian of the Junior College of Virginia, Minn., where they lived until his health failed him.  A son, James Allen, age fourteen months, was born in Virginia, Minn.

             With him at the time of his death were his wife and little son, and his father, Rev. Charles A. Wilson, a Presbyterian minister of Casper, Wyoming.  Surviving also are two brothers and one sister, his mother having died some years ago.

             Funeral services were held in a funeral chapel in Denver and the body was placed in a vault in that city.

             (His marker in Oak Hill Cemetery in Evansville, Vanderburgh Co., Ind., reads:  Allen D. Wilson 1898-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Sideswiping a Tree Causes Death of Two

Cairo Boys Killed Monday Night on Route Two South of Cache Bridge

             Fred A. Scheler, 20, and Lamon Belangee, 19, both Cairo boys, were instantly killed Monday evening about 7 o’clock when a Dodge sedan driven by A. H. Holder, colored contractor of Cairo, sideswiped a tree at the right side of the paving south of Cache bridge and a little north of the old Interurban crossing, knocking both boys off the right running board where they were riding as the car traveled south.

             Scheler was thrown down the embankment while Belangee fell to the concrete.  Both had their skulls crushed and their necks broken.  Holder was thrown against the steering wheel and hurt but Thomas Slaughter, a third Cairo boy, who was riding in the seat with Holder, was not injured.

             Scheler who owned the car, was trying to sell it to Holder who had driven it to Mound City from which place they were returning to Cairo.  Scheler was on the running aboard working on the motor and Belangee was standing near him.  Holder claims that Scheler did something which caused the car to gain speed so rapidly that the wheels began to wobble, causing him to lose control.  Scheler and Holder had picked up Belangee and Slaughter along the highway near Mound City.

 

Mrs. Earl E. Morgan and children were called to Bone Gap the first of last week by the death of Mr. Morgan’s mother, who passed away in the Olney, Ill., sanitarium Tuesday, August 2.  Mr. Morgan was called to Bone Gap from Joliet, where he is employed as guard in the penitentiary.

 

CHILD DROWNS IN WATER TANK NEAR MORRISON

             MORRISON—Donald Lawrence, nineteen months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stewart, of four and one half miles east of Morrison, was drowned in a tank of water Wednesday.  He had a cup which he had evidently been playing with for a boat and in trying to reach it probably fell in head first.  His body was found by thirteen-year-old brother, Marion, and it was face down and floating.

             (His death certificate states that Donald Stuart was born 4 Dec 1930, in Sterling, Ill., the son of Fred Stuart, a native of Holland, and Lina Wieraema, a native of Illinois, died 26 Jul 1932, in Mt. Pleasant, Whiteside Co., Ill., and was buried in Grove Hill, Morrison Whiteside Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Aug 1932:

Ival Norris Taylor

             Ivel Norris Taylor, pioneer resident of Pulaski County, died Tuesday afternoon, August 16, at the Marsh Hotel in Mounds, where he has made his home for the last year or more.

             Mr. Taylor, a native of the state of Kentucky, was born January 1, 1864, and had reached the age of 68 years, 7 months and 15 days.  He came to this community about 50 years ago and was one of the early teachers in the county.  Previous to that time he had taught in Johnson County.  The Meridian School was the first school he presided over in this county.  In 1878 he started teaching at Villa Ridge where he remained for a number of years.  His home at that time was on the farm now owned by M. M. Hartman, from which place he moved to Mounds where he entered the real estate business.  At one time he served as police magistrate.  He retired from business fifteen years ago.

             Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Emma Allice Cunningham, June 3, 1891, and to this union two sons, Norris and Robert, were born.  Mrs. Taylor preceded him in death, dying October 15, 1925.  The two sons, Norris and Robert, both of Trumann, Ark., survive.

             Funeral services were held at the G. A. James Funeral Home Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock, the Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the Methodist Church officiating.  Internment was made at the side of Mrs. Taylor in Thistlewood Cemetery.

 

Rev. and Mrs. W. D. Richardson and sons, John and Harry, were called to Centralia Monday by the death of the former’s uncle, James Daley Richardson.  The Rev. Richardson preached the funeral.

             (His application for a military headstone states that James Dailey Richardson was a private in Co. F, 48th Illinois Infantry, died 14 Aug 1932, and was buried in Antioch Cemetery in Centralia, Ill.  His other marker in the cemetery reads:  Rebecca A. Richardson 1846-1932 James D. Richardson 1845-1932 At Rest.—Darrel Dexter).

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Aug 1932:

AGED RESIDENT OF MOUNDS PASSES ON

Ivel Norris Taylor, long a resident of Mounds, passed away at his home Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the age of 68 years.  He moved to Mounds from Kentucky, his native state, and resided there for half century.  He was a retired real estate agent and had taught school at Villa Ridge.

His wife, Mrs. Emma Taylor, passed away in October of 1925.  He is survived by two sons, Norris and Robert Taylor, both of Truman, Ark.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the funeral parlors of G. A. James by Rev. Mr. Richardson, pastor of the Methodist Church.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

(Ivel N. Taylor married on 23 May 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Emma Cunningham. His death certificate states that Ivel Norris Taylor, retired real estate agent, was born 1 Jan 1864, in Kentucky, died 16 Aug 1932, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Emma A. Taylor, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Ivel Norris Taylor 1864-1932 Emma Alice Taylor 1871-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

JOHN SANFORD SADLER DIES AT HIS HOME IN MOUNDS

John Sanford Sadler passed away at his home in Mounds Tuesday morning at the age of 64 years.  Mr. Sadler was well known in Mounds and was a member of the Masonic Lodge.

He is survived by his wife and six children, Shirley, of St. Louis, Kenneth and William, of Bush, Illinois, Mrs. Zelma Keller, John, Jr., and Birdie, of Mounds.  He also leaves two stepdaughters, Geneva and Olga Mahoney, of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Eliza Millikin, of Pomona, Illinois, eight grandchildren and one great-grand child.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the M. E. church with the Rev. Mr. Richardson, pastor of the church, officiating and Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church assisting.  The Masonic Lodge conducted the final rites at the grave.

(John S. Sadler married Lizzie Mathis on 3 Jan 1887, in Jackson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Sanford Sadler, a locomotive engineer, was born 16 Feb 1868, in Grand Tower, Ill., the son of John Sadler, died 16 Aug 1932, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Ida Sadler, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  John S. Sadler 1868-1932 Elizabeth A. Sadler his wife 1868-1913.—Darrel Dexter)

 

I. N. Taylor remains quite ill at the Hotel Marsh. (Mounds)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Aug 1932:

JOHN A. ROYCE DIES FROM SELF-INFLICTED WOUNDS

John A. Royce, age 51 years, shot himself in the garage of his home shortly after 10:30 o’clock Monday morning and died within a half hour.  The bullet entered his chest near the heart.  He was found by his son, John, a few seconds after he had shot himself.  It is thought the reason for his act was the condition of times, as he was heard to tell his wife after he had committed the act that it was because he loved them.  He was employed with the Scudder Gale Grocery Company for some time and drew a large salary.  He lost his position with his firm on account of the depression.  Later he was employed with the Ben Hur Life Insurance Company, but his salary was not nearly so large and this may have been to blame for his act.

Mr. Royce had many friends in the community who deeply sympathize with the family in this, their great sorrow.  He was known to be the kindest of husbands and fathers and his love for his family was so great that he was willing to die for them.

Mr. Royce was a member of the Masonic Lodge and of the Tribe of Ben Hur.  He was a member of the Presbyterian Church at Owosso, Mich.  He had never moved his membership to Mound City.  He was born at Lansburg, Mich., February 12, 1881.  He came to Mound City in 1910 and was married to Miss Anna Davidson.  To this union three children were born all of whom survive him.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Pilgrim Congregational Church at 2:30 o’clock, the Rev. Thomas Gray officiating.  Immediately after the services at the church, the cortege moved by automobile to Thistlewood Cemetery, where interment was made.  The beautiful Masonic rites were given at the grave.  The casket bearers were taken from the ranks of Masonry.

Surviving Mr. Royce are his widow, Mrs. Anna Royce; two sons, John, Jr., and Charles; and one daughter, Evelyn Jane.  He is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Edith Orser; and a brother, Waldo, E., Royce; besides many other relatives and a large circle of friends.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that John A. Royce, a salesman, was born about 1881 in Lansburg, Mich., the son of Lewellyn P. Royce and Phoebe E. Lord, natives of Michigan, died 22 Aug 1932, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Annie Royce, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Aug 1932:

Mound City Man Shoots Self Monday Morning

             John A. Royce, age 52, a resident of Mound city, shot himself through the abdomen Monday morning about 10:30 o’clock.  Returning to his home from his work for the Ben Hur Life Association about ten o’clock, he changed his clothes and went to the garage to work on his car.  Not long afterward he fired two shots from a .32 caliber revolver into his abdomen.  He lived about half an hour after the shooting and was able to speak to Mrs. Royce.

             He is survived by his widow, the former Miss Anna Davidson of Villa Ridge; two sons, John, 21, and Charles, 19; and one daughter, Evelyn Jane, 17.

             For years Mr. Royce had been a salesman for Scudder Gale Wholesale Grocery House of Cairo.  He had also been interested in the Ben Hur Lodge and through these associations had made many friends in Mounds who deeply regret his untimely death.

             Funeral services were held at the Congregational church in Mound City Thursday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. Thomas Gray of Dupo, a former pastor of the Mound City Congregational Church.

             The Masonic order to which he belonged had charge of the services at Thistlewood cemetery.  The funeral was directed by G. A. James.

