Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

2 Jan. - 25 Dec. 1931

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Jan 1931:

INFANT DAUGHTER PASSES AWAY

Mariam Ruth, two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Gray, passed away at her home in this city Wednesday morning.  Evidently the little one had passed away sometime during the night, as when the parents found her, she was dead.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence, the Rev. W. L. Hanbaum, pastor of the First M. E. Church of this city, officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(Her death certificate states that Marion Ruth Bray was born 23 Oct 1930, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Lloyd Gray and Thelma Dooms, and died 31 Dec 1930, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


SISTER OF MOUND CITY MAN PASSES AWAY TUESDAY

Miss Alice Painter, age 75 years, sister of James Painter, of this city, passed away Tuesday night at her home in Champaign, Illinois.  Mr. Painter was at his sister’s bedside when she passed away.

(Her death certificate states that Mary Alice Painter was born 2 Sep 1856, in Allen Center, Ohio, the daughter of Jacob Painter, a native of Ross Co., Ohio, and Samantha Hare, a native of Ohio, died 30 Dec 1930, in Champaign Co., Ill., and was buried at Roselawn Cemetery at Champaign.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR C. N. BUCHANAN HELD SATURDAY

Funeral services for C. N. Buchanan, who passed away suddenly while at his place of business in Cairo Wednesday, were held Saturday in Norris City, Illinois, followed by interment in village cemetery.  E. A. Burke directed the funeral.

Mr. Buchanan, whose home was in Villa Ridge, had been in the music store business in Cairo for many years and until the past few years had resided in Cairo.
 
YOUNG MAN SHOOTS SELF AT GIRL’S HOME

Samuel Traylor, better known by his nickname of “Wash Tubbs,” about 20 years of age and a graduate from Cairo High School of last year, shot himself at the home of his sweetheart, Miss Jewell Miller, in Cairo about 1:30 o’clock Thursday morning after he had suffered disappointment.

Miss Miller was his sweetheart for about four or six months and he was presumed to be infatuated with her and wished to marry her.  Together they had attended a dance, returning to her home later when the tragedy took place.  Traylor had been heard to say things which indicated he might take his life.

There is a version, however, that it was merely an attempt at bluff and to frighten his girl.  The pistol he had, a 38 caliber owl head, had only one shell.  Perhaps he intended to snap the gun on an empty chamber, then turn and fire it into the floor in an attempt to convince her that he was in earnest.  If that is true, then he made a mistake and was dead in a few minutes.

Miss Miller is under the care of a doctor, because of the shock and the coroner’s jury will probably not reach a verdict until Monday of next week when Miss Miller is able to testify concerning the last words and acts of Traylor.

The tragedy took place at the Albert Miller home at 618 West 36th Street.  Traylor clerked for the Johnston Hardware Co.  He is the son of Mrs. Ruth Traylor.

(His death certificate states that Samuel Traylor was born 28 Oct 1910, in Cairo, Ill., the son of James W. Traylor, a native of Kentucky, and Ruth T. Moore, a native of St. Louis, Mo., died 1 Jan 1931, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
In Memoriam

In loving memory of our dear husband and father, Henry Heisner, who passed away from us on October 29, 1930.
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Jan 1931:
TWO YEAR OLD SON DIES

Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Collin Penninger, of Anna, formerly of Mounds, will be grieved to learn of the death of their two-year-old son, Rex Dean, at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis on Christmas Day.  Funeral services were held Saturday at Anna, Mr. and Mrs. George Sitter, and Mrs. L. Hodge attending from here.

(His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Rex Dean Penninger 1928-1930.—Darrel Dexter)

C. N. BUCHANAN FUNERAL HELD FRIDAY

Funeral services for C. N. Buchanan, of Villa Ridge, who died suddenly Christmas Eve when stricken while at work in his music store in Cairo, were held Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock at his Villa Ridge residence.

Mr. Buchanan had conducted a music store in Cairo for many years and was a gifted musician, playing the violin, cello and cornet.  He was also a composer of merit and a vocalist.

A number of years ago he built an attractive bungalow home on the hills north of Villa Ridge and he and his wife have resided there since its completion.

At 8:30 Saturday morning the funeral cortege left the residence for Norris City, Ill., where interment was made.

WATERLOO—Tularemia is given as the cause of death of Edward Schneider, 42, farmer, living near Waterloo.  Several weeks ago when putting up a stove pipe, Mr. Schneider suffered a scratch.  He treated the injury with home remedies.  In two weeks he suffered pain and called a physician.  Swelling spread to his arm.  A peculiar fever followed.  Blood test showed tularemia was causing the trouble.  He had dressed rabbits shortly after suffering the scratch.

(His death certificate states that Edward C. Schneider was born 7 Jan 1887, in Illinois, the son of Adam Schneider and Emma Stroh, natives of Illinois, died 7 Dec 1930, in East t. Louis, husband of Theresa Schneider, and was buried in Waterloo Cemetery.  Adam Schneider married Emma Stroh on 16 May 1878, in Monroe Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

PINCKNEYVILLE—George Davis, 11-year-old Pinckneyville youth, was almost instantly killed when the shot gun with which he was hunting rabbits accidentally went off, striking him in the abdomen, Sunday morning at 11 o’clock.  He lived about thirty minutes after the accident.  It is said that young Davis was running and stumbled over a nearby log, causing the gun to be discharged

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Jan 1931:
GRAND CHAIN MAN DIES

Augustus Badgley, age 75 years, passed away at his home in Grand Chain Saturday following an illness of three years of kidney trouble.

Mr. Badgley was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Fournie, on September 13, 1882,  Surviving him are his widow, and four children, Frank Badgley, Mrs. Clemson Roach, Mrs. J. F. Reichert, all of Grand Chain, and Ray Badgley, of Lexington, Mo.  He also leaves 11 grandchildren besides many other relatives and a host of friends.

Mr. Badgley was a successful farmer living about one-fourth mile from Grand Chain until the last few years, when his health failed and he moved to town.

Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence, Rev. J. J. Orlett officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(His death certificate states that Henry Augustus Badgley was born 17 Oct 1855, in Illinois, the son of George Badgley and Elsbeth Badgley, natives of Illinois, died 3 Jan 1931, in Grand Chain, Ill.  George Badgley married Elizabeth Badgley on 20 Jul 1854, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  Henry A. Badgley married Eliza Fournie on 13 Sep 1882, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  Her marker in St. Catherine Cemetery reads:  August Badgley Born Oct. 17, 1855 Died Jan. 3, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. EARNEST STEERS PASSES AWAY AT HOME NEAR AMERICA

Mrs. Minnie Henrietta Steers, wife of Earnest Steers, passed away at her home near America at 11 o’clock Monday morning at the age of 53 years. Mrs. Steers had been in failing health for several years, but had been able to be about her household duties until the morning of her death, which has shocked the entire community.  When her daughter left for Mound City, where she attends the Mound City Community High School, she left her mother in her usual health, but was summoned to her home before noon.

Left to mourn her passing are her husband, two children, one son, Henry, and a daughter, Mary Virginia, the daughter being in high school and the son being of high school age.  She also leaves three brothers, Thomas and Robert Aldrich, of Villa Ridge and William Aldrich, of Pulaski.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Union Church at Villa Ridge, the Rev. C. E. Enlow officiating.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  G. A. James was the funeral director.

(Her death certificate states that Minnie Henrietta Steers was born 25 Sep 1876, in Illinois, the daughter of H. J. Alldrich, a native of Ireland, and Mary Virginia Nickum, a native of Illinois, died 5 Jan 1931, in Pulaski, Ill.  A marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Minnie Steers 1876-1929 Earnest Steers 1874-1960.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN DIED AT HOME IN LOUISVILLE

Word has been received by relatives in this city of the death of Mrs. Alice Rennenberg, who passed away Saturday evening at 6 o’clock at the home of her son, Rev. W. F. Rennenberg, in Louisville, Ky.  Mrs.  Rennenberg was 65 years of age and had been in failing health for several months.  She was born and reared in this city, being a member of one of the pioneer families of this community.  She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Stoltz.  She was united in marriage in this city to Charles Rennenberg, who preceded his wife in death several years ago.  For a number of years he was associated with C. F. Meyers in business.

Mrs. Rennenberg was a woman of fine Christian character and was a valued member of the Church of the Redeemer of which her son is rector, at Louisville.  Mrs. Rennenberg had endeared herself to a large circle of friends, she being of a sunny, cheerful disposition.

Left to mourn her passing are one son, the Rev. W. F. Rennenberg; three sisters, Mrs. George Betts, of this city; Mrs. Lillian Handley, of Carbondale, and Mrs. Emma Johnson, of Los Angeles, Calif.; one brother, George Stoltz, of Hannibal, Mo., besides other relatives and a host of friends.

About two years ago Mrs. Rennenberg made a visit to Mound City with her sister and renewed old acquaintances.

Funeral services were held in Louisville at the Church of the Redeemer Monday afternoon.

(Charles W. Rennenberg married Alice Stoltz on 17 Feb 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George E. Betts married Louise F. Stoltz on 1 Nov 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John Johnson married Emma Stoltz on 24 Dec 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. ANNA MAY CREASON PASSED AWAY FRIDAY

Mrs. Anna May Creason, wife of Fred L. Creason, passed away Friday morning at 6:10 o’clock at her home on High Street.  Her infant son, who was only a few hours old, preceded his mother in death only a short time.  Mrs. Creason was 23 years of age and had with her family resided in Mound City for about two years, and during that time Mr. Creason had been employed at the Cardwell garage.  She had been ill for several days suffering from pneumonia, which was the direct cause of the death.

Surviving her are her husband and three small children, also a number of other relatives and many friends.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the First Baptist Church of this city, the Rev. Staggs of Cairo officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

(Her death certificate states that Anna May Creason was born 23 Aug 1907, in Kentucky, the daughter of John Ramey, died 2 Jan 1931, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Anna M. wife of Fred L. Creason Born Aug. 23, 1908 Died Jan. 2, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER PULASKI COUNTY MAN DIES IN MISSOURI

Henry Walker, age 85 years, passed away Sunday at his home in Malden, Mo.  Funeral services were held at the residence of his granddaughter, Mrs. Clyde Bowles, in Mounds at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon followed by interment in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds by W. H. Aldred of Pulaski.

Mr. Walker was a former Pulaski County man, having made this county his home for a number of years.  Surviving him are his widow; two sons, C. A. Walker, of Cairo, and John Walker, of Memphis, Tenn.; three daughters, Mrs. Lina Lolo of Charleston, Mo., Mrs. Hattie Hurst, of St. Louis, and Mrs. Sutton, of St. Louis.  Also a brother, James Walker, of this city.  He also leaves several grandchildren and other relatives.
 
Funeral services were held for Mrs. Earnest Steers Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Union M. E. Church at Villa Ridge.  The family has the sympathy of the friends in this community (America).
 
Those who attended the funeral of Mrs. Earnest Steers were Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Schnaare, Mrs. Charles Pinter and son, Mrs. Annie Burgess, Mrs. Will Baccus, Mrs. Lizzie Neistrath and son, William, Mrs. Sam Jackson and son, Roy, Mrs. Glenn Jackson and son, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Steers, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Dishinger, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mathis, and son, John; Misses Mildred Dishinger and Blanche Snyder, Mrs. Herbert Snow, Mrs. Oscar Mason, R. A. Schnaare.
 
James Painter, who went to Champaign on account of the serious illness and death of his sister Miss Alice Painter, has returned to his home in the community (America).
  

Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Jan 1931:
Gussie Daniels Dies at His Home Wednesday Night

Gussie Daniels, age 52, died Wednesday night, January 7, at his home north of Mounds.

Mr. Daniels was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Daniels.  His mother’s maiden name was Biggerstaff.  He was born near Mounds and resided in this vicinity all his life.

Surviving him are his wife, his mother, two sons, Bonnie Daniels of Mounds, and Ollie, at home; two sisters, Mrs. Ike Essex, of near Mounds, and Miss Frances Daniels, of Ullin; also one brother, Ollie Daniels, of Ullin.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at Shiloh Cemetery.  George P. Hartwell is the undertaker in charge.

(Thomas Daniels married Bell Biggerstaff on 19 Apr 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Ernest Steers, of America, Dies Suddenly

Mrs. Minnie Aldrich Steers, wife of Ernest Steers, of America, Ill., passed away suddenly at her home on Monday morning, January 5th, at 11 o’clock at the age of 53.

She is survived by her husband, two grown children, Henry and Mary Virginia; three brothers, Thomas and Robert Aldrich, of Villa Ridge, and William Aldrich, of Pulaski.  She had been in failing health for some time, but her death was quite unexpected. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Villa Ridge Union Church, conducted by Rev. C. E. Enlow.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery, G. A. James directing the funeral.

Aged Man Dies at Malden, Mo.

Henry Nelson Walker, a former resident of Pulaski County, departed this life at Malden, Mo., on Jan. 3, 1931.  His age was 85 years, 11 months and 15 days.  He leaves an aged wife, one brother, James Walker, of Mounds City; three daughters, Mrs. H. E. Nelms, of Charleston, Mo., Mrs. H. L. Sutton, of St. Louis, Mo., and Mrs. Hattie Hurst, of St. Louis, Mo.; also two sons, C. A. Walker, of Pulaski, Ill., and J. H. Walker, of Memphis, Tenn.  There are also several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at the home of Clyde Bowles, a great-grandson on Blanche Avenue in Mounds on Monday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury, pastor of the Mounds Baptist Church, followed by burial in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Ullin Resident Dies

Mrs. Mary Evaline Nickens, died Thursday, Jan. 1, at her home near Ullin.  She was born October 20, 1861, and had reached the age of 69 years.  She was married to J. E. Nickens in April 1891 and outlived him by six years.

Surviving her are seven brothers, R. M. Hines, Eldorado, C. W. and A. W. Hines, Junction, Ill., Thomas Hines, Arizona, W. J. Hines, Lilburn, Mo., Paul Hines, Dudley, Mo., Frank Hines, Mounds, and four sisters, Mrs. Dosha Boyer, Mrs. Helen Patrick, of Junction, Ill., Miss Anna Hines, of Arizona and Mrs. Ethel Rosh, of Mt. Vernon, Ill.

Funeral services were held at the M. E. Church in Ullin on Friday, Jan. 2, Rev. W. E. Browning in the pulpit.  Interment was made in New Hope Cemetery.

(According to her death certificate, Mary Evaline Nickens was born about 1862, the daughter of Samuel Hines and Hulda Vancleve, and died 1 Jan 1931, in Ullin, Ill.  Samuel Hines married Huldah Vancleave on 14 Aug 1859, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

ELKVILLE—Carterville’s mystery man died in that city Wednesday of last week.  Double pneumonia following an attack of asthma was the cause of death.  For twenty years he had visited Carterville twice each year.  He had recently come from San Antonio, Texas.  At times he registered as Kerk, other times as Kenhu, and more often as Kennezen.  He was 82 years of age.  It is claimed that he was the father of Mary Carr, actress.—Journal

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Jan 1931:
PEDESTRIAN HIT AND CHILDREN ARE INJURED

The two children of Arthur Triplet, of Ullin, colored, were injured Monday evening near Ullin when a hit and run driver crashed into them.  The car was going north.  Triplet was carrying his younger child, Mildred, age two, and Parlee, 6, was walking with him.  The baby’s skull was fractured, Triplet was hurled to the railings that bordered the road and Parlee was knocked down.  No trace of driver has been found.
 
KILLING AT McCLURE

George Creecy is in the Alexander County jail as the result of the shooting of Herbert Gibson at McClure on Thursday night of last week.  Creecy maintains that he fired when Gibson was about to kill his wife and had a pistol.
 
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR FRANKLIN DANIELS

Funeral services of Gus Daniels, who passed away at his home one mile north of Mounds were held at Shiloh Friday afternoon at one o’clock.  Mr. Daniels was born in Mounds April 23, 1878.  Surviving him are his widow, two sons, Bonnie and Ollie; his mother, Mrs. Thomas Daniels; two sisters, Mrs. I. Essex, of Mounds, and Miss Frances Daniels, of Ullin; and one brother, Ollie Daniels, of Ullin.

(Thomas Daniels married Bell Biggerstaff on 19 Apr 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Gust Daniels, 21, of Villa Ridge, Ill., married on 7 Jun 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Carrie Bell Gray, 16, of Ullin, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
GEORGE KING, MOUNDS, PASSES AWAY WEDNESDAY NIGHT

George King, age 65, passed away Wednesday night at the state hospital at Anna following an illness of several years.  Mr. King a number of years ago was a resident of Mound City, residing with his family on Commercial Avenue, until moving to Mounds here he made his home until his illness.  He will be remembered by the older residents of this community.

Surviving him are his widow; one son, Paul, of St. Louis; two daughters, Mrs. Joe Roberts and Mrs. Otto Moore, of Mounds; eleven grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at the undertaking parlors of G. A. James, the Rev. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church, officiating.  Interment will be made in Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(His death certificate states that George King was born 1 Oct 1863, in Tennessee, the son of Hubbard King and Julia Lemms, natives of North Carolina, died 14 Jan 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Amelia Smith King, divorced, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
  
Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Jan 1931:
Mounds Resident Dies in Anna Hospital

George King, age 67, a former resident of Mounds, died Wednesday, January 14, 1931, at Anna State Hospital from ___ paralysis.

Undertaker G. A. James ____ the body to his undertaking parlors Thursday.  At the time of going to press, complete arrangements for the funeral had not been made, but it will be held ____ Saturday.

___ King is survived by two daughters, Mrs. J. R. Roberts, ____, O. L. Moore; and one ____ ___ King, of East St. Louis.  ____ son was killed a number of years ago while at _____ the railroad.  He also ____ a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Ullin Children Seriously Hurt by Unknown Driver

Pailee Triplett, age 2, and her sister, Mildred, age 4, were seriously injured when hit by an automobile Saturday evening on Route 2 in Ullin.

Arthur Triplett, colored, carrying his 2-year-old daughter and leading the older child, was walking south on the highway when a speeding car going north struck the three.  The younger child was thrown from her father’s arms, the father and the older girl were knocked down.  Pailee sustained a serious skull fracture while Mildred suffered a concussion of the brain and a fractured thigh.  The father was not seriously injured.

Dr. O. T. Hudson was called to attend the injured children and had them taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo.

The driver of the car speeded on and no trace of him has been found.

The older girl was taken to her home in Ullin Tuesday.  On Wednesday the condition of the little one showed signs of improvement.

Mrs. W. J. Lacy Dies in Poplar Bluff Hospital

Mrs. Ada Lacy, age 58, died Monday night, January 12, in the Poplar Bluff hospital, following a long illness from diabetes.

She was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Martin, of Johnson County, Ill.  Surviving her are her husband, W. J. Lacy, bridge and road supervisor for the M. and O. Railroad at Poplar Bluff, Mo.; one daughter, Mrs. Ola White, of Centralia, Ill.; two sisters, Mrs. Fred Raub, of Mounds, and Mrs. R. C. Poole, of Centralia; three brothers, James and Frank Martin, of Mounds, and Tom Martin, of St. Louis, Mo.; also a niece, Mrs. J. B. Hester, of Mounds.

Funeral services were held at the home of her niece, Mrs. J. B. Hester, on Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock, Rev. H. B. Shoaff officiating.  Interment was made in Hillcrest Cemetery, Centralia, Wednesday afternoon.

Mrs. Henry Titus was called to Herrin Friday on account of the death of Carolyn, the four-year-old daughter of her sister, Mrs. O. Kelley.

(Her death certificate states that Carol Kelley was born 7 Jan 1927, in Illinois, the daughter of Orol Kelley and Madge Gillimore, died 8 Jan 1931, in Herrin, Ill., and was buried in Lake Creek Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

James Painter returned Tuesday from Champaign, where he was called by the illness and death of his sister, Miss Alice Painter.

Word has been received here (Ullin) that Mrs. Anne Burgeois, formerly of this place, but for the past three months has been residing with her granddaughter, Mrs. Shelby Senteney, of Herrin, is seriously ill.  Her many friends are very sorry to hear of this and we hope for her speedy recovery.

CARTERVILLE—A telegram purported to be from Mary Carr, movie actress, said she believed that Thomas Kennevan, 82, who died here December 17, was her father, whom she has not heard from in 40 years.

The telegram said she would arrange for his interment.

Kennevan, before he died, was known as “a man of mystery” and used several aliases.  He told residents here that he was the father of the actress.
             (Mary Carr nee Kennevan was born 14 Mar 1874, in Germantown, Pa., and died 24 Jun 1973, in Woodland Hills, Calif.  She was a star of many silent films and later became known as “the mother of the movie” because she portrayed so many roles as a mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Jan 1931:
JOHN P. SCHOLLE, FORMERLY LIVED HERE, PASSES AWAY

After a lingering illness which had kept him confined to his home much of the time for a year or more, John P. Scholle, aged 70 years, 6 months and 25 days, died at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, January 11, 1931, at his home 5 miles south of Coldwater.  His illness was due to complication of diseases, terminating, it was thought, in an affection of the lungs.  For a few days before his death he was unconscious a part of the time.  Toward the last, he suffered greatly, and death was not unexpected.  His wife and all of the surviving children except John, were present when death occurred.  John, whose home is in Fort Worth, Texas, arrived a few hours later.

Funeral services were conducted from the M. E. Church in Coldwater, Kansas, at 2:30 p.m.  Tuesday, January 13, with the pastor, Rev. C. C. Brown, in charge.  Burial was made in Crown Hill Cemetery.  Mr. Scholle was well known in and near Coldwater.  For a number of years he had in connection with his farm activities, done considerable work as a brick mason.  He had built, or assisted in building a number of business buildings in this city, in Protection and in other nearby towns, including the building which he erected for his own use and which is located on the corner south of the Allderdice Store in this city.  He was a good workman, having learned the brick mason’s trade many years ago.  He took pride in doing his work well.  During the past two years however, his condition of health made it impossible for him to do much work.

Deceased was born in Unterneger, Germany, on June 17, 1860. When he was about 21 years of age, he came to America and it was not long until he found his way to Kansas, stopping at Dodge City.  He was a U. S. ranger and worked for some time on large ranches.

On August 15, 1887, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Kathryn Anderson, then of Hetmore.  To this union 11 children were born.  All of whom but two survive him.  One son, Frank, died on June 27, 1927.  Another son, William Ray, died in infancy.  The surviving children are John R. Scholle, of Fort Worth, Texas; Charley, Dave, Fred, Eddie and George, of this county; Mrs. Mary Morehouse, of Foster Mo., and Bertha and Kathryn of this county—yet at home.  He is also survived by one brother, Anton Scholle, of Foster, Mo.; three sisters of Dusseldorf, Germany; and by 12 grandchildren.  His parents died when he was quite young.  One sister died about seven years ago.  The faithful wife also survives.

Mr. Scholle had long been a member of the Catholic Church.  He remained true to his convictions on religious as well as other matters. He was loyal to the United States, having taken out his naturalization papers soon after he arrived in this country.  Soon after the time he landed in America he adopted the policy of speaking the English language only.  He was a hardworking man and always showed much interest in his family.  To the sorrowing relatives, the sincere sympathy of all is extended.
 
MARTHA MCCOWEN DIES AT HOME IN DONGOLA

Martha McCowan, aged 77 years, passed away at her home in Dongola at 6:30 o’clock Wednesday evening, January 14th.  She had been in failing health for the past six weeks, her sister having passed away at that time.

Funeral services were held at the Ford Funeral Home in Dongola at __ o’clock by Rev. H. W. Karraker.  Interment was made in the Dongola cemetery.  E. G. Ford directed the funeral.
She leaves one brother, Alex McCowen, of Dongola.
 
MRS. RENA McREYNOLDS DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS

Mrs. Rena McReynolds, age 37 years, wife of Elbert McReynolds passed away at her home in Mounds Wednesday morning at 12:02 o’clock following a brief illness.  Mrs. McReynolds was, before her marriage, Miss Rena Englebert, of Paducah, and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Englebert.
Surviving Mrs. McReynolds, besides her husband and parents, are a nineteen days old baby and one brother, Leonard Englebert, of Paducah, a number of other relatives and a large circle of friends.

The remains were taken to Paducah Thursday evening for burial.  The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9:00 o’clock at the Catholic church at 6th and Broadway streets.  Arrangements were in charge of G. A. James.

Mrs. McReynolds was an active member of the Mounds Woman Club, the auxiliary of the B. or R. T. and the Royal Neighbors.  She leaves many friends who are grieved at her passing and they extend their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved.

(Her marker in Mt. Carmel Cemetery at Paducah, Ky., reads:  Mother Rena Englert McReynolds Feb. 18, 1894 –Jan. 21, 1931, A loving wife and mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CHILD STRUCK BY CAR PASSES AWAY

Mildred Triplet, 2-year-old daughter of Arthur Triplet, colored, farmer who lives near Ullin, died Thursday night at St. Mary’s Infirmary Annex in Cairo.  The child received injuries when she and her father and another sister were stuck by a car on Route 2 just south of Ullin last Saturday night.  The father was carrying the little girl in his arms when they were struck.  The oldest child is recovering from her injuries as well as the father, who was badly bruised.

(Her death certificate states that Mildred Triplet was born 19 Jan 1929, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Arthur Triplet and Katie Ward, natives of Mississippi, died 16 Jan 1931, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
AGED RESIDENT PASSES AWAY AT DONGOLA

John Holshouser, age 95 years, prominent citizen, and retired merchant of Dongola passed away at his home in Dongola at 4:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, January 13th.  Had he lived until February 26th he would have reached the 96th milestone of his life.  His death resulted from pneumonia.

Mr. Holshouser has been a very active man and even at his age has been confined to his home only a few times.  He had his regular chores to perform around the house and made his regular trips to the First State Bank of which he was a director until his death.  He has served the bank in several capacities, as vice president, etc.  He was a pioneer banker in Dongola, having been one of three men to operate a private banking concern many years ago and the present State Bank really came from that private banking firm.

Mr. Holshouser was born near Mill Creek in 1835 and came to Dongola at the age of 20 and has been there ever since.  He was united in marriage to Miss Sophronia Davis September 19th 1869, and to this union one son was born, John Jr., who is the only child and who survives his father.  Mrs. Holshouser passed away in 1922.

Mr. Holshouser owned and operated a large general store in Dongola from his early manhood up until 1909 when he retired from business.  He was a busy man being an extensive land holder in this state and others and being connected with the bank as he was.

He was at one time a member of the Congregational Church and was very instrumental in the organization of the church in Dongola and gave of his finances very liberally when the church was built.
Funeral services were held at his residence in Dongola at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. C. C. Young and Rev. H. W. Karraker.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Dongola.  The casket bearers were H. A. Plott, R. A. Anderson, A. S. Dale, W. W. Karraker, F. M. Karraker, W. A. Albright, W. H. Weatherly, and A. H. Douglas.  Honorary pallbearers were N. T. Lawrence, E. L. Goodman, J. R. Speight, W. A. Elliott, C. C. Baggott, George Dickey, Alex McCowen, and J. B. Jackson.

(John Holshouser married Sophronia Davis on 9 Sep 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John Holshouser was born 26 Feb 1835, in Mill Creek, Ill., the son of John Holshouser and Sophia Eddleman, natives of North Carolina, died 13 Jan 1931, in Dongola, Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  John Holshouser 1835-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A. L. BUTLER DIED AT HOME OF DAUGHTER AT PULASKI

A. L. Butler, age 82 years, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. R. Sneed in Pulaski, Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Mr. Butler was one of the oldest residents of Pulaski County and had resided in the county since a lad of eleven years of age.  He came to this county from Alabama.  He was a retired merchant and well known throughout the county.

Surviving Mr. Butler are his widow, his daughter, Mrs. Sneed; and three grandchildren, Mrs. Rex Taft of Mounds, Joyce Prather, of Mounds, and Mrs. Ocean McKenney, of Memphis, Tenn.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Friday) at 3 o’clock at the Rose Hill Baptist Church in Pulaski with the Rev. E. Coty of Pulaski and the Rev. H. E. Vick, of Tamms officiating.  Interment will be made in Rose Hill Cemetery, W. H. Aldred directing the funeral.

(Abner Butler married Frances E. Kennedy on 20 Feb 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Abner L. Butler was born 23 Sep 1848, in Ohio, the son of Lorenzo F. Butler and Peni Dunahon, died 21 Jan 1931, in Pulaski, Ill., husband of Franka Butler.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery reads:  Abner L. Butler Born Sept. 23, 1848 Died Jan. 21, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
  

Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Jan 1931:
Mrs. Elbert McReynolds Dies Wednesday Morning

Mrs. Rena McReynolds, 37, wife of Elbert McReynolds, died Wednesday, January 21, at 12:02 a.m., leaving motherless a 19-day-old baby daughter, Mary Faith McReynolds.

Surviving her, besides the husband and little daughter, are her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Englert, and one brother, Leonard Englert, all of Paducah, Ky., and many friends in Mounds, where she has made her home for the past fifteen years or more.

Mrs. McReynolds was a member of St. Raphael’s Catholic Church, the Auxiliary to the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and the Mounds Woman’s Club.  She was also a member of the Royal Neighbor lodge at Paducah.

A service in her memory was held at St. Raphael’s Church Thursday morning.  She was taken to Paducah Thursday evening, where on Saturday morning at 9 o’clock funeral services will be held at the Catholic Church, 6th and Broadway.  Interment will be made at Paducah.


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Jan 1931:
FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY PASSED AWAY FRIDAY

Bellenden Hutcheson, age 74, passed away at his home, 3301 Highland Avenue, Cairo, Friday night, following a prolonged illness. Mr. Hutcheson for a number of years was a resident of Mound City until eight months ago, when he moved to Cairo on account of ailing health.

Mr. Hutcheson was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and was the son of Captain Bellenden and Mary Hutcheson.  He went to Mt. Carmel, Illinois, in 1880 and was united in marriage to Miss Mary Luella Wiley in 1883.  To this union five children were born, all of whom survive their father.  His wife preceded him in death twenty years ago, having died suddenly on Christmas Eve.  The Hutcheson family moved to Mound City in 1891 and Mr. Hutcheson had resided here since that time until moving to Cairo.
It was with a deep feeling of regret that his many friends in this city learned of his death.  He being a man of congenial personality, had won many close friends in the community.  Surviving Mr. Hutcheson are five children, four sons, Dr. B. S. Hutcheson, of Cairo, Frederick Hutcheson, Roderick Hutcheson, and George Hutcheson, of Jackson, Tenn., and one daughter, Miss Flirmel Hutcheson, of Cairo.  Three grandchildren, Margaret Lou Hutcheson, Rand Hutcheson, and Mary Courtney Hutcheson, of Jackson.  Also two sisters, Misses Mary and Kate Hutcheson, and two brothers, Robert, of Columbus, Ohio, and John, of Coon Rapids, Iowa.

The body was removed to the home of his son, Dr. Hutcheson, at 3303 Park Place West, where it remained until Sunday afternoon, when it was removed to St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mound City, where funeral services were held.  The church was filled to its capacity and many were unable to gain entrance.  The services were very impressive being conducted by Rev. Schuart, of Carbondale.  His sermon theme was “Death Not the End, but the Beginning.”  The choir very sweetly sang three beautiful hymns, “Come Ye Disconsolate,” “Lord Remember Me,” and “There Is a Blessed Home.”

The casket bearers were Thomas Campbell, Al Shuler, M. F. Browner, George Muscovalley and William Bestgen, all of Mound City, and William Mertz, of Cairo.  Honorary pallbearers were L. D. Stophlet, F. J. Kuny, W. T. Jaccard, Thomas Perks, Dan Hurly, Thomas Boyd, George Grammell, L. Poindexter, Robert Magill, W. S. Sandeson, George Eichhorn, and H. L. Settlemoir.

Following the services at the church the funeral party left via the C. C. C. & St. Louis Railway for Mt. Carmel leaving Mound City at 4:20 p.m.  On Monday funeral services were held and interment was made in the Mt. Carmel Cemetery by the side of his wife.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.

(Bellenden Hutchison married Luella Wiley on 27 Mar 1883, in Wabash Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Bellenden Hutcheson was born 28 Aug 1856, in Syracuse, N.Y., the son of Bellenden Hutcheson and Mary Jones, natives of England, died 23 Jan 1931, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery at Mt. Carmel, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OLMSTEAD MAN PASSES AWAY

Sim E. Taylor passed away Sunday morning at 8 o’clock at his home in Olmsted, following a lingering illness of dropsy.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Osborne officiating.  Interment was made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead, by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(His death certificate states that Sim Elmer Taylor, house carpenter, was born 22 Jun 1875, in Illinois, the son of Frank Taylor and Serepta Meeks, and died 25 Jan 1931, in Olmsted, Ill., the husband of Mary Taylor.  Franklin Taylor married Syrepta Meek on 31 Mar 1873, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BABY OF MR. AND MRS. HARP DIES TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Sylvia May Harp, age 3 years, 5 months, and 27 days of age, passed away at her home on North Main Street at 2:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Harp and had been ill only a few days suffering from pneumonia.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence, the Rev. Minton, Pentecostal minister of Mounds, officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A. James undertaker in charge.

(Her death certificate states that Sylvia May Harp was born 31 Jul 1927, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of Earl Harp, a native of New York, and Ethel Caywood, a native of Illinois, died 27 Jan 1931, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BROTHER OF FORMER MOUND CITY GIRL PASSES AWAY

W. W. Williams, half-brother of Mrs. B. M. James, of Prestenburg, Ky., passed away a few days ago at his home in Prestenburg.  Mr. Williams was a law partner of Mrs. James’ husband and was also circuit judge.

Mrs. James before her marriage was Miss Geneva Howard, of this city, and will be remembered by many Mound City residents.


MRS. LILLY CHEEK DIES AT DAUGHTER’S HOME SUDDENLY

Mrs. Lilly Ann Cheek, age 65 years, a lifelong resident of this city, passed away suddenly at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mike Winkler, on Poplar Street Thursday morning about nine o’clock following a brief illness.  Mrs. Cheek was taken ill Wednesday afternoon but her illness was not thought to be of a serious nature and it was a great shock to her family and friends when she passed away.

She was born in Mound City April 14, 1865, and was the daughter of Amos and Malinda Peasley.  She was united in marriage to Harry McGill and to this union five children were born, two boys and three girls.  Two of the girls and the two boys passed away in infancy, leaving only one daughter.  Mr. McGill preceded his wife in death a number of years ago.  Later she was united in marriage to Sherman Cheek, who passed away about three years ago.

Mrs. Cheek was a woman of lovable disposition and had formed many ties of friendship in the community. She was greatly beloved by all who knew her.  She was a strong supporter of the Congregational Church.  For the past several years she had resided with her daughter and family.
Left to mourn her sudden death are the daughter, Mrs. Winkler; two grandsons, Harry and Frederick Winkler; one sister, Mrs. Emma Conlin; and one brother, W. H. Peasley, of Memphis, Tenn.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Winkler.  G. A. James has charge of funeral arrangements.

(H. A. McGill married L. A. Peaslee on 8 Sep 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William Henry Peasley, 30, born in Mound City Ill., the son of Amos Peasley and Malinda McCoy, married on 10 Mar 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Martha Elizabeth Harland, 22, born in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of J. B. Harland and Lucy Coonrod.  Her death certificate states that Lillie A. Cheek was born 14 Apr 1865, in Mound City, Ill., the daughter of Amos Peaslee, a native of New Hampshire, and Malinda McCoy, a native of Ohio, died 29 Jan 1931, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Jan 1931:
Unknown Man with Wanderlust Dies Alone
Body Found under Thorn Tree South of Mounds

An unknown wanderer died alone in agony Saturday under a thorn tree near the Interurban street car line just south of town.

His body was found by K. F. Caldwell, motorman on the Cairo and St. Louis traction line as he brought his car north in the early afternoon.

The man, with a number of other men, spent Friday night in the city hall.  Saturday morning, W. L. Toler was approached at his store by a young man to whom he had given a Relief Fund order for food the night before, with the plea that he cross the street to see an old man who was very sick.  The old fellow, who gave his age as 70, was in a pitiable condition.  The young men were told to assist the sick man to Dr. O. T. Hudson’s office where he was examined and given medicine.

When found he had the bottle of medicine, unopened in his pocket.  His only other belongings were a razor and a handkerchief.  He was dressed in brown trousers, dirty white shirt, and blue overalls with a black cap for his head.

Coroner O. T. Hudson, and Undertaker George P. Hartwell took charge of the body.  Heart disease was given as the cause of his death.

Men who sleep in the city bas___ are required to register and among the name registered that night was Ed Ryan, of Memphis, Tenn., who complained of being ill.  Descriptions of the dead man, who was five feet seven inches tall and weighed about 140 pounds had brown wavy hair and blue eyes, were sent to Memphis, East St. Louis, Paducah, Ky., and Cape Girardeau, Mo.  From Paducah and Cape Girardeau broadcasting stations, his description and the ___ts concerning his death were announced.