 

HAS TEETH PULLED AND DIES

             HARRISBURG—Louis Bowman, 28, employed as soda clerk in a local drug store in Harrisburg, died last night.  He had all his teeth removed last Tuesday and death was attributed to hemorrhaging. He was exceptionally well known, having formerly been employed at other drug stores throughout the city.

             (His death certificate states that Louie Bowman, drug clerk, of 112 E. Locust St., Harrisburg, Ill., was born 16 Mar 1904, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill., the son of William Bowman and Millie Perkins, natives of Harrisburg, Ill., died 11 Aug 1932, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Sunset Hill Cemetery in Harrisburg, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

KILLS WIFE AND SELF

             ANNA—Charles Timberlake, a former Anna boy, residing in Dallas, Texas, who will be remembered by many residents here, shot and killed himself Monday of last week after he had shot and fatally wounded his second wife, whom he married little more than a year ago.  They quarreled frequently and one of their numerous quarrels ended in the shooting.  Mrs. Timberlake lingered a few hours before she died.

             Timberlake was connected with a wholesale bakery concern.  He had accumulated a comfortable sum which was wisely invested.  His second wife had a son and their last quarrel and others were about him.  He was a student in Little Rock, Ark., and was at home for the vacation period.  The report said Timberlake was annoyed by the lad’s idleness.  He and Mrs. Timberlake were living apart and just before the shooting were arranging for a divorce.  They had been separated two weeks, the report said.

             Timberlake had developed into a fine looking man of the wide awake business type.  He had been in Dallas about 15 years having gone there from Bonham, Texas.  Just prior to the disturbance which occurred in the home where Mrs. Timberlake resided, he had made and signed his will.  Timberlake left his estate to a Mrs. Thomas, a school teacher and close friend of his first wife.

             (His death certificate states that Charles N. Timberlake, of 4129 Cole Ave., Dallas, Texas, retired railroad man, was born 30 Sep 1867, in Illinois, died 8 Aug 1932, at 3001 Knight St., Dallas, Texas, of suicidal gunshot wound, husband of Birdie Timberlake, and was buried in Restland Memorial Park.  Her death certificate states that Mrs. Birdie Akers Timberlake, a trained nurse, of 3001 Knight St., Dallas, Texas, was born 15 Apr 1878, in Unionville, Tenn., daughter of Andrew Jackson Jeffers, a native of Unionville, Tenn., and Margaret Jeffers, a native of Marysville, Mo., died 8 Aug 1932, in Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas, of a believed homicidal pistol shot to left chest and heart in quarrel with husband, widow of C.N. Timberlake, and was buried in Grove Hill Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to express our sincere thanks to our many friends in Mounds and vicinity for their kindness and expressions of sympathy during the illness and following the death of our father, I. N. Taylor.  Especially do we wish to thank Mr. and Mrs. Edward Marsh, Sr., for their devotion to and care of him during his illness.  We also wish to thank the minister, those who sent flowers and all who in any way tendered their services.

Mr. and Mrs. Norris C. Taylor

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Taylor

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Sep 1932:

Mrs. Jennie Lewis Dies at Grand Chain

             Mrs. Jennie Lewis, widow of the late N. V. Lewis, died Saturday morning, August 27, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Guy C. Bartleson, of Grand Chain, following a lingering illness.  Mrs. Lewis was 68 years of age.

             Mrs. Lewis is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Bartleson; a son, Thomas V. Lewis, of Jacksonville, Fla.; a sister, Mrs. T. V. Porter, also of Jacksonville; a niece, Mrs. W. E. Rife, of Villa Ridge and other relatives.

             Mr. and Mrs. Lewis lived many years in Cairo where Mr. Lewis was interested in the Lewis Mercantile Company.  Later they lived in a beautiful country home at Lewis Landing on the Ohio River near Grand Chain.  Since the death of Mr. Lewis, Mrs. Lewis has spent her time with her daughter and at the home of Mrs. W. E. Rife, whom she reared as a daughter.

             Funeral services were held at the Bartleson residence Sunday afternoon.  The casket, banked with a profusion of flowers, was placed on the veranda and a large concourse of following relatives and friends gathered on the lawn to pay their last respects to one whom they had loved “and lost awhile.”  The funeral sermon was delivered by the Rev. Mr. McWhirter, with the Rev. S. C. Benninger, of Grand Chain, the Rev. E. O. Allen of Villa Ridge and the Rev. M. Walker of Cairo assisting in the services.  Interment was made in Grand Chain cemetery, directed by G. A. James.

 

Prominent Olive Branch Man Dies Wednesday

             D. I. Kirkham of Olive branch, former county judge of Alexander County, died Wednesday morning following a several weeks’ illness of typhoid fever.

             Judge Kirkham was active on the affairs of his community.  He was a former school teacher a member of the school board of Olive Branch and one of the pioneers of Horseshoe Lake Game and Fish Preserve.  He also was active in the formation of the Olive Branch bank and the Olive Branch drainage district.

             He is survived by his widow and eight children, three of whom are ill with the same fever that caused his death.

 

Former Mound City Merchant Dies in Vandalia

             Mound City friends of Edward J. Freeman, a resident and merchant in that city for about 45 years, received word on Wednesday of his death which occurred in Vandalia.

             Mr. Freeman left Mound City about six years ago and moved west.  He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Freeman of Vandalia, and other relatives.

 

A number from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral service of Mrs. Jennie Lewis which was held at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Guy Bartleson in Grand Chain Sunday afternoon.  Mrs. Lewis was well known here having spent a great part of her time at the home of her niece, Mrs. W. E. Rife.

 

LIGHTNING KILLS FARMER

             GRAYVILLE—Alva Mathes, 38, farmer near Owensville, was found dead, struck by lightning during a thunderstorm Wednesday afternoon that night by a party of neighbors who set out to search for him when he did not appear for the evening meal.  The neighbors found Mathes lying on his face at the foot of a tree that had been split in two by a lightning bolt.  His clothing was split down the back.  He had been working the field with a tractor, apparently had sought shelter from the storm, sitting on the bottom of a bucket from which he had pitched forward when the lightning struck.

             (A marker in Walnut Hill Cemetery in Fort Branch, Gibson Co., Ind., reads:  Alva C. Mathes 1895-1932 Thelma wife of Alva Mathes 1900-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Sep 1932:

FORMER MOUND CITY MAN PASSES AWAY

William B. Imhoff, formerly of Mound City, age 55 years, passed away in a hospital at Indianapolis, Ind., Sunday morning at 1:45 o’clock.  Mr. Imhoff is a brother of Mrs. Ed O’Hare, of this city.

Mr. Imhoff resided in Alexandria, Ind., and was removed to the hospital in Indianapolis Friday.  He had been in failing health for about one year, but had been able to work until five weeks ago when he became ill with dropsy.

The body was removed to Buchanan, Mich., the birthplace of the deceased.  Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at Evangelical church in that city.  Interment was made in the family lot in the Buchanan Cemetery.

Mr. Imhoff is survived by his widow, two sisters, Mrs. O’Hare, of this city, and Mrs. Mary DeVan, of Los Angeles; one brother, George Imhoff, of Bluford; a nephew, Ab Harrison, of South Bend, Ind., who he reared and loved as his own son; and other relatives and many friends.

Mr. Imhoff resided in Mound City for a number of years.  He came to this city when Williamson-Kuny Mill and Lumber Co., was one of the leading manufacturing concerns of this locality.  He was an expert saw filer and was following his profession at the time of his death, being employed by an Alexandria concern.

Mr. Imhoff was a man whose congenial personality made him many warm friends, who are grieved to learn of his death.

(According to his World War I draft registration, William Benjamin Imhoff, a band saw filer, of Mound City, Ill., was born 3 Jan 1877.  His nearest relative was Melisse Cora Imhoff.  William Imhoff was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Buchanan, Mich.—Darrel Dexter)

 

EDWARD FREEMAN DIES AT HOME IN JEFFERSON CITY

Edward J. Freeman, age 44 years, formerly of Mound City, passed away at his home in Jefferson City, Sunday night following an illness of several months.

His body was taken to Vandalia, the home of his nephew, Clarence Freeman, where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at __ o’clock at the Christian church.  Interment took place in the Vandalia cemetery.

Mr. Freeman is survived by his widow, the former Mrs. Edith __ines, of this city, his mother, Mrs. Mary Freeman, also residing here until about two years ago, and many other relatives and friends.

When in Mound City, Mrs. Freeman was connected with George ___dstine in the clothing business.  Mr. Freeman had many friends in this city who regret to learn of his death.

 

JUDGE D. I. KIRKHAM DIED AT HOME IN OLIVE BRANCH

Judge D. I. Kirkham, former county judge of Alexander County, passed away at his home in Olive Branch Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock, following an illness of several weeks of typhoid fever.  He had been in a serious condition for some time, but was thought to be better when he suffered a relapse.

Judge Kirkham was elected to fill the unexpired term of Judge Hood, who passed away in 1924.  He served two years and was re-elected in 1926 and served four years.

Funeral services were held this morning at 10 o’clock at Olive Branch.  Karcher Brothers had charge of the funeral.

Judge Kirkham is survived by his widow and eight children, three of who are ill with typhoid fever.