No identification was made, however, and he was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery Wednesday morning, an unknown wanderer at the end of his earthly journey.

Eugene D. Horner Dies Friday Afternoon, Jan. 23

Eugene Debs Horner, 31, a former businessman of Mounds, died at the Anna State Hospital, Friday afternoon, January 23, at 2 o’clock, following a nervous breakdown which occurred some two years ago.
Gene, as he was familiarly called, was born at Wetaug, Ill., December 13, 1899.  He lived in Wetaug until about 18 years of age, when he came with his parents to Mounds to reside.

For 13 years he worked for the Illinois Central Railroad in the capacity of brakeman.  After the service rendered for the above railroad he entered into business for himself and continued therein until his health broke down.

About eight months ago he confessed Christ as his personal Savior thus preparing for his exit from the scenes of this immortal life.

He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and of the order of B. P. O. Elks.
He leaves to mourn his departure his mother, Mrs. Hattie Horner; three brothers, Dillard, Claude, and Joe, all of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. Inez Cockrum, of Christopher, Ill., and Mrs. Mildred Jones, of Mounds.  Gene’s death will also be mourned by a large number of other relatives and friends.

The body was brought to the home of his mother in this city and by Undertaker G. A. James.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Mt. Pisgah Church, Wetaug, the Rev. H. B. Shoaff officiating.  Interment was made in the Wetaug cemetery.

(Daniel Horner married Hattie P. Lentz on 1 Jan 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Eugene Debbs Horner Born Dec. 13, 1899 Died Jan. 23, 1931 Aged 31 Yrs., 1 Mo., & 10 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)

Old Resident of Mound City Dies Friday Night in Cairo

Bellenden Hutcheson, for many years resident of Mound City, died Friday night, January 23, at his home in Cairo, where he had lived the past eight months.

Mr. Hutcheson was born in Syracuse, N.Y., came to Mt. Carmel, Ill., in 1880 and married Miss Mary Luella Wiley in 1883.  The family moved to Mound City in 1891.  Twenty years ago Mrs. Hutcheson died.

He is survived by five children, Dr. B. S. Hutcheson, and Miss Flirimel Hutcheson, of Cairo, Frederick, Roderick, and George Hutcheson, of Jackson, Tenn.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Mound City.  Interment was made at Mt. Carmel Monday.

Mrs. Hugh Caudle Dies Wednesday at Holden Hospital

Mrs. Flossie Hooppaw Caudle, wife of Hugh Caudle, of Ullin, former resident of Mounds, died Wednesday morning, Jan. 28, at Holden Hospital, Carbondale, where she had been taken some two weeks ago.

Mrs. Caudle was born at Vandalia, Ill., in 1893, but had made her home in Ullin and later in Mounds.  She is survived by her husband, her mother, Mrs. Sam Carney, of Ullin; two daughters, Mrs. LaVerne Caudle Mathis, of Mounds and Martha Ellen Caudle; and one son, Loren Caudle, both of Ullin; two half-brothers, Lewis Carney, of Texas, and Revis Carney, of Ullin.  Another half-brother died during the World War.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. Church in Ullin with the Rev. H. B. Shoaff of the M. E. Church of Mounds in the pulpit.  Interment will be made in the Ullin Cemetery.

(Mannon F. Hoopaw married Lola Elison on 14 Oct 1888, in Fayette Co., Ill.  Samuel Carney married Lola A. Hoopa on 25 Nov 1894, in Fayette Co., Ill.  Her death certificate stats that Flossie Mae Caudle was born 23 Dec 1893, in Missouri, the daughter of Mannon Hoopaw and the wife of Hugh Caudle, and died 28 Jan 1931, in Carbondale, Jackson Co., Ill., and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Mother Flossie May Caudle 1894-1931 In Loving Remembrance.—Darrel Dexter)

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Thompson and son David and Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Needham returned Thursday from Evansville, Ind., having been called there on account of the death of the former’s uncle, J. Artes.  (Ullin)

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wharton and Mrs. Lela Umberhine, who accompanied the body of their mother, Mrs. Ida Lee Banker, from St. Louis for burial in the Jonesboro Cemetery, returned to the city Monday night.  Mrs. Nora Lentz, a sister of Mrs. Banker, of Mounds, Ill., with her son and family was also present.—Jonesboro Gazette

(Joel M. “Tobe” Lee, 21, born in Jackson, Mo., son of Robert Lee and Temperance English, married on 13 Dec 1880, in Union Co., Ill., Ida J. Standard, 21, born in Vienna, Ill., daughter of Fields A. Standard and Mary A. Spann.  William C. Custer, 51, born in Warren Co., Tenn., the son of Lewis Custer and Rebecca Thompson, married on 30 Dec 1898, in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Ida J. Lee, 38, born in Johnson Co., Ill., daughter of A. F. Standard and Mary Spann.  Newton Birdsell Banker married Mrs. Ida Custer on 4 Jul 1905, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill.  Cicero N. Lentz, 23, born in Wetaug, Ill., son of H. C. Lentz and Miss Peeler, married on 31 Jul 1892, in Union Co., Ill., Nora I. Standard, 23, born in Jonesboro, daughter of F. Standard and Miss Spann.  A marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads Ida Lee Jan. 16, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

Card of Thanks

We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the kind friends and neighbors who assisted us in various ways during the illness and following the death of our beloved wife and daughter, Rena Englert McReynolds.  Especially do we thank those who sent floral tributes and we assure you all these kindnesses will be long remembered.
E. McReynolds
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Englert and family
  

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Feb 1931:
WILLIAM H. KNIGHT DIES AT THE HOME OF DAUGHTER

William H. Knight, age 67 years, of Charleston, Mo., passed away Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Afton Winters, on Poplar Street in this city.  Mr. Knight had been ill for several months and had come to Mound City to receive medical treatment, but after his arrival he gradually grew weaker until the end came.

Surviving Mr. Knight are his widow, three daughters, Mrs. Winters, Mrs. Ed Fox, of this city, Mrs. Howard Stovall, of South Bend, Indiana; one son, Charles Knight, of Charles, Mo.; four sisters, Mrs. Jennie Howe and Mrs. Tankerly, of Kentucky, Mrs. Babb of Missouri and one in Blytheville, Ark.; several grandchildren a number of other relatives and a large circle of friends in the community in which he lived.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Winters.  Rev. W. J. Ward, former pastor of the First Baptist Church, but now residing at Dongola, officiated.

Immediately following the services at the church the cortege left for Arlington, Ky., where interment was made in the cemetery there.  G. A. James was the funeral director.


DONGOLA MAN PASSES AWAY SATURDAY IN DONGOLA

Lee Watson, of Dongola, passed away Saturday at 2 p.m. at the home of his son following a brief illness of pneumonia.

By his request there was no funeral service.  Interment was made in the Hinkle Cemetery near Dongola at 10 o’clock Monday morning.  E. J. Ford was the funeral director.

Mr. Watson leaves his wife, one brother, of Rockwell, Texas, and four children, Mrs. Stella Lingle, of Ullin, Oscar Watson, of Dongola, Mrs. Nellis Duckworth, of Desoto, Illinois, and Thomas Watson, of Glenwood, Iowa.

(His death certificate states that Lee Watson was born 21 Dec 1861, in Kentucky, and died 31 Jan 1931, in Road District 3, Union Co., Ill.  Albert Mowery, son of William Junius Mowery and Mary C. Costley, married Estelle Belle Watson, daughter of Lee Watson and Mary Barnett, on 23 Mar 1909, in Union Co., Ill. Turner S. Lingle married Mrs. Stella Mowery on 1 Dec 1924, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
O. O. LEWIS FORMERLY OF PULASKI PASSES AWAY

Word has been received here of the death of O. O. Lewis, of Raymondsville, Texas, formerly a resident of Pulaski, Illinois, and well known in this community.  Mr. Lewis is a son of the late A. W. Lewis, well known resident of Pulaski for many years, he being one of the most prominent merchants of Pulaski.  He was a brother of Mrs. R. M. Hurst, of this city.

Mr. Lewis was born and reared in Pulaski, living there for many years before removing to Raymondville, Texas, where with his family he has since resided.  Mr. Lewis suffered a paralytic stroke Wednesday, January 28, and was removed to his home where on Thursday at 1:30 o’clock he passed away.

Surviving Mr. Lewis are his widow and several children, two sisters, Mrs. Hurst, of this city, and Mrs. C. E. Aldred, of Raymondville, Texas; four brothers, T. E. Lewis, of Centralia, A. W. Lewis, of Tulsa, Okla., William Lewis of Kankakee, and E. O. Lewis of Edinburg, Texas; and many other relatives and friends who will mourn his sudden death.  Funeral services were held at this home in Raymondville.

(Charles E. Aldred, 24, born in Pulaski, Ill., the son of James L. Aldred and Lucinda Lackey, married on 31 Jan 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Addie Montella Lewis, 20, born in Pulaski, Ill., daughter of Alfred W. Lewis and Elizabeth F. Butler.—Darrel Dexter)

 
CATHYRN DIEPENBROCK OF GRAND CHAIN PASSES AWAY

Cathyrn Diepenbrock, age __ years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. ___ Diepenbrock, of Grand Chain, passed away Sunday morning at __ o’clock following a lingering illness.

Funeral services were held at St. Catherine’s Church in Grand Chain at __ o’clock Tuesday morning.

Surviving Miss Diepenbrock are her parents, of Grand Chain, three sisters, Mrs. Adam Cange, of Cairo, ___ and Mary Margaret Diepenbrock, and a brother, Clemence, of Grand Chain; also two aunts, Mrs. ___ Oehler and Mrs. Ed O’Don___ of Cairo. Miss Diepenbrock leaves many friends who mourn her death.

(Her death certificate states Catherine C. Diepenbrock, born 22 Jan 1901, in Grand Chain, Ill., died 1 Feb 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Theodore Diepenbrock, a native of Germany, and Louise Klein, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Catherine Diepenbrock 1901-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SISTER OF PULASKI WOMAN DIES AT MASON, ILLINOIS

Mrs. Pleas Roach, of Pulaski received word Tuesday of the death of her sister, Mrs. Frank Osburn, who passed away at the home of her sister at Mason, Ill.  Mrs. Roach accompanied by her husband and son-in-law, S. G. Ervin, left Tuesday evening for Mason to attend the funeral.
 
NANCY JANE MEISENHEIMER DIES AT HOME IN DONGOLA

Nancy Jane Meisenheimer was born to Philip and Sarah Hinkle and died at her home January 21, 1931, at the age of 74 years, 10 month and 7 days.  She was married to Wilson Meisenheimer November 21, 1872, and to this union seven children were born, one dying in infancy.  The living are Mrs. Edgar Karraker, of Dongola, and Mrs. Wiley Casper, of Elgin, Arthur, Anderson, George, and Tom Meisenheimer, all of Dongola.  She leaves one brother, Hiram Hinkle, and three sisters, Mrs. Edna Keller, Mrs. Maria Douglas, and Mrs. Sarah Clifford, and six grandchildren, Opal Karraker, Mary Louise and Rollan Meisenheimer, Boyd and Eugene Karraker, and Homer Casper and two great grandchildren, Jean and Marjorie Casper and other relatives and friends.

(Moses W. Misenhimer, son of Elias Misenhimer, married Nancy J. Hinkle, daughter of Sarah Garrot, on 21 Nov 1872, in Union Co., Ill.  Philip Hinkle, Jr., married Sarah Keller on 22 Sep 1853, in Union Co., Ill.  Matthew D. Garrett married Mrs. Sarah Hinkle on 28 Feb 1865, in Union Co., Ill.  Wiley L. Casper, 21, born in Union Co., Ill., the son of John R. Casper and Mary Dillow, married on 13 Aug 1899, in Union Co., Ill., Celia Misenheimer, 19, born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Wilson Misenheimer and Fanna Hinkle.  Jacob Douglas, 20, born in Union Co., Ill., the son of Alexander Douglas and Sarah Garrott, married on 28 Apr 1878, in Union Co., Ill., Mariah E. Hinkle, 18, born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Philip Hinkle and Sarah Keller.  Jacob K. Clifford, 24, born in Union Co., Ill., the son of John Clifford and Eliza Penry, married on 25 Oct 1885, in Union Co., Ill., Sarah E. Garrett, 19, born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Matthew Garrett and Sarah Keller.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR MABEL EASTWOOD

Funeral services were held for Mabel Eastwood Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock in the Pentecostal Church at Karnak.  Rev. House officiated and N. W. Wilson, undertaker, was in charge.  Mrs. Eastwood was the wife of Martin Eastwood and was 46 years old.  She has been seriously ill for the past five months.

(Her death certificate states that Mable Eastwood was born 18 Nov 1884, in Indiana, died 29 Jan 1931, in Karnak, Ill., and was buried in Anderson Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
S. G. NEGLEY DIES AT HOME IN MOUND CITY

Samuel G. Negley, age 52 years, passed away at his home in this city at 5:30 o’clock Sunday morning following a brief illness.  Mr. Negley was a member of the 29th Infantry, serving in the Philippine Islands for two years following the Spanish American War.  He was employed on the ferry boat of George Muscovalley and had filled this place on the boat for some time.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the residence of Paul Tucker, a relative, 434 Eighth Street, Cairo, where the body was removed Monday afternoon.  The Rev. H. W. Berneking, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church conducted the service.  Immediately following the services at the residence the cortege moved by automobile to the National Cemetery where the body was laid to rest with full military honors. Casket bearers were chosen from the American Legion and the American Legion also furnished a firing squad.  Taps were sounded at the grave at the conclusion of the final rites. E. A. Burke of Cairo directed the funeral.

Surviving Mr. Negley are his widow, Mrs. Ella Negley, and five children, besides two brothers, J. H. Negley, of Cairo and B. F. Negley, of Hebbersville, Ky., and a sister, Mrs. Judith A. Cheatham, of Henderson, Ky.

(Samuel Greg Negley was born 6 Nov 1878, in Hebbardsville, Henderson Co., Ky., and died 1 Feb 1931, at Mound City, Ill., and was buried in section F grave 49681 in Mound City National Cemetery.  He was a private in the U. S. Army during the Spanish American War.  His death certificate states that he was born 6 Nov 1879, in Henderson Co., Ky., the son of George R. Negley and Judith A. Hix, natives of Henderson Co., Ky.  He married on 14 Apr 1909, in Jefferson Co., Ky., James Ella Brooking.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Duckworth and children of Desoto were called here (Swan Pond) on account of the death of Mr. Lee Watson.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our deep-felt gratitude for the many kindnesses and sympathy shown us during the recent illness and death of our beloved mother and grandmother, Mrs. L. A. Cheek
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Winkler
Harry Thomas Winkler
Frederick Michael Winkler
  

Mounds Independent, Friday 6 Feb 1931:
PROMINENT VIENNA MAN DIES AT AGE OF 77

P. T. Chapman, president of the First National Bank of Vienna, is dead at the age of 77.  He served five years as Johnson County superintendent of schools, two terms as county judge, eight years as state senator and six years in the House of Representatives.

(According to his death certificate, Pleasant Thomas Chapman was born 8 Oct 1854, in Illinois, the son of D. C. Chapman and Mary E. Rose, died 31 Jan 1931, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., and was buried in the Fraternal Cemetery at Vienna.—Darrel Dexter)

Miss Kathyrn Diepenbrock of Grand Chain Dies

Miss Kathyrn Diepenbrock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theo Diepenbrock, of Grand Chain, died Sunday morning, Feb. 1, following a long illness.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9:30 o’clock at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church at Grand Chain.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

ZEIGLER—J. C. Cletcher, whose home was one mile southwest of Zeigler, on Route 149, died Sunday morning and was buried before the sun went down the same day.

Mr. Cletcher was born in Pope County 75 years ago.  He was a farmer.  He passed away Sunday morning and Mrs. Cletcher ordered the undertaker to prepare a simple funeral and to inter the body the same day.

(According to his death certificate, Stokes C. Cletcher was born 28 Feb 1855, in Pope Co., Ill., the son of Stokes Cletcher and Sarah Martin, natives of Tennessee, died 18 Jan 1931, in Six Mile Township, Franklin Co., Ill., and was buried the same day in Royalton Cemetery.  His wife was Mendoza Cletcher.—Darrel Dexter)

CARTERVILLE—The mystery surrounding the life of Thomas Kannavan, 82, who died here Dec. 18, has been removed with receipt of a letter here from Kannavan’s daughter, Mary Carr, a movie actress in Hollywood.

Kannavan, a wanderer, who was not seen by his daughter or other children for 40 years, had long been known as a sort of “mystery man.”  When his funeral was held here Jan. 17, an automobile bearing a Hollywood license was seen before the funeral parlor where the services were held.

In her letter the movie actress thanked Mrs. A. R. Sisk, of Equality, for the care she gave to the aged man and expressed regret that she had not been able to find her father and give him care and attention.
Kannavan could sing and dance even at his advanced age.  He was an avid reader of newspapers and was always posted on civic subjects.  It was known that he was a glass blower in his earlier life and that he had at one time occupied a position which brought him contact with artists and men of prominence.

He had dropped several hints that he had left his family under the guise of committing suicide, leaving his clothing on a riverbank and disappearing.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Feb 1931:
CHARLES BAGBY PASSES AWAY ON COMMERCIAL STREET

Charles Bagby, age 64 years, passed away at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Dan Bagby, with whom he has lived for the past 15 years on last Sunday, February 8, at 12 o’clock.  Mr. Bagby had only been sick for a few days and his death was unexpected.  Death was attributed to pneumonia and heart trouble.

Mr. Bagby is the last of 13 children, his brother having passed away about a year ago.

Funeral services were held at the Bagby home on Commercial Avenue last Monday, conducted by Rev. W. H. Hanbaum, pastor of the First Methodist Church of this city.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.  G. A. James was the funeral director.
 
FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN LOSES MOTHER IN DEATH

Word has been received from Mrs. Roy Williams of Metropolis that her mother had passed away about the middle of January.  Mr. and Mrs. Williams are former residents of Mound City and they have many friends here who extend their heartfelt sympathy to Mrs. Williams in her bereavement.


AGED LADY DIES AT HOME OF DR. W. R. WESENBERG

Miss Fannie Rose, one of the oldest residents of Pulaski County, passed away at 8:30 o’clock Thursday night in Mound City. For the past nine months Miss Rose had made her home with Dr. and Mrs. W. R. Wesenberg, on Main Street.  She had for 55 years made her home with Mr. and Mrs. H. Wesenberg at America, parents of Dr. Wesenberg.  At their death she was compelled to leave the farm and come to Mound City, where she has since resided.  She had been in failing health for some time and was totally blind for a number of years.

Miss Rose was born in Shawneetown, Illinois, in 1855 and would have been 76 years of age next month.  She has no surviving relatives.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the undertaking parlors of A. A. James.  Rev. W. L. Hanbaum, pastor of the First M. E. Church, officiated at the services and a quartette from the church choir finished the music.  The casket bearers were M. D. Breslford, S. A. Steers, Oscar Mason, Will Mason and Walter Schwarz, all of America and old acquaintances and neighbors of the deceased.

Immediately following the services the cortege moved by automobile to Beech Grove Cemetery where interment was made by G. A. James funeral director.

(Her death certificate states that Fannie Rose was born 3 Mar 1855, in Illinois, and died 5 Feb 1931, in Mound City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

Mrs. Flossie May Hoopaw, the daughter of Mrs. Sam Carney, was born December 23, 1894, and departed this life January 27, 1931, at the age of 37 years, one month and four days. She was a daughter of Mrs. Sam Carney.  She was converted and united with the Methodist Church at Concord at the age of fifteen years, later removing her membership to the Methodist Church at Mounds, Illinois, where she lived a true Christian until the end.  She was loved by all who know her.

On October 30, 1910, she united in marriage to Hugh Caudle and to this union was born three children, Mrs. LaVern M___, of Mounds, Loren and Mary, of Ullin.  She leaves to mourn her passing her husband, three children, her mother, Mrs. Lola Carney, her stepfather, Sam Carney, and two brothers, Louis Hoopaw, of Texas and Revis Hooppaw of __ and a host of friends.

 
MRS. HARLEY McCOMMONS DIES AT DONGOLA

Mrs. Harley McCommons, __ years, passed away suddenly near Dongola Tuesday morning at 4 o’clock. Surviving Mrs. McCommons are her husband, a son, age two years, her ___ Henry Allen, of Dongola and ___ sisters.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the First Baptist Church of Dongola, the Rev. W. J. Ward officiating.  Interment was made in Dongola Cemetery by E. J. Ford funeral director.

(Her death certificate states she was born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Henry Allen and Nancy Hill, natives of Elco, Ill., and died 10 Feb 1931, in Road District 6, Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in American Legion Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Jessie Mae McCommons Born Sept. 4, 1908 Died Feb. 10, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Feb 1931:
Mrs. Anne Burgeois, who has been seriously ill for some time at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Shelby Senteney, of Herrin, remains unimproved.  Her daughter, Mrs. Roy Sichling, of Taft, Calif., has arrived in Herrin to be at the bedside of her mother.  (Ullin)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Feb 1931:
SON OF FORMER MOUND CITY PASTOR DIES IN W. VA.

Word has been received in Mound City stating that Horace Hastings, Jr., had passed away at his home in Charles, W. Va., following an illness of several days.  The cause of his death was heart trouble.  His death has shocked his family and friends, although his parents had been informed of his serious illness.  They left upon receiving the message, but found their son had passed away when they arrived.

He was the eldest son of Rev. and Mrs. Horace Hastings, of Silverton, Colo., formerly of this city, where Rev. Hastings was pastor of the Pilgrim Congregational Church.  Their son and wife visited at the parsonage in this city late last summer and they were accompanied home by Mrs. Hastings. Rev. Hastings and wife spent a few hours in this city Wednesday en route home from Charleston.
 
DUNNING ACQUITTED IN CIRCUIT COURT AT CAIRO

Minus Dunning and William Edward Dunning, admitted operators of stills for some eight years, the former under federal bond, were acquitted Wednesday by the jury in circuit court at Cairo on the charge of killing Herbert Coryell.

Coryell, deputy sheriff, was killed when he and Clarence Brown went to the Dunning still.  The manner of shooting differed.  The state through its witnesses showed that the line of fire which had wounded and killed Coryell came from a point some distance from the still and that Coryell fired only three shots.

The scene represented, roughly a triangle of which a path through a brushy section formed the asides.  Where Coryell’s blood showed when he fell behind a stump marks the end of one leg of the triangle where Dunning is alleged to have stood, is the apex of the triangle and end of the second leg is where the still was located.

The bullets which killed Coryell came from near the apex, it was proved by the state.  A man’s head would show above the bushes and it would be necessary for him to pass this apex when following the part to reach the still.  Bullets in the stump, cutting the trees and in a tree were proved.

It was the contention of the state that Coryell and Brown entering this path proceeded until they came to a point where Dunning opened fire.  At this point the tramped leaves showed someone had been there some time.  It was also the contention of the state that since Coryell’s head would just about show above the brush, that the first shot struck him and sent him to the ground and behind the refuge of as stump. Stunned he lay in protection of the stump while bullets cut overhead or lodged themselves in the stump, and then, recovering some, he drew his gun and fired, as it is argued, Dunning fled across to the still where his hat was found.  The three shots fired by Coryell are accounted for, one hit the still, one hit the younger Dunning and one buried itself in a tree.  About two shots were fired in return from the still, but most of the firing was from the other point. 

The defense argued that Coryell had opened fire on the still, yet the facts showed that whoever shot Coryell shot from a point considerably to one side of the still and directly on the path leading to the still and just before the apex or turn.

Clarence Brown, state’s witness, who was with Coryell, was frightened so much so, that he told Judge C. S. Miller, who was helping prosecute, that he was afraid they would kill him.

The two Dunnings, of course, were witnesses for the defense, and insisted that Coryell opened fire on them.

Acquitted by the jury, the two men found themselves in the hands of the U. S. agents, who are holding them in default of bond.  They admitted freely they were operating a still and had been in the business some eight years.

The courthouse spectators were largely in sympathy with the defendants.  Coryell, who once was with the liquor crowd, had their disfavor for turning to the other side.
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Feb 1931:
T. N. Haberts Dies at the Age of Seventy

T. N. Haberts, age 70, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Perry Keefe, on South Elm Street, Thursday morning, Feb. 19th, at 6 o’clock, following a long illness.

Surviving him are three daughters, Mrs. Keefe, of Mounds, Mrs. McLaughlin, of Toledo, Ohio, and Mrs. Walter Lewis, of Philadelphia, Pa., also one grandson.

Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church with the Rev. H. B. Shoaff officiating.  Interment will be made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with Masonic rites.  George P. Hartwell and Son are the undertakers in charge.  An obituary will appear next week.

CARBONDALE—One month from the day he was to have been married, Jerry K. Allen died at the Holden Hospital here.  He had an acute attack of appendicitis, was taken to the hospital and operated on Wednesday night, and died Thursday morning.  He was 25 years old and was purchasing agent for the Kroger Grocery & Baking Co., with headquarters in Herrin.

(According to his death certificate, Jerry Allen was born 2 Sep 1905, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Frederick I. Allen, a native of Morrow, Ohio, died 12 Feb 1931, in Carbondale, Ill., and was buried in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati.—Darrel Dexter)

CENTRALIA—Dr. Charles B. Bateman, 54, practicing physician here for the past 17 years and one of three candidates for mayor at the primary election March 3, passed away at 11:45 p.m. Tuesday at St. Mary’s Hospital, where he was taken Saturday evening following a paralytic stroke while he was in his office at 226 ½ East Broadway.

Dr. Bateman had just finished with one of his patients about 10 p.m. Saturday, when he felt a tingling sensation pass over his right side.  His condition grew worse and he lapsed into unconsciousness in about an hour, the whole right side being completely paralyzed.

Although he is deceased, the name of Dr. Charles B. Bateman will remain on the official primary ballot to be voted upon March 3 as a candidate for the office of mayor of the city of Centralia.

(According to his death certificate, Charles B. Bateman was born 10 Oct 1876, in Keysport, Clinton Co., Ill., the son of James C. Bateman and Emalvina Moore, natives of Jefferson Co., Ill., died 8 Feb 1931, in Centralia, Ill., and was buried at Keysport, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Penn and family were called to LaCenter, Ky., Friday by the death of Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Penn’s sister, who was instantly killed in an automobile accident Thursday at Tilden, Ill.  (Villa Ridge)

The son born to Mr. and Mrs. Logan Claxton Wednesday died and was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery at two o’clock Thursday afternoon.

(The death certificate states that he was the stillborn son of Logan Claxton, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., and Leona Nicholson, a native of Union Co., Ill.  A marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Eugene Claxton Feb. 10, 1931 Raymond Claxton 1922-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

TAMMS MARSHAL DIES IN VILLAGE JAIL

Locked in the same jail in which he had confined many other persons, George H. Gilbert, marshal at Tamms, died while in the jail and only a few hours following his incarceration on Saturday night.  He was found dead early Sunday morning.

An Alexander County coroner’s jury at the inquest gave as their verdict “Death caused by acute alcoholism,” according to the Cairo Citizen.

(George P. Gilbert married Irene Kerr on 4 Apr 1893, in Randolph Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that George P. Gilbert was born 25 Sep 1870, in Illinois, the son of John Gilbert, died 15 Feb 1931, in Tamms, Ill., the husband of Irine Gilbert, and was buried in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery in Mounds reads:  George P. Gilbert 1870-1931 Irene E. Gilbert 1872-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Feb 1931:
BOBBY EUGENE GULLEY DIES AT HOME IN DONGOLA

Bobby Eugene Gulley, 3-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jess Gulley, passed away at his home in Dongola Friday morning about 5 o’clock.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. J. Ward.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery, E. J. Ford directing the funeral.

Surviving little Bobby are his parents, his grandparents, and two brothers, two sisters, several aunts and uncles.

(The death certificate states that Bobby Eugene Gulley was born in Wetaug, Ill., the son of Jess Gulley, a native of Dongola, Ill., and Dassie E. Godman, a native of Union Co., Ill.  His marker in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Bobby Gulley Born March 8, 1928 Died Feb. 20, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
J. W. GALLION, OF VILLA RIDGE, PASSED AWAY MONDAY

J. W. Gallion, age 81 years, passed away Monday morning at his home in Villa Ridge.  Mr. Gallion was one of the oldest and most highly respected residents of Pulaski County.  He would have attained the age of 82 years had he lived until April.

Left to mourn his passing are four daughters, Mr. F. M. Block, of Cairo, Mrs. B. I. Britton, of Villa Ridge, Mrs. C. C. Johnson, of Brookfield, Fla., and Mrs. George Nichols, of Springfield, Illinois; one son, William Gallion, of Champaign, Illinois; and a brother, James Gallion, of Aurora, Mo., besides a number of grandchildren and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. B. I. Britton, in Villa Ridge.  The services were conducted by J. C. Mench, of the Y. M. C. A. of Mounds.  Immediately following the services at the residence the cortege moved by automobile to Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds where interment was made.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(Frank Block, 24, born in Aurora, Ind., the son of William Block and Sarah Cheek, married on 21 Feb 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Aetna Gallion, 18, born in Smithand, Ky., the daughter of John Gallion and Tennie Daniels.  B. I. Britton married Emma Gallion on 7 Jan 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John W. Gallion was born about 1850 and died 23 Feb 1931, in Road District 5, Union Co., Ill., husband of Anna Gallion.—Darrel Dexter)
 
E. J. B. ALDRIDGE PASSES AWAY IN FLORIDA RECENTLY

E. J. B. Aldridge, many years ago a resident of this city, passed away in St. Petersburg, Fla., on February 12, according to word received recently in this city.

Mr. Aldridge will be remembered by only a few of the residents of this city due to the fact that it had been probably thirty-five years since he had made his home here.  At that time he was employed on the Patriot, a weekly publication which was later changed to the Pulaski Enterprise.  After leaving here he went to DuQuoin, where he was employed for a while in newspaper work later becoming manager of the telephone exchange there.  He made his residence there until the beginning of winter when he went to Florida where he passed away.
 
OLMSTEAD BABY PASSES AWAY

Charles Kenneth Hannan, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hannan, of Olmsted, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo Saturday evening at 6 o’clock at the age of 2 years, 3 months, and 4 days.  The little one had been ill for some time and had been at the infirmary twelve days.  Mr. and Mrs. Hannan have one other child, a seven weeks old baby.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at 10 o’clock at the Catholic church at Grand Chain and interment as made in the Grand Chain cemetery.  The services were conducted by Father Orlett and G. A. James was the funeral director.

(The death certificate states that Charles Kenneth Hannon was born 17 Nov 1928, in Olmsted, Ill., the son of Edward Hannan and Geraldine Castleman, and died 21 Feb 1931, in Cairo, Ill.  His marker in St. Catherine Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Charles K. Hannon Born Nov. 17, 1928 Died Feb. 21, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Those from Mounds who attended the funeral of Mr. Stokes of Buncombe, were Mr. and Mrs. Lester Keller, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Stokes, Mr. and Mrs. B. Bagby, Mrs. L. Black, Mrs. L. Jenkins, Mr. and Mrs. A. Mattson and daughter Frances, and Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Buchanan and two daughters.
 
People of this neighborhood (Beech Grove) were sorry to hear of the death of their old neighbor, John Schick.  He moved to Anna sixteen years ago, was buried at Jonesboro Friday.

(Jonathan Shick, 31, born in Chester Co., Pa., the son of Amos Shick and Elizabeth Hook, married on October 23, 1879, in Union Co., Ill., Mary Elizabeth Frick, 30, born Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Jacob Frick and Sarah Miller.  His marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  Jonathon Shick Born June 22, 1848 Died Feb. 19, 1931 Mary E. Shick his wife Born Nov. 17, 1843 Died Dec.20, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Feb 1931:
Walter Ausby Stokes

Walter Ausby Stokes was born near Mt. Pleasant, Union County, Illinois, Dec. 21st, 1869 and died at the Hale-Willard Hospital, Anna, Ill., Friday, Feb. 20th, 1931, age __ years, 1 month and 28 days.  He was the son of Mathew and Sarah E. Stokes.

Mr. Stokes spent his entire life farming in Union County.  On August 29, 1887, he was united in marriage to Ollie Amburn.  To this union were born five children, Ernest M. Stokes, of Indianapolis, Ind., Mrs. Fount Roberts, of Buncombe, Ill., Mrs. Lollo Hepp, of Mounds, Mrs. William Menk, of Chicago, and Mrs. Jack Lowry, also of Mounds.

Surviving him are his wife and five of his children, five grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.

(Matthew Stokes married Sarah E. Boswell on 24 Aug 1865, in Union Co., Ill.  Walter A. Stokes married Ollie Amburn on 29 Aug 1888, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  W. Ausby Stokes Dec. 21-1869-Feb. 20 1931 Father Ollie Stokes his wife Nov. 9, 1872-Feb. 2, 1951 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

John W. Gallion Dies at Age of Eighty-One

John W. Gallion, for many years a resident of this county, died at one o’clock Monday morning at the Anna hospital.  He had reached the age of 81 years.

Surviving him are four daughters, Mrs. B. I. Britton, of Villa Ridge, Mrs. F. M. Block, of Cairo, Mrs. Claude Johnson, of Brookfield, Fla., and Mrs. George Nichols, of Springfield, Ill.; also one son, William Gallion, of Champaign, Ill.; and one brother, James Gallion, of Aurora, Mo.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Britton, at Breezy Summit farm near Villa Ridge, Secretary J. C. Mench, of the Y. M. C. A., officiating.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with Undertaker G. A. James in charge.

Among those attending the funeral from Mounds were Mr. and Mrs. L. Hodge, Mrs. A. Holbrook, Mr. and Mrs. William Earle, Mrs. R. C. Poole, Mrs. George Stinnett, Mrs. A. C. Burr, Mrs. A. Deeslie, Mrs. Ora Pollock, Mrs. H. C. Fellenstein, and Mrs. Ida Weaver.


Mr. and Mrs. William Gallion of Champaign were called here the first of the week by the death of Mr. Gallion’s father.

Life Story of Thomas N. Habirts Reads Like a Romance

Thomas N. Habirts was born September 15, 1860, in Detroit, Michigan, and died February 19, 1931, in Mounds, Ill.  On his father’s side he was of French descent.  His mother was a Norwegian doctor, something unusual in that day.  He was educated for the priesthood and while he later renounced Catholicism, he was devoutly religious throughout his life.  Mr. Habirts spoke both French and Spanish fluently and had some knowledge of the German language.

His life story reads like a romance.  In the prime of life he was a brilliant, successful business man, a general contractor in Pittsburg, Pa., acquiring much wealth and losing it in later years.  He made frequent business trips to South America, Central America and Mexico, where he was sole engineer in the construction of battle ships for these counties at that time.

Reverses overtook him, his health failed and he felt keenly the cessation of his activities.

For the last twenty years he had lived with his daughter, Mrs. Perry Keefe, in Vienna, Ill., for some years in Metropolis, going there in 1918 and in Mounds since July 1924.

He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Perry Keefe, of Mounds, Mrs. McLaughlin, of Toledo, Ohio, and Mrs. Walter Lewis, of Philadelphia, Pa., also one son and one grandson.

Mr. Habirts became a Mason May 5th 1916, and received the Shriners’ degree April 22, 1920.

Funeral services were held at the Mounds M. E. church Saturday afternoon February 21st and he was buried with Masonic honors in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

(According to his death certificate, Thomas Napoleon Haberts was born 15 Sep 1860, in Detroit, Mich., Joseph Haberts, a native of France, and Ellen Emery, a native of Holland, died 19 Feb 1931, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

Cards of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere appreciation for the many kindnesses shown us during the illness and at the death of our husband and father, Walter Ausby Stokes.  We also wish to thank those who sent flowers.
Mrs. W. A. Stokes and children

We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the neighbors and friends show so kindly assisted us during the illness and after the death of our beloved father, Thomas N. Habirts.  The gracious deeds and words of consolation will be remembered always.
Mr. and Mrs. Perry Keele
 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Mar 1931:
FORMER MOUND CITY GIRL PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Julia Sally, sister of Mrs. P. B. Dunsworth, of this city, passed away at her home in Augusta, Ga., Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  The body was brought to Mound City arriving Sunday and was taken to the Dunsworth home on South Fourth Street where funeral services were held Monday afternoon.  The services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Ward of Dongola, pastor of the Baptist Church.  Immediately after the services at the residence the cortege left via automobile for Grand Chain where interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.

Mrs. Sally is survived by her husband, one sister, Mrs. Dunsworth, and a nephew, Leo Dunsworth.  Mrs. Sally was before her marriage Miss Julia Yoakum, of this city, and was quite well known in the community, having resided here before going to Augusta to reside.

G. A. James was the funeral director.
 
ANDREW HARRISON BLAKLEY PASSES AWAY ON BIRTHDAY

Andrew Harrison Blakley, age 51, years, passed away Friday at his home near Ullin.  A coincidence of his death was that he passed away on his birthday anniversary.

He is survived by his widow, a sister, who resides in Cleveland, Ohio, and two brothers, William and Richard Blakley, of Evansville, Ind.  The body was taken to Evansville Saturday, the cortege leaving Ullin by automobiles.

Funeral services were held Monday in Evansville, followed by interment in the cemetery there.  W. J. Rhymer was the funeral director.

(Andrew H. Blakely married on 15 Oct 1908, in Vanderburgh, Ind., Carrie B. Koozley.  After Mr. Blakely’s death, she married William Akers.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Murder Charge Is Probable in Killing
Harry Hamilton, Colored, Held Following Killing of Garner McClinton

Harry Hamilton, colored, will probably face either death or life imprisonment, following the killing of Garner McClinton, also colored, at Grand Chain, on last Friday night.  Hamilton, four hours after his dispute with McClinton, stepped from behind an automobile and called out to him as he shot one time.  McClinton staggered back a few steps and dropped, dying in a few minutes.

Details of the shooting are missing in some instances.  Hamilton claimed that McClinton took $10 from him in the joint that McClinton was operating.  It was taken when Hamilton laid down $10 and McClinton picked it up, so Hamilton asserts, and not as the result of gambling.

Angry and sore, Hamilton began to seek revenge and started hunting for a shotgun, it is asserted trying to borrow one.  He was seen about Grand Chain all evening and asked to borrow a shotgun from one person.

A car containing Ulysses Calhoun, Clifford Calhoun, and Mrs. Harry Hamilton, drove up near the home of Harry Edwards, which is at the turn of the rods as your leave Grand Chain to go to Karnak. 

Hamilton was seen behind the woodshed at this place and it is said at that time he did not have a gun.  It was about 8 o’clock.

A moment later when McClinton stepped from the rear or side door of the house and came towards the car, Hamilton stepped from behind the car, and addressing the McClinton, “There’s the ____ that I’m going to kill,” he leveled the shotgun and fired.  Some think his wife bought the gun.  Ownership of the gun has not been established.

The charge struck McClinton in the stomach and he staggered back a few steps, dropped down and died.

Hamilton went on a few steps, came back and viewed his victim.  Then he went on the road toward Levings where officers found him.

Hamilton maintains that he fired in self-defense.  He asserts that the thought McClinton was about to shoot.  But the fact that he hung about Grand Chain for four hours armed himself and suddenly stepped out, points to deliberate shooting.
             The coroner’s jury under Dr. O. T. Hudson, bound Hamilton over to the grand jury.

Search of McClinton’s body failed to reveal any firearms.  There was around $3 on him.

Hamilton’s served time for petit larceny at Dam 53 and had not been out so very long.  Many consider his case as one in which either a long prison sentence will result or possibly the electric chair.  Both men were married.

(Garner McClinton was born 22 Jul 1904, in Mississippi, the son of Sam McClinton and Josia Taylor, natives of Mississippi, died 27 Feb 1931, in Grand Chain, Ill., husband of Smithia McClinton, and was buried in Medioth (?) Cemetery in Road District 5, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Andrew Blakely passed away Friday morning after several months’ illness.  His body was taken to Indiana.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Mar 1931:
Ullin Resident Dies Friday

Andrew Harrison Blakely, age 51 years, died Friday at his home near Ullin in his birthday anniversary.  He is survived by his widow, a sister, who resides in Cleveland, Ohio, and two brothers, William and Richard Blakely, of Evansville, Ind.  The body was taken to Evansville, Ind., Saturday morning, the cortege leaving Ullin by automobile.

Funeral services were held Monday March 2, in Evansville with interment in the cemetery there.  W. J. Rhymer, undertaker at Ullin had charge of the funeral.

Mrs. Edna Freeze, Mrs. Frank Gandy, Mrs. M. G. Hart, Miss Anna White, Dick Cline, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Carson, Mrs. Charles Rider, and Mrs. Thomas Alldrich, of Villa Ridge attended the funeral of Andrew Blakely in Evansville, Ind., Monday.  (Ullin)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Mar 1931:
DIED NEAR ULLIN

John R. Smith, 57 years, died near Ullin yesterday.  He was at the home of W. H. Evans, his nephew, with whom he had made his home for a number of years.  His funeral was held this morning at __ o’clock at Cache Chapel.

(His death certificate states that John R. Smith was born about 1875, the son of Albert Smith, and died 11 Mar 1931, in Road District 3, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. MARY ANN HOLT DIES AT MOUNDS HOME

Mrs. Mary Ann Holt, age 89 years, mother of W. J. Crocker, of Mounds, passed away Monday morning at the home of her son.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. M. Craig, at Elkville, where the body was taken Tuesday morning, leaving Mounds at 5:17 o’clock. 

Interment was made in the Elkville cemetery.

Mrs. Holt was born November 7, 1841.  She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Craig, and her son, Mr. Crocker, besides many other relatives and friends.  G. A. James had charge of arrangements at Mounds and the shipping of the body.

(Francis M. Craig married Rosa D. Crocker on 6 Jul 1898, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER MOUND CITY MAN DIES AT HOME IN MEMPHIS

Word has been received in this city stating that James Fisher, brother-in-law of Miss Belle Goldsmith, had passed away early Sunday morning, March 8, at his home in Memphis, Tenn., following a brief illness.

Mr. Fisher formerly resided in Mound City, having united in marriage to Miss Ollie Goldsmith, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goldsmith.  While in Mound City he was an employee of the Marine Ways.

Mr. Fisher and his family moved from Mound City to Memphis several years ago where they have since resided.

Left to mourn his passing are his widow, one daughter, and two sons, and a wide circle of friends, both in Memphis and this community.  His sister-in-law, Miss Belle Goldsmith, who has been confined to her home by illness, was unable to attend the funeral.
 
BROTHER OF MOUND CITY MAN DIES AT ANNA HOME

William Settlemoir, age 86 years, passed away at his home in Anna Sunday night following an illness of several months.  Mr. Settlemoir was the eldest brother of I. J. Settlemoir, and had on several occasions visited his brother and other relatives in Mound City.  He was well known throughout Union County, being one of the most prominent farmers in the county.  For the past several years or since his retirement from active farm life, Mr. Settlemoir and his wife had resided in Anna, where he had made many friends.  He was a man of fine Christian character and until the infirmities of age crept upon him, was the possessor of jovial disposition.  He was a man of unusual kindness and in all conditions of life, extremely optimistic.

Surviving Mr. Settlemoir are his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Settlemoir, six children, three brothers, I., J. Settlemoir, of Mound City, John Settlemoir of Benton, Illinois, and Eph Settlemoir, of Anna; one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Treece, of Malden, Mo.; more than forty grandchildren and several great grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at Anna at the family residence Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock which were largely attended.  Interment was made in the Anna Cemetery.  At the cemetery full military honors were given.  Mr. Settlemoir being a veteran of the Civil War.  He leaves many close friends who deeply sympathize with the bereaved aged widow and the family.

(William W. Settlemoir, 18, born in Union Co., Ill., 5’ 4 ½”, light hair, grey eyes, fair complexion, enlisted as a private on 23 Mar 1865, in Co. F, 14th Illinois Infantry at Danville, Ill., to serve one year.  William W. Settlemoir married Elizabeth Phelan on 25 Sep 1867, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that he was born in Tennessee, the son of John Settlemoir.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  William W. Settlemoir Born Oct. 8, 1845 Died March 8, 1931 Co. F, 14 Ill. Inf. Father Elizabeth Settlemoir Born Jan. 25, 1849 Died Jan. 9, 1935 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 
I. J. Settlemoir, accompanied by his son, J. W. Settlemoir, spent Tuesday afternoon in Anna, where they attended the funeral of the former’s brother, William Settlemoir.
 
LUCREASY PRYOR, AGE 105 YEAS, PASSED AWAY

Funeral services of Lucreasy Pryor, who passed away March 2, 1931, at her home five miles northeast of Villa Ridge were held at Church of God in Christ Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.

Mrs. Lucreasy was born in state of Louisiana.  She was 105 years old.,  Surviving her are three sons, Grant Pryor, Dan Pryor, Isaac Pryor, and one daughter, Mary Woody, all of Villa Ridge, 28 grandchildren, 45 great-grandchildren and a host of friend.

(The 105 years seems to be an exaggeration and she was closer to 82 years old.  The 1870 census of Caledonia, Pulaski Co., Ill., states that Loucretia Prior was born about 1849 in Arkansas.  The 1880 census of Mound City states that Cresa Prior was born about 1850 in Arkansas.  The 1930 census of Pulaski states that Lucrecea Prior was born about 1858 in Arkansas.  Her death certificate states that Lucretia Prior nee Marshall was born about 1835 in Baton Rouge, La., died 2 Mar 1931, in Pulaski, Ill., and was buried in Caledonia Cemetery.  Dan Prior, 24, born in America, son of Alfred Prior and Lourena Marshall, married 14 May 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Millie A. Gray 20, born in Villa Ridge, daughter of Charlie Gray and Susan Sitters.  Andrew Prior, 22, of Villa Ridge, son of Alfred Prior and Loucretia Marshall, married on 4 Aug 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Ella Offord, 20, born in Nashville, Tenn., daughter of William McKinney and Lizzie Voars.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Mary Ann Holt, mother of W. J. Crocker, died at her son’s home March 9, at 6:30 a.m. at the age of 89 years, 4 months, 2 days.  The body was shipped to Elkville Tuesday morning, March 10th, and funeral services were held at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. M. Craig, of that town.
 
INFANT BURIED

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. William Crippen, of Mounds, who was born at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo Thursday, March 5, was buried Thursday afternoon in the cemetery at Mounds.  Mrs. Crippen, was before her marriage Miss Agnes Schuler of this city.

(His death certificate states that William Robert Crippen was stillborn 5 Mar 1931, in Cairo, Ill., the son of W. A. Crippen, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Agnes Schuler, a native of Mound City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Mar 1931:
Mrs. Mary Ann Holt Dies Monday Morning

Mrs. Mary Ann Holt, mother of W. J. Crocker, died early Monday morning, March 9, 1931, at the home of Mr. Crocker, where she had lived for a number of years.  Mrs. Holt, who was born Nov. 7, 1841, had reached the advanced age of 89 years, 3 months and 28 days.  She is survived by her son, and a daughter, Mrs. F. M. Craig, of Elkville, also other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the home of her daughter in Elkville and interment was made in the Elkville Cemetery.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

Mr. and Mrs. Zon Walston were called to Bardwell, Ky., on Tuesday on account of the death of a nephew of Mr. Walston.  He was employed as a mail clerk with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico, where his death occurred last Thursday.  He leaves a wife and one child, besides a host of other relatives.

Hugh Rhymer and daughter, Miss Vera, of East St. Louis visited relatives and friends here Thursday, having been called to Ullin by the death of Mr. Rhymer’s sister, Mrs. John Keller, of Centralia, whose funeral was held at Ullin Wednesday afternoon.  Mr. Rhymer and family formerly resided in Mounds.

(Her death certificate states that Ora Keller was born 8 Sep 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Charles Rhymer, a native of North Carolina, and Victoria Sowers, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., died 9 Mar 1931, in Centralia, Ill., wife of J. W. Keller, and was buried in New Hope Cemetery.  Her marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Orah wife of J. W. Keller 1886-1931.—Darrel Dexter)

Rev. and Mrs. W. L. Hanbaum attended the funeral of a relative in Fairview Tuesday of last week.  They were accompanied home by Mrs. Hanbaum’s parents, Dr. and Mrs. Resho Robertson, of Belleville, who spent a few days with them.  (Mound City)

Card of Thanks

We desire to express our deep appreciation and heartfelt thanks to our neighbors and friends for their many acts of kindness and their words of sympathy during the illness and following the death of our beloved mother, Mrs. Mary Ann Holt.  Especially do we wish to thank those who sent floral offerings and those who furnished cars.  Your kindness will ever be remembered.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Crocker
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Mar 1931:
PROMINENT COLORED CITIZEN OF MOUND CITY PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Nancy Williams, prominent colored woman of this city, passed away at her home at 7 o’clock Thursday morning at the age of 60 years.  She was the mother of John Watts, mail carrier in north Mound City.  She is also survived by three daughters, Misses Ona and Birdie Williams, and Mrs. Carrie Lackey, all of this city.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 12 o’clock noon at the A. M. E. Church of this city. 

Undertaker Donaldson of Cairo has charge of funeral arrangements. Interment will be made in the cemetery at Mounds.
 
VETERINARIAN DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS THURSDAY

Dr. Elmund Cuffle, age 59 years, well known colored veterinarians of Mounds, passed away Thursday night at 8 o’clock following an illness of several months.  He practiced his profession for more than a score of years in Pulaski County and was well known and highly respected throughout the community by both white and colored residents.

Surviving him are three daughters, Mrs. Amanda Chishom and Miss Annie Cuffle, of Pontiac, Mich., and Mrs. Bernice Pearson, of Newark, N.J., and two brothers, Andrew Cuffle, of Cairo and Henry Cuffle, of Mounds.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. John’s Baptist Church of Mounds, the Rev. J. T. Dodson officiating.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Mounds.

(According to his death certificate, Edmond Cuffie was born 14 Oct 1871, in Charleston, Mo., the son of Hiram Cuffie, a native of Georgia, died 12 Mar 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Mame Cuffie, and was buried Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. CYNTHIA BOWERS PASSES AWAY AT HOME IN MOUND CITY

Mrs. Cynthia Bowers, age 33 years, wife of Curtis Bowers, passed away at her home in this city at 5:15 o’clock Wednesday morning following a brief illness of pneumonia.  Mrs. Bowers, who was before her marriage, Miss Cynthia Talley, was born in Grand Chain and came to Mound City when quite young, where she has since made her home.  She was united in marriage February 17, 1916, to Curtis Bowers, and to this union one son was born.

Surviving Mrs. Bowers are her husband, one son, Ralph, age 13 years, her father, J. W. Talley of this city, two sisters, Mrs. C. B. Mohundro, of Cairo, and Mrs. Henry Hall, of this city, six brothers, Mark, Noah, Adolphus, Charles, Earnest, and Gilbert Talley,  all of Mound City, several nieces and nephews and a number of other relatives.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o’clock this afternoon (Friday) at the residence on Main Street conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward, pastor of the Baptist Church of Dongola and formerly pastor of the Baptist Church in this city.  Interment will be made in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

Casket bearers will be Albert Boekenkamp, Harry Dalton, Edward Ellenwood, John Edwards, Alva Smith and Roy Beaver.

(Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Cynthia Bowers Born Oct. 12, 1898 Died March 18, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)


OLMSTEAD MAN DIES AT AGE OF 101 MARCH 6

William Washington, well known colored resident of the Olmsted section passed away at his home on the B. Bierbaum farm east of Olmstead March 6, at the age of 101.  He had asserted that he was born October 25, 1830, in Columbus, Miss.  He claimed to have served in the Civil War under Gen. Robert E. Lee, being in the Siege of Richmond. He was the father of 11 children and had 17 grandchildren.

(His death certificate states that William Washington was born 25 Oct 1830, in Lowndes Co., Miss., the son of Henry Kitchen Keen and Susie Brown, and died 7 Mar 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Callie McCray Washington.  The 1900 census of Gibson Co., Tenn., states he was born in October 1830.  The 1910 census of Gibson Co., Tenn., also gives his year of birth as about 1831.  The 1930 census of Pulaski Co., Ill., gives his age as 100.—Darrel Dexter)
 
TAKES LIFE

Ike Bodkin, lumberman of Wickliffe, Ky., took his life yesterday morning by cutting his throat with a razor.  Quite a number of people here who have been in the lumber business knew him.
 
OLMSTEAD MAN PASSES AWAY

William Mayer passed away at his home three miles northwest of Olmstead at 6:30 o’clock Thursday morning following a brief illness of pneumonia.  He was 55 years of age and had been a resident of the Olmstead district about twenty-five years.

He is survived by his widow, four children, Earnest Mayer, of Grand Chain, Fred, of St. Louis, Mrs. William Temke, of Ullin, and Lorene, residing at home with her parents.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Lutheran church at Olmsted, the Rev. Huebotter officiating.  Interment will be made in Concord Cemetery by G. A. James, undertaker in charge.

(His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  William Mayer 1875-1931 Josephine Mayer 1873-1950.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A. Holbrook was called to Pennsylvania on account of the death of his sister.  (Mounds)
 
On Monday of last week Mrs. Roscoe Woods was called to Centralia to the bedside of her sister, Mrs. John Keller.  She had been in failing health for a number of years and she passed away early on Tuesday morning.  Her body was brought to New Hope for burial.  She leaves to mourn her passing a husband and several children and two brothers, W. J. Rhymer and Hugh Rhymer and several sisters. (Beech Grove)

(Her marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Orah wife of J. W. Keller 1886-1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Mar 1931:
Mrs. Winifred Penrod Palmer Dies Following Surgical Operation

Mrs. Winifred Penrod Palmer died in the Willard-Hale Memorial Hospital, Anna, Ill., March 16, following an operation for appendicitis.

Mrs. Palmer was the widow of the late Manley Palmer, of this city, Illinois Central fireman who was killed in a wreck near Belleville about two years ago.  She was born November 2, 1902, and had reached the age of 28 years.

Surviving her are her mother, a sister, Mrs. Parker, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and a brother, Ray Penrod, of Anna.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church of Anna, Ill., Wednesday afternoon, March 18th, at 2 o’clock.  Interment was made in the Mounds cemetery.

(According to her death certificate, Winifred Palmer was born 2 Nov 1902, in Illinois, the daughter of James Allen Penrod and Malinda Meisenheimer, died 16 Mar 1931 in Anna, Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Well Known Veterinarian Dies

Dr. Edmond Cuffie, colored, for many years a practicing veterinarian in Mounds and Pulaski County, died at his home here Thursday, March 12.  While he had been in poor health for some time, he had been able to attend to his practice until quite recently.

Dr. Cuffie was born October 14, 1871, and had reached the age of 59 years, 4 months and 26 days.
Surviving him are three daughters, Mrs. Amanda Chishom and Miss Anna Cuffie, of Pontiac, Mich., and Mrs. Bernice Pearson, of Newark, N.J.; also two brothers, Andrew Cuffie, of Cairo and Henry Cuffie, of Mounds.  His wife preceded him in death last year.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the St. John Baptist Church, the Rev. J. T. Dodson officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Former Mounds Resident Dies

Vester Webb, who with his family formerly resided here, died last Sunday at his home in Arlington, Ky.   Mr. Webb leaves his widow and four children, three sons and one daughter.

Pioneer in Woman’s Club Movement Dies Saturday

Mrs. Isabella Lanning Candee of Cairo, first president of the Illinois Federation of Woman’s Clubs, died Saturday, March 14th, at the home of her son, H. S. Candee, of Chicago, at the age of 84.

Mrs. Candee was one of the organizers of the Cairo Woman’s Club and Library Association in 1873 and was second president of the club.  At the time of her death she was its president emeritus.

Mrs. Candee was a member of the board of lady managers of the World’s Columbian Exposition and she also served many years as state president of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Episcopal Church in Illinois.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Mar 1931:
FORMER MOUND CITY MAN DIES AT HOME IN EAST

News has been received in Mounds City announcing the death of Thomas S. Rouse, of Hammonton, N.J., which occurred Monday, March 23.

Mr. Rouse was born in Baltimore, Md., but was reared in Mound City.  He was the son of the late James W. and Rachael G. Rouse.  He was quite well known here among the older settlers, the Rouse family being pioneer settlers of the county.

Left to mourn his passing are his widow, four daughters, several grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Eva M. Bowling, of St. Louis and one brother, James W. Rouse, of Memphis, Tenn.  Funeral services were held at this home in Hammonton, Wednesday and interment was made in the cemetery there.

(Jesse L. Bowling married Eva M. Rouse on 23 Apr 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
HUSBAND OF FORMER GRAND CHAIN GIRL DROWNS FRIDAY

Emery Haas, formerly of Grand Chain, is missing and it is supposition that he was drowned Friday shortly after he went to work.  He was employed on the U. S. government fleet at Paducah.  Every effort is being made to recover the body.

He leaves a wife, Mrs. Louise Reichert Haas, and small daughter age 3 years.  Mrs. Haas is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Reichert, who formerly resided at Grand Chain, but now live at Olive Branch.  She is also a cousin of Mrs. C. E. Richey of this city.  Mr. and Mrs. Richey motored to Paducah Tuesday and spent a few hours with Mrs. Haas.
 
FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN PASSES AWAY IN ST. LOUIS

Mrs. Emily Jane Cagle, widow of George Cagle, passed away at the home of her daughter in St. Louis at the age of 77 years.  Mrs. Cagle, who was affectionately known to her friends in this community as “Grandma Cagle” was ill about three months. She made her home in Mound City many years and about five years ago left here and for some time resided in Arkansas later going to St. Louis, where she has since made her home.

She was a woman of beautiful Christian character and to know her was to love her.  Her kind and sympathetic disposition had won for her many loyal friends.  She was a kind and loving mother and one who will be greatly missed by her children.  She had made her home since leaving Mound City with her daughter, Mrs. Al Maples.

She is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Daisy Maples, of St. Louis, Mrs. Della Dumm, on New Madrid, Mo., Mrs. Beel Reid, and Mrs. Georgia Ann Wallace, of Arkansas, and one son Daniel, of St. Louis, besides a number of grandchildren and other relatives.

Funeral services were held at the grave Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by a minister from St. Louis.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, G. A. James of Mound City directed the funeral.

(Laurence Harris, 24, born in Coles Co., Ill., son of James Harris and Frances Blevins, married on 24 Mar 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Laura B. Cagle, 24, born in Benton Co., Tenn., daughter of George W Cagle and Emily Wright.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Emily J. Cagle 1851-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
  
FORMER RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY PASSES AWAY IN SOUTH

Word has been received by relatives in this city stating that Joe Masterson, of Monroe, La., a former resident of Mound City, passed away at his home Saturday night, following a brief illness of pneumonia.
Mr. Masterson was born in Mound City and lived here until fourteen years ago when he left for the south.  He was married in Monroe, La., and his widow and three daughters survive him.  He also leaves to mourn his passing a brother, John Masterson, of this city; two sisters, Miss Kate Masterson, of this city, and Mrs. Mary Carson, of Memphis.  While in Mound City he was an employee of the Marine Ways.
John Masterson and sister, Miss Kate, left immediately upon receipt of the message to attend the funeral of their brother.  They were joined in Memphis by Mrs. Carson, who also went to Monroe.
 
MRS. MARTHA CURRY DIES SUDDENLY NEAR PULASKI

Mrs. Martha Curry, age 87 years, widow of James Curry, passed away suddenly at her home three miles east of Pulaski late Tuesday afternoon.  Her death has brought great sadness to the community as she was very much loved by a large circle of friends.  She had been ill less than two weeks, but was thought to be improving as just before the end she seemed in good spirits and seemed to be much better.  She was known to her many friends as “Aunt Martha” or “Grandma Curry.”  She was very active considering her age and even until the end her will to go and do astonished her family and friends.

She came to Pulaski County when quite young while southern Illinois was still a wilderness and she lived almost her entire life on the farm where she was living at the time of her death.  This farm was cleared by her husband, James Curry, who preceded his wife in death many years ago.

She is survived by six children, Charles Curry, with whom she had lived; Olen Curry, of Detroit, Mich.; Mr. Essie Rives, of Pulaski; Mrs. Ab Bankson, of Pulaski, Mrs. Edward Lackey, of Pulaski, and Mrs. George Mumford, of Ullin.  She is also survived by a large number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held in the New Concord Methodist Church four miles east of Pulaski at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon.  Interment was made in the Concord Cemetery beside the grave of her husband.  W. H. Aldred directed the funeral.

(James Curry married Martha E. Rodgers on 24 Dec 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill. Her death certificate states that Martha Ellen Curry was born 16 May 1844, in Mayfield, Ky., daughter of Anthony and Lucy Rogers, died 24 Mar 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  J. Edward Reeves, 20, born in Union Co., Ill., son of W. T. Reeves and Barbara Smoot, married on 6 Aug 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Essie Curry, 21, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of James Curry and Martha Rodgers.  Abner C. Bankson married Laura B. Curry on 27 May 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill. E. J. Lackey married Stella Curry on 5 Aug 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Peter Lentz married Nancy A. Curry on 28 Jan 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George M. Mumford married Mrs. Alice Lentz on 30 May 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

John T. Ellis, age 70 years, 11 months and 15 days, died at the home of his sister, Mrs. Charles Rose, March 1_, 1931, at 3 p.m.  He was the son of D. R. Ellis, of Pope County, Illinois.

He was united in marriage early to Nora Blake.  To this union one daughter was born, Mrs. ___nnett, now residing in St. __, Idaho.  Later in life he was married to Sue Chenoth, of Granite City, __nn.  Unto this union 2 sons were born, namely, Harold D., of Knoxville, Tenn., and Fred, of Los Angeles, Calif.
He leaves to mourn his death besides his children, one brother, P. B. Ellis, of Carterville, Illinois and one sister, Mrs. Grace Rose, of Perks and a host of other relatives and friends.

He was never confined to his bed ___t of his breathing.  His ___position will be missed by those who came in contact with him.

Funeral services were conducted _________ Wednesday night by J. L. Littleton.  Interment was made in the Odd Fellows Cemetery at Golconda, Illinois. 

(His death certificate states that John T. Ellis died 17 Mar 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of David R. Ellis and Catherine Watson.—Darrel Dexter)


Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Mar 1931:
Pioneer Passes

Mrs. Martha Curry, 87, a Pulaski County pioneer, died at her home near Pulaski Tuesday.  She is survived by six children:  Charles, with whom she lived, Mrs. Essie Rives, Mrs. Ab Bankson and Mrs. Edward Lackey, all of Pulaski, Mrs. George Mumford, of Ullin, and Olen, of Detroit, Mich.

Mrs. Effie Stull Dies in St. Louis

Mrs. Effie Stull, of Cairo, a former resident of Mounds, died Wednesday, March 25th, at the Bernard Hospital in St. Louis, where she had been a patient for some time.

Surviving Mrs. Stull are her husband, Oscar Stull, and five children, Mrs. Georgia Volker and Mrs. Ruby Haige, of East St. Louis, Mrs. Beulah Stroud, of St. Louis, Mrs. Hazel Boyle, of Mounds and Raymond Stull of Cairo.  She also leaves one brother, Mark Britt, of Mounds, and four sisters, Mrs. Robert Anglin, Mounds, Mrs. Robert Welch, and Mrs. Lacy Hughes, of Attica, Ind., and Mrs. Cloara Morford, of St. Louis.

Funeral services will be held at the family home in Cairo this afternoon at 1:30 o’clock with interment in Thistlewood Cemetery, Mounds.  G. A. James will direct the funeral.

Several from here (America) attended the funeral of Will Meyers in Olmstead Saturday afternoon.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Apr 1931:
DONGOLA WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Bertha Martin, age 39 years, passed away Saturday night in the hospital at Anna.  The body was removed to the home of her sister, Mrs. Henry Corzine, in Dongola, and funeral services were held Monday morning at the Christian Chapel near Dongola, the Rev. W. W. Karraker officiating.
Interment was made in the Karraker Cemetery.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.
 
JAMES A. CROW PASSES AWAY NORTH OF MOUNDS

James A. Crow, age 50 years, passed away at his home north of Mounds Saturday.  Surviving Mr. Crow are his widow and three children, Leonard Crow, Mrs. Edith Daniels, and Miss Edna Marie Crow, all of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Umphrey, of Jackson, Tenn., and Mrs. Nora Duncan, of Murphysboro; besides five grandchildren and other relatives and a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Shiloh Baptist Church with Rev. W. J. Ward, pastor of the Baptist Church at Dongola, officiating.  Interment was made in the Shiloh Cemetery.

George Hartwell and son directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that James Augustus Crow was born 15 Feb 1881, near Carbondale, Ill., the son of Jesse Crow and Sarah Burgeous, died 29 Mar 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Ollie Crow, and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge.  His marker in New Shiloh Cemetery reads:  James A. Crow Born Feb. 15, 1880, Died March 28, 1931 Ollie B. Crow Born Dec. 27, 1880 Died April 11, 1973.—Darrel Dexter)
 
HELD FOR AID IN GRAND CHAIN MURDER

Mrs. Florence Hamilton, of Grand Chain, colored, was held for the grand jury following a preliminary hearing held yesterday before C. M. Thompson.  This is the case in which Harry Hamilton shot Garner McClinton with a shotgun.  The state expects to show that she got the gun and delivered it to her husband who then shot McClinton within a minute or so after receiving the gun.
 
MOTHER OF LOCAL DOCTOR PASSES AWAY AT DONGOLA

Mrs. Harriet Hargan, mother of Dr. J. F. Hargan, of this city, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Corbett, near Dongola, at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Hargan was 97 years of age and all her life had been unusually active despite her age, until a year ago when he health began to fail.

She had been confined to her bed only two weeks.

She was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, and had only resided in Illinois the past four years where she had made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Corbett, and family.  Until about two years ago she with her daughter and family resided in Pulaski County near America on the Hendricks farm.

In 1851 she was united in marriage to Alfred Hargan and to this union thirteen children were born, eight of who survive their mother.  Left to mourn her passing are four sons, Dr. J. F. Hargan, and Ben Hargan of Mound City; Oscar Hargan, of Louisville, Ky., and Virgil Hargan, of Paducah; four daughters, Mrs. Betty Goodman, and Mrs. Corbett of Dongola, Mrs. Kate Leonard, of Elizabethtown, Ky., besides a number of grandchildren and three great-grandchildren and a large circle of friends.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed at press time.

(Her death certificate states that Harriet Hargan was born 24 Apr 1834 in Hardin Co., Ky., the daughter of John K. Davis, died 2 Apr 1931, in Union Co., Ill., the wife of Alfred Hargan, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads Harriet Hargan 1837-1931 In Memory of Our Mother—Darrel Dexter)
 
Sunday afternoon G. A. James went to Barlow, Ky., where he assisted undertaker F. M. Elkins in directing the funeral of Mr. and Mrs. John Willis whose death occurred at Memphis, Tenn., Friday. 

 

Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of “Aunt” Martha Curry last Thursday at New Concord.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Apr 1931:
Death Claims J. A. Crow

James Augustus Crow, was born near Marion, Williamson County, Illinois, February 18, 1881, and passed away at his home northwest of Mounds, March 28, 1931, aged 50 years, 1 month and 13 days.
He was united in marriage to Miss Ollie Pennell October 19, 1902.

He made a profession of faith when about 14 years of age and united with the Baptist Church at Murphysboro.  He had been a resident of this county 28 years.

Surviving him are his widow, Ollie Pennell Crow, and three children, Leonard Crow, Mrs. Raymond Daniels, and Edna Marie Crow, all of Mounds; two sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Umphrey, of Jackson, Tenn., and Mrs. Nora Duncan, of Murphysboro, also five grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at Shiloh Baptist Church with the Rev. W. J. Ward in the pulpit.  George P. Hartwell and Son directed the funeral.


Quite a number from here (Ullin) attended the funeral of Mrs. Martha Curry at New Concord near Pulaski Thursday afternoon.

Olen Curry returned Sunday to his home in Detroit, Mich., having been called here by the death of his mother, Mrs. Martha Curry.  (Pulaski)

Pulaski County Resident Dies

Mrs. Harriet Hargan, known to everyone as “Grandma Hargan,” passed away at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Tony Corbett, in Dongola.

Until one month ago she made her home in Mounds with Mrs. Corbett, going to Dongola with her daughter when she moved to that city.

She has been a member of the Methodist Church for over 80 years.  Up to ten days before her death she was able to be out and enjoy her work and friends.  She would have reached her 97th birthday April 24th.

Mrs. Hargan was the mother of thirteen children, eight living, Mrs. Tony Corbett, of Dongola, Mrs. Betty Goodman, of Dongola, Dr. John Hargan, of Mound City, B. I. Hargan, of Cairo, W. V. Hargan, of Paducah, Ky., Mrs. Lucy Leonard, Mrs. Kate Bagard, and Oscar Hargan, all of Vinegrove, Ky.

She is the grandmother of Mrs. Carl Harper, Mrs. Robert Wildy, Hazel Corbet, Effie Corbett, and Mrs. Floyd Butler, all living in Mounds.  Besides grandchildren, she leaves a number of great grandchildren to mourn her death.

Funeral services will be held at the Baptist Church in Dongola this afternoon, Rev. Ward of Dongola and Rev. H. B. Shoaff of Mounds officiating.  Interment to be made in the Mounds cemetery.
   
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Apr 1931:
___ER OF LATE DR. EDWIN CUFFLE DIES IN MOUNDS

___e Peron, colored, 28 years old, passed away at her home in Mounds Tuesday.  She was a ___ of the late Dr. Edwin Cuffle, well known veterinarian who died in Mounds about a month ago. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the St. John’s Baptist Church conducted by ___so. Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.
 
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. HARRIET HARGAN

Funeral services for Mrs. Harriet Hargan age 97 years, who passed away at the home of her daughter, ___ny Corbett, in Dongola, ___y afternoon at 2 o’clock ___ Friday afternoon at the Baptist Church in Dongola with Rev. W. I. Ward officiating.  Immediately following the services at which the cortege left by automobile for Mounds where interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Karcher Brothers directed the funeral.  Many sorrowing friends of the family attended services and floral offerings were profuse and beautiful.

Pallbearers were H. J. Neibauer, Clem Baggott, Preller Douglas, ___ Penrod, Frank Armon___, John Goodman, Tell Groner, Arthur Albright.  Mrs. Hargan was the mother of Dr. J. F. Hargan, of this city and Ben Hargan of Ur___.

FORMER MOUND CITY MAN DIES AT HOME IN JOPPA

George King, age 52 years, passed away Tuesday morning at his home in Joppa, Illinois.  Mr. King formerly resided in Mound City where he was in the garage business, and was quite well known here.  He was only ill one week.

He is survived by his widow and three sons, and several other relatives.  Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock and interment was made in the cemetery near there.

(His death certificate states that George King was born 12 Sep 1879, in Elkville, Ill., the son of Miles Brouney King, native of Bowling Green, Ky., and Olive A. Hillen, native of Illinois, died 7 Apr 1931, in Joppa, Massac Co., Ill., husband of Anna King, and as buried in Reevesville, Johnson Co., Ill.  Miles B. King married Olive A. Hillen on 1 Jul 1874, in Randolph Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dr. J. F. Hargan and son, John, and Ben Hargan, of this city, were called to Dongola last Thursday on account of the death of their mother and grandmother, Mrs. Harriet Hargan.
 
Oscar Atherton spent Tuesday afternoon at Joppa, Illinois, on account of the death of George King.
 
BADLY DECOMPOSED BODY OF MAN FOUND IN SOUTH MOUNDS

A body of a man which was badly decomposed was found in South Mounds Saturday in a pile of rubbish.  One arm was missing from the body and the features were almost entirely obliterated so that identification would be impossible. This is the second finding of this kind in the last two months.  A white man of middle age was found dead under a tree in south Mounds here some two months ago with nothing on the body by which an identification could be established.

The body which was discovered by workmen was in such a state of decomposition that it offered no clue to identification.  His age is believed to be about fifty according to Coroner O. T. Hudson and Undertaker George P. Hartwell and Sons who handled the body.

Coroner Hudson did not empanel a coroner’s jury inasmuch as nothing was available which could be used to identify the man.  The body was buried Saturday.
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Apr 1931:
Mother of A. J. Williams Dies

A.J. Williams returned Wednesday from Golden Gate, Illinois, where he had been called by the death of his mother, Mrs. ____ now Mrs. Snow, who was stricken Sunday with paralysis and died Monday night, was ___ years, 3 months and 15 days.  She was the mother of ten children, four of whom survive.  She also leaves 14 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.  She had been helpless for years.

Patrick J. Levitt Dies Following Long Illness

Patrick J. Levitt, of Villa Ridge, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, early Friday morning, April 4th, following a lingering illness.  Mr. Levitt, who was 39, had spent most of his life in Cairo where he was born, but had moved to Villa Ridge when his health began to fail.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Roseanna Graves Levitt; four children, John Edward, Rosemary, Leon and Raymond; his mother, of Cairo; two brothers, John J. Levitt and Leonard Levitt, also of Cairo; and three sisters, Mrs. Carl Bucher, of Memphis, Tenn., Miss Edna Levitt, and Mrs. Joseph Nelson, both of Cairo.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at St. Patrick’s Church, Cairo with Father Bernard Pender officiating.  Interment as made in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

(His death certificate states that Patrick James Levitt was born 13 Mar 1892, in Cairo, Ill., the son of John J. Levitt, born in Sandusky, and Ellen Doud born in County Gallway, Ireland, died 4 Apr 1931, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Rosanna Levitt. His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  P. J. Levitt 1892-1931.—Darrel Dexter)

Judge T. W. Hanes, 91 Years “Young” Today

Judge T. W. Hanes, Civil War veteran and a longtime resident of Mounds, is quietly celebrating his 91st birthday today.  He was born in Vermillion County, Ind., April 10, 1840, and was reared in the State of Iowa, coming to Illinois in March 1861.