(His World War I draft registration on 5 Jun 1917, states he was born in Princeton, Ind., and had a wife and four children.  His death certificate states that Don Ingersoll Kirkham was born about 1887, the son of R. N. B. Kirkham and Kate Voke, died 31 Aug 1932, in Olive Branch, Ill., the husband of Anna E. Kirkham.  His marker in Olive Branch Cemetery reads:  Allice E. Kirkham Born April 9, 1886 Died March 3, 1960 Mother Don I. Kirkham Born Nov. 17, 1886 Died Aug. 31, 1932 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HARLEN LITTLE PASSES AWAY AT HOME IN KARNAK

Harlen Little, age 24, passed away at his home in Karnak, Illinois, at 4 o’clock Thursday afternoon following an operation for appendicitis at St. Mary’s Infirmary last Friday, August 19.  He was brought to his home in Karnak from the hospital Thursday.

Mr. Little is survived by his widow, and one child, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Little; a brother, Byrl; and a sister, Edith, of Karnak; and two sisters, Madge and Mrs. Millie Johnson, of Cairo.

Funeral services were conducted at the First M. E. Church at Karnak Saturday afternoon with interment at Salem Cemetery.

(His marker in Lower Salem Baptist Cemetery in Massac Co., Ill., reads:  Harlen S. Little Feb. 17, 1908 Aug. 19, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. JENNIS LEWIS FUNERAL HELD SUNDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. Jennie Lewis, of Grand Chain, age 68 years, wife of the late N. V. Lewis, formerly of Cairo, who passed away at 12:05 o’clock Saturday morning were held Sunday afternoon at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Guy C. Bartleson.

Mrs. Lewis formerly resided in Cairo where her husband was manager of the Lewis Mercantile Company.  She was an active member of the Christian Church.  Mrs. Lewis had been ill for nearly a year when death came to end her suffering.

Surviving Mrs. Lewis are her daughter, Mrs. Bartleson, of Grand Chain; a son, Thomas V. Lewis, of Jacksonville, Fla.; a sister, Mrs. T. V. Porter, also of Jacksonville; a niece, Mrs. E. C. Rife, of Villa Ridge; and many other relatives and friends.

The casket was placed on the veranda where the funeral services were held.  The pastor of the Christian Church, Rev. Mr. McWhirter, conducted the services.  He was assisted by Rev. Mr. Allen, pastor of the M. E. Church of Cairo, the Rev. W. H. Walker, pastor of the Christian Church of Cairo, and Rev. Mr. Benninger, pastor of the Congregational churches of Mounds and Grand Chain.  An abundance of floral offerings were sent as tributes of love and sympathy and were placed about the grave of the deceased.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral.

(Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Jennie Lewis 1864-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Those attending the funeral of Mrs. Jennie Lewis of Grand Chain were:  Mr. and Mrs. Carl McIntire, Mrs. S. F. McIntire, Attorney and Mrs. Warner Wall, Mrs. Catherine Scheck, Mrs. Mary Gwin, and grandson, Gwinn Cull.

 

Several people from here (Olmsted) attended Rev. Hill’s funeral at Elco Sunday.  It was one of the largest funerals Elco ever had.  Brother Hill was killed in a car wreck last Friday on his way to Anna to see his sick daughter.  He was pastor of the Elco church a few years ago and was highly respected.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Sep 1932:

Typhoid Fever Epidemic in Alexander County

A mild epidemic of typhoid fever is in the northern part of Alexander County and the death of D. I. Kirkham called it forcefully to the minds of authorities.  Something was wrong, it was known, and a state health man made a survey of the neighborhood.

It is presumed that Kirkham swallowed water while swimming in Wolf Lake and contracted the disease.

Quite a number of typhoid cases are reported at Olive Branch and the situation there is one where people are exercising care.  Wells and streams are contaminated and the disease, unless checked, may sweep in wider circles.  There are something like 20 cases in and around Olive Branch, it is said.

 

TRAGEDY FOLLOWS MRS. S. H. GRAVES

Mrs. S. H. Graves has again met with a tragic visit when she visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Boor, of Durand, Wis.  Her brother, Antone, age 38, was drowned while she was there.

Mrs. Graves brought her seven children to visit her mother-in-law, Mrs. Mary E. Graves, at Villa Ridge early in the summer and her eight year-old son, Bernard, was drowned.  So it seems as though tragedy has followed Mrs. Graves on both vacation trips this summer.

(The application for a headstone states that Anton Baur served as a corporal in the 10th Company, 161st Depot Brigade during World War I and died 30 Aug 1932.  He was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Durand, Wis.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PULASKI RESIDENT PASSES AWAY

James Gillispie, age 71 years, passed away at his home near Pulaski Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the Christian church, with the Rev. Mr. Holloman officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery, W. H. Aldred directing the funeral.

Mr. Gillespie, well known throughout the community in which he had lived for many years, is survived by his widow, Mrs. Belle Gillespie; a son, George Gillespie, of Pulaski; a daughter, Mrs. Arthur Palmer, near Pulaski; and several grandchildren.

(The death certificate states that James Alexander Gillespie was born 21 Mar 1861, in West, Union Co., Ohio, son of Andrew Gillespie, a native of Brown Co., Ohio, and Maria Russell, and died 2 Sep 1932, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Belle Gillespie.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  James A. Gillespie 1861-1932 Belle C. Gillespie 1866-1944—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. PHENIA CURRY DIES AT HER HOME IN ULLIN

Mrs. Penia Curry, age 73 years, mother of Mrs. Harry Parker, formerly Mrs. Sam Sheerer, of this city, passed away at her home at Ullin Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock following an illness of ten days.

Besides her daughter, she is survived by a son, James Curry, and two grandchildren, Dale and Sam Sheerer, all of Ullin.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church at Ullin, followed by interment in Concord Cemetery.  W. J. Rhymer directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Phena Curry was born 25 Jan 1859, daughter of James A. White and Casey Bigg, died 5 Sep 1932, in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Concord Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter0

 

VIENNA EDITOR DIED SUDDENLY LAST FRIDAY

Harry Bridges, 60 years of age, editor of the Vienna Times and mayor of Vienna, died there last Friday of apoplexy.  The funeral was held Sunday.

Bridges was a unique character.  He was a printer on the Times for years and then took it over when the ownership became somewhat tired of the proposition and made of the Times a very respectable country weekly.  His family aided him and relieved him of the work in later years.

Bridges was blessed with a genial nature and kindly attitude, forgiving the faults of people and encouraging their virtues.  He had an optimistic trend and in his years, he had made and acquired many friends.

The call to Bridges to surrender his life came very quickly.  The last turn was off the press for him and life’s edition was closed.

(Harry T. Bridges married Sena Brooks on 25 Jul 1897, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Harry T. Bridges was born 6 Jan 1872, in Vienna, Ill., the son of Henry T. Bridges, a native of Illinois, and Mary Carter, a native of Vienna, Ill., died 2 Sep 1932, in Vienna, Ill., husband of Sena Bridges, and was buried in the Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna.  His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads Harry T. Bridges 1872-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Hazel Roberts and son, Leslie, left Tuesday for Champaign to attend the funeral of Leslie’s grandmother, who died in the Canal Zone August 11.  Her body accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. S. C. Abernathy, arrived in New York Wednesday and was taken to Champaign where she was buried.  She had been ill the past six years.  (Mounds)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Sep 1932:

Editor of Vienna Times Dies Suddenly Friday

Was Mayor of Vienna and Prominent Citizen of Johnson County

             Harry Thompson Bridges, Sr., aged 62, editor and publisher of the Vienna Times for many years and mayor of Vienna, died at his home Friday night at ten o’clock from a cerebral hemorrhage at four o’clock in the afternoon while in his newspaper office.

             Mr. Bridges, the son of Harry T. And Mary Bridges, was born in Johnson County Jan. 6, 1870.  He received only a rural school education and started to work in the local printing office when a mere boy.  At that time the paper was owned by W. A. Gillian who later sold out to C. J. Huffman.  In 1920 Mr. Bridges purchased the Times.

             He was married in 1895 to Miss Aseana Brooks who survives him.  The surviving children are four sons, Harry T., Royce, William and James; three daughters, Mrs. Oscar McCorkle, Misses Lucille and Marion, all of Vienna.

             Funeral services were conducted in Vienna Sunday afternoon at the Christian Church.

 

James Gillespie Dies at Home near Pulaski

             James Gillespie, age 71, died at his home near Pulaski Thursday afternoon, September 1, at one o’clock.

             Mr. Gillespie is survived by his widow, a son, George Gillespie, of Pulaski; a daughter, Mrs. Arthur Palmer, near Pulaski, and a number of grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the Christian church of Pulaski, the Rev. Mr. Holloman officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery, W. H. Aldred directing the ceremony.

 

Mrs. Phena Curry Dies Monday at Ullin

Mrs. Phena Curry was born Jan. 25, 1859, and passed away at her home in Ullin, Monday, Sept. 5, 1932, at 1:30 p.m.

             She was a member of the Methodist Church of Mounds.

             She is survived by one son, James Curry of Ullin; one daughter, Mrs. H. E. Parker, of Cairo; and two grandsons, Sam and Dale Sheerer.  Also two brothers, J. W. White of Pulaski and E. M. White of Rising Star, Texas.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday at the Ullin Methodist Church at 2:00 p.m. by Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the Mounds M. E. Church.  Interment was made in the Concord Cemetery near Olmsted.

 

Mrs. E. H. Riggle Dies at Centralia

             Mrs. Ellie Riggle, wife of E. H. Riggle, aged 64 years, passed away at her home in Centralia, Wednesday morning, Aug. 31, after an illness of about three years.

             She leaves besides her husband, two sons, Homer and Herbert.

             The family formerly lived at Unity, removing to Centralia about nine years ago.