He enlisted for service in the Civil War from Douglas County, Ill., on May 14, 1861.  U.S. Grant was his first colonel.  This enlistment was for a period of three months and at the end of this time he enlisted for a period of three years and was mustered in at Springfield, Ill.  Again, in Feb. 1864, at Ooltewah, Tenn., he enlisted this time for three more years or until the close of the war.  His regiment participated in 27 “stiff” battles besides numerous skirmishes.  Mr. Hanes served on the Mexican border and was at the capture of Atlanta, Ga.

Judge Hanes proudly wears a Grand Army of the Republic badge which bears the following inscription:  Co. D, 31st Illinois Veterans Volunteers, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corp.
All honor to Veteran Hanes and to the remaining few of the boys who wore the blue!

(T. W. Hanes died two months later on 23 Jun 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

George Gleason of Ullin Dies While Driving Car

George Gleason, prominent Ullin resident, died suddenly Thursday evening between 6:30 and 7 o’clock at the wheel of his Chevrolet sedan while returning home from the farm.  In the car with him were three other men.  Just as they reached the Chicago and Eastern Illinois viaduct north of Ullin, the car veered to one side of the highway and Mr. Gleason’s companion noticed that he had been stricken.  He was brought at once to the office of Dr. H. J. Elkins of this city, who found that Mr. Gleason had already passed away.  He had been suffering for some time from high blood pressure.

Mr. Gleason is the father of Mrs. Guy Ganong, of Mounds.  He is survived by his widow, two daughters, Mrs. Ganong, Mrs. Helen Maloney, of Dongola, and one son, John Gleason, of St. Louis.

(His death certificate states that George Gleason, the son of John Gleason and Helen James, died 9 Apr 1931, in Ullin, Ill., the husband of Hattie Gleason.)

Owner of Palace on Wheels Killed in Auto Accident

Many persons in Mounds will remember the “Palace on Wheels” that passed through here last fall and was parked in front of the Woodard Garage while its owner, Dr. Mark L. Smith, and Mrs. Smith visited with Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Toler.  Below is an article taken from the Grayville Mercury-Independent which we believe will be of interest to our readers.

A pamphlet prepared for the funeral services of Dr. Mark L. Smith, formerly Grayville man, who was buried in Los Altos, Calif., February 18, a few days after his sudden death, caused by an automobile accident, has been received by relatives here.  From it is taken the following story of his work in India:

“Dr. Mark Smith, with his brother, Dr. Daniel Smith, established a great imperial dental service in Calcutta, which expanded to the great capital centers of the various provinces and kingdoms of India, Bombay, Delhi, and other cities.  Some twenty-five years ago he was called by the Amir of Afghanistan and arrangements were made for him to be conveyed by sixty-five soldiers from British India to Kabul, the capital, in the mountainous interior of Afghanistan, where he gave a month of noble service to the king, the Amir and his royal household.

“With such ability, fair dealing and fine sprit was the work accomplished, that after the death of the Amir, and the enthronement of the son in more recent years, when the younger king needed dental work for himself and the royal household, he sent to India to secure the Smith brothers’ dental service.  Dr. Mark Smith and his brother were both at this time in America, but Mark’s own son, who had become a famous dentist at Delhi, India, went to Afghanistan and gave a service to the Amir and his royal family, similar to the service his father had given.

“It is believed that the dental establishment of Dr. Mark L. Smith and his brother, Dr. Daniel Smith, gave more service to kings, princes, rajahs, viceroys, and other distinguished men of the royal families and of the English government than any other dental establishment in the world.

“Their great offices, with headquarters in Calcutta, Bombay, Delhi and other cities, were centers of American life and influence.  Their home were also the centers of social and religious culture, supporters of every hospital organization and missionary service.  Dr. Smith’s mountain home in Darjeeling was ever open to visitors and the center of union, interdenominational and missionary activity of that great official capital.

“Dr. Smith’s influence was a link that helped to bind the English speaking governing class and the native rulers and people of India into a closer affiliation and into a better sympathetic attitude and spirit toward each other.  He was without portfolio, but an American Business Ambassador of Good Will.  He gave unstintingly of his time, money and talents for the advancement not only of his own great dental establishment, but for the progress of every great and noble cause in Indian, native or European.

“The Smith Brothers establishment were known from the Himalaya Mountains to the Equator as centers of relief, comfort, health and restored strength.”

Father of Mrs. J. T. Thompson Dies at His Home in Kentucky

William Frazier O’Donley, father of Mrs. J. T. Thompson, of this city, died at his home near Kevil, Ky., Friday, April 3, 1931, death resulting from a paralytic strokes suffered fifteen months ago.

Mr. O’Donley was born October 13, 1859, and had reached the age of 71 years.  He is survived by his widow and nine children, Mrs. J. T. Thompson, of Mounds, Roy O’Donley, Mrs. Julian Capps, Mrs. Mae Grief, Booker O’Donley, Mrs. Carnie Grief, and Mrs. Elmo Lanier, all of Ballard County, Ky., and Mrs. Rex Nuckolls and Mrs. Thelbert McKinney, both of Detroit, Mich.

Mrs. Thompson had spent much of the time helping care for her father during his long illness.


COLP—Tony Politan, 21, of Colp, a student at the Carbondale Teachers College and a graduate of Herrin High School, died yesterday from a pistol wound in his right lung as the result of a self-inflicted shot.

Young Politan shot himself while in a confectionary store at Colp.  A clerk, Josie Bartoni, witnessed the shooting.  A disappointment in love was given as the cause of the suicide—Marion Post
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Apr 1931:
INFANT FALLS IN LARD CAN OF WATER AND DROWNS

The infant of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Christian was drowned when it fell into a lard can partly filled with water.

Interment was made in Mt. Olive Cemetery Saturday morning.

(The death certificate states that C. W. Christian was born about 1930, the son of Clarence Christian and Pauline Rice, and died 9 Apr 1931, in Road District 8, Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SISTER OF MRS. LULU HOUSE DIES AT HOME IN PARIS, TENN.

Mrs. Lulu House received a message Tuesday morning stating that her sister, Mrs. J. C. Dinkins, of Paris, Tenn., had passed away at her home Monday night.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the residence in Paris and interment was made in the cemetery there.

Besides her sister, Mrs. House, she is survived by her husband and four sons. Mrs. House was unable to attend the funeral of her sister.
 
BODY OF MAN BURIED LONG AGO DISINTERRED TUESDAY

“The grave gave up its dead” when the body of a man exhumed by some negro tenants on a farm just north of Cache bridge in Pulaski County, perhaps a mile south of Mound City and east of the interurban tracks.  The discovery of the body was made when the farmers were digging to repair a pump which had ceased to function properly.

It is supposed that the body is that of a Civil War veteran and that he had been a member of the U.S. Navy as a few buttons which had stood the test of time and the elements remained preserved.  The buttons wore the initials U. S. N. and had three five-pointed stars and a seaman’s anchor across the face.  The buttons bore the date of 1851.  Nothing was left of the body but a few decayed bones, even the casket or coffin in which the man had been buried, having long ago decayed.
 
GEORGE GLEASON OF ULLIN DIES SUDDENLY THURSDAY

George Gleason, age 50, of Ullin, passed away very suddenly Thursday night about 7 o’clock before reaching the office of Dr. Elkins of Mounds.  Mr. Gleason was engaged in loading some corn and livestock in cars at Ullin and was just about ready to bill out the cars when he was suddenly stricken with apoplexy and fell to the ground unconscious.  He was removed to Mounds as quickly as possible, but it is thought he died en route to Mounds.

Mr. Gleason was a highly respected citizen and very useful businessman of Ullin.  He was well and favorably known throughout Pulaski County.  He carried on quite a few business interests and was an asset in the community in which he lived.  He was a grain and hay dealer, lumberman, livestock dealer, saw mill man, and also farmed on quite a large scale.  He will be greatly missed in his community.

Left to mourn his passing are his widow, two daughters, Mrs. Guy Ganong, of Mounds, Mrs. Edward A. Maloney, of Dongola; one son, Johnnie Gleason, of St. Louis.  He also leaves two brothers, James Gleason, deputy sheriff, of Pulaski County residing at Mound City, and Harry Gleason, of Cairo; and one sister, Mrs. M. Lay, of Kansas City, Mo.

Funeral services which were largely attended were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence at Ullin.  The Rev. S. A. Morgan, of Steelville, officiating.  Interment as made in the cemetery at Anna by undertaker E. J. Ford of Dongola.

(According to his death certificate, George Ernest Gleason was born about 1881, the son of James Gleason and Helen James, and died 9 Apr 1931, in Ullin, Ill, the husband of Hattie Gleason.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  George E. Gleason 1880-1931 Hattie E. Gleason 1882-1951.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Apr 1931:
Funeral of George Gleason Held Sunday Afternoon

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon for George Gleason, of Ullin, who died suddenly Thursday evening while at the wheel of his car within a short distance of his home.  The services were conducted in the home at 2 o’clock by Rev. S. A. Morgan, of Steelville, a former pastor of the Ullin M. E. Church.  Interment was made in the Anna Cemetery.  The attendance at the funeral was unusually large and there are many who mourn his passing.

Mr. Gleason leaves his widow, two daughters, Mrs. Guy Ganong, of Mounds, Mrs. E. A. Malongey, of Dongola, one son, John Gleason, of St. Louis, two brothers, former sheriff James Gleason, of Mound City and Harry Gleason, of Cairo; and one sister, Mrs. M. Lay, of Kansas City, Mo.

Well Known Colored Man Dies Saturday

Herbert Eden, for many years a Mounds resident, died Saturday, April 11th in the Anna State Hospital, where he had been a patient for some time.  He is survived by one daughter, Ruby Eden, a son Carthell, a granddaughter, Catherine, and a half-brother, Clint Kemp.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. John Baptist Church, the Rev. J. T. Dodson officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

(The death certificate states that Hubbard Eden was born about 1870 and died 11 Apr 1931 in Union Co., Ill., the husband of Lena Eden.—Darrel Dexter)

Mother of Leo Sponsler Dies

Mrs. Elmer Sponsler, age 64, died Saturday night at her home in Carbondale, following an illness of two weeks.  Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church of Carbondale, to which organization she had belonged for 32 years.  She leaves her husband, two sons, Leo, of Mounds, Alvin, of Carbondale, and one daughter, Mrs. Bess Tygett, of St. Louis.

(Elmore Sponsler married Emma Poteat on 17 Jan 1886, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Emma Teresa Sponsler was born 11 Jan 1867, in Marion, Ill., daughter of George W. Poteete and Miss Stroud, died 11 Apr 1931, in Carbondale, Ill., and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Leo Sponsler was called to Carbondale Saturday by the death of his mother.

Mr. and Mrs. John Gleason, of St. Louis were called to Ullin Thursday on account of the sudden death of the former’s father, George Gleason.

Funeral services were held in McClure Friday afternoon at the Pentecost Church for Mrs. Coleman Phillips, who passed away in the St. Francis Hospital at Cape Girardeau, Mo., Wednesday.  Mrs. Phillips was a half-sister to Cecil Craig, of Ullin, to whose home the body was brought prior to being taken to McClure Friday morning.  Interment was made in the McClure Cemetery with Undertaker W. J. Rhymer of Ullin directing the funeral.  (Ullin)

MURPHYSBORO—Chap Mitchell, 80, was burned to death here last night when his home was destroyed by fire.  The cause of the fire has not been determined.  No crime, however, is suspected.

MARION—A dead child was plowed up by a farm hand of William Elliott, on his farm south of Marion this morning.  Coroner W. E. Clayton was called and an inquiry was to be held at the Frick Funeral home this afternoon.  Indications were the child had been there for several days, as the body is in a sad condition.  Clothing had been placed on it and the little one had been wrapped up in a sort of package.  There is no clue as to whom it might be and prospects are that as much is known today as will be known tomorrow about the affair.

A number of persons from Mounds attended the funeral of George Gleason of Ullin Sunday afternoon.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Apr 1931:
Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Mrs. Martha Hartline Knupp at Mt. Pisgah on last Monday.

(John H. Hartline, 21, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Charles Hartline and Mary Ann Myers, married on 4 Oct 1885, in Union Co., Ill., Martha A. Peeler, 21, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Jesse Peeler and Mary Miller.  John Wesley Canupp married Mrs. Martha Hartline on 16 May 1897, in Johnson Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Martha Ann Peeler Cannupp died 18 Apr 1931, in Cypress, Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug, Ill., reads:  Martha A. Hartline Born June 26, 1864 Died April 18, 1931 John H. Hartline Born Sept. 4, 1864 Died Jan. 17, 1896.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Ernest Mowery and Mrs. Ed Short have received a message from their sister, Nellie, of the death of her little son that was operated on a few weeks ago for abscess on the lungs caused from pneumonia and whooping cough.  Nellie will be remembered as Nellie Guild, a prominent school teacher of this county several year ago.  She now resides near Sheridan, Wyoming.

(Nellie Guild, the daughter of James Bruce Guild and Catherine Sullivan, married in 1915 in Sheridan County, Wyoming, Fred Creswell.  His marker in Sheridan Municipal Cemetery reads:  Fred Harold Creswell 1924-1931.—Darrel Dexter)


Several from here (Beech Grove) attended the funeral of Mr. Gleason at Ullin Sunday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. U. D. Clark attended the funeral of Mrs. Pleas Rose, Sr., of Vienna, mother of Dr. Rose.  (Perks)
             (Her death certificate states that Mary E. Rose was born 11 Jul 1848, in Tennessee, the daughter of Ned Farris and Mary Ball, natives of Tennessee, died 16 Apr 1931, in Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., wife of P. W. Rose, and was buried in Grissom Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)


Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Apr 1931:
Nephew Dies

Mr. and Mrs. Zon Walston attended the funeral of the latter’s nephew, Ray Mangum, in Anna, Friday afternoon.

Mr. Mangum was an ex-soldier of the World War, serving in the Medical Corps.  He had been ill at Jefferson Barracks for a number of weeks prior to his death.  The funeral was in charge of the American Legion.

(His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Ray J. Mangum Nov. 13, 1892-April 14, 1931 Illinois PFC Ambulance Co. 36 World War I.—Darrel Dexter)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 May 1931:
YOUNG WOMAN PASSES AWAY AT ULLIN

Mrs. Irene Ledbetter, age 27 years, wife of Alvin Ledbetter, passed away Wednesday, May 29, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Harmon, of Ullin, following a prolonged illness.

Surviving Mrs. Ledbetter are her husband; three children, Sherman, Margaret and Donald; one brother, Lawrence Harmon, of Ullin; and four sisters, Mrs. Getta Rogers, and Miss Lorene Harmon, of Ullin, Mrs. Marie Backwell, of Chicago, and Mrs. Bennie Height, of Carbondale.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Ullin, the Rev. Loar, pastor of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery by Undertaker W. H. Aldred, of Pulaski.
 
DONGOLA YOUNG LADY PASSES AWAY FRIDAY

Miss Wilma L. Kerr, age 21 years, passed away at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kerr, near Dongola, Friday, following a prolonged illness of tuberculosis.

Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock at the Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church near Wetaug, with the Rev. W. J. Ward, of the First Baptist Church of Dongola, officiating.  The funeral was directed by E. J. Ford, of Dongola, and interment was made in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

Miss Kerr is survived by her parents and several sisters and brothers.

(Her marker in Mt. Pisgah cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Wilma L. Kerr Born Jan. 26, 1910 Died April 29, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR JOHN HUBBARD TUESDAY

Funeral services for John Hubbard, father of Mrs. M. C. Waterbury, and Mrs. Herman Dunn, of this city, who passed away at the home of his son, Ross Hubbard, of San Francisco, Calif., Wednesday morning, April 29, was held Tuesday afternoon at Dexter, Mo., in the chapel of the C. O. Biggs Funeral Home.  Rev. John Dougherty, pastor of the Missionary Baptist Church of Dexter, officiated.  The casket bearers were members of the W. O. W. order, of which Mr. Hubbard was a member.

Besides Mr. Hubbard’s daughters in Mound City, he is survived by two sons in San Francisco, Calif., and several grandchildren.

Mrs. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Waterbury, and daughter, Miss Iona, attended the funeral in Dexter.
 
FATHER OF C. E. RICHEY DIES IN GREENWOOD, IND., TUESDAY

James Richey, father of C. E. Richey, of this city, passed away at his home in Greenwood, Ind., Tuesday morning at 5 o’clock following a brief illness.  Mr. and Mrs. Richey left Monday for Greenwood in response to a message they had received stating that Mr. Richey was seriously ill.  Tuesday, Mrs. Paul Baccus, granddaughter of the deceased, received a message from her parents, stating that he had passed away Tuesday morning.

His death, while it has been a great shock and grief to his family, was not unexpected as he had been in a critical condition for several days.
 
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD THURSDAY FOR AMOS ECHOLS

Funeral services for Amos E. Echols, of Villa Ridge, who was instantly killed near Tamaroa, Illinois, when the truck which he was driving struck a bridge bannister and exploded, were held at the M. E. Church in Ullin Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, the Rev. W. E. Browning, of Hoyleton, Illinois, officiating.

Mr. Echols was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Echols, of Ullin, and was quite well known in that vicinity.  He also was well known in this community, having been employed last summer at the Sears Nichols Canning Co.

Besides his widow, he is survived by his parents, one brother, Philip Echols, of Anderson, Ind.; three sisters, Misses Marie and Louisa Echols, of Ullin, and Mrs. Ruth Farnbaker, of Anna; and many other relatives and a large circle of friends.  Mr. Echols was a very likeable man and quickly made friends wherever he went.

Interment was made in the New Hope Cemetery by W. J. Rhymer, of Ullin, undertaker in charge.
             (His marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Amos Ivan Echols Born Jan. 29, 1903 Died April 29, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)


Miss Rena Crain has returned to her home in this city after spending several days in East St. Louis, where she attended the funeral of her nephew, Bobbie Truitt, who passed away in that city.
 
Mr. and Mrs. M.C. Waterbury, daughter, Miss Iona, Mrs. Herman Dunn, were at Dexter, Mo., Tuesday, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Waterbury’s and Mrs. Dunn’s father, John Hubbard, who passed away at the home of his son in San Francisco, Calif., last Wednesday.  They were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Capoot, of this city.
 
Funeral services for Mrs. Irene Ledbetter, who died Wednesday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Harman, were held at the M. E. church here (Ullin) Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock.  Rev. Loar, pastor of the church, officiated.  She is survived by her parents, several sisters, one brother, her husband, two sons and one daughter.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.  (Left over from last week)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 1 May 1931:
Former Mounds Girl Mourns Death of Son

Robert Truitt, four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Truitt, of St. Louis, died Sunday, April 26th, of that dread disease spinal meningitis.  Mrs. Truitt will be remembered in Mounds as Miss Alice Brunner, daughter of Mrs. Clyde Auld.  She spent most of her girlhood days here and has many friends who will sympathize with her and her husband in their bereavement.

Villa Ridge Man Killed as Truck Strikes Bridge

A man identified as Amos Echols, 26, of Villa Ridge, employed as a truck driver for a Pana trucking concern, was instantly killed and burned beyond recognition early Tuesday morning when the truck he was driving crashed into a bridge banister north of here.

The man whose identity was traced through the license number on the truck, was en route to Alto Pass with some furniture when the accident occurred.  It is believed he fell asleep while driving.

There were no witnesses to the accident, although several persons reported hearing the explosion.  The body of the man was found 75 feet from the truck.  Furniture was scattered over a wide area.

There was nothing to identify the man.  A piece of paper was found nearby with the names of Ellen Ray Trent and Igle Ray Trent dated March 29, Herrin, Illinois.  It is believed the paper may have come from furniture drawers in the wreckage.

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Schuler were in Grand Chain Sunday where they attended the funeral of Emery P. Haas, husband of Mrs. Schuler’s niece, formerly Miss Louise Reichert.  Mr. Haas, a derrick operator on a government fleet stationed at Paducah, Ky., stepped overboard accidentally on March 28th.  His body was found at Hickman, Ky., the latter part of last week.

Emery P. Haas Buried at Grand Chain Sunday

Funeral services for Emery P. Haas were held Sunday afternoon in the Congregational church at Grand Chain.  Mr. Haas, who was 31 years of age, met a tragic death by drowning on March 20, when he fell from the government fleet at Paducah, where he was employed.  Diligent search was made for the body for many days, but it was not recovered until Saturday, when it was found on some drift in the Mississippi River, eight miles below Hickman, Ky.  G. A. James brought the body to Mound City late Saturday evening and prepared it for burial.  The funeral services were largely attended and the Masonic order of Grand Chain, of which he was a member, conducted the services at the grave.  The casket bearers were members of the Paducah I. O. O. F. lodge of which he was also a member.  There was an abundance of beautiful floral pieces, which silently extended their sympathy to the bereaved family.  Following the services, interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.  Mr. Hass was the son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Reichert, formerly of Grand Chain, but now residing in Olive Branch.  He leaves his widow and one little daughter to mourn his passing.

(His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Emery P. Haas Born Jan. 26, 1900 Died March 20, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

GOLCONDA—Clarence Gibbons, 18, of Crab Orchard, Ill., was exonerated by a coroner’s jury after killing his father, Ed Gibbons, Saturday night.  The slain man was the father of 15 children.  The tragedy resulted from the father’s abuse of a widowed daughter and the young slayer.

The youth, according to his mother and an invalid sister, who witnessed the slaying, shot his father when the latter advanced on him with a poker while he was washing his face in the kitchen.

Gibbons, first threatened his son when the boy returned home from the grist mill with half the quantity of corn he had ordered the son to take to the mill.  The boy left home and obtained an automatic pistol.

When he returned home he went directly to the kitchen and was washing his face, the father entered with the poker and began threatening him.  Young Gibbons shot his father five times in the breast and shoulder.—Herald Enterprise

(According to the death certificate, Ed Gibbons was born about 1880, the son of James Gibbons and Jane Carpenter, and died 18 Apr 1931, in Crab Orchard, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CARBONDALE—The Masonic Penny belonging to Donald Forsythe, first Carbondale soldier killed in action in the World War, which was given him by the Royal Arch Chapter upon completion of his work in the chapter and carried by him as a soldier overseas, has been returned to the Masonic lodge here by C. G. Scott, of Indianapolis, Ind., a member of the Graves Registration Service.  Mr. Scott found the penny in a field in which he was working.

The penny had been hit by shrapnel or bullet.  The lodge here plans to have the penny encased and framed and attached to Forsythe’s picture hanging in the lodge hall.  Forsythe was Master of the Blue Lodge here at the time he entered the service.—Free Press

Memorial to Mrs. Isabella Lanning Candee
Mrs. J. D. Ladd

Truly has it been said, “To live in lives we leave behind is not to die,” and our dear friend and coworker of many years, Mrs. Isabella Lanning Candee, who went from this earthly country to the heavenly, March 14, 1931, after a long and well spent life of more than fourscore years, fully exemplified these words.

For fifty-six years she held her membership in our Cairo Woman’s Club, filling the office of president three different terms and being at the time of her demise, President Emeritus, and she was the last one of that brave, intrepid band of women, who were the pioneers in the work of clubs, in this part of our dear Illinois.

It meant much in the early ‘70s to come out from the seclusion of the home and take their place in this new and untried effort of women, and I have been told by some of these loyal, far-visioned women, that the ridicule and the sarcasm to which they were subjected even from some of their own dear friends was very had to bear.

But undaunted, they carried on, perseveringly looking far into the future and by the eye of faith, seeing the place and the power which the club women were destined to occupy in this twentieth century.
The story has ofttime been told, that it was this organization weak and feeble though it seemed at that time that was the power and impetus which gave to Cairo its splendid and useful Memorial Library.
And we know that much credit was due Mrs. Candee for her influence and assistance to her sister, Mrs. Safford who presented the building to our city.

All through the more than sixty years of Mrs. Candee’s life in Cairo, she was one of our foremost women, never standing back and waiting for someone else to do the planning of any public work, she was always ready with advice, counsel, time and labor to assist in any and every good work, for the advancement of her dearly loved hometown.

In the church of her choice, the Church of the Redeemer (Episcopal), she gave liberally of time, labor, money and prayer to advance the cause of her Master and the lasting memorial to her is the beautiful walnut altar carved by her own hands.

A teacher for many years in the Sunday school, women her mature years today in Cairo owe much to the instruction she gave them, in the way of the Christian life.

She told the writer, about a year ago, after the inactive life had begun, when she could no longer walk and the dimmed eyes no longer permitted her to read, which was one of her greatest pleasures, this:  “When the long night comes on, and sleep is denied me, I don’t count sheep, that’s so silly, but I have the beautiful Shepherded Psalm and ten poems and those I repeat over and over, until I slumber.”
Even the age had set the ban on many privileges she still had this comfort and this cheer to the end.

She was always interested in everything pertaining to our club work and as the first president of our great State Federation, she felt, may I say, a mother’s interest and pride in the accomplishments of every club in the state, from the large city clubs with their many departments of work and their great advantages, even to the small club in the small town, whose work is principally in the uplift of their own vicinity.

Again we say, “To live in hearts we leave behind, is not to die,” and we know her love and interest is ours today, we rejoice in the thought that for her the long day of this life is ended, the suffering, the pain and loneliness is over and that now in the Paradise of God, she rests from her labors, but her work lives on.

(The article contains a photo of Mrs. Isabella Lanning Candee.)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 8 May 1931:
Funeral Services for Amos Echols Held Thursday

Funeral services for Amos Echols, of Villa Ridge, who was killed Tuesday near Tamaroa, Ill., when the truck he was driving struck a bridge banister and exploded, were held at the M. E. church in Ullin Thursday at 1:30 p.m., Rev. W. E. Browning, of Hoyleton, officiating.

Amos was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Echols, of Ullin.

He leaves, besides his wife, Leatha Parker Echols; his parents; one brother, Philip Echols, of Anderson, Ind.; three sisters, Misses Marie and Louisa Echols, of Ullin, and Mrs. Ruth Farnbaker, of Anna.

(Alonzo Echols, 22, born in Ullin, Ill., son of Augustus Echols and Louisa C. Nickens, married on 26 Apr 1892, in Union Co., Ill., Julia A. Meisenheimer, 18, born in Alexander Co., Ill., daughter of Moses Meisenheimer and Eliza McMellon.   His marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Amos Ivan Echols Born Jan. 29, 1903 Died April 29, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

Cecil Hanes Dies Saturday Following Long Illness

Cecil Hanes, the son of Judge T. W. Hanes, died at the Anna Hospital early Saturday morning, May 2nd, following an illness of more than three years.

Mr. Hanes was the son of T. W. and Susan E. Mattson Hanes and was born at Villa Ridge, Ill., December 2, 1883.  He had reached the age of 47 years and 5 months.  Many years of his life were passed in Mounds, where he had many friends.

His mother passed from this life April 11, 1922.  Those immediate relatives who survive him are his father, stepmother, two half brothers, Albert and Art Mattson, and an aunt, Mrs. Ab Butler, of Pulaski, Ill.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock with interment in the Villa Ridge cemetery.  Rev. H. B. Shoaff conducted the services.

OREGON—Mr. and Mrs. Robert Talbot, of Rockford, returning from a funeral Sunday, saw a neighbor boy, Leonard Lane, dragging the body of another boy across a field to the Talbot home.  It was their fourteen year-old son, Ralph.  The boys had been hunting and Ralph was killed by accidental discharge of a gun.—Ogle County Reporter

Funeral services for Mrs. Irene Ledbetter, who died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Harmon, Wednesday, were held at the M. E. church in Ullin Saturday afternoon, Rev. Loar, pastor of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery.  W. A. Aldred, undertaker at Pulaski, had charge of the funeral.

Mrs. A. C. Burr was called to Binghamton, New York, Thursday on account of the death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Florence Hug.

A large number from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral of Amos Echols, which was held at the M. E. Church in Ullin Friday afternoon and burial at New Hope Cemetery.
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 May 1931:
DONGOLA WOMAN PASSES AWAY MONDAY MORNING

Mrs. Ellen Pierce, age 65 years, passed away at her home on a farm near Dongola at 7:15 o’clock Monday.

Funeral services were held at her home Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock conducted by Rev. F. L. Cress, pastor of the Dongola Lutheran Church.  Interment was made in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery by the side of her late husband.  E. J. Ford, directed the funeral.

Surviving Mrs. Pierce, one brother, Monroe Dillow, of Dongola, and a number of nieces and nephews and a large circle of friends.

(William R. Pierce, 55, son of Morgan Pierce and Mary Shourd, married on 11 Feb 1906, in Union Co., Ill., Margaret Ellen Dillow, 39, daughter of Jacob Dillow and Rosena Cruse.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WELL KNOWN KARNAK MAN DIES

George Hanle, age 67 years, well known and highly respected resident of Karnak, passed away suddenly about 6:30 o’clock last Friday morning as the result of a heart attack.  Mr. Hanle had not been in the best of health for several weeks, but was not confined to his bed.  Thursday night he was out in his car, but while preparing to go to his work the following morning, he suffered an attack and passed away almost instantly.

He had been a resident of Karnak for many years, his family of six children being reared there.  He had been employed for some time in the Main Brothers Mill.

Surviving him are his widow, and the following children, Lawrence Hanle, of Canada, Charles, of Johnston City, Illinois, Gilbert, Ed, and Jake, of Karnak, and one daughter, Lena, living in Missouri.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at Karnak and interment was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery by undertaker N. W. Wilson.

(His death certificate states that George I. Hanle was born 16 Aug 1864, in Posey Co., Ind., the son of George I. Hanle, Sr., and Barbary Aberhost, died 8 May 1931, in Karnak, Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain.  His occupation was listed as lumber sorter.  His wife was Catherine Wagner.—Darrel Dexter)
 
COLORED MAN DIES FOLLOWING AMPUTATION OF LEG SUNDAY

John Mitchell, colored, died Tuesday at 11 o’clock at his home in this city following the amputation of his leg Sunday.  He had been afflicted with a bad leg for several months.  He consulted Dr. J. F. Hargan, who, after examination, found it to be cancer and advised amputation, which he consented to have done.  John was quite a familiar figure in Mound City because of his affliction.  His leg was bent at the knee and had become stiff, causing him to walk very crippled.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the undertaking parlors of G. A. James and interment was made in the cemetery at Mounds.  The services were conducted by the minister of the colored Baptist church of this city.

His wife and a number of relatives survive him.

(His death certificate states that John R. Mitchell was born 16 Dec 1873, the son of John Mitchell, died 12 May 1931, in Mound City, Ill., husband of Lizzie Mitchell, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY SATURDAY

Mrs. Golda M. Tosh, age 35 years, 4 months and 5 days, wife of E. E. Tosh, of Fulton, Ky., passed away Saturday afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo.  Mrs. Tosh received a serious spinal injury on April 21, and at the time she did not think the injury serious, but a week later she was suddenly stricken ill and was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary where she remained in an unconscious state until her death.  She was brought to the infirmary Monday, April 27.

Mrs. Tosh was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Williams, of Mounds, and spent practically all her life in Mounds, being reared from childhood there.  She was born at Olmstead, Illinois, her parents moving to Mounds when she was a small child.  She received her education in the Mounds school and attended a school of music in St. Louis.  She was an accomplished musician, taking an active part in musical affairs of the Baptist Church of Mounds and of the community.  She was a valued member of the Baptist Church of Mounds and also a member of the Mounds Woman’s Club.  She was a kind and loving mother, her first thoughts being for her little family.  She always had time to play with her children and entertain them, and it was while playing with her small child that she received the serious injury to her spine.  Mrs. Tosh had just recovered from a severe attack of the flue which left her spine in a weakened condition, making it more susceptible to injury.

Left to mourn her passing, besides her husband, are three children, Jack, age 6; Paul, age 4; and Mary, age 1; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Williams; and a brother, Harry Williams, of Mounds.  She is a niece of William I. Baccus, of near America, who formerly resided in this city.  Her immediate relatives were at her bedside when the end came.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Baptist church in Mounds, the Rev. T. C. Ury, officiating, assisted by the Rev. C. C. Cloyd, pastor of the Christian Church of Fulton, which Mr. and Mrs. Tosh attended.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by undertaker, G. A. James.  Casket bearers were Mr. Ingram, Mr. Liggon, and Mr. Pickering, of Fulton, Ky., Howard Copeland, C. F. Melton, and Ed Adams, of Mounds.

(Andrew J. Williams, 27, married on 10 Sep 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mary Belle Baccus, 16.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER LOCAL RESIDENT PASSES AWAY IN SOUTH

Mrs. Mary Copeland Tucker, age 72 years, widow of the late James H. Tucker, passed away at her home in Memphis, Tenn., Sunday morning.  For many years, Mrs. Tucker with her family, resided in Mound City, where her children were reared.  Mr. Tucker was an employee of the shipyard in this city.

Surviving Mrs. Tucker are three children, one daughter, Mrs. George M. Tolson, formerly Miss Alice Tucker, of Memphis; and two sons, Elijah, of Natchez, Miss., and Harry Tucker, of Helena, Ark. John Tucker, of this city, was a brother-in-law of the deceased.  Mrs. Tucker’s husband passed away in 1912.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at a funeral home in Memphis, the Rev. M. L. Pate officiating.  The body arrived at Mounds Tuesday morning at 11:50 o’clock and interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Service was held at the grave by Rev. O. B. Allen, pastor of the First M. E. Church, of Cairo.  E. A. Burke directed the funeral.

A number of friends of the deceased from Mound City and Cairo attended the services.  Mrs. Tucker and family also resided in Cairo for a short time before moving to Memphis.
 
William Brown returned from Chester where he went to attend his son-in-law’s funeral.  (Perks)
 
Jessie Coharn died at the Anna hospital May 9th.  Mr. Coharn leaves a wife and two sons, Harry and Willie, to mourn his loss.  (Perks)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred McIntire were called to Grenada, Miss., on account of the death of Mr. McIntire’s brother-in-law, J. D. Brown, who passed away at San Francisco, Calif.  His body was brought to Grenada, where the funeral services were held.  (Mounds)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 15 May 1931:
Mrs. E. E. Tosh Dies as Result of Accidental Injuries

All Mounds was grieved late Saturday afternoon when news of the death of Mrs. Golda Williams Tosh was telephoned from St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where she had been a patient for the past week.  Known and loved by everyone, and in the midst of a life of service both in the home and in church and music circles, her passing was widely mourned.

Mrs. Tosh had suffered an injury to her back Tuesday, April 28, while at play with her children and two days later had fallen to the floor at her home at Fulton, and had at once been taken to the Cairo hospital.

Golda Mae Williams Tosh, wife of Ernest E. Tosh, and daughter of A. J. and Mae Williams, was born at Olmstead, Ill., January 4, 1896, and died May 9, 1931, in Cairo, Ill., age 35 years, 4 months, and 5 days.  She was united in marriage to Ernest E. Tosh on March 5, 1918.  To this union three children were born:  John W., six, Paul A., four, and Mary Mae, one year old.

She was converted at the age of eleven years and united with the Congregational Church of Mounds, changing her membership to the First Baptist Church in 1922.  She was educated in the public schools of Mounds and was graduated from Forest Park Conservatory of Music, St. Louis, Mo.,   Having much natural talent in her chosen art, she was highly gifted both as teacher and performer and was ever generous with her services in church, Woman’s Club, and any other good cause.  From a small child she had lived here until June 7, 1930, when, with her husband and family, she moved to Fulton, Ky.

She leaves her husband, three children, her parents and one brother, Harry B. Williams, of Mounds, with other relatives and many friends.

Funeral services were conducted at the First Baptist Church of Mounds at 2:30 o’clock Monday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. T. C. Ury, assisted by Rev. Cloyd, pastor of the Christian Church of Fulton, Ky. 

Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery, directed by Undertaker G. A. James.  Pallbearers were Messrs. Ingram, Pickering, and Logon, of Fulton, Ed Adams, Howard Copeland, and C. F. Melton, of Mounds.

Harry Hamilton Found Guilty of Murder
Jury Acquits Wife—Co-defendant in Case

After three hours deliberation the jury in the McClinton murder case rendered a verdict of guilty in the trial of Harry Hamilton and placed his sentence at 14 years.  Florine Hamilton, Harry’s wife, and co-defendant in the case, was found not guilty and was released.

Approximately 100 prospective jurors were examined and the better part of a week’s time was consumed before the case was tried.  The crime for which Hamilton was sentenced was committed at Grand Chain on February 27.  Garner McClinton was fatally shot in a quarrel with Hamilton.  All parties concerned were colored.