             Funeral services were conducted at the Mounds Baptist church conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury and Rev. S. E. Hamilton of Puxico, Mo., with burial in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             (Her death certificate states that Etta Riggle was born 7 Feb 1868, in Henry Co., Tenn., daughter of Joseph Riggle, a native of Indiana, and Susan Garman, a native of Franklin Co., Ind., died 31 Aug 1932, in Warmac, Marion Co., Ill., wife of E. H. Riggle, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Ettie M. Riggle Feb. 7, 1868 Aug. 13, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Sep 1932:

Former Resident of County Dies in St. Louis Hospital

Fred Gaunt, Sr., a former resident of Grand Chain, died Saturday night, September 10, in a St. Louis hospital of pneumonia.

             Mr. Gaunt was born in Grand Chain, Oct. 9, 1877.  He is survived by his widow and nine children, four sons, Fred, Joe, Raymond, and Jack; five daughters, Mrs. Claude Hohnes and Blanche, Ruth, May and Bettie Gaunt.  He also leaves a brother, Joe Gaunt, of Grand Chain and a half-brother, W. P. Copeland, of Muskogee, Okla.

             The family formerly lived in Cairo, but for a number of years have resided in Mt. Vernon, Ill.

 

Dr. J. A. Wolfe of Cairo Dies Suddenly Friday

             Dr. James A. Wolfe, prominent physician and surgeon of Cairo, died Friday evening, September 9, at his home, having been confined to his bed only two days.

             Dr. Wolfe, whose age was 60 years, was born in Anna.  He was a veteran of the World War, having been a captain of medical forces.  He was a leader both in civic work in Cairo and in Republican politics.

             Surviving are his widow, two daughters and four grandchildren.

 

William Edward DeCrow Dies Monday Morning

             William Edward DeCrow died Monday morning, September 12, at his home west of Mounds at the age of 54 years.

             Mr. DeCrow was born in Paducah, Ky., and came to Mounds vicinity with his parents at the age of five.

             Mr. DeCrow began working for the I. C. R. R. at Mounds in 1898, retiring Sept. 30, 1929.

             He is survived by his widow, a stepdaughter, two brothers, A. R. DeCrow, of Mounds and Jock DeCrow of Shreveport, La.; also an uncle, James DeCrow of Cairo.

             Mr. DeCrow had been an employee of the Illinois central as stationary engineer for 19 years.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Railway Fireman.’

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the First Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery in charge of G. A. James.

 

STRANGE INSCRIPTION MARKS GRAVE NEAR CARTERVILLE

             ELKVILLE—One of the strangest inscriptions to mark the resting place of the dead is that of A. J. Watson, who died nearly 60 years ago and was buried in the Hurricane Baptist Church cemetery near Carterville.  The inscription reads: 

My children dear, as you pass by,

As you are now, so once was I.

             As I am now, so you shall be;

Prepare for death and follow me.

             Relatives of Mr. Watson says he left instructions that the foregoing be engraved on his tombstone.  J. E. Watson of Carterville is his son and W. W. Watson of Elkville route, is a nephew.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Sep 1932:

WILLIAM E. DECROW OF MOUNDS PASSES AWAY

William E. DeCrow, age 54 years, passed away at his home north of Mounds Sunday at 5:30 p.m.

Mr. DeCrow was born in Paducah, Ky., spent several years of his childhood in Cairo.  The family moved to Mounds while he was still quite young and he has resided there ever since.

Surviving him are his widow and several stepchildren and two brothers, Al and Jock DeCrow, of Mounds.

Funeral services were held at 1 o’clock Wednesday afternoon in the Baptist church and interment was made in the Mounds Cemetery by undertaker, G. A. James.

(His death certificate states that William E. DeCrow, stationary engineer for the Illinois Central, was born 28 Aug 1878, in Paducah, Ky., the son of R. P. DeCrow, a native of Paducah, Ky., and Annie Rhinehart, a native of Alexander Co., Ill., died 12 Sep 1932, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Cordie DeCrow, and was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Holdup of Gambling Joint Fatal at Cairo

The holding up of a gambling join in the heart of Cairo’s business district was fatal for Ed Jones, merchant police, Monday night, when he was shot through the head, presumably by Andrew Smith, reputed operator of the place.  Jones was attempting to arrest the robbers when he was killed.

A tip off that a robbery was in progress caused unusual police activities.  Jones and Chris Skelton, merchant police, saw two men go up the stairs leading to the gambling room, one of the men bearing a shotgun.  They knew immediately what was up.

They took over Buster Polson, who was waiting blow in the car and handcuffed him to an awning, and then started up the steps, only to find their way barred as the door was locked

The two bandits, Harry Ford and Todd Shelby, after scooping up $165 from a table, started to leave and were at the door, unlatching it, when Smith, standing above, opened fire with a .32 automatic.  It is presumed that Jones was in line of fire, for two bullets hit him, one in the arm and one in the head, the latter causing death in a few minutes.  Jones, thinking that Ford and Shelby were firing, shot Ford through the stomach with his .38 special, inflicting a wound expecting to prove mortal.

A post-mortem examination showed the bullet which killed Jones came from a .32 automatic.

Shelby in the confusion, dropped the empty shotgun he was carrying and fled.

Cairo was now clamped a lid down on gambling houses and slot machines until things quiet down.

Ford, in the hospital, maintained that they took only the cash on the table and not from persons and that they did it because they had no other way to obtain funds.  The car they had was stolen.

 

FRED GAUNT PASSED AWAY IN HOSPITAL IN ST. LOUIS, MO.

Fred Gaunt, formerly of Grand Chain, but now residing in Mt. Vernon, passed away in a hospital in St. Louis Saturday night following a brief illness of pneumonia.  He was a brother of Joe Gaunt, of Grand Chain and a son of the late Joe and Adeline Gaunt.  His mother passed away several months ago.

Mr. Gaunt traveled for a St. Louis concern and was taken suddenly ill while there.  He was removed to a hospital and only lived a few days.

He is survived by his widow and nine children.  The oldest daughter at home will graduate this year and the youngest is just entering school.  He is also survived by his brother, Joe Gaunt, of Grand Chain and a half-brother, Will Copeland, of Oklahoma.

His body was brought to Grand Chain Monday afternoon and interment made in the Grand Chain cemetery.

Mr. Gaunt formerly resided in Cairo for many years and was in business there.  He was a cousin to Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir of this city.

(His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Fred Gaunt 1877-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DR. JAMES E. WOELFLE OF CAIRO PASSES AWAY

Dr. J. E. Woelfle, age 60 years, passed away at his home in Cairo Friday night following a brief illness.  His illness was not thought to be serious until just before his death.

Dr. Woelfle had many friends in Pulaski and Alexander counties and he will be greatly missed.  He had done a great work for the crippled children in connection with the clinic directed by the Cairo Rotary Club.  Through his skill and devotion to this work, a great number of crippled boys and girls had been restored.

Funeral services were held Sudan afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the residence, the Rev. M. A. Souers, pastor of the M. E. Church officiating.  The remains were taken to Vienna, Illinois, where interment was made in the Vienna cemetery.

Having served as a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, during the World War, Dr. Woelfle was given a military burial.  A firing squad of 32 Co. K men in command of Capt. Hewitt Johnson fired three volleys over the grave and a bugler sounded taps.  The casket was draped in the Americana flag.

The Winifred Fairfax Warder post of the American Legion of which Dr. Woelfle had been first commander was in charge of the services at the grave.

(James E. Woelfle, 28, born in Anna, Ill., son of John M. Woelfle and Anna L. Clark, married on 10 Oct 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Hortense Hannon Echols, 20, born in Grand Chain, daughter of Thomas B. Echols and Annie Brown.  His death certificate states that James E. Woelfle, physician, of 826 Charles St., Cairo, Ill., was born 31 Oct 1871, in Anna, Ill., son of John Woelfle, a native of Germany, and Anna L. Clark, a native of Canada, died 9 Sep 1932, in Cairo, Ill., husband of Hannah Woelfle, and was buried in Vienna, Ill.  His marker in Vienna Fraternal Cemetery reads:  Dr. James E. Woelfle 1871-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Sep 1932:

MURDERED INFANT FOUND AT SIDE OF HARD ROAD

The body of a newly born baby boy was found lying along the south side of the pavement on Route 34 just above Thackers’ Gap on the large S curve there Wednesday morning of last week about nine o’clock by two boys who live in that part of the county.  Coroner Fred E. Rottmann was called to take charge of the body and hear the testimony of the boys.

The baby’s body had never had medical attention after birth and the little body showed three holes in the left side, that were presumably inflicted by some sort of a sharp instrument, such as a knife or a pair of scissors.  There were also some blood spots on the body of the infant, indicating that the baby had lived after birth and had been deliberately killed and thrown from a car or wagon into a ditch on the wide of the road.

The hat box in which the baby’s body was so unmercifully thrown into the ditch is the only clew the authorities here have upon which to work.  There is the name of a St. Louis store on the lid of the box and it is highly possible that fingerprints will be obtained from the container.

The baby was perfectly formed and would weigh in the neighborhood of eight pounds.

Sheriff McCormick was notified of the crime and is at the present time working on the case.—Golconda Herald-Enterprise

 

INFANT DAUGHTER OF MR. AND MRS. THOMAS ALLENSWORTH DIES

Hazel Rhea, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Allensworth, passed away Tuesday afternoon at her home in this city.  The little one was three months and eighteen days old and had been ill for several days.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock at the residence.  In the absence of Rev. George W. Humphrey, who is attending the Southern Illinois Methodist Conference at Flora, Illinois, W. T. Parker conducted the funeral.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(Her death certificate states that Hazel Rhea Allensworth was born 2 Jun 1932, in Mound City, Ill., daughter of Thomas Allensworth, a native of Kentucky, and Sydia Russell, a native of Tennessee, died 20 Sep 1932, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MOUNDS MAN KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT IN SEATTLE, WASH.

LeRoy Childress, age 25 years, of Mounds, was instantly killed in an automobile accident in Seattle, Washington, Monday night at 8 o’clock.  He had gone to Seattle with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Childress, and his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wood, about three months ago.  The party had intended to motor to California before returning to Mounds.  The young man was driving with his aunt and cousin when the accident occurred.

J. A. Childress, father of the young man, formerly was an agent for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., of Cairo, and is well known here.  Besides his parents, he is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Ed Stout, of Mounds, and Mrs. Rolla Gurley, of Anna, and other relatives.  The body is being brought to Mounds for interment.

(J. A. Childers, 32, merchant, born in Plumfield, Ill., the son of J. A. Childers and Mary J. Elder, married 2nd on 25 Oct 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Dasey May Hosler, 25, born in Villa Ridge, daughter of Thomas Hosler and Lottie T. Purdy.   His death certificate states that Leroy Childers was born bout 1907, the son of Joseph Childers and Daisy Hosler, died 19 Sep 1932, in Seattle, King Co., Wash.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill., reads:  Leroy Childers Dec. 5, 1906 Sept. 19, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Sep 1932:

LeRoy Childers Killed in Automobile Accident

Tragedy Occurred in Seattle Where Victim and Parents Were Visiting

             LeRoy Childers, only son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Childers, of this city, was instantly killed in an automobile accident which occurred in Seattle, Wash., Monday night at 8 o’clock, according to a message received by relatives.  In company with his patents and his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wood, he had motored west about three months ago.  LeRoy was driving with his aunt and a cousin at the time of the accident.  His age was 25 years.  He was an employee of the Fruit Dispatch Company.

             Surviving him are his parents, his aged grandmother, Mrs. Lottie Hosler; and two sisters, Mrs. R. A. Gurley, of Anna, and Mrs. Ed Stout of this city.

 

MASSAC COUNTY MAN DROWNS IN CREEK

             BROOKPORT—The body of Joe L. Reagan, 25 or 30 years of age, was found last Thursday in a creek between his home and Brookport.  Failing to return to his home the same day, his family thought he had done to Chicago or Detroit in search of employment.  He was seen to swim the swollen creek on his way here, and is supposed he returned the same route toward his home and was accidentally drowned.

             (A death certificate for Ladd Reagan, farmer, states he was born 23 Aug 1903, in Illinois, the son of Joe Reagan and Laura Dent, natives of Illinois, died 3 Sep 1932, in Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Pell Cemetery in Road District 7, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William McKim Dies in Flint, Michigan

             William McKim, for many years a resident of Mounds, died Tuesday, September 20, at his home in Flint, Michigan, at the age of 79 years.

             Mr. McKimm is survived by his widow and a grandson.  A son, Harry McKimm, passed away in December 1925.

             The body will arrived in Cairo this (Friday) morning.  Interment will be made in the Villa Ridge Cemetery with services at the grave conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Cairo Lutheran Church.

             (The 1930 census of Flint, Genesee Co., Mich., states William C. McKimm was born about 1855 in Northern Ireland.  The 1910 census of Ward 1, Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., lists his birthplace as Ireland and his occupation as railroad shop manager.  His wife, Ella McKimm was born about 1851 in Ohio.  Their son, Harry N. McKimm was born in 1886 in Illinois.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish our friends to know that we are deeply and truly grateful and will never forget their kindness to us during the last illness of my beloved husband.

             The floral tributes were perfectly beautiful and the kind offices of the pastor and members of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Fireman as well as other true friends will never be forgotten.

             Sincerely yours,

Cordie DeCrow and family

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Sep 1932:

Walter A. Williams Dies at Villa Ridge

Walter A. Williams died at his home at Villa Ridge Monday morning, Sept. 26, following a long illness.  Mr. Williams had resided in Villa Ridge for three years, having before that time been a resident of Cairo and alter of Helena, Ark.  He is survived by his widow, a sister, Mrs. F. A. Ulen of Coryden, Ind.; and a nephew, Gerald Williams, of Princeton, Ind.

             Mr. Williams was a member of the Masonic Lodge and Knights Templars of Cairo.  He was yard master of the Missouri Pacific railroad for many years.

             Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the residence, conducted by Rev. J. Turner Hood, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Cairo.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery, in charge of the Masonic Lodge.

 

Prominent Railroad Superintendent Dies

             F. E. Hatch, age 55, of Memphis Tenn., died at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Memphis, Sunday, Sept. 25, following an illness of eight months of kidney trouble.

             Mr. Hatch was a former superintendent of the Carbondale division of the Illinois Central Railroad.  In March of 1931 he was transferred to the Memphis division.  He was a prominent Mason and first commander of the Beausant Commandery of Carbondale.

             Funeral services were held in Carbondale Tuesday afternoon with burial in Oakland Cemetery.

             (His death certificate states that Franklin Eugene Hatch, N. M. Railroad superintendent, of 1445 North Parkway, Memphis, Tenn., was born 31 Jul 1878, in Kansas, the son of Charles Hatch, a native of Ohio, and Elizabeth Donahue, a native of Kansas, died 25 Sep 1932, at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Memphis, Shelby Co., Tenn., of hypertension, the husband of Blanche Hatch, and was buried in Carbondale, Ill.  His marker in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale reads:  Franklin E. Hatch July 31, 1877 Sept. 23, 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MAY BE MURDER

             GRAYVILLE—There is a report that could not be verified this week that the body of Esco Parson, which was found in the Wabash River at Winkler’s Ferry a few weeks ago, may be exhumed to determine if he had been murdered.  According to current reports, some evidence has been found leading to the belief that he might have been killed, robbed and his body tossed into the river.  Parsons disappeared one Saturday night after having been to New Harmony.  The following Monday afternoon a body was found in the Wabash River at the Winkler ferry which was not identified before it was interred at Kuykendall Cemetery near Carmi.  Later Parson’s parents learned of the body.  Identified the clothing and the shoes that the coroner had removed before burial.

 

HERRIN MAN DROPPED DEAD WHILE EATING

             HERRIN—Haywood Simmons, 60, of Herrin, died suddenly while eating his evening meal at his home in Herrin late Saturday.  A coroner’s jury empaneled by Coroner Clayton termed the cause of his death unknown.

             The aged man slumped in his chair as he was eating it is stated, and the son picked him up and was holding him in his arms when a physician arrived and pronounced him dead.

             (This may be the same person as Haywood Simmons, who married Sarah S. Etchison on 7 Sep 1884, in Bond Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Haywood Simmons, engineer, of West Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., was born 30 May 1860, died 17 Sep 1932, in West Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., husband of Ollie Simmons, and was buried in Marion Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Sep 1932:

FORMER MOUND CITY MAN PASSES AWAY

William J. Mecham, age 81 years, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Bert Kirley, in Tolona, Illinois, Monday afternoon.  The body was brought to Cairo arriving there at 6:30 o’clock Tuesday evening and was taken to the home of his son, Loren Mecham, 501 Thirty-fourth Street.  Mr. Mecham formerly resided in Mound City having lived here years ago.

Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with the Rev. William C. Hart, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church, officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, Dan Sullivan directing the funeral.

The active casket bearers were Frank Downs and Charles Hunley, of Cairo, and the following from Mound City, George E. Martin, Charles James, Martin Bolar, Timothy O’Sullivan, and Dan O’Sullivan, Sr.  The honorary casket bearers were George Betts, Mark Capoot, John Schulter, Jack Hurley, Dan Hurley, James Painter, L. A. Rink, and H. Goldsmith, of Cairo.

Mr. Mecham was born January 16, 1851.  His first wife, Lottie Mecham, died in 1906.  He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Mecham and the following children:  Eugene Mecham, of Huntington, W. Va., William Mecham, Jr., of Caruthersville, Mo., Loren and Roy Mecham, of Cairo, and Dan Mecham, of East St. Louis, Mrs. Margie Webb, of Topeka, Kan., Mrs. Dora Koehler, of East St. Louis, Mrs. Albert Mecham and Mrs. Birt Kirly, of Tolona.  He also leaves 18 grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and two brothers, Oliver Mecham, of Tolona, and Frank Mecham, of Memphis, Tenn.

(The death certificate states that William J. Mecham was born 16 Jan 1951, in Illinois, the son of William Mecham, of Kentucky, and Mary Thomas Delaney, a native of Kentucky, died 26 Sep 1932, in Tolono, Champaign Co., Ill., husband of Mary Mecham, and was buried in Mounds, Ill.  Robert E. L. Stout, 21, of Beechwood, son of John Stout, married on 27 Feb 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mayme C. Meacham, 19, of Mound City born in St. Louis, Mo., daughter of William Meacham and Lottie Downs.—Darrel Daxter)

 

WILLIAM JAMES PASSES AWAY AT HOLDEN HOSPITAL

William James, age 76 years, 1 month and 28 days, passed away at the Holden Hospital at Carbondale, Wednesday morning at 3:30 o’clock following an illness of several months.  His health had been failing the past year, but the last several months his condition became critical.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Sumner, Illinois, at the United Brethren Church and interment will be made in the Sumner Cemetery.  The body will be taken to Sumner early Friday morning by automobile.

Mr. James is survived by two sons, George, of Mound City, and C. E. James, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; one daughter, Mrs. C. R. Leach, of Mattoon, Illinois.  His wife preceded him in death in 1921.  He also leaves several grandchildren.