Card of Thanks

We desire to thank our many friends for their deeds of kindness and expressions of sympathy during the sickness of our loved one and in the hour of our bereavement.  Especially do we thank the donors of the many beautiful flowers and the friends who gave the use of their cars.  All of these kind attentions will ever be remembered.
E. E. Tosh and Family
A. J. Williams and Family
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 May 1931:
Villa Ridge Pastor Passed Away Suddenly

C. E. Enlow, age 67, years, 6 ___ pastor of the Union Congregational Methodist Church of Villa Ridge passed away suddenly ___ Saturday at his home.  He had been feeling fairly well until ___ night when he became suddenly ill while attending a basketball game played by the Boy Scouts of Villa Ridge.  He was taken to his home and seemed to be improving ___ attack Saturday, which led to his death.

__ Enlow had previous to this ___ ___red ill health and one two _____ was compelled to abandon the pulpit, but each time sufficiently recovered to be able to return to his chosen work.  He had _____ medicine for ten years at ____ because his voice failed.  _____ greatly interested in the _____ of the community and was _____ supporter of Boy Scout _____ came to Villa Ridge ____ years ago when he took ____ with the Union Church.  At that time he resided in ____.  He had many friends _____ the entire community will be greatly missed by his ____ion and his friends of the _____y.

Surviving Rev. Enlow are his four daughters, Mrs. Maud ____, Altamont Springs, Fla., ___ Enlow Steele, of DeLong, ___, Mrs. Miriam Enlow Dodds, ____ Park, Illinois, and Mrs. _____ Enlow Sutch, of Pittsburg, ___; one son, Elmer Reemer Enlow, of Atlanta, Ga., besides a number of other relatives and a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock in the ___ Congregational Methodist Church, the Rev. S. C. Benninger, of the Congregational Church of Grand Chain officiating.  He was assisted by ___ Shoaff, of Mounds, pastor of the M. E. Church.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Cobden, Illinois.  G. A. James of Mound City directed the funeral.

Pallbearers were three deacons and three trustees of the ___ namely:  Messrs. Earnest ___, W. Hogendobler, Harry ___, E. J. Koonce, G. W. Al____, R. L. Spaulding.

(According to the death certificate, Charles Egbert Enlow was the son of Thomas Enlow and Mary Ames, and died 16 May 1931, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the husband of Susan M. Enlow.  Thomas J. Enlow married Mary Ames on 30 Oct 1851, in Adams Co., Ill.  His marker in Cobden Cemetery reads:  Dr. C. E. Enlow Born Nov. 15, 1863 Died May 16, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER VILLA RIDGE BOY ACCIDENTLY KILLS MAN

Fred Leidigh, Jr., while driving his car near Baton Rouge, La., accidently hit a man instantly killing him.  The man was walking on the wrong side of the road and the lights from an approaching car blinded Mr. Leidigh and caused him to hit the man.

The accident occurred Thursday night, May 7, on the highway near Baton Rouge.  He was exonerated from all blame.  Mr. Leidigh is one of our Pulaski County boys, having resided at Villa Ridge before leaving a few years ago with the Jones Construction Company with whom he has employment.
 
MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY AT HER HOME FRIDAY

Mrs. Goldia Essex, age 41 years, wife of Isaac Essex, passed away at her home near Mounds Friday evening at 6 o’clock.

She is survived by her husband, three children, Willie, Clarence, and Ruth; a brother, Ollie Daniels, of Ullin; and a sister, Mrs. Frances Daniels, of Anna; besides a number of other relatives.

This is the third death which has occurred in the family of Mrs. Essex since the first of the year, she having lost her mother three weeks ago and a brother passed away in January.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock in the Shiloh Church near Villa Ridge with the Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating. Interment was made in the Shiloh Cemetery by undertakers George Hartwell and Son.

(Thomas Daniels married Bell Biggerstaff on 19 Apr 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her death certificate states that Goldia Essex was born 29 Oct 1889, in Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Tom Daniels and Bell Biggerstaff, married Isaac Essex, died 15 May 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Shiloh Cemetery.  Her marker in New Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge reads:  Goldia M. Essex born Oct. 23, 1889 Died May 15, 1931 Isaac A. Essex Born Feb. 20, 1883 Died Nov. 27, 1960.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Rev. W. L. Hanbaum and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gordon, of this city, attended the funeral of Rev. C. E. Enlow, which was held at Villa Ridge Tuesday morning.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Hoffmer and their daughters, Mrs. Oliver, of Toledo, and Mrs. Delbert O’Neal, of Marion, Mrs. Daisy Langston, of Evansville, Ind.; and Mr. and Mrs. Len Churchill, of Perks, attended the funeral of Mr. Theodore Hass, of Farnfelt, Mrs. Hoffmer’s grandson.  (Perks)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 22 May 1931:
Mrs. Isaac Essex Dies Friday Evening at Her Home

Mrs. Goldie Daniels Essex, died Friday evening, May 15, at 6 o’clock at her home west of this city at the age of forty-one years.  Her death was the third in the Daniels family in the year 1931, Gus Daniels, her brother, having died in January and her mother three weeks ago.

Surviving Mrs. Essex are her husband, three children, Willie, Clarence and Ruth; a sister, Miss Frances Daniels, of Anna; and a brother, Ollie Daniels, of Ullin.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at Shiloh Church near Villa Ridge, conducted by the Rev. W. J. Ward, of Dongola.  Interment was made in Shiloh Cemetery.  Hartwell and Son directing.

County Shocked by Death of Dr. C. E. Enlow

The entire county was shocked Saturday afternoon when the news of the sudden death of the Rev. Dr. C. E. Enlow, of Villa Ridge, was spread from one to another of his friends and parishioners.  Only a few knew that on Friday night at a Boy Scout basketball game in the Villa Ridge gymnasium he had suffered a heart attack.  He was better the next morning, but near noon he suddenly expired.

Dr. Enlow, a former practicing physician and later a Congregational minister, organized the Community Church of Villa Ridge, a consolidation of the Congregational and Methodist congregations.  For more than a year he had served as pastor of this community church and had won the love and esteem of his entire congregation.

Surviving him are his widow, three daughters, and two sons.  The daughters, Mrs. William Steele, of DeLong, Ill., Mrs. J. W. Dodds, of Villa Park, Ill., Mrs. Beatrice Sutch, of Pittsburgh, Pa., and one son, E. R. Enlow, of Decatur, Ga., arrived to attend the funeral.  A son who lives in Florida was unable to attend.

The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Union Church of Villa Ridge, conducted by the Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the Mounds and the Grand Chain Congregational churches.  Interment was made in the Cobden Cemetery in charge of Undertaker G. A. James.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred McIntire returned Monday from Grenada, Miss., where they had been called by the death of their brother-in-law, J. Dudley Brown, who died in the Southern Pacific Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., following a surgical operation.  Mr. Brown is survived by his wife, the former Miss Helen Hill, of Cairo, who was visiting Mr. Brown’s mother in Grenada at the time of his death.  Funeral services were held in Grenada Sunday.  Mr. Brown, who had been ticket agent for the Southern Pacific Railroad Company at Douglas, Ariz., for a number of years, had gone to California for the operation and had planned to take the pace of ticket agent at Grenada upon his recovery.

ELDORADO—Ivy Hill, well known landscape gardener of Eldorado, was accidentally drowned in a small pond on a vacant lot owned by him about two blocks from his home Friday.  The pond, or hole of water, was being filled in by Hill.  He became entangled in some old wire and fell into the water.  Indications showed that he had struggled to free himself from the wire.—Elkville Journal

(Ivey Hill married Lucy Edmondson on 1 Jul 1897, in Gallatin Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Elmer Ivy Hill was born about 1877, the son of James Hill and Cynthia Hips, and died 24 Apr 1931, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill., the husband of Lucy Hill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Frank Williams and Mrs. A. West attended the funeral of Mrs. Golda Essex at Shiloh Church Sunday. 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 May 1931:
TOM JOHNSON DIES AT HOME IN EAST ST. LOUIS

Tom Johnson, husband of Mrs. Ruth Johnson, who was formerly Miss Ruth Painter, of this city, passed away at his home in St. Louis, Sunday.  Mrs. Johnson is a cousin of Mrs. E. P. Easterday, of this city and was a daughter of the late William A. Painter, who several years ago met a tragic death when he was deputy sheriff under L. F. Crain, who was the sheriff of Pulaski County. Mrs. Johnson spent her girlhood in Mound City and was a graduate of the Mound City high school.  She has many friends here among the older settlers who are sorry to learn of her bereavement.

Mrs. Easterday went to St. Louis to attend the funeral.
 
Abner C. Bankson Passed Away Monday

Abner C. Bankson, age 75 years, 1 month and 21 days, passed away at his home near Pulaski Monday morning, May 25th, at 3 o’clock.  Mr. Bankson had been in very poor health the past four years, but had been able until recently to be up and around his farm.  His death was caused from a kidney trouble and other complications.  Throughout his many years of suffering, he retained his jovial and kindly disposition and his good will toward his fellow men.

Mr. Bankson was born April 4, 1856, on a farm near the Old Liberty Cemetery in Pulaski County.  On this farm he grew to manhood.  He was the son of George and Sarah Jane Bankson.  He received his education in the public schools of the county near where he lived.  In 1875 he was united in marriage to Miss Julia Snell, and to this union two children were born, one son, Imon Alfred Bankson, now circuit clerk of Pulaski County, residing in Mound City, and Miss Abbie Julia Bankson, who owns and operates a funeral home at Linn Creek, Mo.

Mr. Bankson’s first wife passed away in January 1882 and in the latter part of the year of 1883, he was again married to Miss Laura Bell Currey.  To this union eight children were born, two passing away in infancy.  The surviving children of this union are Mannon Bankson, deputy U.S. marshal of Benton, Illinois; Mrs. Hallie Reeves, of Pulaski, Mrs. Lois Day, Ullin; Mrs. Mona Lackey, Mattoon; Clyde Bankson, who holds a position with the Trustee Service System of Chicago; and Wayne Bankson, who is studying for the ministry at Kimberline College, Kilberline Heights, Tenn.  His widow and several grandchildren also survive him.

The outstanding characteristics of Mr. Bankson’s life was the great interest he always felt for the public welfare of the community in which he lived.  He took unusual pride in all civic improvements of the county.  He was always ready with a friendly handshake and a word of cheer for his fellowman.  Speaking of Mr. Bankson regarding his home life, he was an unusually kind and considerate husband, and to his children, he was more than a father; he was a companion and a pal to whom they felt no hesitancy in going to with their joys and sorrows.  His sympathetic and understanding disposition will be long remembered by his family and friends.

Mr. Bankson was prominent in politics in this county, having served a term of from 1906 to 1910 as sheriff and collector of Pulaski County.  Aside from the four years spent in Mound City his entire life was spent on the farm where he passed away with the exception of the first nineteen years of his life, which were spent on the farm which belonged to his father and adjoining the one where he lived after his first marriage.

At one time Mr. Bankson was one of the largest land owners in Pulaski County.  He also dealt extensively in the buying and selling of stock.  He was a descendent of one of the pioneer families of Pulaski County.  It is said that a member of the Bankson family was teacher of the first school ever taught in Pulaski County.

Mr. Bankson confessed his faith in Christ and was baptized December 22, 1930, and united with the Christian Church of Pulaski.

His body lay in state at the family residence on the farm until 1 o’clock Wednesday afternoon where many friends passed in and out extending sympathy to the bereaved family.  His remains were then moved to the church yard of the Old Liberty Cemetery where he lay in state under the beautiful shade trees until 2:30 o’clock.  Upon the arrival of the body at the cemetery a large number of friends were found in waiting. At 2:30 o’clock the casket was closed and funeral services were held under the shade of the trees.  Rev. Mr. Holloman, pastor of the Christian Church of Anna, officiated.  He was assisted by Rev. W. H. Baker, pastor of the Christian Church of Cairo and Gene Ligon, who is a student at Kimberline College where Mr. Bankson’s son, Wayne, is studying for the ministry.  The music was furnished by a quartette from the Christian Church of Pulaski, the quartette being composed of lifelong friends and neighbors of Mr. Bankson.  The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful and were silent tokens of the esteems of his many friends.

Immediately following the service, interment was made in the Liberty Cemetery, undertaker, W. A. Aldred, of Pulaski, directing the funeral.

The casket bearers who bore the remains of their loved one to the last resting place were his four sons, Imon, Mannon, Clyde, and Wayne, and two nephews, Everett Bankson, of Olmstead, and Dr. Berry Rife, of Mounds.

In the cemetery were Mr. Bankson was interred rests the remains of his parents, both his paternal and fraternal grandparents and many other relatives of the old Bankson family.

After the services at the cemetery, a scene long to be remembered took place.  Friends and relatives of Mr. Bankson, now advanced in years, who had come to pay their respect, clasped hands and exchanged greetings.  Their common sorrow and grief had brought them together after years of separation. And the family and their friends stood together once more in that binding relation of kin and friendship.

(George W. Bankson married Jane Canady on 24 Jun 1839, in Alexander Co., Ill.  A.C. Bankston married Julia Snell on 10 Dec 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Abner C. Bankson married Laura B. Curry on 27 May 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Abner C. Bankson was born 4 Apr 1858, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of George W. Bankson and Sarah Kennady, died 25 May 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Liberty Cemetery.  His marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  Abner C. Bankson 1856-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Clyde Bankson, of Chicago, is in Mound City, being called on account of the death of his father, A. Bankson, of Pulaski.  Mr. Bankson’s family have been in Mound City for several days and while here have taken the apartment at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Parker on Main Street.
 
SISTER OF MOUND CITY MAN DIES AT MILWAUKEE

Miss Margaret K. Kinney, of Milwaukee, Wis., formerly of this city, and a sister of Dr. T. J. Kinney, of this city, passed away at her home in Milwaukee, Saturday morning according to a message received by relatives.

Surviving Miss Kinney are four brothers, Dr. Kinney, of Mound City, Hugh and John Kinney, of Milwaukee, and Edward, of Chicago; and three sisters, Mrs. R. E. Cahill and Mrs. Agnes Farnbaker, of Milwaukee, and Sister Mary Julia, of Chicago. She also leaves several nieces and nephews, Mrs. Orville Childress, of Cairo being a niece.

Miss Kinney was born and reared in Anna, but for a number of years resided in Mound City.  For the past several years she made her home in Milwaukee.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at St. Thomas Acquantis Catholic Church at Milwaukee and interment was made in Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Chicago.
 
Aunt Dosie Eller died at the state hospital at Anna Thursday afternoon and was moved to the home of Thomas Hinkle.  Funeral services were held at Mt. Olive Church Friday at 2 o’clock. Rev. H. W. Karraker conducted the funeral.  (Swan Pond)

(Michael D. Eller, 41, born in North Carolina, son of George Eller and Rosena Goodman, married 2nd on 1 Jan 1893, in Union Co., Ill., Mrs. Docia Blackburn, 42, born in Union Co., Ill., the daughter of Abner Keller and Polly Gales.  Her death certificate states that Docie Keller was born 8 Dec 1850, in Illinois, the daughter of Abbie Keller, died 21 May 1931, in Anna, Ill., wife of Mike Eller, and was buried at Mt. Olive Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Charles Kerr and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dexter and daughter, Dorothy, attended the funeral of Mrs. Dexter’s uncle, A. C. Bankson, at Liberty last Wednesday.  (Beech Grove)

(James Franklin Dexter married on 31 Jul 1909, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Georgia Elmira Mumford, the daughter of George Mumford and Alice Curry.  George M. Mumford married Mrs. Alice Lentz on 30 May 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Peter Lentz married Nancy A. Curry on 28 Jan 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Abner C. Bankson married Laura B. Curry on 27 May 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mounds Independent, Friday, 29 May 1931:
Pulaski County Pioneer Dies Early Monday Morning

A. C. Bankson, former sheriff of Pulaski County, died early Monday morning, May 25, at his home near Pulaski, following a long illness.  Mr. Bankson, who was 75, had been for many years prominently identified with the political life of the county belonging to the Republican Party.  He served a term as sheriff and two of his sons have filled various county offices.

Surviving him are his widow, and eight children—Mannon, U. S. deputy marshal, of Benton, Ill.; Abby, of Linn Creek, Mo.; Mrs. Hallie Reeves, of Pulaski; Mrs. Lois Day, of Ullin; Mrs. Mona Lackey, of Mattoon; Imon, of Mound City, Circuit clerk of Pulaski County; Clyde of Chicago; and Wayne A., a ministerial student at Kimberlin Heights, Tenn.; also one sister, Mrs. B. A. Royall, of Villa Ridge, and one brother, Lon Bankson, of Pulaski.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Liberty Church, the Rev. Mr. Holloman officiating.  Interment was made in Liberty Cemetery.

Former Mounds Resident Dies in Memphis

J. B. Healy, 75, in former years a resident of Mounds, died Sunday afternoon, May 24, at the home of his son, Charles Healy, in Memphis, Tenn., where he had been ill for a number of weeks.  Mr. Healy was an Illinois Central engineer for many years and had been retired and pensioned by the company.  His former home in Mounds was what is now the Chris Bauer residence, Mr. Bauer having purchased the place from Mr. Healy.

He is survived by his widow and two sons, Worth B. Healy, of East St. Louis, and Charles Healy, of Memphis, Tenn.  The sons grew to manhood in this city and were married before Mr. and Mrs. Healy left here to make their home in Paducah, Ky., at which place they have since lived.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock in the Broadway Methodist Church of Paducah.  Burial was in the Paducah cemetery.

These from Mounds who attended the funeral were Mrs. A. Deeslie, Mrs. Homer McKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Givens, and daughter, Virginia, J. C. Mench, Mrs. Ora Pollock, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Fellenstein and Mr. and Mrs. George Sitter.

(According to his death certificate, James B. Healy was born 13 Oct 1856, in Ohio, the son of Patrick Healy and M. Fogarty, natives of Ireland, died 24 May 1931, in Memphis, Tenn., the husband of Mary Bone Healy.—Darrel Dexter)

Clarence McClellan Dies at Home of His Father

Clarence McClellan, age 29 years, died Tuesday night at 8:10 o’clock at the home of his father, Henry McClellan, west of town.  He had been ill for some two months.

Mr. McClellan is survived by his widow, a daughter, ten months old, his father, stepmother, two uncles, Dow McClellan, of Mounds, and George McClellan, of Memphis, Tenn., four aunts and two grandmothers.

Funerals services were held Thursday afternoon at Shiloh Baptist Church, Rev. W. J. Ward of Dongola officiating.  Burial was in Shiloh Cemetery with Hartwell and Son directing.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Jun 1931:
PROMINENT RAILROAD MAN OF MOUNDS PASSES AWAY

Earl Giles, age 41 years, of Mounds, Illinois, passed away at the Illinois Central Hospital in Chicago, Saturday morning at 4:30 o’clock following an illness of three months.  Mr. Giles has been a patient in the hospital in Chicago or several weeks and, although his death was not unexpected, it has shocked and saddened the entire community.  He was a man of excellent character and was well liked by all who knew him.  He was a member of Trinity Lodge No. 562 A. F. & A. M. at Mound City, Illinois, and he had many friends in the order as well as in the community in which he had resided for a number of years.  He was also a member of the Mystic Shrine of the Ainad Temple of East St. Louis.

Mr. Giles was born in Anna and came to Mounds to reside in 1910.  February 8th, 1911, he was united in marriage to Miss Metta Shearer of Mound City and to this union two children were born.

Surviving Mr. Giles are his widow, a son, Earl Jr., age 19; and a daughter, Louise, age 17 years.  The son is with the U.S. Navy stationed at New York.,  He also leaves four half-brothers, Elmer Standard, of Columbus, Ohio, Charles and W. W. Standard of Bensonville, Illinois, and Tommy Cole, of Drummond, Wis.  His mother, Miss Minnie Cole, preceded him in death about four years ago.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock at the Methodist Church in Mounds, the Rev. W. L. Hanbaum, pastor of the First M. E. Church of Mound City officiating in the absence of Rev. Shoaff, pastor of the Mounds church.  The beautiful Masonic rites were given at the church.

The body was then removed to his home where it remained until five o’clock when interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  This was necessary on account of Earl Jr., not arriving until 12:30 o’clock.  G. A. James directed the funeral.  Two brothers from Bensonville, Illinois, were in Mounds to attend the funeral.

(His death certificate states that George E. Giles was born 17 Jul 1889, in Illinois, the son of George Giles and Minnie Cole, and died 30 May 1931, in Chicago, Cook Co., Ill.  He was an engineer and his wife was Metta Giles.  S. A. Standard married Mrs. Minnie Giles on 22 Mar 1890, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  George E. Giles 1889-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JAMES W. ROUSE PASSES AWAY IN MEMPHIS

James W. Rouse, age 79 years, passed away at his home in Memphis, Tenn., Saturday, May 30, at 3:30 p.m. following a ten days’ illness.  Mr. Rouse was in the government service for 57 years and five years ago retired from active duties.  He was born July 12, 1852, at Baltimore, Md.  Fifty-one years ago he was married to Miss Juliett Hunter.  Mr. Rouse was a former resident of Mound City. He was the son of the late James and Rachel Rouse, he and his wife both being members of pioneer families of this community.  During his residence in this city, he was an employee of the Marine Ways, leaving here with his family several years ago, locating in Memphis, where he was connected with government work.  The cause of his death was intestinal hemorrhage.

He was a life member sf Desoto Lodge No. 299, A. F. and A. M. and of the Consistory.  Mr. Rouse is survived by his widow, Mrs. Juliett Hunter Rouse; a daughter, Mrs. Harry E. Allen, of Memphis; two sons, Hunter N. Rouse, of Memphis and Walter Rouse, of Emmet, Neb.; and a sister, Mrs. Eva M. Bowling, of St. Louis, and a number of other relatives and a large circle of friends who join in extending sympathy to the bereaved family.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the J. W. Norris Funeral Home at 3:30 o’clock conducted by the Rev. Dr. C. A. Marrs, Masonic funeral services were held at the grave in Forrest Hill Cemetery by members of the De Soto Lodge.

(James W. Rouse married Julia E. Hunter on 18 Feb 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Jesse L. Bowling married Eva M. Rouse on 23 Apr 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Miss Abbie Bankson, of Linn Creek, Mo., who was called to Pulaski on account of the death of her father, A. C. Bankson, has returned to her home.  She was accompanied home by her brother, Imon Bankson and wife, who returned to their home in this city Sunday evening.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 5 Jun 1931:
A. E. Clift Dies Saturday in Savannah, Ga.
Former Superintendent of St. Louis Division Illinois Central

Albert E. Clift, president of the Central of Georgia railway and a former senior vice-president of the Illinois Central Railroad, died Saturday in Savannah, Ga., after an illness of several weeks.  He had undergone an operation for abdominal trouble on May 25.

Born in Urbana, Ill., in 1869, Mr. Clift began his railroad career as brakeman for the Illinois Central in 1888.  Promotions followed and he became yard master, train master and in 1905, superintendent of the St. Louis Division with headquarters at Carbondale.  In 1910 he was made general superintendent of the system; from 1917 to 1923 he was assistant general manager and general manager and in 1923 and 1924 was vice president in charge of operations.  In addition to his residency of the Central Georgia railway, he was president of the Ocean Steam Ship Company.

Mr. Clift is survived by his widow, Mrs. Letitia Yeats Clift, and his mother, Mrs. Emma E. Clift, of Urbana.

(Albert E. Clift married Letitia Yeats on 9 Feb 1892, in Champaign Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

G. E. Giles Dies Saturday in Illinois Central Hospital

George Earl Giles, machinist for the Illinois Central Railroad, died Saturday in the Illinois Central Hospital, Chicago, where he had been a patient for about three weeks.  His condition was serious from the beginning and gradually grew worse until the end.

George Earl Giles was born July 17, 1889, and died May 30, 1931, at the age of 41 years, 10 months and 13 days.  He was born at Anna, Ill., but has resided in Mounds since 1910.  His mother died four years ago.

He was united in marriage on February 8, 1911, to Miss Metta Sheerer, of Mound City, and to this union two children were born:  Earl, Jr., age 19 years, who has been stationed at Fort Slocum, New York in Air Corps which was to sail for Hawaii on May 5, but on account of the serious condition of his father he has been transferred to Scott Field, Illinois, and Louise, age 17 years, who is at home.

He also leaves four half-brothers, Elmer Standard, Columbus, Ohio, Tommie Cole, Drummond, Wis.; William W. Standard, and Charles Standard, of Bensonville, Ill., William W. and Charles being in Mounds for the funeral.  The others were unable to come.  T. L. Cole, a stepfather, also survives.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock at the M. E. church of Mounds, Rev. W. L. Hanbaum of Mound City gave the sermon and Masonic rites were administered with C. E. Ferrill conducting after which the body was taken home to await the coming of the son, who arrived on the noon train.  At 5 o’clock burial was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with a prayer service, Rev. Hanbaum of Mound City officiating and G. A. James directing the funeral.

(According to his death certificate, George E. Giles was born 17 Jul 1889, in Illinois, the son of George Giles and Minnie Cole, died 30 May 1031, in Chicago, Ill., the husband of Metta Giles.—Darrel Dexter)

Earl Giles, Jr., arrived from Fort Slocum, N.Y. Tuesday afternoon, having been called home by the death of his father.  From here he will report to Scott Field, Belleville, where he will be stationed for a year.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Jun 1931:
Two Die in Crash Against Interurban
Grable May Have Bled to Death While Spectators Looked on Ten Minutes

Ruth Pulley, 15, of Mounds, and Charles Grable, Jr., 16, of Cairo, met death about 8:43 p.m. Monday evening when the motorcycle on which they were riding crashed with an interurban car at the crossing about a quarter mile south of Mounds.  Miss Pulley sustained two fractures of the skull, while Grable probably lived 15 or 20 minutes.  His death was due either to the excessive loss of blood when his left leg was severed below the knee, or concussion of the brain, or to a combination of these and shock.  Had early arrivals applied tourniquets to Grable’s leg, he might be alive today.

Witnesses state that Grable had Miss Pulley riding on the cross bar between the seat and handlebar and was traveling 45 or 50 miles per hour south from Mounds.  He turned out from behind cars that had stopped for the interurban and made for the crossing.  W. H. Mylott, of Mounds, who was walking, shouted a warning to Grable, but he probably never heard it.  Grable was following Louis Sams of Cairo who had a girl on the motorcycle with him.

The crash took place on the west side of the crossing and from all indications, the left side of the interurban struck the motorcycle. The momentum of the motorcycle carried it about 30 feet south and to the right where it landed.

There were cars waiting for the interurban to cross, for the car had slowed, whistled, and then seeing the cars, stopped, put on speed to cross when the crash took place.  Some think that Grable did not see the interurban because Miss Pulley obstructed the view.

It was about 10 minutes after the accident that Dr. O. T. Hudson of Mounds was summoned and arrived.  All this time nothing had been done to stop the arterial bleeding of Grable.  When Dr. Hudson arrived there was still heart action and Grable’s leg was pumping blood.  Immediately he stopped this and on getting him to the office, salt solution was pumped into his veins to increase the blood.  It was possible, Dr. Hudson stated, that Grable died from loss of blood or that there may have been concussion sufficient to have been fatal or the shock and operation to amputate may have all combined to induce death.  Ten minutes of unchecked bleeding of an artery in the leg will drain almost all the blood from the human body.

Miss Pulley died instantly from her injuries.

The inquest was held Tuesday with few new facts learned.  The motorists who had stopped for the interurban were not found to testify.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the residence and were largely attended by sorrowing friends and relatives of the family.  Rev. W. M. Baker, pastor of the First Christian Church of Cairo, officiated.  The floral offerings were profuse and beautiful.  Four of Ruth’s most intimate friends and school mates acted as flower bearers:  Misses Lucille Henson, Evelyn Mae Winchester, Eleanor Bauer, and Madeline Fox.

The casket bearers were Lester Grandstaff, Robert Pletcher, Eugene Roberts, Roderick Connell, Carlos Walston, Mounds, and Floyd Knight, William Garrett, and Claude Waite, of Mound City.
Immediately after the services at the residence the cortege left for Spencer Heights Cemetery where interment was made.  Hartwell and Son directed the funeral.

Funeral services for Charles Grable, Jr., were held at 1:30 o’clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Grable, 509 Center Street at Cairo.  Following the services the cortege moved by automobile to Spencer Heights Cemetery where interment was made by Karcher Brothers of Cairo.  Rev. Baker also officiated at the funeral of Charles.  Casket bearers were Louis Sams, Charles Yarbrough, Robert Smith, Jack Rees, Eddie Kern, Sam Parker, Paul Jones, and Woodrow Duncan.

Miss Pulley is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Pulley; one sister, Carolyn; and a brother, William; and a grandmother, Mrs. Addie Curtsinger, of Mounds.

Left to mourn the passing of Charles are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Grable, of Cairo; four sisters, Dorothy, Hazel, Shirley Jean, and Barbara Ann, of Cairo; and his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Mowery, of Tamms.

(Charles B. Grable, 21, born in Hopkins Co., Ky., son of William and Mary Grable, married on 29 Aug 1912, in Union Co., Ill., Minnie May Mowery, 19, daughter of Jacob M. Mowery and Huldah Casper.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Ruth W. Pulley Born Dec. 26, 1915 Died June 8, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SEVEN DAYS OLD SON PASSES AWAY THRUSDAY

Glenn Edward, the week old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Hankins, of St. Louis, passed away Thursday afternoon at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Williams, on Pearl Street.  The little one had not been well since birth.

Short services were held at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Williams, Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock and interment as made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by undertaker G. A. James.  Rev. Shoaff, pastor of the M. E. Church of Mounds officiated in the absence of Rev. Hanbaum of this city.

Mrs. Hankins, mother of the baby, was before her marriage, Miss Ada Williams, of this city, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Williams.
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 12 Jun 1931:
Mounds Girl and Cairo Boy Killed in Collision on Highway
Girl Meets Instant Death—Boy Fatally Injured when Street Car and Motorcycle Run Together

Ruth Pulley, 15-yar-old Mounds girl, and Charles Grable, Jr., 16, of Cairo, were victims of a motorcycle accident Monday evening at 8:40 o’clock at the interurban crossing on Route 2 just south of Mounds.  Miss Pulley was instantly killed and the youth was so badly injured that he died less than six hours later.  Their motorcycle and the 8:45 interurban car collided on the crossing, the impact throwing the young couple from the motorcycle and into the weeds at the southwest side of the track.  It is thought the girl’s head struck a concrete stone as it was badly crushed.  Her glasses were found some distance away, intact.

Young Grable had purchased the motorcycle only a few days ago. He and Louis Sams, also of Cairo, both riding motorcycles, had stopped at Mattson’s lunch stand where a crowd of young folk were playing volleyball and otherwise amusing themselves.  Pearl Mattson mounted the motorcycle of young Sams and Ruth Pulley that of young Grable, planning to ride south to the Mound City Cairo Y and return.  It is said that Ruth, in a joking way, waved her hand at the crowd and said, “Good-bye, if I don’t see you again.”  As they approached the crossing the interurban car was winding its way toward the same point of intersection.  An automobile going south had paused to await the passing of the street car.  Young Sams and Miss Mattson were in the lead and got across safely.  Young Grable dashed around the automobile perhaps not seeing the approaching car as Ruth was sitting on the handle bars of his motorcycle.  The crash came and two young lives were lost.

Dr. O. T. Hudson pronounced the girl dead and gave first aid to the boy, whose left side was injured.  He was first taken to Dr. Hudson’s office and later removed to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he died at 2 o’clock Tuesday morning.

The body of Miss Pulley was removed to Hartwell and Ryan’s funeral parlor where it was found the victim had sustained a crushed skull and numerous other wounds.

Coroner O. T. Hudson conducted an inquest over Miss Pulley Tuesday morning at 10:30 o’clock at which time a verdict of accidental death was returned.

At the inquest over young Grable conducted in Cairo by Dan Sullivan, coroner of Alexander County, Leslie Hodge, the motorman on the interurban car, is reported to have testified that he sounded his whistle for the crossing signal and had the car under control, that the motorcycle almost cleared the tracks, the street car striking only the outside of the machine near the car.

W. H. Mygatt, who was walking along the highway at the time, is reported to have testified that he cried out in warning to Grable.  The speed of the motorcycle was estimated by Mygatt at about 45 miles and by Motorman Hodge as 50 miles.

Ruth was the second child of Mr. and Mrs. Carol L. Pulley.  She was born in Mounds, Dec. 26, 1915 and had lived here all her life.  She would have been a junior in high school next year.

Surviving her are her parents, a sister, Carolyn, a brother, William; a grandmother, Mrs. William Curtsinger, all of Mounds; two aunts, Mrs. Mettie Minton, of Caruthersville, Mo., and Mrs. Lydia Jenkins, of Mounds; six uncle, T. L. Pulley, of Maywood, Cal., R. T. Pulley, of Jonesboro, Ill., Urban Curtsinger, of Fulton, Ky., and Artel and Robert Curtsinger, of Cairo.  She also leaves numerous other relatives and a host of friends, especially among the young people with whom she was a favorite.

Funeral services were held at the family residence on Blanche Ave., Wednesday afternoon at 3:00 o’clock, conducted by Rev. W. M. Baker, pastor of the First Christian Church, of Cairo, assisted by Rev. H. B. Shoaff, pastor of the M. E. Church of Mounds.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery undertaker Hartwell and Ryan in charge.  There was a large attendance and the flowers were many and beautiful.

Young Grable was a freshman in the Cairo high school.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Grable, of Cairo.  He is survived by his parents, four sisters, Dorothy, Hazel, Shirley Jean and Barbara Ann; a brother, Clarence and his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Mowery, of Tamms.

His funeral services were held the same day at an earlier hour—1:30 o’clock—by the same minister.  He was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Former Resident Dies

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. C. E. Horsley’s mother, Mrs. Timms, which occurred at the Horsley home in Chicago a number of weeks ago.  Mrs. Timms made her home with her daughter while the family were residents of Mounds and her many friends here who will grieve to hear of her passing.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Jun 1931:
CLINTON S. THOMPSON OF ULLIN PASSES AWAY

Clinton S. Thompson, age 35, formerly of Ullin, passed away at Marion, Illinois, Tuesday, June 9.  Mr. Thompson was a nephew of Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Mathis, of Ullin, and was reared in their home, as one of their own children and in fact had always been as dear to them as if he had been their own son.
He was a graduate of Valparaiso University and had attended the State University at Urbana.  During the World War, he enlisted and served as regimental sergeant major in the aviation department.  He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and the order of the Eastern Star.  For several years he had held a position with the C. I. P. S. Co., acting in the capacity of distributing engineer, with headquarters at Marion.
When he was still quite young his parents passed away and since that time he has made his home with Dr. and Mrs. Mathis and family.

Besides the family of Dr. Mathis, he is survived by his widow, who before her marriage was Miss Leta Clark, a teacher in the Ullin School.  He also leaves several uncles and other relatives.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the M. E. Church at Ullin, the Rev. M. H. Loar, of Carbondale officiating.  Interment took place in the Ullin Cemetery.  Services at the grave were conducted by the Masonic order.  Undertaker W. J. Rhymer directed the funeral.

Casket bearers were M. G. Hart, Russel Holcomb, C. G. McIntire, Carl Sichling, Lloyd Rhymer, and Clifford Needham.

(His death certificate states that Clinton Samuel Thompson was born 1 Mar 1896, in Illinois, the son of Louis Thompson and Judah Lentz, and died 9 Jun 1931, in Marion, Ill.  His occupation was electrical engineer.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Clinton S. Thompson Born March 1, 1896 Died June 9, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
X-RAY BLAMED FOR DEATH OF HIS SISTER

Anemia, which may have been contracted from constant use of x-ray lights when she was an assistant in a doctor’s office, is believed to have been the cause of the death Tuesday of Marguerite Pauline Veail, 33 years old, 1354 North Topeka Avenue, Kansas City, a sister of Ira Veail, of Pulaski.

Miss Veail, who was the daughter of Mrs. George Bailey, 1354 North Topeka Avenue, had been suffering from this anemic condition for more than a year and a half, during which time she was a patient in several hospitals, undergoing several blood transfusions and receiving other treatment.

She had been employed in a doctor’s office for more than five years.  The x-ray, while beneficial to the patients, is used only a short time, but the operator, in a course of duties is in frequent contact.
Early this year Miss Veail was taken to the hospital, where she remained for almost three months.  She was returned to her home, but went back to Wesley Hospital two weeks ago, and died there early Tuesday.

Miss Veail has resided in Wichita since early childhood.  Besides her mother, she is survived by a twin sister, Mrs. Marie Schlesx, Indianapolis, Ind.; a brother, Ira, of Pulaski, Illinois; and the following aunts:  Mrs. Emma Woodbury, 1354 North Topeka Avenue, Mrs. R. M. Fouts, and Mrs. Mamie Maggard, Wichita.
 
No Identification of Floater Found Friday

There has been no identification of the floater found last Friday in the river just above the shipyard by Junior Cowles and Harry Layton.  Efforts to find out who he was have proved unavailing, and as the body was in no condition to be kept, it was interred that afternoon.

Layton and Cowles were throwing rocks in the river when they spied the form they thought was a scarecrow washed from some farmer’s field.  A closer look revealed that it was a man’s body and, after securing it, so it would not float down the river, they went for help.