Mr. James had made his home with his son, George James, in Mound City for the past six years and had only been in Carbondale at the Holden Hospital a few weeks.  The body was brought to Mound City and prepared for burial Wednesday and removed to the home of Mr. James.

(His death certificate was born 31 Jul 1856, in Indiana, died 28 Sep 1932, in Carbondale, Ill., husband of Samantha James, and was buried in Sumner Cemetery in Lawrence Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

WALTER A. WILLIAMS PASSED AWAY AT HOME IN VILLA RIDGE

Walter A. Williams passed away at his home in Villa Ridge Monday morning at 4:30 o’clock following an illness for some time of throat trouble.  Mr. Williams had lived in Villa Ridge for the past three years, moving there from Helena, Ark.  Prior to living in Helena, he had resided in Cairo.  He was a member of the A. F. & A. M. Lodge No. 237; Cairo Chapter No. 71 R. A. M., and Cairo Commandry No. 13 Knights Templar.

Surviving Mr. Williams are his widow, Mrs. Mary Williams, sister, Mrs. F. A. Ulen, of Corydon, Ind., a nephew, Gerald Williams, of Princeton, Ind., and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the residence with Rev. J. Turner ___d, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cairo officiating.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge Cemetery, Karcher Brothers directing the funeral.

The Masonic Lodge of Cairo of which Mr. Williams was a member, conducted final rites at the grave and members of the lodge also acted as casket bearers.  Many friends of Mr. Williams attended the services and there were numerous beautiful floral offerings.

(His death certificate states that Walter A. Williams, yardmaster for the Missouri & Pacific Railroad, was born 1 Jan 1873, in Boonville, Ind., the son of William Williams and Elizabeth Smith, a native of England, died 26 Sep 1932, in Villa Ridge, Ill., husband of Mary Williams.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Walter A. Williams 1873-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Oct 1932:

Quarrel—White Man Shot by Oglesby

A quarrel after a slight brush of cars led to a fight and then the killing of Charles Ray Lemons, 41, of Mounds, by Cornelius Oglesby, a negro, about 30 years of age.  Sunday morning about 10:30 o’clock on a road a short distance from Mounds.

Lemons, accompanied by his wife started to turn off the road and Oglesby was following and in the turn off, the cars scraped or touched.

Lemons was irate, it appears, over the accident, maintaining that he held out his hand, and one word led to another and the fight was on, Lemons attempted to strike the first blow, but failed, and the colored man hit him in return.  Lemons returned to the attack and Oglesby swung the second time, and this time it was with a gun in his hand, a Luger, which is a heavy and compact automatic used by the Germans in the war.  This blow staggered Lemons, knocking him part of the way down, which pierced Lemons’ heart.  Lemons sank down and was dead in a moment.

Oglesby replaced his gun and left the scene, alter trying to give himself up by telephoning authorities.  He was taken in custody soon after and brought to jail in Mound City and then removed to another county for safe keeping.  There was some agitation in Mounds for a time, it is understood.

Oglesby appeared on the county court records of 1927 as having been convicted of possessing intoxicating liquor and fined $100.  The Luger automatic was surrendered to Sheriff Hudson by Oglesby’s mother.

Lemons, it appears at one time had a little work for local officers and regard to prohibition enforcement, buying some evidence.

It might be that there was some slight feelings over this, though Lemons probably had nothing to do with his case.  A little ill feeling would make a small car wreck much worse.

The fight was witnessed by Winbush, the colored man riding with Oglesby, Mrs. Lemons, I. T. Dalton, a section foreman, and probably others, who have not yet appeared, but who will show up at the trial.

There is no doubt but what Oglesby will have to explain why he had the pistol and there is little doubt but what he will plead self-defense in shooting Lemons, maintain that Lemons had a gun and that he shot him when Lemons was reaching for it.  Lemons naturally would have reached for a gun after having his nose broken and being __t with one.

Whether or not Lemons had a gun may be a disputed point, but those in touch with the case now known that an attempt will be made to show that he did have a gun and that it was removed from his body very soon after the shooting.  This has not brought out at the inquest which merely held Oglesby for firing the shot which killed Lemons.  Indictment will be by the grand jury this October term of court.

Indications are that considerable interest will be attached to the case and that there is much feeling about it.

Lemons has four brothers, all living in cities north of here, and his wife and five children survive.  He had lived in Mounds for over 20 years and was an electrician for the I. C. Railroad.

(The death certificate states that Charles Raymond Lemons, lineman for the Illinois Central, was born 2 Jan 1891, in Pope Co., Ill., son of Charles Lemons and Margaret Williams, natives of Pope Co., Ill., died 2 Oct 1932, in Mounds, Ill., husband of Allie Lemons, and was buried in Anna, Ill.  His marker in Anna city Cemetery reads:  Ray Lemons 1891-1932 Allie Lemons his wife 1892-1934.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TOBIAS EDDLEMAN DIES AT HOME NEAR DONGOLA

Tobias Eddleman, age 80 years, passed away at his home near Dongola Tuesday morning at 4:20 o’clock.

Funeral services were held at Mt. Olive Church near Dongola Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. Lowell Earnhart.  Interment was made in the Mt. Olive Cemetery by E. J. Ford, undertaker in charge.

He leaves a widow, Mrs. Minnie Eddleman; and six children, C. T. Eddleman, Mrs. George Sowers, Tobe, Cleo and Cletus Eddleman of Dongola and Dovie Crocket, of Grantsburg.

(Tobias Eddleman, 24, married on 12 Dec 1876, at the home of Henry Chamberlain in Union Co., Ill., Mary Adams, 20.   According to the death certificate, Tobias Eddleman was born 22 Dec 1851, near Dongola, Ill., son of Jacob Eddleman, died 4 Oct 1932, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., husband of Minnie Eddleman, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery.  His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Tobias Eddleman Dec. 22, 1851-Oct. 4, 1932 Minnie Eddleman Dec. 31, 1871-April 9, 1965.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MARY FRANCES PEELER DIES AT HOME IN DONGOLA

Mary Frances Peeler, age 11, daughter of Harley Peeler, died at Dongola Monday morning at 5 o’clock.

Funeral services were held at Mt. Pisgah Church at 10:20 o’clock Wednesday morning, conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward.  Interment was made in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery, E. J. Ford directing the funeral.

Surviving her are her father and a small sister with other relatives and friends.

             (Her death certificate states that Mary Frances Peeler was born 8 Apr 1921, near Dongola, Ill., daughter of Harley Peeler, a native of near Dongola, Ill., and Grace Byers, a native of Indiana, died 3 Oct 1932, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Ill., reads:  Mary Frances Peeler 1921-1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

HUSBAND OF FORMER MOUND CITY GIRL PASSES AWAY

Harry Edward Allen, husband of Mrs. Florence Rouse Allen, formerly of Mound City, passed away at his home in Memphis, Tenn., last Thursday.  Funeral services were held Friday.

Mrs. Allen is the daughter of Mrs. Julliette Rouse, and the late James Rouse and the family was well known in Mound City, having resided here for many years before moving to Memphis.

Mr. Allen was active in Masonic and Civic Club circles.  At the time of his death he was vice president of the Glenview Home Improvement Club.  He resided in Cairo several years ago and received part of his education in the Cairo schools.

(His death certificate states that Harry Edward Allen, of 1115 Rozelle St., Memphis, Tenn., was born 14 Jul 1885, in Marion, Ind., the son of Edward C. Allen and Willabelle Reeves, natives of Ohio, died 29 Sep 1932, in Memphis, Shelby Co., Tenn., husband of Florence Rouse Allen, and was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery.  His marker in Forest Hill Cemetery in Memphis, Tenn., reads:  Harry E. Allen 1885-1932 Florence R. Allen 1879-1955.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PRINCIPAL GORHAM HIGH DIED AT MURPHYSBORO

Adilia Eddleman, age 40, principal of the Gorham High School, passed away in the Murphysboro hospital at 5 o’clock, Tuesday evening of pneumonia.

Mr. Eddleman was formerly principal for two years at Dongola and as at one time candidate for county superintendent in Union CO7unty.

His body was brought to Dongola and taken to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James E. Eddleman, near Dongola.  Funeral services were held at the St. John’s Church at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon and interment was made in St. John’s Cemetery.

Mr. Eddleman is survived by his widow, Mrs. Florence Eddleman and three children, Mary, Jimmie, and Joah.  Also his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James C. Eddleman and five brothers and two sisters.  E. J. Ford had charge of funeral arrangements.

(The death certificate states that James Adlai Eddleman, school principal, was born 17 Sep 1892, near Dongola, Ill., the son of James C. Eddleman and Annabelle Barringer, natives of Illinois, died 4 Oct 1932, in St. Andrew’s Hospital, Murphysboro, Ill., husband of Florence Eddleman.  His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  James Adlai Eddleman Sept. 17, 1892 Oct. 4, 1932 Florence Rose Eddleman Oct. 24, 1895 March 25, 1985.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Alberta Leech who was called here by the death of her father, William James, has returned to her home in Mattoon, Illinois.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Oct 1932:

Alma Langston Dies at Home in Ullin

             Alma, nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Langston, died Friday, September 30, at the family home in Ullin after an illness of one week.

             Alma was born in St. Louis, Mo., July 2, 1923.  Surviving her are her parents, her maternal grandmother, Mrs. Sarah Sowers; one brother, Thomas Leonard; three sisters, Doris, Millie and Bertha; an aunt, Mrs. Hugh E. Rhymer, of East St. Louis; an uncle, Arvle Sowers of Mounds; besides other relatives.

             Burial was in Ullin Cemetery Saturday, October first.

             (Her death certificate states that Cina Alma Langston was born 2 Jul 1923, in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of Claud Langston, a native of Illinois, and Cina Sowers, a native of Ullin, Ill., died 30 Sep 1932, in Road District 3, Ullin, Ill., and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  She has no marker in the cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 

C. Ray Lemons Shot Through the Heart

Tragedy Follows Argument over Right-of-Way at Foot of Viaduct

             Charles Raymond Lemons, well known Illinois Central electrician, was shot through the heart Sunday morning about 10:25 o’clock by Cornelius Oglesby, negro, in a quarrel over which had the right of way at the south end of the Illinois Central viaduct.

             Mr. and Mrs. Lemons and a young son, Lynn Calvin, were driving into Mounds over the viaduct.  Oglesby and Claudius Winbush, also colored, were in a car directly behind them, moving in the same direction.  At the branch road which turns sharply from the main road just at the foot of the viaduct toward North Mounds, Mr. Lemons apparently intending to turn toward North Mounds, swung his car to the center of the road.  The two cars came in close proximity and a dispute resulted.  The men left their cars and resorted to blows.  Oglesby then shot at Lemons, the bullet entering his left side, piercing the heart and passing through the body.  Lemons staggered a short distance and fell.  Oglesby reentered his automobile and turned back over the viaduct.

             County officials were called and quickly spread a net in all directions.  Attempts to make telephone calls to Mound City led Sheriff I. J. Hudson and Special Agent Dallas Winchester to a farm house west of town where Oglesby’s car was found.  Shortly afterward Oglesby came out of a nearby house and gave himself up.

Coroner O. T. Hudson held an inquest Monday morning at which time I. T. Dalton, section foreman for the Illinois Central, an eye witness, gave testimony.  Mr. Dalton, testified that he first saw the men as they met in the middle of the road.  Both had left their cars and were arguing.  He said that the only conversation he heard at the time was a remark of Mr. Lemons, who said, “I held out my hand.”  According to Dalton, Oglesby called Lemons a lair and the two exchanged blows.  Lemons swung at the negro who dodged the blow and landed on himself.  When Mr. Lemons sprang back to the attack, Dalton said the negro struck his opponent with his right fist.  He also said that the gun was in the negro’s right hand at the time.  Dr. Hudson introduced testimony to the effect that Mr. Lemons’ nose was broken, presumable by the blow.  Continuing Mr. Dalton said that Mr. Lemons reeled and swayed as if falling.  Oglesby then fired the fatal shot and Mr. Lemons fell without speaking.  He was dead before aid could be given.

             The jury returned a verdict to the effect that Lemons died from a wound in the chest inflicted by Cornelius Oglesby and recommended that Oglesby be held for the action of the grand jury in the next term of court.

             Mr. Lemons was born in Pope County, January 2, 1891, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lemons.  He was united in marriage to Allie Wilkerson of Anna in the year 1910.  Surviving him are his widow, three daughters Jean, Maxine, and Wanda Lee; two sons, Ray Jr., and Lynn Calvin; his father and mother who now reside in Anna; four brothers, Norville of Elkville, James of Murphysboro, Lynn and Homer of Anna.

             He had been employed by the Illinois Central as an electrician for more than 20 years.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at 1 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, the Rev. W. D. Richardson officiating.  Interment was made in Anna Cemetery.

 

Large Crowd Attends Funeral of LeRoy Childers

             The funeral services for LeRoy Childers, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Childers, who was killed in an auto accident in Seattle, Wash., September 19, which were held at the Congregational church at two o’clock Sunday afternoon were attended by a large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends.

             Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, preached the funeral sermon.  Casket bearers were William Wise, Laurence Schneider, Edward Schuler, Leo Knupp, Dewey Mahoney, and Charles Fletcher.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Hartwell and Ryan directing.

             Surviving LeRoy are his parents, two sisters, Mrs. R. A. Gurley of Anna and Mrs. E. R. Stout, of this city; his grandmother, Mrs. Lottie Hosler and other relatives.

 

Marion W. George Dies Saturday Night

             M. W. George died Saturday night, October 1, at 9:30 o’clock at his home on Front Street at the age of 58.  He had been in failing health for some time.

             Mr. George was born near Villa Ridge, Ill., June 4, 1874.  He was united in matrimony to Mrs. Mary Coleman on May 12, 1900.

             Surviving are his widow, a daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Heater; a stepson, LeRoy Coleman, of East St. Louis; a half-brother, Philip Sams of Olive Branch; a half-sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Ozment, of Pulaski; and six grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the residence, the Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the First Baptist Church conducting.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, Hartwell and Ryan directing.

             (Marion W. George married Mary Coleman on 12 May 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Marion W. George, painter, was born 4 Jun 1874, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of Sim George and Amanda Bridgeman, died 1 Oct 1932, in Mounds, Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Mary George, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Marion George 1874-1932 Mary George 1873-1942.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Father of G. A. James Dies in Holden Hospital

             William James, father of G. A. James of Mounds and Mound City, died Wednesday morning, September 28, in Holden Hospital, Carbondale, following a long illness.

             Mr. James was 76 years of age.  He had made his home with his son, G. A. James, for six years.  His wife preceded him in death, passing away in 1921.

             Surviving are two sons, G. A. and C. E. James, the latter of Pittsburgh, Pa.; and one daughter, Mrs. C. R. Leach of Mattoon, Ill.  He also leaves grandchildren.

             Funeral services were held at Sumner, Ill., his former home, Friday, September 30, at the United Brethren Church, with interment in the Sumner Cemetery.

 

Charles (Son) Fletcher of St. Louis was called here Sunday to act as pallbearer fat the funeral of LeRoy Childers.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Arvle Sowers and family attended the funeral of Mr. Sowers’ niece, Alma Langston, in Ullin Saturday afternoon.

 

Mrs. Hugh E. Rhymer of East St. Louis was the guest of her brother, Arvle Sowers, and family the first of the week.  Mrs. Rhymer was called to Ullin by the death of her niece Alma Langston.

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Oct 1932:

CIVIL WAR VETERAN KILLED BY TRAIN

             COBDEN—Dallas McCann, one of the six surviving members of the Grand Army of the Republic of Cobden, was instantly killed at 5:15 o’clock last Thursday evening when he walked into the path of No. 26, a northbound passenger train preparing to make its regular station stop 100 yards further on, at the south crossing.

             Mr. McCann had passed his eighty-eighth birthday on Wednesday, Sept. 4.—Review

             (Dallas McCann married E. C. Bodine on 22 Jun 1862, in Jefferson Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Dallas McCann was born 14 Sep 1844, in Spring Garden, Ill., the son of James McCann, died 30 Sep 1932, in Cobden, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  The application for a military headstone states that Dallas McCann was a private in Co. F, 31st Illinois Infantry, died 29 Sep 1932, and was buried in Cobden Cemetery.  His military record states that Dallas McCann, farmer of Jefferson Co., Ill., 20, 5’8”, with dark hair, brown eyes and dark complexion, was drafted as a private in Co. F, 31st Illinois Infantry on 14 Oct 1864, in Olney, Ill., and mustered out on 19 Jul 1865, in Louisville, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Oct 1932:

CAIRO’S DEATH AVENUE GETS ANOTHER VICTIM

The tree lined death avenue which leads to Cairo claimed another victim last week when William Cooper, of Cairo, 35 years of age, crashed into one of the beautiful trees, wrecked, and was badly injured.  Both legs were broken and he was internally injured.

Cooper was riding with H. L. Murray.  They were coming north and attempted to pass a truck which was also going north.  A southbound truck forced them to cut over quickly ahead of the truck, and it swerved to the right and was crashed into a tree and was wrecked and the car in which Cooper was riding, swerved back, crossed the road and sent into a tree and was demolished and Cooper badly hurt.

The tree-lined avenue, beautiful to behold, has lurking behind it the grim reaper whose grinning skull shows from behind every tree.  The beauty of the place makes it still worse.  No car can escape, if forced to leave the concrete, for those trees, like death posts, line the highway closely.

It is, no doubt, the most dangerous drive anywhere in Southern Illinois and the Highway Department, always quick to clear pavements, has let it go because of civic pride or beauty or something and the toll of lives it has taken is appalling.

 

DONGOLA MAN DIES

Adoi F. Head, aged 55 years, passed away at his home near Dongola Sunday morning at 11:30 o’clock.  Mr. Head was a well-known and a highly-respected farmer and had been in failing health for several months.  Surviving him are his widow, Ivan B. Head; two children, Mrs. Avi Swain and Atwood Head; also four sisters, Mrs. W. J. Ward, Mrs. Grant Cley, Mrs. Henry Ketchie, and Mrs. Charles B. Kesler, all of Dongola; and other relatives and many friends.

             Funeral services were held at the Mt. Olive Baptist Church near Dongola Tuesday afternoon at o’clock conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward.  Interment was made in the Mt. Olive Cemetery by E. J. Ford, funeral director.

             (The death certificate states that Ado Franklin Head was born 3 Dec 1876, near Dongola, Ill., the son of S. W. O. Head, a native of Aberdeen, Miss., and Malinda C. Karraker, a native of Illinois, died 9 Oct 1932, Road District 3, Union Co., Ill., husband of Ivah B. Head, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery.  His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Ada F. Head Dec. 3, 1876-Oct. 9, 1932 Ivah B. Head Aug. 14, 1879-Dec. 4, 1969.—Darrel Dexter)

 

SHERIFF OZBURN OUTWITS PLANS FOR MOB ON NEGRO

(Carbondale Free Press)

A mob was outwitted by Sheriff Ozburn and his forces one day this week, which sought Cornelius Oglesby, a Negro, who shot to death Charles Lemons, a white man, near Mounds last Saturday as a result of an argument in which drivers of both cars became involved in an accident.