The man had been in the river about two weeks, it was estimated by G. A. James, who cared for the remains that was beginning to decompose.  Swelling had distorted the features and size so that accurate estimates are hard.  He was dressed in a pin stripe suit, was about 50 years of age, about 5 feet 7 inches high and weighing around 160 pounds. Neither his clothing nor the contents of his pockets revealed anything concerning his identity.  A collar button and a few pennies were all that they contained.  His shoes were gone. There were no marks of violence.

Sheriff Hudson sent word as far up the river as Paducah, but so far, nothing has been heard.

Mounds Independent, Friday, 19 Jun 1931:
Floater Found in Ohio River at Mound City

Three boys walking along the levee at Mound City Friday morning discovered the body of a man floating down the Ohio River.  The boys immediately notified Sheriff I. J. Hudson, concerning their gruesome find and the body was taken from the water and removed to the undertaking establishment of G. A. James.  State’s Attorney Joe O’Sullivan has been active in trying to establish the man’s identity which will be possible only through his clothing as the body had been in the water long enough to be in advanced stage of decomposition.

Mrs. Mary Fulkerson received word this week that her nephew, Hodge Taylor, trainmaster at Champaign, was in a serious condition in the hospital at Kankakee, suffering from injuries received in an automobile wreck.
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Jun 1931:
MRS. W. J. SMITH PASSED AWAY IN NEW ORLEANS

Mrs. W. J. Smith, formerly Miss Annie Malley, of Mounds, passed away Saturday in a hospital in New Orleans, following a serious operation.  She had been in very poor health for the past four years.  She was born in the county of Donegal, near Mt. Charles, Ireland, and at the age of 18 came to Cairo to make her home with her aunt. Three years later, the family moved to Mounds. She was married to William Smith and moved to New Orleans in 1922 where Mr. Smith is superintendent of the Fruit Dispatch.

Surviving Mrs. Smith are her husband, two sons, Tom, who is studying to be a priest in Perryville, Mo., and William Jr., of New Orleans; four brothers, Pat Malley, of New Orleans, Mike, of Oregon, Pete of Texas and John, of Mounds; an aunt, Mrs. Cassie Travis; two cousins, John Travis, and Mrs. Ed Raub, of Mounds.

Funeral services were held Monday at New Orleans and interment was made there.  Mrs. Cassie Travis, and Mr. and Mrs. John Travis, attended the funeral.
 
Hold Up Man Shot as He Wields Pistol

An unidentified colored man was shot and killed at Villa Ridge Friday night by George Green, while he was in the act of holding up Miss Agnes Gunn, who operates the confectionary there.

Miss Gunn was in the car when the colored man faced her with a gun.  Green, who was in the confectionary and was closing, saw what was in progress and stepped out.  He fired as the negro turned, the bullet entering his chest not far from the heart and lodging near the spine and almost at the surface of the skin.

That was the only shot fired.  By the time the would-be robber was taken to Mounds, he was dead.
He had two pistols, one a Colts which he was using and the other a cheap pocket gun.  He had no money nor means of identification, other than a transfer ticket of a St. Louis street car company and a work slip of some construction company of St. Louis.  He had been hanging about Villa Ridge for several days.
The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of justifiable homicide the next morning, exonerating Green entirely.

The dead man was about 5 feet 10 inches in height, had a Roman nose, brown in color and had a scar on the right side of his chin.  He was somewhere around 25 or 30 years of age.

This confectionary has been held up before and precautions are taken by both Miss Gunn and Mr. Green against robbery.  It has been less than six or eight months that shots were fired at someone trying to break in.  This was the second shot ever fired from Green’s .38 special.
 
THOMAS WILLIAM HANES DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS

Thomas William Hanes, age 91 years, who was the only surviving member of the Grand Army of Republic in his precinct, passed away at his home in Mounds at 2:35 o’clock Tuesday morning following a paralytic strokes, which he suffered about a week ago.  He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served four years.  He had been a resident of Mounds for many years.

He is survived by his widow and two step sons, E. A. Matson and A. E. Matson, both of Mounds. 

He leaves no other near relatives.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Methodist church in Mounds, the pastor, Rev. H. B. Shoaff, officiating.  Interment was made in the National Cemetery at Mound City and full military honors were accorded the old soldier.  The funeral was directed by Hartwell and Ryan, undertakers of Mounds.

(Thomas W. Hanes, 19, born in Vermilion Co., Ind., 5’6”, with light hair, gray eyes, dark complexion and farmer, enlisted on 14 Jun 1861, in Tuscola, Ill., as a private in Co. D, 21st Illinois Infantry.  He re-enlisted 27 Feb 1864, and was discharged 16 Dec 1865. Thomas W. Hanes married Mrs. Susie E. Mattson on 11 Feb 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George Mattson married Susan E. Butler on 24 Feb 1869, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Thomas William Hanes was born 10 Apr 1840, in Indiana, the son of John Hanes, died 23 Jun 1931, in Mounds, Ill., and was buried in the Mound City National Cemetery.  His spouse was Josephine Marie Hanes and his occupation was given as building contractor.  He was buried in section F grave 4964S.—Darrel Dexter)


YOUNG WOMAN OF DONGOLA PASSES AWAY WEDNESDAY

Mrs. Fern Winter McMahan, age 26, passed away at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Winter, in Dongola, Wednesday afternoon, June 18, at 2 o’clock following an illness of several months.  Her husband, Martin L. McMahan, passed away, April 27, 1931.  One little daughter, Tina, who is about 2 years of age, survives her parents.

Mrs. Mahan is a native of Dongola and after finishing her high school education was employed in the drug store of J. A. Dillow at Dongola.

Funeral services were held from the First Baptist Church in Dongola Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. J. Ward.  Interment was made in the Dongola I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  Funeral director E. J. Ford was in charge.

Casket bearers were R. S. Dillow, W. O. Corzine, Guy L. Penrod, Oscar E. Jones, H. N. Holshouser, and C. E. Baggot.

Besides her parents and little daughter, she leaves one brother, Robert S. Winter, of Dongola, several uncles and aunts, and a large circle of friends.

(Her marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Fern Winter McMahan Born Aug. 28, 1904 Died June 17, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 26 Jun 1931:
Negro Killed in Attempted Robbery at Villa Ridge
Orders Proprietor of Confectionery to Hold up Hands.  Gets Shot in Breast

“Hands up,” said a negro to Miss Agnes Gunn, who had just started the engine of her car after leaving the Gunn Confectionery at Villa Ridge Friday night at about eleven o’clock.  George Green, who operates the filling station for Miss Gunn, and was fastening the door had not yet entered the car.  And there’s where the fellow made his last and most costly mistake.  When he turned to cover Mr. Green, the latter had drawn his own revolver and fired first.  The bullet entered the breast of the marauder and lodged just behind the skin in his back.  Death came before medical attention could be secured.

The body was brought to the undertaking establishment of Hartwell and Ryan in this city, where it lay unidentified until Saturday evening when identification was made by John Robinson, a colored man of Sandusky, who gave the dead man’s name as Otto Perkins, his age as 21, and his residence at St. Louis, Mo.

William Perkins, of St. Louis, father of the dead boy, arrived in Mounds Sunday and positively identified the body of his son.  The Perkins family had formerly lived in southern Illinois and its members were highly respected.  Otto Perkins had come to this vicinity at the opening of the berry season and it is claimed that he had not previously been known as a law breaker.  Another colored man had accompanied him here from St. Louis and this man has disappeared since the shooting.

A coroner’s inquest was conducted at the undertakers Saturday morning by Coroner O. T. Hudson and a verdict of justifiable homicide was returned.

Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery Monday afternoon, services being held at the grave.  Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that Otto Perkins, of 1217A North 8th St., St. Louis, Mo., was born 1 Oct 1909, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the son of William Perkins, a native of Villa Ridge, Ill., and Ella Davis, a native of Levings, Ill., died 19 Jun 1931, in District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. W. J. Smith Dies in New Orleans Hospital

Friends of Mrs. W. J. Smith, formerly Miss Annie Malley, of this city, will hear with regret of her death in a New Orleans hospital the latter part of last week.  Mrs. Cassie Travis, an aunt, and Mr. and Mrs. John Travis, all of Mounds, attended the funeral, which was held in New Orleans Monday.

Mrs. Smith was born in the county of Donegal, near Mt. ___arles, Ireland, and came to this county and to Cairo at the age of 18, to make her home with her aunt, Mrs. Fitzpatrick.  Three years later the family moved to Mounds, where she was later married to William J. Smith.  In 1__2 they moved to New Orleans, where Mr. Smith is superintendent of the Fruit Dispatch Company.

Surviving her are her husband, two sons, Thomas and William; four brothers, Pat and John Malley, of Mounds, Mike, of Oregon and Pete of Texas.  Pat was with his sister at the time of the death.  She also leaves her aunt, Mrs. Travis, and her cousins, __n, Ed. Raub, and J. R. Travis.

Taps Sounded for Last Civil War Veteran in Mounds
Judge Thomas William Hanes Dies at the Age of 91

Judge W. T. Hanes, a prominent longtime resident of Mounds, died early Tuesday morning, June 23, at the family residence on Blanch Avenue, following a paralytic stroke suffered some two weeks ago.  He had celebrated his 91st birthday on April 10th, and at that time was in fairly good health, having retained all his faculties to a remarkable degree.  Always interested in public affairs, he could talk with ease on almost any subject.  He had served the community as Justice of the Peace a number of terms.  In his earlier days he was in the contracting business.  For a number of years he was been in the real estate business.

His only son, Cecil Hanes, died May 2nd of this year and his death was a blow to the aged father.  He is survived by his widow, four stepsons and two stepdaughters.

The following obituary was written by Judge Hanes himself before his last illness.

“Thomas William Hanes was born at Eugene, Vermillion County, Indiana, son of John and Rebecca Hanes, on April 10th, 1840.  His parents moved to Van Buren County, Iowa, in 1846 and settled near Keosauqua.  He lived with his parents until February 1861, then came to Illinois and made his home with an uncle in Douglas County near Newman until the outbreak of the Civil War.  He enlisted in Co. ‘D’ of the 21st Illinois Infantry for three years, May 14, 1861.  The regiment was commanded by Ulysses S. Grant, and he served with his regiment until finally the regiment was discharged at Springfield, Ill., Jan. 19, 1866, having been in the service 4 years, 8 months and 5 days.

“Since leaving the army he has made his home in Pulaski County, but has lived in St. Louis, Mo., and New Orleans, La., for short times, but has always done his voting in Pulaski County, Ill.  He first married Miss Nancy Cook, of Union County, on March 8th, 1867.  She was killed in Cape Girardeau, Mo., March 5, 1868.  No children survive this union.

“On February 14, 1883, he married Mrs. Susan E. Mattson, of Villa Ridge, Ill.  To this union there was born one son, Cecil B. Hanes.  Mrs. Hanes died April 11, 1922, at the age of 76 years, 2 months, and 8 days.  She was a member of the First Methodist Church of Mounds, Ill.

“T. W. Hanes, professed religion in the First M. E. Church of Mounds on the 11th day of March, 1925, at a revival conducted by Evangelist Reagon, a union meeting held by the Congregational and Methodist churches.  He joined the church March 29, 1925.

“He married again October 27, 1926, to Mrs. Josephine Marie Mattson, of Mounds, Ill.  No children by this marriage.”

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Methodist church, with the pastor, Rev. H. B. Shoaff, in the pulpit.  Burial was with full military honors, in the National Cemetery between Mounds and Mound City, where 5,000 soldiers of the Civil war are resting, more than half of them unknown.

Mrs. Curtis Hunsaker attended the funeral of a relative in Anna Tuesday.  (Villa Ridge)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Jul 1931:
CHESTER CUNNINGHAM PASSED AWAY AT ANNA

Chester Cunningham, age 39 years, passed away Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock at the Anna hospital where he had been a patient for several months.  Mr. Cunningham had been in ill health for some time, but his condition became serious just a week ago.  He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Cunningham, of Valley Recluse.

He was born and reared in Mound City and had made his home here until a few years ago.  Besides his parents, he is survived by one brother, Jesse Cunningham, and a nephew, Carl Cunningham, of Rock Island, Illinois.

The body was removed from the funeral home of G. A. James to the home of his brother Wednesday evening, where it remained until Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock when it was removed to the Congregational Church and funeral services were held.  The Rev. Benninger pastor of the Congregational Church at Grand Chain officiated.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.

Casket bearers were E. E. Keller, Olan Bowers, Ive Calvin, George Gunn, Clifford Biggs, and George Beaver.  G. A. James was the funeral director.

(Andrew Cunningham married Mary Maria Alloway on 30 May 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Chester H. Cunningham 1891-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
William Biggs Drops Dead While at Work

William Biggs, employee for years of the Illinois Light and Power Co., dropped dead about 5:20 at the power station yesterday afternoon.  He was talking with a stranger and went inside to fill in on a report sheet.  He returned to the door, staggered and fell backward and was dead in a moment.

The inquest this morning will probably give the cause of his death, although, according to a physician who was called, he either died of the heat or of heart trouble.  In either case, his death was almost instantaneous.

Mr. Biggs is well known in this city and has lived here for years and was held in respect by all who knew him.  His death is a shock.

Besides his wife, there survives two sons, Henry Biggs, who is manager of the Rhodes Burford store at Mounds, Clifford Biggs, who is at home; and one daughter, Bernice, of Memphis, Tenn.

No funeral arrangements could be given at press time, but it will doubtless be Saturday afternoon.

(His death certificate states that William Biggs was born about 1860, the son of Cass and Zaeva Biggs and died 2 Jul 1931, in Mound City, Ill.)
 
Dr. Sterns, father of Dr. C. A. Sterns, of Alto Pass, died Sunday at Holden Hospital in Carbondale, following a paralytic strokes.  Mr. Sterns had been for many years a practicing physician at Pomona, Illinois, until recently he gave up his practice and went to live with his children in Carbondale.  His wife preceded him in death several years ago.  He is survived by three sons and three daughters.  Funeral arrangements have not yet been learned.  (Alto Pass)

(Willis Stearns, 23, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Adam Stearns and Julia A. Outland, married on 9 Mar 1884, in Union Co., Ill., Annie E. Black, 18, born in Calhone Co., Ark., daughter of George Black and Lucinda Clemons.  The death certificate states that he was born 20 Dec 1860, in Pomona, Ill., and died 28 Jun 1931.  His marker in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale, Ill., reads:  Willis Stearns M.D. 1860-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Jul 1931:
Death in North Mounds

William Shaw, colored, age 26, died Thursday, July 2, at the home of his mother in North Mounds, following a long illness.  Arrangements for the funeral have been delayed pending the arrival of a brother and other relatives.

(According to his death certificate, William Shaw was born about 1906, the son of Preston Shaw and Jane Hammonds, and died 2 Jul 1931, in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Jul 1931:
E. B. THOMAS DIES AT HOME OF DAUGHTER NEAR ULLIN

Edwin B. Thomas, age 85, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. H. James, near Ullin, June 30.  He had been in failing health for some time suffering from a severe stomach trouble.

His remains were taken to his old home in Milburn, Ky., where funeral services were held Thursday, July 2, the Rev. Sutton officiating.  Interment was made in the Milburn Cemetery.  E. J. Ford, funeral director of Dongola, had charge of the funeral.

Surviving Mr. Thomas are two children, Mrs. E. H. James, of Ullin, and W.E. Thomas, of Chicago.  Five sisters and one brother also survive.

(His death certificate states that Edwin B. Thomas was born 6 Jul 1845, in Kentucky, the son of Elijah Thomas and Louisa Ship, died 30 Jun 1931, in Alexander Co., Ill., and was buried in Milburn, Ky.  His wife was Anna L. Thomas.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD SUNDAY FOR WILLIALM BIGGS

Funeral services for William Biggs, who passed away suddenly last Thursday were held Sunday afternoon at the First M. E. Church at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. W. L. Hanbaum, pastor of the church, officiating.  The church was filled with friends and relatives of the deceased and his family.  The profusion of beautiful floral offerings which were banked upon the chancel was a silent tribute to the deceased and showed the high esteem in which he was held by his friends in this community.  A quartette composed of Miss Cora Fullerton, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Karraker, and G. A. James, sang, “The Old Rugged Cross,” and “Beautiful Isle.”  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by undertaker G. A. James.

Casket bearers were James Finley, George Cunn, Olen Bowers, S. F. McIntire, Imon Bankson, and Ivan Galvin.

Mr. Biggs was born in Hamletsburg, Pope County, Illinois, February 18, 1859, and departed this life at Mound City July 2, 1931, at the age of 72 years, four month and fourteen days.

He was united in marriage to Miss Zoe Eva Carnes, July 27, 1889, and to this union were born, one daughter, Miss Bernice, now of Memphis, Tenn., and two sons, Henry and Clifford, of this city.

In 1900 he became a member of First M. E. Church of Cairo and later transferred his membership to the M. E. Church of this city.  He at one time was a teacher of the Men’s Bible Class for a number of years.  He was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, Camp No. 5151 and was a charter member of the Cairo chapter.

For many years he has been an employee of the Illinois Power and Light Corporation plant in Mound City.  He was known and commended for his loyalty and faithfulness to his duties.  Besides his widow, two sons and daughter, he is survived by one granddaughter, Doris Biggs, of Grand Chain.

(W. M. Biggs married Zoever Carnes on 26 Jul 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery t Mounds reads:  William Biggs 1859-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
INFANT SON OF MR. AND MRS. MARK DOVER PASSED AWAY

Edgar Louis, the 16-month-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Dover, passed away at the home of his parents, Saturday morning.  The little one had been ill two weeks.  Besides his parents, he is survived by a brother, age about three years, his paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dover, of Grand Chain, his maternal grandmother, Mrs. Hayes, of this city.

Funeral services were held Sunday morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church. Father Eugene Traynor officiating.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.  The funeral was in charge of G. A. James, funeral director.

(His marker in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Edgar L. Dover Born March 6, 1930 Died July 4, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CLINTON TERRELL OF CAIRO PASSED AWAY MONDAY

The entire community has received a shock in the death of C. C. Terrell, prominent shoe merchant of Cairo, which occurred Monday morning at this home 2837 Park Place West.  Mr. Terrell had been suffering or sometime of angina pectoris, but it was not thought that death was near.

He was born in Ballard County, Ky., and came to Cairo as a young man working as a clerk in a shoe business.  Later he went into business for himself and since has been senior partner in the shoe store on Commercial Avenue, which was then known as Terrell-Howe Shoe Company and later Terrell-Karcher.  He was well and favorably known throughout Pulaski County.  His congenial smile, hearty greeting and friendly handshake will long be missed form his place of business.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the First M. E. Church in Cairo, the Rev. O. B. Allen, pastor of the church officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Charles, Mo., by the side of his wife, who preceded him in death two years ago.

(His death certificate states that Clinton Christopher Terrell was born 17 Feb 1869, in New Slater, Ky., the son of Christopher C. Terrell, a native of Virginia, and Anna Hall, died 6 Jul 1931, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Charleston, Mo.—Darrel Dexter)
 
H. GRANT PEELER OF DONGOLA PASSED AWAY SATURDAY

H. Grant Peeler, age 61, passed away at his home near Dongola Saturday morning.  He had suffered ill health for several months, but the end came suddenly following a heart attack.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Dongola, where he was a member, at ten o’clock Monday morning, conducted by Rev. W. J. Ward, pastor of the church.  Interment was made in Mt. Pisgah cemetery near Wetaug.  E. J. Ford directed the funeral.

Mr. Peeler was a member of the M. W. of A. Camp at Dongola.  He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Emma Peeler, and seven children as follows:  Mrs. John Taylor, Mrs. Floyd Peeler, Harley, Raleigh, Sam and Mattie Peeler, all of Dongola, and Mrs. Emory Lingle, of Pontiac, Mich.; also sisters and brothers as follows:  Mrs. Eli Mowery, Mrs. C. W. McCommons, of Dongola, Mrs. George Hartline, of Plant City, Fla., Mrs. Berty Arey, of Cairo, and Sam Peeler, of Cypress, and a large circle of other relatives and friends.

(Grant Henry Peeler, 22, the son of Jesse Peeler and Emeline Miller, married on 2 Jan 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Amy Isabelle Hartline, 21, the daughter of Charles W. Hartline and Susan Anna Casper.  His death certificate states that Henry Grant Peeler was born 1 Feb 1870, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Jesse Peeler and Mary Emiline Miller, natives of North Carolina, died 4 Jul 1931, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dover, Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Dover, and family, and Mr. and Mrs. George Sneed, of Grand Chain, were here Sunday to attend the funeral of Edgar Louis Dover, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Dover.
  

Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Jul 1931:
C. C. Terrell of Cairo Dies Monday Morning

Clinton C. Terrell, of Cairo, age 62 years, died at his home Monday morning at 9:30 o’clock from angina pectoris.

Mr. Terrell had been in the shoe business in Cairo for many years and was well and favorably known throughout Southern Illinois, Southeast Missouri, and Northwestern Kentucky.  He had been prominently identified with all community affairs and will be greatly missed.  He was born in Ballard County, Ky., and his wife, who preceded him in death two years ago, was from Charleston, Mo.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon in the First Methodist Church of Cairo, of which Mr. Terrell was a devoted member.  Interment was made in Charleston, Mo., beside the body of his wife.

Funeral of William Shaw Held Sunday

The funeral of William Norval Shaw was held July 5, 1931, at St. Paul A. M. E. Church by Rev. Herman Fiske.  William was born at Cobden, Ill., July 18, 1904, and died July 2, 1931, at his home in North Mounds.  He was a graduate for Mounds High School, with Prof. E. C. Hamilton, as principal.  He leaves a mother, one brother, Henry Shaw, of Richmond, Ind., and other relatives.  Miss Maud Kennedy and brother, Robert, of St. Louis, cousins, of the deceased, motored here to attend the funeral.

(According to his death certificate, William Shaw was the son of Preston Shaw and Jane Hammonds.  Henry P. Shaw married Jane S. Hammonds on 24 Dec 1896, in St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

ELKVILLE—It is reported that Mrs. Theodore Creekpaum, of Vergennes hung herself last Thursday night in a barn and failed to kill herself.  A sister from Anna, a guest in the home at that time, found the unconscious form and rescued Mrs. Creekpaum.  Mrs. Creekpaum is about 22 years of age and the mother of two children.  Her husband works on a bridge gang.  Mrs. Creekpaum is said to be in a serious condition.

MARION—In a clump of woods which had been previously searched by posses of men with bloodhounds, the body of Joe Yearack, missing since June 11, was found Wednesday of last week, with little but the skeleton remaining.  It was found accidently by friends of Yearack, who were preparing to descend into an air shaft of an abandoned mine nearby in continuing the two week’s search.  The body was identified by a brother, Frank, by dental work.  No weapon or other evidence was found to indicate the manner of Yearack’s death, although suicide was previously expected by members of the family.—Post.

(His death certificate states that Joseph Yearack, a coal miner, was born 10 Jan 1893, in Coal City, Ill., the son of Victor Yearack and Anna Mandelik, natives of Germany, died 24 Jun 1931, in East Marion, Ill., and was buried in Marion, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Jul 1931:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. ELLEN GASKILL

Funeral services for Mrs. Ellen Gaskill, prominent resident of Ullin and a sister of S. A. Cantrell, of this city, who passed away at the Anna Hospital Tuesday, July 7, were held Wednesday afternoon, July 8, at 2:30 o’clock at the Ullin Methodist church, the Rev. S. A. Morgan, of Steelville, Illinois, a former pastor at Ullin, officiating.  Many floral offerings were sent as marks of sympathy for the deceased and her family.

Mrs. Gaskill was born and reared near Ullin and for a number of years conducted a store there, until her health failed and she was compelled to retire from active service.

She was a devout member of the Methodist church and to serve the cause of Christianity was one of her greatest and most sacred privileges.

Surviving her are her husband, a daughter, Mrs. D. W. Jordan, of Tamms; a son, Frank, of Ullin; a brother, S. A. Cantrell, of Mound City; a sister, Mrs. A. J. Mowery, of Bedford, Ind., and many other relatives and a large circle of friends.  She was a valued member of the Royal Neighbors Lodge of Ullin and that order took part in the services acting as casket bearer and flowers bearer.

Interment was made at the New Hope Cemetery, with W. J. Rhymer directing the funeral.

(Adam Jerome Mowery married on 16 Oct 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Martha Victoria, Cantrell.  Jacob A. Heddinger married Ellen J. Cantrell on 16 Oct 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in New Hope Cemetery reads:  Jacob A. Heddinger March 22, 1860 Nov. 10, 1913.  Her death certificate states that Ellen Cantrell was born 2 Apr 1865, in Illinois, the daughter of Richard Cantrell and Sarah Stevens, died 7 Jul 1931, in Union Co., Ill., and was buried in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin.  Her husband was Enos Gaskill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir spent Sunday afternoon at Anna, where they attended the funeral services of Mrs. John W. Roy, who passed away suddenly at her home Thursday following an attack of acute indigestion.  Others from Mound City who attended Mrs. Roy’s funeral were Mrs. E. P. Easterday, Mrs. Blanche Hood, Mrs. Otto Betts, and Miss Cora Fullerton.

(J. W. Roy married M. M. Gaunt on 23 Jun 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Mary M. Roy Born May 12, 1861 Died July 9, 1931 John W. Roy Born Dec. 4, 1857 Died June 19, 1957.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Jul 1931:
Mrs. John Roy of Anna Dies Suddenly

Mrs. Mary M. Roy, wife of John W. Roy, of Anna, died suddenly Thursday of last week following an attack of acute indigestion.  She is survived by her husband and five married children—three sons and two daughters.

For years Mrs. Roy had been a prominent club woman in the 25th District, having been a member of the board of directors for a number of terms.  She was also an active worker in the Eastern Star Lodge.
Mrs. Roy was a native of Grand Chain, this county, her maiden name being Mary Gaunt.

(J. W. Roy married M. M. Gaunt on 23 Jun 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary M. Roy was born in Grand Chain, Ill., the daughter of James M. Gaunt and Mary M. Steen.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Mary M. Roy May 12, 1861-July 9, 1931 John W. Roy Dec. 4, 1857-June 16, 1957.—Darrel Dexter)

Switchman Killed by Train

Nova A. Warren, 30, of Centralia, a switchman for the Illinois Central railroad, was run over and killed by a northbound freight in the yards at Wamac, a suburb of Centralia at 11:30 o’clock Saturday night. Warren was on his way to work when he was stuck.  He is survived by a wife and 4-year-old daughter.

(According to her death certificate, Nova A. Warren was born 7 Feb 1901, in Hardin, Ky., the son of James Warren and Lucilla Mowfield, natives of Hardin, Ky., died 11 Jul 1931, in Irvington, Ill., the husband of Flora L. Ohlan, and was buried in the Baptist cemetery in Hardin, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

Cousins of C. E. Koonce Killed at Grade Crossing

C. E. Koonce received a message Sunday night conveying the news of the accidental death of two cousins, Misses Addie and Charlotte Lovett, in a grade crossing accident near Greenville, Ill., that evening.  Both were killed instantly when their automobile was demolished by a fast passenger train on the Pennsylvania Railroad.

The two spinster sisters, Addie, age 78, and Charlotte, age 74, had lived alone on their farm since the death of their mother and sister.  On the 30th of December, 1930, they attended the golden wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Koonce, which was celebrated at the Koonce Hotel here in Mounds.

(According to her death certificate, Charlotte A. Lovett was born 22 Nov 1857, in Bond Co., Ill., the daughter of John C. Lovett, a native of Vermont, and Elizabeth Koonce, a native of Harper’s Ferry, W. Va., and die 12 Jul 1931, in Greenville, Bond Co., Ill.  Her sister, Addie J. Lovett was born 24 Oct 1853, in Greenville, Ill., according to her death certificate.—Darrel Dexter)

TAYLORVILLE—Richard Watkins, 8, only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Watkins, was shot to death by Gilbert Lawler, 10-year-old son of Dr. and Mrs. T. A. Lawler, at their home here Friday.

Doctor Lawler said he had handed what he believed was empty an automatic rifle to Gilbert to place in the kitchen.  The youngster snapped it at his playmate and the shot pierced the playmate’s heart.  He rushed into the Lawler’s living room and died a few minutes later in Dr. Lawler’s arms.

(His death certificate states that Richard Watkins was born 17 Jun 1923, in Taylorville, Ill., the son of Gus Watkins, a native of Christian Co., Ill., and Beulah Drennan, died 10 Jul 1931, in Taylorville, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

IRVINGTON—An 18 months old baby was run over and killed at Irvington Saturday by a truck of the Midwest Dairy Products Co.  It is said that the baby wandered in front of the truck while it was parked and was playing in front of the front wheel so close to the truck that it was not seen when the driver went back to his seat to start up.—Elkville Journal
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jul 1931:
OLMSTEAD MAN DIED SUDDENLY

William Lipe, age 61 years, passed away suddenly at his home in Olmstead early Monday morning.  Mr. Lipe had been in failing health for the past two years and his death was not unexpected, but Monday morning he suffered a heart attack which caused his death.

Mr. Lipe leaves one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Johnston, of Olmsted.  He had never married.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the residence at 2 o’clock, Rev. Osborne, of Cairo, officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery by undertaker G. A. James, of Mound City.

(His death certificate states that William Lipe was born about 1870, the son of William Lipe, Sr., and Mary Ray, and died 20 Jul 1931, in Olmstead, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. RUTH SUTTON PASSED AWAY AT MOTHER’S HOME

Mrs. Ruth Wilson Sutton, age 50 years, passed away at the home of her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson, Wednesday night at 10 o’clock following a lingering illness.  Her father, W. R. Wilson, passed away about two years ago.

Mrs. Sutton was born and reared in this city residing here with her parents until a few years ago when she left Mound City for Battle Creek, Mich., where she has since held a responsible position with an abstracting company.  About six weeks ago she was compelled to give up her position on account of ill health.  Later she came to the home of her mother in Mound City, where she has been in a critical condition.  About two weeks ago she was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo in the hope that something could be done to relive her condition, but it was found to be too late and she was removed to her mother’s home in this city three days later.

She was a graduate of Mound City high school and for a number of years held responsible positions with various firms in Mound City.  For several years she held a position in the circuit clerk’s office during the administration of E. P. Easterday as circuit clerk.  She has many friends in this community who are made sad by her passing and who deeply sympathize with the bereaved family.

Surviving Mrs. Sutton are her mother, one brother, Harry Wilson; an adopted sister and niece, Miss Elizabeth Wilson, of this city; one sister, Mrs. Helen Dawson; and a niece, Miss Vera Dawson, of Ecorse, Mich.; besides a number of relatives residing in Pulaski County.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o’clock at the First M. E. Church of this city, Rev. W. L. Hanbaum, officiating.

Interment will be made in the Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds by Undertaker G. A. James of this city.

(According to her death certificate, she was the daughter of W. R. Wilson and Elizabeth Dishinger.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Ruth B. Sutton Born Feb. 27, 1881 Died July 22, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. ERNEST TANNER DIES AT HOME NEAR AMERICA

Mrs. Bessie Tanner, age 35 years, wife of Ernest Tanner, passed away at her home near America, Illinois, Saturday afternoon.

Surviving her besides her husband are three children, four stepchildren, and the following sisters, Mrs. Julia Farlos, of Granite City, Mrs. Nettie Clutts, of America, Mrs. Annie Nicholson, of McClellan, Texas, and Mrs. Lena Stroud, of Sedalia, Mo.; and a brother, William Eaves, of Mounds.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Pentecostal church in Mounds followed by interment in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Hartwell and Ryan of Mounds directed the funeral.

(According to her death certificate, Bessie Irene Tanner was the daughter of Jesse Eaves and Bridget Mae Guest, and died 18 Jul 1931.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Bessie Eaves Tanner Born Oct. 9, 1895 Died Aug. 25, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARIES

Mrs. Ella Dunham, wife of John Dunham, died Thursday at her farm home on Hudgeons Creek after a few days illness from paralysis. She was 60 years old and a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Riley Wright, early pioneer residents of this section.  Her life was an open book to all her friends who had known her since early girlhood days.  She was a member of the Lyerla Chapel Church.  Funeral services were conducted from the Alto Pass Baptist Church by Rev. Hunsaker, of Cobden, and she was laid to rest in the Alto Pass Cemetery.  She is survived by her husband, an adopted daughter, Mrs. Dave Gale, of Alto Pass; and one brother, W. R. Wright, of Murphysboro.
             (According to her death certificate, Martha Ella Dunham was born 22 Jun 1870, in Illinois, the daughter of Riley Wright and Martha Grammer, died 15 Jul 1931, in Union Co., Ill.  William R. Wright married Martha Grammer on 5 Jul 1859, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Ella Dunham 1872-1931 Wife  John Dunham 1861-1949 Husband.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. James Harrell died at her home Friday morning after a week’s illness.  Mrs. Harrel was a devoted wife and mother, a real home loving mother and her noble life and teaching reflects in the life of her children, who are bereft of a mother’s care.  For what is a home without a mother, yet God has seen first to remove from this earth a jewel for the glorious kingdom, where sorrow and sadness never come, and he will be a guiding star to beckon her loved ones home.  Funeral services were conducted from the Alto Pass Baptist Church Sunday by Rev. Wilson, and she was laid to rest among her loved ones in the Alto Pass Cemetery. She is survived by her husband and seven children, a father, Alonzo Roach, of St. Louis, and several sisters and brothers.

(Miles Alonzo Roach, 21, born in Williamson Co., Ill., the son of Abner W. Roach and Mary Bennett, married on 24 Feb 1889, in Union Co., Ill., Sarah Isabelle Lasley, 20, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of William Lasley and Louisa Lence.  Her death certificate states that Martha Evaline Roach was born 23 Feb 1893, in Anna, Ill., the daughter of M. A. Roach and Isabelle Lesley, died 17 Jul 1931, in Alto Pass, Ill., wife of James R. Harrell, and was buried in Alto Pass Cemetery.  Her marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  James S. Harrell Born Jan. 13, 1879 Died Nov. 9, 1955 Martha E. Harrell his wife Born Feb. 23, 1893 Died July 17, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Jul 1931:
Young Man Killed This Morning by Northbound Chickasaw
Falls Asleep with Head on Railroad Track

Toy Morgan, 20, of Water Valley, Miss., was found dead at 2:58 o’clock this morning, one mile south of the Mounds Illinois Central yards by two young companions, A. B. Smith and Estes Davis, also of Water Valley.  Young Morgan had fallen asleep with his head on a northbound track and had been hit by the fast passenger train No. 16, known as the Chickasaw.

This is another tragedy whose underlying cause is found in the present unemployment situation.  These three young men left their homes in Water Valley with high hopes of finding work in the peach orchards of Union County.  Unable to do so, they decided to return to their homes, catching rides as best they could.  Early this morning, while waiting for a southbound freight train, along the I. C. tracks, the three agreed that Smith and Davis would get some sleep while Morgan watched for the freight.  Later, awakened by the noise of a passing train, his companions discovered young Morgan lying dead with his head on a northbound track, evidently having fallen asleep in the path of the fast passenger.

The body was removed to the Hartwell & Ryan Funeral Home and a telegram was sent to his mother at Water Valley, conveying to her the sad news of her son’s death.

Husband of Former Mounds Resident Dies in California

Mrs. Lena Black has received word of the death of her brother-in-law, A. G. Morrison, which occurred at the family home in Portersville, California, on Thursday, July 16, about 4:30 in the morning.  His death followed a stroke of paralysis and a three weeks illness from double pneumonia.  Funeral services were held Saturday July 18.

Mrs. Morrison will be remembered as Mrs. Mollie Stern Serbian, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Philip Stern, of this city.

H. C. Eisner Called to Detroit by Death of Brother

Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Eisner returned Saturday from Detroit, Mich., where they had been called by the death of Mr. Eisner’s brother, Maurice Eisner. The following concerning Mr. Eisner’s death was taken from a Detroit paper:

“Maurice Eisner, 118 Woodmere Ave., passed from this life quite suddenly July 12, aged 74 years, ten months and 18 days.  Mr. Eisner had been in his usual health until about two hours before his death.  He was born in Philadelphia, August 24, 1856, and was united in marriage to Ida May Seward, at Auburn, Ind., May 12, 1881.  To this union four children were born, there of whom are living.  Surviving also are 10 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Luly Tibbets, of Detroit, and one brother, H. C. Eisner, of Mounds.  Mr. and Mrs. Eisner celebrated their golden cycle of their wedded life on May 12 of this year at the home of their son in Toledo, Ohio.”

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 31 Jul 1931:
NEPHEW OF MOUND CITY WOMAN DIES IN DENVER

Joseph Herbert, age 26 years, well known and popular young man of Cairo, passed away in the National Jewish Hospital at Denver, Colo., Tuesday afternoon at 2:17 o’clock following an illness of three years.