Oglesby was brought to the Murphysboro jail for safekeeping, but fearing that the jail might be stormed, Sheriff Ozburn took the Negro to a basement on his farm that night and then the next day Oglesby was spirited away to another county jail, the name of which has never been learned.

A call by a man who said he was a deputy sheriff from Ullin said he was bringing another Negro arrested in connection with the accident to the county jail at Murphysboro.  The sheriff figured the other man with Oglesby was not held.  Then another thing that gave the ruse away was the fact that the man who called and represented himself to be a deputy said the other Negro had confessed and had been sentenced to life.  It was their plan to get into the jail and storm it, the sheriff believed, by the use of another Negro prisoner.

The man or men did not show up with the second Negro.  However, previous to this, two men appeared at the Murphysboro jail and inquired whether Oglesby was there, but were unable to find out.  This was the clue to spirit the Negro to some other place and he was sneaked out of Murphysboro and hidden in a farm basement.

After leaving the Murphysboro jail, the Negro was taken to Belleville and then to the state penitentiary, where Oglesby was lodged and now is.  It was not learned where Claudius Winbush, who was with Oglesby and a witness to the shooting, is being held.

 

SISTER OF MOUND CITY MAN PASSES AWAY OCT. 6

Mrs. Cora Songer, of Windfield, Kansas, died Thursday, October 6, in the Newtore Memorial Hospital.  Mrs. Songer was a sister of P. B. Dunsworth, of this city.  Besides Mr. Dunsworth, Mrs. Songer is survived by a son, David Songer, of Winfield.  Mr. Dunsworth was unable to attend the funeral.

Funeral and burial was made in Windfield.  Mrs. Songer was a resident of Mound City and will be remembered by the older residents of the city.

(She was buried in an unmarked grave in Highland Cemetery in Winfield, Cowley Co., Kan.

 

OSCAR MORRIS PASSES AWAY AT HOME IN JACKSONVILLE

The friends of Mrs. Oscar Morris will be shocked to learn of the death of her husband, Oscar A. Morris, which occurred Saturday night about 10 o’clock in a hospital in Jacksonville, Illinois, where they had resided for a number of years.

Mrs. George Eichhorn received a message stating his death.  It seems that Mr. Morris had been in Chandler, Illinois, on business and had called on some very intimate friends.  When he arrived at their home, they were preparing to go on a picnic.  He went along and it was while cooking over an open fire that his clothing caught fire and burned him severely.  He was rushed to the hospital at Jacksonville and he was not thought to be in a serious condition.  His family were with him until about 8:30 and then went home.  About ten o’clock they were called.  They hurriedly went back to the hospital, but when they reached there, he had passed away.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon.  Interment was made in a Jacksonville cemetery.

Mr. Morris was well known in Southern Illinois.  He was associated with his father in the insurance business in Metropolis, Illinois.  Later he moved to Dongola and then to Jacksonville.

He leaves his widow, two sons, of Jacksonville, his mother and one sister at Metropolis.

Mrs. Morris was formerly Miss Bertha Waugh and was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John A. Waugh, of this city.

(Oscar A. Morris, of 243 Pine St., Jacksonville, Ill., was born 29 Jul 1872, in Illinois, the son of James Morris and Cornelia Parker, died 8 Oct 1932, in Jacksonville, Ill., husband of Bertha E. Morris, and was buried in Diamond Grove Cemetery in Jacksonville, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Ado Head, 60, a prominent farmer living near Mt. Olive in Union County, died Sunday.  Interment was made in Mt. Olive Cemetery Tuesday at 2 p.m. (Wetaug)

 

Several from here (Perks) attended the funeral of Tobias Eddleman last Thursday at Mt. Olive.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Oct 1932:

INFANT SON BURIED FRIDAY

Leonard John, the infant son who was born to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Beisswingert Thursday night at 10:30 o’clock, was laid to rest Friday morning at 10 o’clock in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  Short services were held at the grave, being conducted by Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the First M. E. Church.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

(His death certificate states that Leonard John Beisswingert, Jr., was born in Mound City, Ill., the son of Leonard J. Beisswingert, a native of Illinois, and Velma Reed, a native of Mound City, Ill., and died 13 Oct 1932, in Mound City, Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  L. J Beisswingert 13 Oct 1932.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Oct 1932:

Infant Son Dies

             Leonard John, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Beisswingert of Mound City, passed away Thursday night, October 13, shortly after birth.

             Burial took place Friday morning in Spencer Heights Cemetery, Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the Mounds and Mound City M. E. churches conducting the service.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

 

FORMER MEMBER WAYNE KING’S ORCHESTRA A SUICIDE

             ROCHELLE—Another tragedy was enacted in Rochelle Friday when David Sherwood, 32, former member of Wayne King’s dance orchestra and at the time of his death a teacher in the music department of the Rochelle grade school, ended his life with a .32 caliber revolver.

             Mr. Sherwood was discovered unconscious early Friday morning on the floor at the rear part of his father’s store, the Burbank and Sherwood jewelry store in Rochelle, by Lester Keagy and W. D. Bruckert, Rochelle men.

             He was rushed to the Lincoln hospital where x-ray examination disclosed that the bullet had entered his temple.  He died three hours after being admitted to the hospital. Jury members who examined the body said that because of the powder marks found on the left hand, Mr. Sherwood probably had held his right hand with the left to steady himself when he fired the shot.

             (His death certificate states that David C. Sherwood, musician, was born 6 Aug 1900, in Rochelle, Ill., the son of Orrin Sherwood, a native of Flagg Township, Ogle Co., Ill., and Nettie B. Levey a native of Steward, Ill., died 7 Oct 1932, in Rochelle, Ogle Co., Ill., husband of Ida Belle Sherwood, and was buried in Lawn Ridge Cemetery in Rochelle.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE FOR LEGISLATURE DEAD

             BROUGTHON—John McElvain, former Democratic representative in the General Assembly of the 51st senatorial district, died at the Missouri Baptist Hospital in St. Louis early Wednesday morning.

             Mr. McElvain was returning to his home in Broughton from McLeansboro, where he had delivered an address to the voters in behalf of his candidacy for representative, Monday evening.  Near Dale, his car skidded on wet pavement, going in to a ditch.  The car turned over pinning him beneath.  He was picked up and taken back to McLeansboro where an examination revealed that he was in a serious condition.

             He was taken to the St. Louis hospital, where it was learned that he had a dislocated vertebra of the spinal column, causing him to be paralyzed from the hips down and he had also received a broken collar bone in the accident.

             (His marker in the Odd Fellows Cemetery in McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., reads:  John McElvain Dec. 11, 1887 Oct. 12, 1932.  Ruth McElvain Mar. 3, 1893 May 27, 1975—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Oct 1932:

Mound City Girl Dies from Burns

Ona May Savage, of Mound City, who was severely burned at her home on Pearl Street when she kindled a fire with kerosene Thursday evening upon her arrival home from work died Saturday morning.

Miss Savage was the daughter of Robert Savage.  She was born November 11, 1912, at Iuka Ky., and died October 22, 1932, at the age of 19 years, 11 months and 11 days.

             Surviving her are her father, stepmother, three sister and three brothers.

             She was a member of the Methodist Church of Iuka.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. D. Richardson at one o’clock Sunday afternoon, with interment in Thistlewood cemetery, G. A. James directing.

 

Mrs. Louisa Echols, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. G. Nickens, was born near Columbus, Tenn., March 19, 1848, and died Oct. 17, 1932, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Nellie Williams, near Ullin with whom she made her home.  She lived to a ripe old age of 84 years, 6 months and 18 days.

             On Jan. 12, 1865, she was united in marriage to August Echols and to this union were born five children, three sons and two daughters, Alonzo, Mrs. Margaret Brown, who preceded her mother to the grave; Leonidas, passing away in infancy; Richard Everett, and Mrs. Nellie Ethel Williams.

             When in her girlhood days she realized the great need of one who could help her over the rough and difficult places of life.  This one was Jesus Christ, whom she found when she was 16 years of age.  During a revival meeting on Old Butter Ridge she gave herself to God and since that time she has been true and faithful to Him.

After her conversion, she united with the Baptist Church and later with the Methodist Protestant and lived in this church until it disbanded and then she united with the M. E. South of New Hope and held her membership in this church until she moved her membership to the First M. E. Church in Ullin and remained faithful to the cause until death called her away from this life.  She was a devoted Christian throughout her entire life and a very faithful servant in the Master’s vineyard.  To know her was to love her.  She was a loving mother and faithful companion.  Her husband preceded her in death Jan. 6, 1919, and left her to fight the battle of life alone.  She leaves to mourn her departure three children above named, one brother, Lemuel Nickens, of Ullin; ten grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends.

             The funeral services were held at the First M. E. Church in Ullin, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Elmer Smith.  The sermon was preached by Rev. W. E. Browning, pastor of the M. E. Church at Ramsey, Ill., who was a former pastor of the M. E. Church at Ullin.  The remains were then laid to rest in the New Hope Cemetery.

             (Augustus Echols married Louisa C. Nickens on 12 Jan 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Everett G. C. Nickens married Mrs. Martha Walker on 22 Mar 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  Everett C. G.