Mr. Herbert was the son of Albert Herbert of Villa Ridge.  Since he was an infant he had made his home with his aunt, Mrs. Steger, of 36th St., Cairo, Illinois.  He was a nephew of Mrs. M. L. Capoot, of this city.  He received his education in the Cairo high schools and graduated with the Class of ‘22.  He also attended Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Chicago.  He was captain of the Cairo high school football team and a star of the school in the game.  He also played with the Washington University team and starred on the independent team in Cairo.  He was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.

Besides his father, his aunt in Mound City and his aunt and uncle in Cairo, he is survived by a number of other relatives in this vicinity.

He had been in failing health for some time and hopes for his recovery had been abandoned several months ago.

The body arrived in Cairo Thursday night at 9:15 o’clock accompanied by his aunt, Mrs. Steger, who was with him when the end came, and was taken to the Steger home.  At the time the Enterprise went to press no arrangements had been made for the funeral.
 
INFANT DAUGHTER DIES

Funeral services for the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spier, who passed away Tuesday morning at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Coleman, west of Mounds, was held Tuesday afternoon at the residence.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery by Hartwell and Ryan, funeral directors.

(According to her death certificate, the infant was stillborn on 28 Jul 1931, in Road District 7, Pulaski Co., Ill., the daughter of Charles E. Spier, a native of Arkansas, and Cleta May Miller, a native of Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. RUTH SUTTON

Funeral services for Mrs. Ruth Wilson Sutton, who passed away at the home of her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson, Wednesday night, were held Friday afternoon at the First M. E. Church.  Rev. W. L. Hanbaum, officiating.  The church was filled with sympathizing friends of the family.

Members of the church choir very sweetly and impressively sang two of Mrs. Sutton’s favorite hymns, “God Will Take Care of You” and “Going Down the Valley.”

The casket bearers were George R. Martin, George Gunn, Thomas Campbell, John McNeile, C. E. Richey, and Imon Bankson.

Immediately following the services the cortege moved by automobiles to Spencer Heights Cemetery where interment was made by G. A. James, funeral director.
 
NEGRO KILLED AT PICNIC SATURDAY NIGHT

Lavel Smith, colored, 19 years old, was shot in the abdomen, the ball passing through his body at a picnic north of Karnak near the Stratton Cache Bridge on Saturday night about 11:30.  George Stratton, about 40 years of age, also colored, was the one that did the shooting.

A negro picnic was in full sway at time of the shooting with about 200 present.  As is usually the case, drawn off to one side of the group of merry makers was a crap game in progress.  It was here that Stratton and Smith had a quarrel; both it was reported were intoxicated.  During the squabble Stratton drew a .38 caliber revolver and fired at young Smith.

Smith was taken to a nearby house where medical aid was summoned, but the youth died within thirty minutes, after being shot.  He was employed on Main Bros. farm under the supervision of Herbert Hodge at Mermet.

An inquest was held on Saturday night, resulting in the arrest of Stratton for his part in the shooting.  He was taken to the Massac County jail, where he is being held on a murder charge.—Vienna Times
 
SLEEPER ON TRACK IS KILLED BY FAST TRAIN

Falling asleep by the track while watching for a freight, proved fatal to Tom Morgan, 20, of Water Valley, Miss., early last Friday morning at Mounds, when the fast Chickasaw train struck him.  Morgan was in company with A. B. Davis and Estes Davis, also of Water Valley.

The trio had gone into Union County seeking work in the orchards.  They were returning and tired, decided to sleep.  Morgan lay close to the track to watch and his companions were off the track.  They awoke when the train thundered by and then went to Morgan to wake him.  Blood on his face made them know he was hurt and when he did not respond they went for help.  Morgan had probably been hit by a step or end of the car when he roused suddenly and lifted his head.  The body was shipped to his mother at Water Valley.

About two weeks ago a boy lost his life near Golconda.  He was not identified as the train had run over him and mutilated his body.
 
The Minton families and Mrs. Rebecca Pygett were called to Cape Girardeau Wednesday to attend the funeral of a relative, Mrs. Mary Yow.  (Alto Pass)

(Her marker in Fairmount Cemetery in Cape Girardeau, Mo., reads:  Mary A. Yow 1883-1931 W. Thomas Yow 1881-1955.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Annie Blankertz and Miss Laura Blankertz and daughter, Mary Frances, attended the funeral of Mrs. Sarah Porter in Anna Sunday. (Mounds)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 31 Jul 1931:
Mother of Mrs. Zon Walston Dies in Anna

Mrs. Sarah Porter, mother of Mrs. Zon Walston, of this city, died at her home in Anna, late Friday afternoon, July 24, following an illness of several weeks duration.

Mrs. Porter was well known in Mounds, where she had often visited her daughter, Mrs. Walston and granddaughter, Mrs. Herman Peak.

The following article concerning the life of Mrs. Porter was handed us for publication:

“Impressive funeral services were held in the Anna Christian Church for Mrs. Sarah Carmack Porter Sunday afternoon.  The Rev. Hoax told of the righteous life that Mrs. Porter had lived and how she had been a member of the Anna Christian Church for over 40 years.  That she had sacrificed to help build and organize the church that its members are now enjoying.  He spoke of her religious influence, of her popularity with her many friends and stated that she was a very worthy mother—never shirking her duty to her loved ones through all these years.  The flowers were many and beautiful and the Christian choir rendered a number of beautiful selections.  Scores of friends and relatives attended the funeral.

“Mrs. Porter was 75 years old.  She had resided in Union County for over 50 years and was a well-known pioneer citizen.

“She leaves seven children, four daughters, Mrs. U. G. Mangum and Miss Maude Carmack of Anna, Mrs. Zon Walston, of Mounds, and Mrs. Arthur Rackliffe, Los Angeles; and three sons, John, of Elco, Jim, Matthews, Mo., and Will, Anna; also a brother, John Perkins of Mill Creek; fourteen grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, a number of other relatives and scores of friends.

“Interment was made in the Anna Cemetery.”

(William J. Carmack, 21, married Sarah F. Perkins, 21, on 6 Aug 1874, in Union Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Sarah F. Porter was born 21 Nov 1856, in Washington Co., Ky., the daughter of Granderson Perkins and Lydia Kelley, natives of Kentucky, died 24 Jul 1931, in Anna, Ill., wife of John J. Porter, and was buried at Anna, Ill.  Ulysses E. Mangum, 34, born in Johnson Co., Ill., the son of S. J. Mangrum and Miss Casper, married on 21 Feb 1900, in Union Co., Ill., Lydia S. Carmack, 22, born in Anna, daughter of William J. Carmack and Sarah Perkins.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WEST FRANKFORT—Living in different cities, two brothers died within 30 minutes of each other last night.  Thomas Spain, 60, died at his home last night, and when relatives telephoned his brother Randall in Zeigler, they were informed that Randall had died suddenly less than 30 minutes before from heart trouble.—Carbondale Free Press

(According to his death certificate, Thomas Alva Spain was born 1 May 1864, in Gallatin Co., Ill., the son of George Spain and Ann Wilkerson, died 24 Jul 1931, in West End, Saline Co., Ill., husband of Alzra Spain, and was buried in Tate, Saline Co., Ill.  According to his brother’s death certificate, George Randall Spain was born about 1874 and died 24 Jul 1931, in Zeigler, Franklin Co., Ill., husband of Lena Spain.  George R. Spain married Lenie A. Hall on 21 Sep 1894, in Saline Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to express our thanks to our many friends, who sent flowers and to those who so kindly helped to console us in our time of sorrow at the death of our mother and grandmother.
Mr. and Mrs. Zon Walston
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Peak


Mr. and Mrs. Lon Walston, of Bardwell, Ky., visited relatives here Sunday, after attending the funeral of Mrs. Sarah Porter in Anna.
 
Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Duley, and family were called to Barlow, Ky., Sunday by the death of Mrs. Duley’s brother-in-law, William Terrell, cashier of the Barlow bank, who shot himself Friday and succumbed to his wounds Saturday.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon.  Others from Mounds who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. George Sitter, Mrs. S. L. Atherton, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Knupp and Mrs. Stone Fisher.
 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 Aug 1931:
ULLIN WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. George Burgois, well-known resident of Ullin, Illinois, passed away at her home Thursday morning, July 30, following an illness of several weeks.

Mrs. Burgois is survived by three children, Mrs. J. W. Binkley, of Ullin, Mrs. Roy D. Sichling, of Taft, Calif., and E. A. Burgois, of Cobden, Illinois, besides several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Baptist church in Ullin, followed by interment in the Ullin Cemetery.  W. J. Rhymer, of Ullin, directed the funeral.

(George Burgeois married Anna Downs on 19 Dec 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Annie Burgeois was born 16 May 1860, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of Andrew Down and Sarah Jane Russell, and died 30 July 1931 in District 3 in Ullin, Ill.  Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Mother Annie Burgeois Born May 16, 1860 Died July 30, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOTHER OF LOUIS BRASWELL PASSED AWAY MONDAY

Mrs. Florence Barringer, of Cambria, Illinois, passed away at midnight Monday night following a brief illness.  She is the mother of Louis Braswell, of this city, and Mr. and Mrs. Braswell and son, were called to her bedside Saturday.  Besides her son in Mound City, she is survived by her husband and two other sons, Minor and Tom Braswell, and a daughter, who resides at Burnsides, Illinois.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon and interment was made in the cemetery at Cambria.

(Her death certificate states that Florence Barringer was born 11 Dec 1864, in Williamson Co., Ill., the daughter of Robert Hampton and Mary Weber, died 4 Aug 1931, in Carterville, Ill., the wife of the Rev. William Barringer, and was buried in Hampton Cemetery in Grassy Township, Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DENNIS MEADOWS, COLORED, PASSED AWAY MONDAY

Dennis Meadows, a highly respected colored man of this city, passed away Monday afternoon at his home in this city.  G. A. James conveyed the body to Paris, Tenn., where interment was made in Oak Grove Cemetery near Paris.

(According to his death certificate, Dennis Meadows was born about 1874, the son of Reed Perry and Harriet Meadows, and died 27 Jul 1931, in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BROTHER OF MOUND CITY MAN PASSES AWAY

Loren Leroy Mattson, age 25 years, of Mounds, brother of Sam Mattson, of this city, passed away in the hospital at Paducah, Sunday evening.  Mr. Mattson had undergone a surgical operation in the hospital about ten days ago.  He was well and favorably known in Mounds and the community, where he had many friends.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Lelia Thomasson Mattson; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Mattson, of Mounds; and the following brothers and sisters, George Mattson, of Mounds, and Sam Mattson, of Mound City.

Mr. Mattson was born and reared in Mounds and received his education in the Mounds schools.  For some time he had been employed with the Illinois Central Railroad Company at Mounds.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church in Mounds.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by Hartwell and Ryan, funeral directors.

The casket bearers were Richard Schneider, Lawrence Schneider, Hard Young, James Young, Leo Knupp, and Carl Reed.
             (According to his death certificate, Loren Mattson, 25, the son of Arthur Mattson and Myrtle Harper, died 2 Aug 1931, of sinus infection, at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah, Ky., and was buried in Mounds, Ill.  Arthur E. Mattson, 28, of Beechwood, Ill., married on 12 Oct 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Myrtle May Harper, 25, of Villa Ridge.—Darrel Dexter)


Funeral services for Mrs. George Burgois, who died Wednesday, were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Baptist church of Ullin, with Rev. Peterson officiating.  She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. James Binkley, of this city, and Mrs. Roy Sichling, of Taft, Calif., and a daughter who preceded her in death several years ago, a son, Adolphus Burgois, of Cobden, seven grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren.  Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery by her husband.  W. H. Rhymer, funeral director, directed the funeral.  The casket bearers were Mrs. Burgois’ grandsons.
 
MRS. MARY FRANK KELSEY MILFORD PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Mary Frink Kelsey Milford, age 88 years, mother of Mrs. Laura Milford Rife, formerly superintendent of schools in Alexander County, passed away at her home, 611 Thirty-sixth Street, Saturday night at 3 o’clock, following a brief illness. Mrs. Milford was well known in Pulaski County.  She was a sister of Mrs. Annie Kelsey Burgess, of America, and an aunt of Rev. Joel Burgess, who formerly was pastor of the Pilgrim Congregational Church of this city.

Mrs. Milford’s father and mother, Capt. and Mrs. Namaan Kelsey, settled in Illinois in 1857 and made their home for a number of years near America.  When a girl she was a member of the Loyal League, at Mound City during the war.  This was an organization of young women who assisted in administering to the comforts of the soldiers who were in the hospital at Mound City, their activities being to write letters, roll bandages, and delivering flowers.

Mrs. Milford attended the Cincinnati High School before coming to Illinois and attended the old State Normal University at Normal, Illinois. She taught her first school in Mound City and will be remembered by the older settlers of this city.  She also taught in Thebes and Richwoods in Alexander County and two years in Lake County, Illinois.  Some of her pupils of the Mound City school probably still reside here.

Besides her daughter, Mrs. Rife, of Cairo, and sister, Mrs. Burgess, of America, who is now 86 years of age, she is survived by two sons, George E. Milford, of Diboll, Texas, and J. Eugene Milford, of Hurst, Illinois; three stepsons, John A. Milford, of Olive Branch, H. M. Atkinson, of Cairo, and W. E. Milford, of Unity; a stepdaughter, Mrs. Lida Milford Dixon, of Dallas, Texas; and a number of grandchildren, a great-grandson, and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the family residence in Cairo, with her nephew, Rev. Joel Burgess, pastor of the Christian Church of Carbondale, and Rev. W. H. Hart, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church officiating.  After the services, the cortege moved by automobile to the Atherton Cemetery, two miles west of Unity, where interment was made.  The active casket bearers were sons and grandsons of Mrs. Milford.  Honorary casket bearers were former pupils of Mrs. Milford.  Karcher Bros. directed the funeral.

(W. J. Milford married Mary F. Kesley on 25 Dec 1875, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Mary Frank Kelsey Milford was born 4 May 1843, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the daughter of Namaan Kelsey, a native of New York State, and Sarah J. Barlow, a native of Hartford, Conn., died 1 Aug 1931, in Cairo, Ill., the wife of William J. Milford, and was buried in Atherton Cemetery in Unity, Ill.  Her marker in Richwood Cemetery in Alexander Co., Ill., reads:  William J. Milford Born Sept. 25, 1821 Died Nov. 21, 1884 Bertie Milford Born Aug. 5, 1883 Died Sept. 15, 1884 Gone to His Father Mary Frank Kelsey wife of Wm. Milford Born 1843 Died 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 7 Aug 1931:
Mrs. Nettie Barnett was called to Cambria Wednesday by the death of Mrs. William Barringer, mother of Minor Braswell, of Bluford and Louis Braswell, of Mound City, which occurred at her home in Cambria early Tuesday morning.  Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon with interment in the Cambria cemetery.
 
Death of Popular Young Man Brings Sorrow to Many
Loren Leroy Mattson Dies Sunday in Paducah Hospital

Loren Leroy Mattson died Sunday evening between six and seven o’clock in the Illinois Central Hospital, Paducah, Ky., following an illness of only a few weeks duration.  He had been in the hospital for ten days during which time he had been dangerously ill.

Mr. Mattson was born Feb. 2, 1906, and died Aug. 2, 1931, at the age of 25 years and 6 months.  He was educated in the Mounds schools and in October 20, 1927, was married to Miss Lelia Thomasson, his childhood sweetheart.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Mattson.  Surviving him are his parents, his wife, three brothers, Sam Mattson, of Mound City, George of Detroit, Mich., and Charles at home; three sisters, Mrs. Flora Perry, of Detroit, Mich., Irma and Pearl, at home; also many other relatives and many friends.

Mr. Mattson was of pleasing disposition and his untimely passing is mourned not only by his relatives and close friends, but by the entire community.  He was an employee of the Illinois Central railroad.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the M. E. Church, conducted by the pastor.  Rev. H. B. Shoaff.  The casket bearers were young men friends of the deceased, Richard and Laurence Schneider, Harold and James Young, Carl Reed and Leo Knupp.  The flower girls were Frances Mattson, Mrs. Carl Harper, Mrs. Louis Graves, Miss Marjorie Ferrell, Miss Ruby Beisswingert, and Mrs. Cline Cole.

Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery with Funeral Directors Hartwell and Ryan in charge.
 
Pioneer Resident of This County Dies in Cairo

The passing of Mrs. Mary Kesley Milford of Cairo brings to the attention of the present generation a leaf from the pages of the Civil War period in Pulaski County history.

Mrs. Milford was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 4, 1843.  Her father, Captain Naaman Kelsey, was pilot on the gunboat Choctaw, during the Red River Expedition in Civil War times, the family having come to Illinois in 1857 and located a few miles north of Mound City on the Ohio River.

Mrs. Milford then Mary Kelsey, was a member of the Loyal League of Mound City during the war, an organization of young women who administered to the comfort and relief of soldiers in the hospital at Mound City.

She attended the Cincinnati high school before coming to Illinois and later attended the old State Normal University at Normal, Ill.  She was one of the pioneer normal-trained teachers of Southern Illinois and taught her first school at Mound City.

She was the mother of Mrs. Laura Milford Rife, of Cairo.
 
Appreciation

We desire to express our most sincere thanks to our friends for the many kind expressions of sympathy shown during the illness and following the death of our beloved husband, son and brother.
Mrs. Lelia Mattson
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Mattson, and family
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 Aug 1931:
GIBSON H. MOORE, GRAND CHAIN, PASSED AWAY

Gibson H. Moore, age 57 years, passed away at his home in Grand Chain Friday evening at 6:30 o’clock.  Mr. Moore’s health had been failing for several years, yet his death was a great shock and has brought much sadness to his relatives and many friends in the community in which he has lived so many years.

He was born near Levings and all his life has resided in Pulaski County.  In Grand Chain he was prominent in business circles, having conducted a restaurant for a number of years.  He was also interested in farming, his main venture being fruit farming.

Mr. Moore is survived by his widow; one son, Willard; three brothers, James and Robert Moore, of Grand Chain, and H. C. Moore, of Mounds.  Two sisters also survive, Mrs. Fanny Bristow, of Chicago, and Mrs. Inda Jerdon, of Grand Chain, besides many other relatives and a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at nine o’clock at the Catholic church at Grand Chain, Fr. Orlett officiating. Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery, the funeral being directed by G. A. James, of Mound City.

(According to his death certificate, Gibson Hughes Moore, merchant and restaurant owner, was born 3 Aug 1874, in Grand Chain, Ill., the son of Richard Moore, a native of Ohio, and Mary Juddugher, a native of Illinois, died 7 Aug 1931, in Grand Chain, Ill., husband of Kate Moore.—Darrel Dexter)
 
LETTER OF CONDOLENCE

Among the letters of condolence received by Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson after the death of her daughter, Ruth, was one from the firm with which she was employed in Battle Creek, Mich.  The letter brings forth the high esteem in which Miss Wilson was held by her employer and states, “that they have lost one of their most trusted and sincere employees.”
 
HIGHLY RESPECTED COLORED CITIZEN DIES AT AMERICA

Ed Early, age 66 years, well known and highly respected colored citizen of this county, passed away at his home near America, Friday night.

He had resided in this county all his life and had always lived an honorable, clean life.  He had many friends both his own raced and the white people of the county.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the residence at America and interment was made in a private family cemetery on his farm.  G. A. James, of Mound City, directed the funeral.

(According to his death certificate, Edward Early was born 15 Dec 1864, in West Virginia, the son of Palmer Early, died 7 Aug 1931, in Road District 6, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Laura Early, and was buried near America, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
YOUTH FATALLY INJURED FRIDAY NIGHT ON ROUTE 1
(Vienna Times)

Friday night about 7:30 when a party consisting of twelve young people living in the vicinity of Mermet were en route to a revival meeting, the wagon in which they were riding was crashed into by a Ford automobile driven by Wesley Williams, of Vienna, about one mile south of Mermet on Route No. 1.  Both vehicles were headed north.  According to Williams, the driver of the automobile, he passed another car which blinded him and he did not see the wagon in time to stop.  Occupants of the wagon claimed that Hallard Meyers was sitting in the rear of the wagon holding a lighted lantern at the time the crash came.

Hallard Meyers was thrown beneath the front of the car, which struck the wagon, and when pulled from beneath the machine he was unconscious.  Reba Lindsey was also taken from the wreck unconscious. 

Meyers and the two girls that were injured were placed in a passing car and taken to the Fisher Hospital in Metropolis. Meyers died at 11:30 without gaining consciousness, suffering from a fractured skull and other injuries.

Sheriff George Krueger and Deputy Fred Risinger, of Metropolis, went to the scene of the accident. A search of the car resulted in the finding of a half-gallon of whiskey in a paste board carton and near the wreck three other fruit jars of liquor and two broken jars were found.

Williams was placed under arrest and taken before Police Judge Thomas Sharp and committed to jail, charged with transportation and possession of intoxicating liquor, which, it is reported, he admitted was his property and the violation of the state highway laws.

(According to his death certificate, Hallard B. Meyer was born about 1908, the son of Fritz Meyer and Bertha Anderson, and died 31 Jul 1931, in Metropolis, Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 14 Aug 1931:
Brother of H. C. Moore Dies at Home in Grand Chain

G. H. Moore, of Grand Chain, passed away at his home Friday evening, August 7, following a short illness caused from getting overheated while threshing wheat.

Mr. Moore is survived by his widow; one son, Willard Moore; three brothers, H. C. Moore, of Mounds, James and Robert, both of Grand Chain; two sisters, Mrs. Fannie Bristow, of Chicago, and Mrs. Inda Jerdon, of Grand Chain.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at 9 o’clock with burial in the Grand Chain cemetery.
 
CAMBRIA—On Tuesday of last week Mrs. Lillian Howell came home from Chicago for a short visit with relatives and friends at Cambria.  She was stricken with tonsillitis and died from strangulation Thursday, the funeral being held Sunday.  She had been in apparently good health, visiting and talking with people about the little village the day before.—Marion Post.

(This is likely the same person as Eunice Howell, who, according to her death certificate, was born 12 Jul 1905, in Cambia, Ill., the daughter of Hershal Johns, a native of Tennessee, and Bertha Tyner, a native of Williamson Co., Ill., died 30 Jul 1931, in Carterville, Ill., the wife of Paul Howell, of Chicago, Ill., and was buried at Carterville, Ill.  Herschel Johns married Bertha Tyner on 2 Jan 1900, in Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 Aug 1931:
DROWNS AT MASSAC

Clyde Brown, 13-year-old son of Gib Brown, who lives between Cypress and Belknap, drowned at Fort Massac last Sunday when he went off in deep water while swimming.  One of his companions nearly drowned trying to get him out and was pulled out the third time he came to the surface and was senseless.  The body was recovered some 200 yards down the stream when it caught on a trout line.

(According to his death certificate, Clyde Brown was born 23 Nov 1918, in Illinois, the son of Henry E. Brown and Bertha Fains, died 16 Aug 1931, in District 6, Massac Co., Ill., and was buried in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
ULLIN WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. J. M. Richards, age 73 years, whose home is near Ullin, Illinois, passed away at the Anna hospital Tuesday.  She is survived by her husband, a daughter, of Carbondale, and another daughter, of Herrin, besides fourteen grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence, followed by interment in Cache Chapel Cemetery.  W. J. Rhymer, of Ullin, directed the funeral.

(According to her death certificate, Harriet Louisa Richards was born 9 Jun 1859, in Harrisburg, Ill., the daughter of Olvina Travelstead, died 18 Aug 1931, in Union Co., Ill., the wife of James Marcus Richards.  Her marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Harriet Richards 1859-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CLARENCE FORD, FORMERLY OF THIS CITY, PASSED AWAY

Clarence Ford, age about 32, passed away Tuesday morning, August 18, following a lingering illness of tuberculosis.  His body was brought to Dongola Tuesday night and was taken to the home of his father-in-law, J. F. Karraker.

Mr. Ford was cashier of the bank at Anna at the time it was closed.

On Thursday afternoon funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. C. W. Culp, of DuQuoin, Illinois, assisted by Rev. W. J. Ward, of Dongola.  Interment was made at Dongola directed by Mr. McCarty, undertaker at Anna.

Mr. Ford is survived by his widow, who was formerly Miss Clara M. Karraker, of Dongola, his father, W. J. Ford; three brothers, Harry and Roy and Elmer Ford, who is in the undertaking business in Dongola.

Mr. and Mrs. Ford came to Mound City in 1918 and resided here five years.  During their residence here, they made many friends who deeply sympathize with the bereaved widow and family.

(According to his death certificate, Clarence R. Ford was born in Dongola, Ill., the son of William J. Ford, died in Menard City, Randolph Co., Ill., the husband of Clara Ford.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Clarence R. Ford Born Dec. 17, 1897 Died Aug. 18, 1931 Clara F. Ford Feb. 23, 1898 Died April 21, 1984.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. ANNIE BURGESS REMAINS CRITICALLY ILL AT AMERICA

Mrs. Annie Kelsey Burgess, 79 years of age, remains critically ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. C. Poynter, of America.  Her son, Rev. Joel Burgess, and daughter, of Carbondale, have been called to her bedside.  Another son, Henry Burgess, of San Francisco, has been notified of his mother’s condition.  The shock which Mrs. Burgess received in the death of her sister, Mrs. Mary Milford, which occurred in Cairo several weeks ago, is thought to have brought on this illness.  Owing to the infirmities of age, Mrs. Burgess is not expected to recover.
 
COLORED MAN FOUND DEAD ON M. & O. TRACKS

A colored man, apparently about 30 years old, was found dead on the M. & O. track near Luck Rock, south of Alto Pass, Saturday morning by the train crew.  No 16 brought the body to the M. & O. depot where the Harden and Broadway undertakers took charge.  H. O. Taylor, coroner, was called, a jury was empaneled and viewed the body Saturday morning and adjourned until Sunday.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death by being hit or falling off the train.  A letter in his pocket indicated that he was from Escatawpa, Miss.  Communications were sent to the place and it was learned his name was James Underwood, of Escatawpa, Miss.  The body was buried in the Alto Pass Cemetery.

(According to his death certificate, Berry James Underwood, divorced, of Escatawpa, Miss., black, died 15 Aug 1931, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
  
SCENE OF HANGING IS REMOVED BY CAIRO

Cairo tore down its arch, a thing of beauty when lighted, but also the scene of mob violence the night when mob ruled Cairo and wrested from authorities Froggy James, a colored man, and hanged him on the arch.

James was accused of the murder of Anna Pelley, and her body was found in an alley in Cairo when she was supposed to have spent the night with a friend.  James was cornered in a barn near Karnak and the mob took over a train on the Big Four and went up got James, brought him back in a coach with blinds and then hanged him on this arch.  His body was decapitated and the head set on a pole.

Not satisfied with that, the mob got hold of Mr. Salzner, who was charged with killing his wife, and they did not give him the dignity of the arch for a scaffold.  They used a telephone pole.  That was about 1909.

Now the arch is down, the scaffold of Froggy James and the scene of one night when Cairo was ruled by mob law is no more.  Its colored lights blink no more, nor can the clamor of the mob be heard.  Like the victim, who breathed his life there, the arch is no more.
 
BOY FATALLY SHOT BY SISTER WHILE PARENTS ARE AWAY

Frank Morrison, 14 years of age, was shot and instantly killed at 9:30 o’clock Wednesday morning by his sister Helen, age 19 years.  The parents were in Charleston, Mo., attending the funeral of Mrs. Morrison’s grandmother, when the fatal shooting occurred.

An inquest was held by Coroner Dan Sullivan at the E. A. Burke Funeral Home in Cairo Wednesday afternoon and a verdict of accidental shooting was reached.

The Morrisons live on the McManus-Luby property on the Beech Ridge Road and the shooting took place in the house.  One charge from a double barrel 12 gauge shotgun fired at close range entered the boy’s chest directly over the heart.  His death was instantaneous.  The sister is prostrated over the tragedy.

(According to his death certificate, Frank H. Morrison was born 3 Nov 1916, in Benton, Mo., the son of J. C. Morrison, a native of Blytheville, Ark., and Annie Kethel, a native of Charleston, Mo., died 19 Aug 1931, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

Mrs. Huldah James Powell, another dear old pioneer mother, has been called from our midst. Mrs. Powell died at the home of her brother, George James, Sr., at the old homestead where her childhood days and early girlhood days were spent.  In her old age she wandered back among her brothers at the old home where many childhood memories were recalled. She was a dear old mother and her brother’s home was always sweetened with her smile when she came to visit, old and young loved her and honored her and her kind and loving smile is badly missed.

She was married to Daniel F. Powell, of Fredericktown, Mo.  To this union six children were born, three sons and three daughters, all with their father having preceded her in death, except two daughters, Mrs. J. D. Boyd, of Commerce, Mo., and one daughter in Idaho.

Funeral services were conducted from the home of her brother, where she died, Rev. W. W. Hunsaker, of Cobden, officiating, with Rev. Vincent Crosslin and Rev. Marion Wilson, assisting. Everyone bowed heads in sorrow as the one who had lived a period of 78 years among them had come to the evening of life and was laid to rest in the Alto Pass Cemetery.  Besides her two daughters, she is survived by two brothers, George James, Sr., Joe Jacob and William James, nine grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

(According to her death certificate, Hulda M. Powell was born 6 Dec 1852, in Alto Pass, Ill., the daughter of Wilson James and Hulda Abernathy, died 2 Aug 1931, in Union Co., Ill.  Wilson J. James married Huldah M. Abernathy on 5 Nov 1846, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 21 Aug 1931:
Two Killed in Plane Crash at Alto Pass

Frank Willey, Jr., 30, postmaster at Alto Pass, and Glenn Joram, 22, of Cobden, met instant death Sunday afternoon when Joram’s plane, in which Willey was a passenger, took a nose dive in the vicinity of the state forest preserve and crashed to the ground.

Young Joram, son of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Joram, of Cobden, had recently completed a flying course at Wichita, Kan., and had brought his plane to the flying field south of Jonesboro.  He was taking Willey for a flight over Alto Pass while the plane was out of gasoline.

Willey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Willey, of near Alto Pass, had visited friends in Mounds Saturday night and it was a great shock to them to hear of his sudden death only a few hours later.

(According to his death certificate, Willis Franklin Willey was born in Alto Pass., Ill., the son of Frank Willey, a native of Wilmington, Kan., and Flora E. Cauble, a native of Alto Pass, Ill.  His marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Frank Willey, Jr., Born Jan. 10, 1906 Died Aug. 16, 1931.  According to his death certificate, Glenn H. Joram was born 27 Aug 1909, in Cobden, Ill., the son of Harry R. Joram, a native of Cobden, Ill., and Susie Ragsdale, a native of Kentucky.  A marker in Cobden Cemetery reads:  Glenn H. Joram Born Aug. 28, 1909 Died Aug 16, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Drenckpohl, which was born at the home of Mrs. Drenckpohl’s mother, Mrs. J. F. Fraser, Thursday, August 13, died Saturday and the little body was taken to Centralia for burial.

(According to her death certificate, Nancy Jane Drenckpohl was born 13 Aug 1931, at Mounds, Ill., the daughter of Vernon Drenckpohl, a native of Centralia, and Lula Mae Afflack, a native of Illinois, died 16 Aug 1931, in Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Essie Rives, daughter Wanda, and son Charles; Mrs. Bertha Manwaring and son Arthur attended the funeral of Mrs. Cora Griffith at Lovelaceville, Ky., Monday afternoon. (Pulaski)
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 Aug 1931:
DR. N. W. COX, OF CAIRO, PASSED AWAY SATURDAY

Dr. N. W. Cox, age 45 years, prominent dentist of Cairo passed away Saturday evening at six o’clock following an illness of about a year.  Even though Dr. Cox had been in failing health for some time, his death was very sudden, as he was at his office attending to his daily tasks Friday before his death occurred Saturday.  His death has brought a great shock and much sadness to his friends in this community.  He was one of the best known men in southern Illinois and had many friends who are grieved to learn of his death.

He is survived by his widow, three children, Eunice, Sue and Nick, Jr.; and his mother, Mrs. James A. Cox.  His father preceded him in death about a year ago.

Funeral services were held at the family residence, 2605, Walnut Street, Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, with Rev. O. B. Allen, pastor of the First M. E. Church, of which he was a member, officiating. Rev. Allen was assisted by Rev. H. W. Berneking, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with E. A. Burke in charge.

Casket bearers were selected from his most intimate friends from the lodge, Rotary associates, business and professional.

(His marker in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds reads:  N. W. Cox 1886-1931 Eunice W. Cox 1885-1973.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER ALTO PASS BOY BURNS TO DEATH IN KANSAS

According to word received here, Edward Miller, son of B. Frank Miller, former Alto Pass residents, of Kansas City, Mo., was burned to death August 13 while operating and plowing with a tractor in a wheat stubble field in southwestern Kansas.  The fire started on an adjoining ranch and swept across two hedgeways to the field where Edward was working with four others. Miller was caught by the flames on his tractor and his clothing was almost burned from his body. He walked half mile where he was met by a car and rushed to a hospital at Garden City, Kansas, where he died.  His parents were notified and reached his bedside about an hour before he died.  His fellow workmen were not seriously injured. The family moved to Kansas City about 12 years ago.  Miller’s mother was formerly Miss Nina Gray, of Alto Pass.
 
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir and daughter, Mrs. Joe Crain, left for Carrier Mills today where they went on account of the death of Jerome Henderson, a son of a very intimate friend of the family.

(His death certificate states that Jerome Henderson, a student, was born 17 Oct 1907, in Illinois, the son of Harry C. Henderson and Edith B. Thompson, natives of Illinois, died 24 Aug 1931, of tuberculosis at Long’s Sanitorium at El Paso, Texas, and was buried in Carrier Mills, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mounds Independent, Friday, 28 Aug 1931:
Prominent Cairo Dentist Dies Saturday, Aug. 22

Dr. Nicholas W. Cox, prominent dentist and a leading citizen of Cairo, died at his home Saturday, August 22, following a stroke of apoplexy.  He had been in failing health for the past year.

Dr. Cox was a native of Cairo, a graduate of the Cairo High School and the only graduate of the school to take up dentistry, having graduated from the Northwestern University dental school.  He was the first president of the Cairo Rotary Club.

Surviving him are his widow, the former Miss Eunice Conant; a son, Nicholas, Jr.; and two daughters, Mrs. Jack Gray, of Maryville, Mo., and Miss Sue Cox, of Cairo.  He also leaves his mother, his father having died about one year ago.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. O. B. Allen, of the Cairo Methodist Church, an organization to which Dr. Cox was intensely devoted.  Interment was made in the Beech Grove Cemetery of Mounds.
 
Rev. Loar, of Carbondale, preached the funeral of Mrs. Richards at Cache Chapel Church Thursday. (Ullin)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Sep 1931:
ULLIN GIRL PASSES AWAY

Miss Ruby Beatrice Watkins, age 17 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Watkins, of Ullin, Illinois, passed away Saturday morning at 3:15 o’clock at the home of her grandparents in Carbondale.
Besides her parents and grandparents, she is survived by a brother and a sister.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4 o’clock at the Methodist church in Ullin, followed by interment in the Ullin Cemetery. W. J. Rhymer directed the funeral.

(According to her death certificate, Ruby Beatrice Watkins was born 6 Dec 1913, in Ullin, Ill., the daughter of William Watkins and Zella Holder, natives of Makanda, Ill., died 29 Aug 1931, in Carbondale, Ill., and was buried at Ullin.—Darrel Dexter)
 
___ud Foster’s little infant passed away Saturday after several days’ illness. (Perks)

(This may be the same person as Walter E. Foster, who was born 24 May 1931, in Perks, Ill., the son of Walter Foster, a native of Round Mountain, Ala., and Ellen Chestnut, a native of Spillertown, Ill., died 29 Aug 1931, in Road District 13, Pulaski Co., Ill., and was buried near Cypress, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

The death angel came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Coy Girtman last Sunday and claimed for its victim their little daughter, Maxine, who was just 21 months old.  Little Maxine was a favorite in the neighborhood where her short life was spent and her little sunny smile will be missed.  The home has been made sad, but she was just a precious little flower budded on earth to blossom in Heaven with Jesus who once said, “Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven” and little Maxine is one more jewel added to that Heavenly land.  The little casket was covered with many beautiful flowers brought by sympathizing friends.  The funeral cortege went to the Casper Church near Anna, where the funeral services were conducted and the precious little body was laid to rest beneath the summer grasses in the Casper Cemetery. She is survived by her parents and one little brother, and many other relatives.

(According to her death certificate, Maxine Girtman was born 11 Nov 1929, in Alto Pass, Ill., the daughter of Coy Gertman, a native of Goreville, Ill., and Dorothy Little, a native of Anna, Ill., and died 23 Aug 1931, in Alto Pass.  A Lutz & Rendleman Funeral Home marker in Casper Cemetery reads:  Maxine Girtman 1929-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DONGOLA RESIDENT DIES

Mrs. Loretta Melvina Davis, age 78, well known resident of Dongola, passed away Tuesday at her home.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Lutheran Church at Dongola, followed by interment in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery. W. H. Rhymer, of Ullin, directing the funeral.

Mrs. Davis is survived by a brother, Jacob Miller, of Mill Creek; a son, Jacob Peeler, of Dongola; and two daughters, Mrs. Della McIntosh, and Mrs. Mabel Keller, both of Dongola; besides a number of other relatives and a large circle of friends.

(Jacob A. Peeler married Loretta M. Miller on 28 Nov 1872, in Union Co., Ill.  According to her death certificate, Loretta Melvina Davis was born 1 Aug 1853, in Mill Creek, Ill., the daughter of Solomon Miller, and died 1 Sep 1931near Dongola, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
VIENNA DOCTOR DIES FROM AUTO INJURY

Dr. G. K. Farris, a well-known Vienna physician, died Tuesday afternoon at Harrisburg from injuries suffered in a motor car accident a week ago near there.  He was a member of the Masonic order and Johnson County Medical Society and other similar organizations in the county.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Sep 1931:

Former Southern Illinois Resident Dies in California

             Riley Lentz, a veteran Civil War soldier, died at the home of Mrs. A. J. Lentz, of El Modena, Calif., August 19, at the age of 86 years.  Mr. Lentz was born at Dongola, Illinois, and was in the service of the Illinois Central Railroad at Arcola, for many years.

             He was a member of the Christian Church of Elmodena from which he was buried with military honors.

             Surviving him are there grandchildren, of Arcola, Ill., and one brother, Silas Lentz, of Howard Lake, Minn., besides other relatives among whom are his nephews, Dr. O. T. Hudson, of this city, and Sheriff I. J. Hudson, of Mound City, a niece, Mrs. J. B. Mathis, of Ullin, and grandniece, Mrs. Joe Biggerstaff, of this city.

             Mr. Lentz was a great traveler and until the last year or so had made an annual pilgrimage to Illinois from California, touring many different states at different times.

             (His grave marker in Santa Ana Cemetery in Orange Co., Calif., reads:  S. Riley Lentz 1846-1931 Rozella F. Lentz 1851-1920.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Arthur Rackliffe, of Los Angeles, Calif., who was called to Anna by the death of her mother, Mrs. Sarah Porter, visited last week with her sister, Mrs. Zon Walston.

 

Miss Ruby Watkins, who has been very ill with typhoid fever for some time, passed away at her grandmother’s home in Carbondale, at 3 o’clock Saturday morning, August 29th.  Funeral service were held Sunday, Aug. 30, at the Methodist church in Ullin.  Burial was in the Ullin Cemetery.

  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Sep 1931:
MOUNDS MAN PASSES AWAY AT HOME SUNDAY

Jefferson D. Trant, age 59 years, passed away at his home in Mounds, Sunday night at 11:45 o’clock.
Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10:30 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Bertha Cotilla, the Rev. Ury, pastor of the Baptist church at Mounds officiating.

Surviving Mr. Trant are his widow, two daughters, Mrs. Cotilla and Miss Delcie Trant, and one son, Clarence Trant.

Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery by Undertaker G. A. James.

(Jefferson D Trent married Laura E. Adauer on 16 Mar 1890, in Alexander Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Jefferson Trent was born 25 Sep 1871, in Illinois, and died 6 Sep 1931, at Mounds, Ill., husband of Laura Trent, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FATHER OF MRS. JAMES GLEASON PASSES AWAY

Mrs. James Gleason, of this city, received a message last Wednesday from Wesley, Iowa, stating that her father was seriously ill.  Mrs. Gleason left immediately for Wesley, but upon her arrival found that her father had passed away.  He was 86 years of age.
 
MRS. MARY CASE OF KARNAK PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Mary A. Case, of Karnak, age 78 years, passed away at her home in Karnak, Saturday, September 5.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Elmer Smith officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain Cemetery.

Mrs. Case is survived by her husband, A. K. Case, and one daughter, Mrs. Capitola Walker, of Grand Chain, besides many other relatives and a large circle of friends.

(Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Mary A. Case Born June 6, 1853 Died Sept. 5, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JAMES CLIFTON CARTER, OF CYPRESS, FATALLY INJURED

James Clifton Carter, age 19 years, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Carter, of Cypress, Illinois, was fatally injured last Friday at Port Clinton, Ohio, while riding on a bicycle.  He was struck by a taxicab.  He lived only 7 hours after the accident.

The body was brought to Cypress to the home of his parents at 11 o’clock Monday morning and funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at his home.  Interment was made in the Cypress Cemetery by G. A. James of this city.

He was a member of the standing army and was stationed at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., and had gone to Port Clinton, for rifle practice.

Mrs. Carter, mother of the victim, was quite well known in lodge circles in Mound City, she being a member of Zion Shrine No. 58, Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Sep 1931:

Cobden Youth Dies Suddenly in Local Doctor’s Office

Came in on Freight Train during the Night

             Harry Zimmerman, age 22 years, died very suddenly Wednesday morning at 11:30 o’clock in the office of Dr. H. J. Elkins, where he had been carried in an unconscious condition from the Illinois Central viaduct a short while before.

             The youth had come to Mounds on a through freight from East St. Louis and had been carried through Cobden near which place he lived with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Zimmerman.  He was quite ill when he reached Mounds at 2 o’clock that same morning and received medical attention at that time at the office of Dr. Elkins.  He felt great relief and walked from the office to the viaduct with the intention of catching the northbound freight train that would take him to Cobden.  He was suffering from organic heart trouble and collapsed again at 8:30 at which time he was removed to the doctor’s office.

             His father was notified of his death and came to Mounds with a representative of the McCarthy Funeral Home at Anna, who took charge of the body and removed it to the family home near Cobden.

             (According to his death certificate, William Henry Zimmerman was born in Cobden, Ill., the son of Frank Zimmerman, a native of Murphysboro, Ill., and Hallie C. Harbaugh, a native of Cobden, Ill., died in Mounds, Ill., and was buried at Cobden.  His marker in Cobden Cemetery near his parents, Frank Benjamin and Hallie Esther Zimmerman, reads:  William Henry Zimmerman Born Aug. 12, 1909 Died Sept. 9, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Former Mounds Resident Commits Suicide

             Allan Pullen, a former Mounds resident, passed away at a hospital in Paducah, Ky., Tuesday morning, September 9th, from the effects of a dose of bi-chloride of mercury taken with suicidal intention Tuesday, September 2.

             Mr. Pullen had been out of employment for some time and had but lately returned from Denver, Colo., where he had visited his parents.  While in Mounds he was employed by the Illinois Central.

During his residence here he was married to Miss Mary Gray McWherter, who survives him.  According to reports he left a note to his wife telling her of his intention to take his life giving as the reason the fact that he was out of employment and did not wish to burden her.  He suffered great agony during the days that he lingered near death’s door.

(According to his death certificate, Allen Thomas Pullen was born 3 May 1903, in Graves Co., Ky., the son of H. H Pullen and Annie Wilkerson, natives of Graves Co., Ky., died 8 Sep 1931, of nephritis and bichloride mercury poisoning, the husband of Mary Grey Pullen, and was buried in Fulton, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

 

In Memoriam

             In loving memory of our dear son, who passed away Sept. 9, 1929.

Dear son, you are not forgotten.  Though on earth your are no more, Still in memory you are with us.  As you always were before.

His parents,

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Wiedemann, Mounds, Ill

 

Jefferson D. Trent Dies Sunday, Sept. 6

             Jefferson D. Trent died at his home in Mounds, Sept. 6, 1931, age 59 years, 11 months and 11 days.  He was born near Pulaski and had lived in Mounds for the past 12 years.  He leaves his wife, Mrs. Laura Trent, two daughters and one son as follows:  Delsie Trent, Clarence Trent, and Mrs. Bertha Cotilla.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. T. C. Ury at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Cotilla in North Mounds at 10:30 a.m., Sept. 8.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

 

Mrs. Van Snyder received a message this week that her sister had died in California Sunday.  The body was sent to Joppa, Ill., for burial.

 

BENTON—Physicians today attributed the death of Miss Dorcas Russell, 70, as due to starvation.

She died at her home last night without medical attention. The elderly spinster reportedly lost her savings in failure of two banks here.—Post

             (According to her death certificate, Dorcas Russell was born 10 Oct 1857, in West Frankfort, Ill., the daughter of William Russell and Anna Moore, natives of Indiana, died 2 Sep 1931, in Benton, Ill., and was buried in Logan Cemetery, Logan, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
 The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Sep 1931:
BEATEN IN JAIL

A colored man, captured near Pulaski some months ago after breaking jail at Marion, was given the third degree in the county jail at Marion recently.  Effort was made to wring from him information concerning a murder.  He was knocked insensible, left on his bunk and fell to the floor, fracturing his skull.  For a time it was thought that he might not live.
 
SISTER OF MOUNDS WOMAN DIES IN CALIFORNIA

Mrs. Garland Joehannis, sister of Mrs. Van Snider, of Mounds, passed away at her home in Napa, California, Sunday, September 6.  The remains were brought to Joppa, arriving there Friday where funeral services were held and interment made in the cemetery there.

Besides her sister in Mounds, she is survived by her husband, her parents, two other sisters and three brothers.  Those from Mounds who attended her funeral were Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Essex, Mr. and Mrs. L. Keller, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Adams, Mrs. J. Stewart, Mrs. C. Stone, Mrs. T. Lackey, Mrs. G. Robertson, Mrs. W. Adams, Mrs. T. B. Thomason, and Mrs. S. Fisher and daughter Rivers.

(Florence Johannes was born about 1911 and died 6 Sep 1931, in Napa, Calif.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 25 Sep 1931:
FORMER DONGOLA BOY PASSES AWAY

Jack Leon Easley, age 22, passed away in Chicago hospital late Tuesday night following an operation. He was the nephew of Mrs. F. M. McBride and Guy L. Penrod, of Dongola, and spent part of his childhood in Dongola where he was well known. His body was taken to his former home in Illmo, Mo.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon and interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola, the cortege reaching the cemetery at 3 o’clock Friday afternoon.

(His death certificates that Jack Leon Easley was the son of Ellis Hunter Easley and Anna Penrod.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS INFANT PASSED AWAY

Mina Jean Schweiger, age 16 months, only child of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Schweger, of Mounds, passed away Tuesday morning.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the residence in Mounds, followed by interment in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Rev. Ury, pastor of the Baptist Church of Mounds, officiated.

The funeral was directed by G. A. James.

(Her death certificates states that Mina Jean Schweiger was born 19 May 1930, in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of Alfred Schweiger and Gladys DuPree, died 22 Sep 1931, in Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mina Jean Schweiger Born May 9, 1930 Died Sept. 22, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JOHN F. NEWSOM, OLMSTEAD, PASSED AWAY TUESDAY

John F. Newsom, age 63 years, a well-known resident of Olmstead, passed away at the home of Mrs. Kate Bagby, near Olmsted Tuesday.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Center Church, with the Rev. Mr. Corey of Pulaski officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery, W. H. Aldred directing the funeral.

Mr. Newsom was a member of Friendship Lodge A. F. and A. M. No. 89.

(John L. Newsom married Julia Ann Orshorn on 17 Sep 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  J. F. Newsom married Artie Sharp on 23 Nov 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, John F. Newsom was born 14 Aug 1868, in Illinois, the son of John and Julia Ann Newsome, died 15 Sep 1931, the husband of Arti Newsom, and was buried in Concord Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. T. L. PULLEY DIES AT HOME IN CALIFORNIA

Mrs. T. L. Pulley, sister-in-law of C. L. Pulley and Mrs. Lydia Jenkins, of Mounds, passed away at her home in Maywood, Calif., Tuesday morning.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Huntington Park, Calif. and interment will be made at the Angelus Abbey Mausoleum.
 
MRS. ED MOWERY DIES AT HER HOME IN ULLIN

Mrs. Mattie Mowery, age 63, passed away at her home in Ullin Tuesday evening, September 22, at 7:30 p.m.  She has been ill for some time and hasn’t been expected to live for days.

She is survived by her husband, ten children, Mrs. Lennie Cantrell, of Centralia, Hugh, of Mayfield, Ky., Verno, Floyd, and Oris, of Ullin; Ralph, of Carbondale; Orville, of Allendale, Harley, of Dupo, Lolo of St. Louis, and Miss Ina Lois Mowery, of Ullin.  She also leaves six daughters-in-law, one son-in-law; fifteen grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Warren Richie, of Olmsted; and Mrs. Molley Lentz, of California; three brothers, Charlie Bundschuh, of Ullin, John and Chris Bundschuh, of California.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m. at the Methodist Church at Ullin, with Rev. Bush, of West Frankfort officiating.  The casket bearers will be her Sunday school class.  Interment will probably be made in St. John’s Cemetery with funeral director E.J. Ford, of Dongola, directing the funeral.

GRAND CHAIN WOMAN PASSED AWAY TUESDAY

Mrs. Kate Weece, of Grand Chain passed away suddenly at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo Tuesday night at 11:30 o’clock.

Mrs. Weece had made her home with her daughter, Mrs. August Reichert, for several years and three weeks ago she suffered a broken hip when she fell at the home of her daughter.  She was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo following the accident where she has since been a patient.

Funeral services will be held at Grand Chain at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church at nine o’clock this morning and interment will be made in the Grand Chain Cemetery.

Mrs. Weece is survived by two sons, W. A. Price, of Olmsted, and J. A. Weece, of Galva, Illinois, and two daughters, Mrs. August Reichert and Mrs. Lena Bayless, of Grand Chain, besides fourteen grandchildren and one great grandson.

Hartwell and Ryan, of Mounds, directed the funeral.

(Abraham Weece married Mrs. Kate Price on 10 Mar 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William Price married Kate Roach on 12 May 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in St. Catherine Cemetery at Grand Chain reads: Kate Roach Weece Born Nov. 1, 1855 Died Sept. 22, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
INNOCENT MAN TO GET FREEDOM

After serving 23 years of his life behind bars for the alleged murder of a Wabash County farmer, Jesse Lucas, of Mt. Carmel, may win his freedom from the Southern Illinois penitentiary at Menard within a few weeks to live to see himself cleared of the murder charge.

The death-bed confession of George Pond, farmer and fisherman who died at Decker, Ind., June 30, may be the basis on which the pardons board will order the release of Lucas who had been sentenced in Wabash County in 1908 for life.

Lucas was convicted of the murder of Clyde Showalter, Wabash County farmer, whose body was found buried in a shallow grave near the junction of the Patoka and Wabash rivers in Indiana.

Wednesday of the past week Dr. M. P. Hollingsworth, Princeton coroner at the time of the murder; Ray Sisson, former Evansville newspaper man and now a druggist at Decker; Mrs. Anna Smith, neighbor of Pond, who allegedly heard confession; and Mayor Ben Wright, Mt. Carmel, Illinois, visited the pardon board at Springfield, Illinois, and presented evidence which will clear the innocent man of crime for which he was convicted in 1908. Forgotten by most persons, some who did not believe Lucas, but still fresh in the memory of guilty, the old crime lived again June 30 this year.  Pond, desperately ill, called his wife, the fourth, he had wed in his 62 years, and Mrs. Smith to his bedside.

He told them of a crime he had committed of which they had never heard.  He told them he was the person who killed Clyde Showalter, prosperous cattle trader and member of a good family of Patton, six miles north of Mt. Carmel.  He told of Lucas, an innocent man, who was serving a life sentence for the deed.  He further confessed to the murder of another man at Milltown 40 years before, the story goes.—Grayville Independent
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 25 Sep 1931:

Little One Passed Away

             Mina Jean Schweiger, little daughter of Alfred and Gladys Schweiger, was born in Mounds, Ill., on May 19, 1930, and died at the home of her parents on North Oak Street in Mounds on Sept. 22, 1931, aged 1 year, 4 months and 3 days.  She leaves her father and mother and both grandfathers and grandmothers.  Her illness was brief as was her little life.  The morning glory of an hour envies not the pine tree of a thousand years.  It casts its beauty and is soon gone, yet content.

Funeral services were conducted at the home on Wednesday at 2 p.m. by Rev. T. C. Ury of the Baptist church.

Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

 

Mrs. T. L. Pulley Dies in California

             Mrs. Lydia Jenkins and brother, Carol Pulley, have received word of the death of their sister-in-law, Mrs. T. L. Pulley, which occurred Tuesday morning at her home in Maywood, Calif.  She is survived by her husband.  Mr. and Mrs. Pulley, formerly resided in southern Illinois.

 

ALTO PASS—The appointment of Frank Willey, Sr., to the postmastership of the post office at Alto Pass has been announced.  Mr. Willey succeeds in that position, his son, who was killed in an airplane accident about six weeks ago.—Cobden Review

   

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Oct 1931:
AGED MOUND CITY RESIDENT PASSES AWAY FRIDAY MORNING

Mrs. Bettie Ritchie, aged 80 years, passed away Friday morning at 9 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Hattie Cagle in this city.  Mrs. Richie had made her home with Mrs. Cagle and family the past two years.  She had been a resident of Mound City for several years, having lived here with her husband, Dave Richie, who preceded his wife in death several years ago.

Mrs. Richie had been blind for a number of years and had also been in failing health for several years.  She bore her infirmities with a wonderful patience.  So far as is known, she left no relatives.  She was a Christian woman and was loved by all who knew her.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the First M. E. Church in Mound City with the Rev. W. L. Hanbaum officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. lots in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

Casket bearers were Edward McDonald, Otto Edwards, James Dolan, John Travis, and J. A. Lutz, of this city, and Mr. DeCrow, of Cairo.

(Her death certificate states that Bettie Ritchie was born 8 Jan 1865, in Tennessee and died 25 Sep 1931, in Mound City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

MOTHER OF MOUND CITY WOMAN DIES

Mrs. Lester King, of this city, received a message a few days ago stating that her mother was seriously ill.  Mrs. King and daughters left immediately for Water Valley, Miss., to be at her mother’s bedside.  She passed away soon after their arrival.

BROTHER OF FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Fred Scheler, age 50 years, passed away at his home, 211 Ohio Street, Cairo, Saturday night following an illness of six weeks.  He was a brother, of Mrs. N. A. DeVore, of Vicksburg, Miss., formerly of this city.

Besides his sister, Mrs. DeVore, he leaves his widow, Mrs. Ida Scheler, a son, Fred Austin Scheler, of Cairo.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9:30 o’clock at the funeral home of Karcher Brothers, the Rev. C. Robert Dunlap officiating.  Immediately after the services the cortege left by automobiles for Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, where interment was made.

(His death certificate states that Fred Scheler was born 25 Jun 1881, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Frederick Scheler, a native of Germany, and died 26 Sep 1931, in Cairo, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CIVIL WAR VETERAN LAID TO REST WITH MILITARY HONORS

Richard David Richardson, age 95 years, veteran of the Civil War, passed away Saturday night following an illness of a few days at his home, 727 37th Street, Cairo.

“Grandpa” Richardson, as he was affectionately known among the youngsters, was well known among the kitties of Mound City and Cairo, as he annually appeared as Santa Claus during the holiday season in Cairo.  He was a friend to the children in and around Cairo.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the residence, Father Bernard Pender, pastor of St. Patrick’s Church, officiating, and interment was made in the National Cemetery at Mound City.  Full military honors were extended the war veteran with casket bearers from the American Legion, a firing squad and taps by a bugler at the conclusion of the last rites.  A flag supplied by the government draped the casket of the aged veteran, who served his country for four years.

(His death certificate states that Richard David Richardson was born 30 Mar 1836, in Philadelphia, Pa., the son of David Richardson, also a native of Philadelphia, died 26 Sep 1931, in Cairo, Ill., the husband of Mary Ellen Richardson.  He was buried in Mound City National Cemetery and served as a private in Company D, 1st Maryland Infantry.—Darrel Dexter)

RETIRED METHODIST MINISTER OF KARNAK PASSES AWAY

Funeral services for Rev. DeWeece, a retired Methodist minister who passed away at his home in Karnak, were held Tuesday morning at the M. E. Church at Olive Branch, Illinois, and interment was made in the Olive Branch Cemetery.

G. A. James of Mound City furnished his funeral coach and went to Karnak where he assisted the undertaker of that place in the funeral arrangements.  He also accompanied the remains to Olive Branch.

(According to his death certificate, J. W. Deweese was born in Kentucky, the son of Purson Deweese, and was the husband of Sarah E. Deweese.  His marker in Olive Branch Cemetery reads:  J. W. Deweese Born Aug. 22, 1850 Died Sept. 27, 1931 Caroline Deweese Born Jan. 22, 1855 Died Jan. 3, 1930 Robert M. Deweese Born Feb. 9, 1885 Died April 18, 1953.—Darrel Dexter)

PROMINENT PULASKI COUNTY RESIDENT DIES SUDDENLY

Clement J. Spencer, age 69 years, passed away at his home in Mounds Saturday afternoon about four o’clock.  Mr. Spencer’s death was a great shock to his family and friends as he was thought to be in his usual health just a few minutes before his death.  His death has brought much sadness to his many friends in this community where he had resided a greater part of his life.

He was born in Madison, Wis., in 1862 and was the son of E. T. and Sarah Spencer, pioneer settlers of this county.  His parents, a brother and sister preceded him in death several years ago.  He came when quite young to Pulaski County with his parents and sisters and brother, where he resided on a farm near Pulaski for several years, spending the remainder of life in other parts of Pulaski County.

Funeral services, which were largely attended, were held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the residence on South Reider Ave., at Mounds and interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery by the side of his parents.  Thomas Meredith, a representative of the International Bible Institute, officiated at the funeral service.  At the cemetery the services were in charge of the Masonic order of which Mr. Spencer was a member.

Mr. Spencer is survived by his widow; one son, Forrest J. Spencer, of Mounds; one sister, Mrs. U. S. A. Gadbois, of Villa Ridge; and several nieces and nephews of Pulaski and Alexander counties.  Mrs. George Piper, of Cairo, Mrs. Albert Herbert and Mrs. John Clancy, of Villa Ridge, are nieces of Mr. Spencer.

He was a member of Trinity Lodge No. 562 A. F. and A. M. of Mound City and of the Knight Templar of Cairo.  He also belonged to a number of other branches of the Masonic order and was a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge.

For a number of years he was game warden of Pulaski County and afterwards had charge of the state game reserve at Horseshoe Lake in Alexander County.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Clement J. Spencer was born 18 Feb 1863, the son of Elias Spencer, and died 26 Sep 1931, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Addie Spencer.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Clement J. Spencer 1862-1931.—Darrel Dexter)

Owen Richie and Mrs. Lillian Hunting, of Chicago, have returned to their home after being called to Mound City on account of the death of Mrs. Bettie Richie.  Mrs. Hunting was a niece of Mrs. Ritchie’s husband, Dave Richie, who passed away several years ago.  Owen Richie is a nephew of Mrs. Hunting.

Nearly the whole neighborhood attended the funeral of Mrs. E. C. Mowery at Ullin and a number accompanied them to the St. John’s Cemetery on last Thursday.  Mrs. Mowery will be greatly missed in this neighborhood as well as Ullin.  She was an active church worker at both places.  (Beech Grove)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 2 Oct 1931:
Prominent Resident Dies Suddenly Saturday Afternoon
C. J. Spencer Answers Last Call Upon Return from Trip to Cairo

The entire community was shocked when word of the sudden death of C. J. Spencer was passed from one to another of the residents following his unexpected demise Saturday afternoon, September 26th, at 2:45 o’clock. 

While Mr. Spencer had not been well for some time, he was able to be about at the time of his death and had been to Cairo on Saturday morning.  According to his physician the real cause of death was poison in the system from tooth infection this having affected the arteries of the heart.

Clement J. Spencer was born February 18, 1863, at Meads, Wisconsin, and died September 26 at Mounds, Ill., at the age of 68 years, 7 months and 8 days.  He was the son of E. T. and Sarah Spencer.  On August 1, 1901, he was united in marriage to Miss Addie Ferrell at Stonefort, Illinois.  This this union was born a son, Forrest F. Spencer.

Surviving Mr. Spencer are his widow, his son, a sister, Mrs. U. S. A. Gadbois, of Villa Ridge and several nieces and nephews.

Four years Mr. Spencer advocated the establishment of a State Game and Fish Preserve at Horseshoe Lake and no one was more delighted than he when this idea became a reality.  He was appointed superintendent of the Preserve and during his term of service, gave his time and thought to its development.  He was an active member of the Sportsman’s League, a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge and of several branches of the Masonic order, including the Knights Templar.

Funeral services were held at the home Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock conducted by Thomas Meredith, of Ohio, a representative of the International Bible Students.  Burial was in Villa Ridge Cemetery, the Masons having charge of the ceremonies.  G. A. James was the funeral director.
 
Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Brelsford attended the funeral of Mrs. Ed Mowery in Ullin Thursday.
 
Mrs. Mattie Mowery, age 63 years, wife of E. C. Mowery of Ullin, died at her home Tuesday evening, Sept. 22, following an illness of several months.  She is survived by her husband and ten children: Mrs. Lennie Cantrell, of Centralia, Hugh Mowery, of Mayfield, Ky., Verno, Floyd, and Oris and Ina Lois, of Ullin, Orville, of Allendale, Harley, of Dupo, Ralph of Carbondale, Lois, of St. Louis.  She also leaves six daughters-in-law, fifteen grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Warren Richie, of Olmstead and Mrs. Molly Lentz, of California and three brothers, Charles Bundschuh, of Ullin, and Chris and John Bundschuh, of California.  Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist Church at Ullin with the Rev. Mr. Bush of West Frankfort officiating.  Interment was made in St. John’s Cemetery with E. J. Ford of Dongola directing the funeral.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Mowery and children accompanied by the former’s father, Ed Mowery, have returned to Mayfield, Ky.  Mr. Mowery will visit his son several weeks.
 
Several from here (Pulaski) attended the funeral of C. J. Spencer in Mounds Monday afternoon.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Oct 1931:
VALUED MEMBER OF MOUND CITY SHRINE PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Nellie Kleb, of Cairo, member of Zion Shrine No. 58, Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem, which is held at Mound City, passed away at her home at 2:50 o’clock Monday morning following a prolonged illness.

Miss Kleb had many friends and acquaintances in Mound City and vicinity who are grieved to learn of her death.  She made many friends throughout Pulaski County during her employment as sales lady for Kaufman Bros. Dry goods Store in Cairo.  She served in that capacity a number of years. 

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Church of the Redeemer and interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

(According to her death certificate, Nellie Elizabeth Kleb was born in Cairo, Ill., the daughter of Leo Kleb and Louisa Zimmerman, natives of Germany, and died in Cairo, Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Leo Kleb Born April 10, 1835 Died Jan. 30, 1884 Leo Kleb Born April 4, 1875 Died May 18, 1878 Dorothea Zimmerman Kleb Born Sept. 14, 1804 Died April 21, 1882 Nellie E. Kleb Born Feb. 10, 1873 Died Oct. 5, 1931 Minnie Kleb Born Aug. 15, 1878 Died Nov. 14, 1955 Amelia C. Kleb Born July 7, 1868 Died Feb. 19, 1943 Annie Kleb Vincent—Darrel Dexter)

Mounds Independent, Friday, 9 Oct 1931:
Mrs. Lester King and four daughters were called to Water Valley, Miss., on account of the serious illness and death of the former’s mother, have returned to their home in this city (Mound City).
 
JONESBORO—Harvey Burk, 38, fell from a skiff into the Mississippi River near Grand Tower, where he lived, on Wednesday evening of last week.  Two negroes were in the skiff with him, but their efforts to rescue him were unavailing.

About 5:30 Saturday morning Burk’s body was discovered lodged against some piling in the river opposite Reynoldsville by William Dusky, who towed it ashore and it was subsequently taken to the mortuary of Norris & Son in Jonesboro, where Dr. H. O. Taylor held a coroner’s inquest Saturday evening, a verdict of accidently drowning being returned.  One of the negroes who was in the boat with him testified at the inquest that their efforts to rescue Burk were hopeless because he sank at once and never came to the surface.  The body was buried in the Jonesboro Cemetery Sunday morning.
Burk was a farmer by occupation.  He is survived by his wife and three children.—Gazette

(According to his death certificate, James Harvey Burke was born in Jackson Co., Ill., the son of Frank P. Burke, a native of Kentucky, and Margaret Harley, a native of Arkansas, died 26 Sep 1931, in Road District 10, Union Co., Ill., husband of Margaret Burke.  His marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  James Harvey Burke Born Aug. 2, 1893 Died Sept. 24, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
  
CARBONDALE—Miss Dora Mertz, for many years a Carbondale musician and piano teacher, was found dying alone in her home yesterday afternoon and before she could be taken to the hospital, expired.
Found in a semi-conscious condition after entrance was made through a window in her second story bedroom.  Miss Mertz died in about a half hour after relatives reached her bedside.—Free Enterprise

(Her death certificate states that Dora Louise Mertz was born 7 Jun 1873, in Carbondale, Ill., the daughter of H. C. Mertz, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Elnora Boren, a native of Caledonia, Ill., died 27 Sep 1931, in Carbondale, Ill., and was buried in Oakland Cemetery.  Her marker in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale, Ill., reads:  Dora L. Mertz 1873-1931.—Darrel Dexter)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Oct 1931:
E. W. THIELECKE PASSES AWAY AT HOME OF DAUGHTER

Edward William Thielecke, age 76 years, passed away at 9:30 o’clock Friday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William E. Rife, at Villa Ridge.  He was stricken only two days ago with cerebral meningitis and death came suddenly which was a great shock to his many friends in this community.
Mr. Thielecke was born December 31, 1854, in Germany and was brought to the United States by his parents at the age of four years. He came to Cairo when a small boy where he spent practically all his life.  For a number of years he was editor of the Cairo Bulletin, which position he held until 1925.  He started the Bulletin in 1880 and with the exception of about ten years which time was spent with his brother in Chicago, the entire period was spent with the Bulletin office.

Mr. Thielecke took a decided stand upon every issue of public interest and swung the sentiment of the people in many a political campaign.  He was always outspoken with criticism and on one occasion roused so much feeling against him for this reason that he was shot at the bullet lodging in the wall of the office above his desk.  He dug this bullet out of the wall and until his departure from this life he wore it as a watch charm.

Surviving Mr. Thielecke are his daughter, Mrs. Rife, three grandchildren and three nephews, and a number of other relatives.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the residence of his daughter at Villa Ridge, Rev. E. O. Allen, pastor of the Union Congregational Methodist Church officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery, G. A. James of Mound City being the undertaker in charge.  Casket bearers were old friends and associates of Mr. Thielecke, Alexander Wilson, Hunter Bird, John Thistlewood, Clyde Sullivan, John C. and Seldon Fisher, all of Cairo.

(E. W. Thielecke, 44, of Cairo, Ill., married on 7 Sep 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Cora Bartleson, 28, of Grand Chain.  According to his death certificate, Edward William Thielecke was born 31 Dec 1853, in Germany, the son of William Thielecke, a native of Germany, died 10 Oct 1931, in Road District 1, Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Cora Thielecke.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Edward Thielecke 1853-1931.—Darrel Dexter)

ULLIN MAN PASSES AWAY

W. H. Ervin, age 67 years, well known resident of Ullin, passed away at his home Friday night at 9 o’clock.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at one o’clock at Cache Chapel with the Rev. Mr. Holloman, pastor of the Christian Church of Pulaski, officiating.  Interment was made in the Cache Chapel Cemetery.  W. H. Aldred directing the funeral.

Surviving Mr. Ervin are his widow, three sons, Henry, Arthur and Floyd, and one daughter, Mrs. Edna Oliver, all of whom reside near Ullin.  He also leaves a number of other relatives and a large circle of friends.

(His marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery reads:  William H. Ervin Born Aug. 5, 1884 Died Oct. 8, 1931 Cora L. Ervin Born Aug. 8, 1874 Died Dec. 5, 1954.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. ROSA CARTER DIES

Mrs. Rosa Carter, wife of Melvin Carter, passed away at her home on North Commercial Avenue at 3 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  Mrs. Carter was 42 years of age and had been ill for several months.

She is survived by her husband and several children and a number of other relatives.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at 10 o’clock at the Pentecostal Church in this city, Rev. Van Meter, Pentecostal minister of this city, officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

(According to her death certificate, Rosa Carter was born 5 Mar 1891, in Arkansas, the daughter of Marion Arnold, a native of Arnold, died 10 Oct 1931, in Mound City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 16 Oct 1931:
Veteran Newspaper Man Dies Suddenly Saturday, October 10
Edward Thielecke Succumbs at Home of Daughter near Villa Ridge

Edward William Thielecke, age 76, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William E. Rife near Villa Ridge, Saturday, October 10, following a two day illness from cerebral meningitis.

For more than forty years Mr. Thielecke edited the Cairo Bulletin, becoming editor of that paper in 1880 under the ownership of E. A. Burnett and remaining editor through several changes in ownership until 1925, except for a time about ten years ago when he engaged in the advertising business with his brother in Chicago.  Upon the death of his brother, Mr. Thielecke returned to Cairo and again became editor of the Bulletin, retiring from active work in 1925.

Mr. Thielecke was born in Germany, December 31, 1854, and was brought to the United States by his parents when four years of age.  He had spent the greater part of his life in Cairo.

The Cairo Citizen says of his editorial writing:

“Always a forceful writer, Mr. Thielecke took a decided stand upon every issue of public interest and swung the sentiment of the people in many a political campaign.  For his outspoken criticism of a political faction that was dominating Cairo at one time he was shot at while seated at his desk in the old Bulletin office on Ohio Street.  The bullet was imbedded in the wall at his side and he dug it out and wore it as a watch charm for the remainder of his life.  While he contended he knew who fired the shot, he never would divulge the name and continued his editorial attacks upon the political faction.”

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. E. Rife, near Villa Ridge, Rev. E. O. Allen, pastor of the Union Church of Villa Ridge conducting the service.  Burial was at Grand Chain by the side of his wife, with G. A. James in charge.  The pallbearers were old friends and associates, Alexander Wilson, Hunter Bird, John Thistlewood, Clyde Sullivan, John C. and Selden Fisher, all of Cairo.
 
E. W. Thielecke, a former resident of Cairo, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. Rife, Saturday morning, Oct. 10th, after only two days illness of cerebral meningitis.  The remains were laid to rest in the Grand Chain Cemetery Sunday afternoon, Rev. E. O. Allen, pastor of the Union Church officiating.  (Villa Ridge)

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 23 Oct 1931:
ULLIN CHILD PASSES AWAY DUE TO DIPHTHERIA

Lelan Crippen, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Olen Crippen, of Ullin, died at his home Tuesday morning at eleven o’clock, after an illness of nine days with diphtheria.

He is survived by his parents, three brothers, Junior, Gerald, Harold; and a sister, Eloise; grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Sutton, and several uncles and aunts, also other relatives.

Funeral services were held Wednesday at 2 p.m. at the residence.

Interment was made in the Ullin Cemetery with W. J. Rhymer directing the funeral.

(According to his death certificate, Leland Clair Crippen was born 7 Jun 1923, in Ullin, Ill., the son of Olen Crippen, a native of Ullin, and Mabel Sutton, a native of Tunnel Hill, Ill., and died 20 Oct 1931, in Ullin, Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Leland C. son of O. H. & M. C. Crippen June 7, 1923-Oct. 20, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

PROMINENT PULASKI COUNTY RESIDENT PASSES AWAY

J. H. Hendricks, aged 66 years, prominent resident of this county, passed away at his home northeast of Mounds, at 1 o’clock Saturday morning following an illness of several weeks.  For a number of years he had been engaged in farming, his farm being located about halfway between Mounds and Valley Recluse.

Funeral services were held at the family residence at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church of Cairo, officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

Mr. Hendricks is survived by his widow, two children, Miss Mary and Henry Hendricks, of Mounds and two brothers, C. C. and G. W. Hendricks, of Malden, Mo.

Mr. Hendricks was born in Cypress, Ind., June 28, 1865, and in 1891 was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Koppa.  For a time they lived in west Kentucky later moving to Pulaski County where they have since resided.

In 1903 Mr. Hendricks received an injury to his limb by traumatic pressure.  Later the injury carried a cancerous appearance.  At the time of the cyclone which hit the county north of Mounds his home was completely ___ant pinning Mr. Hendricks under heavy timber.  He received ___ minor injuries, but none serious.  In 1919 it was found necessary to amputate the limb which was done by Dr. J. F. Hargan of Mound City.

Active casket bearers were Forest Nixon, H. C. Moore, J. M. Mahoney, Fred Hoffmier, Alex Parker, and Robert Anglin.

Honorary Jake Blum, M. F. Browner, Robert Spaulding, O. B. Hastings, Harry Carpenter, Lowell Hargan, C. S. Miller, Dr. J. F. Hargan, Warner Wall, Joe Crain, and Earl Smoot.

(His marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  John Henry Hendricks 1865-1931 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

PROMINENT MOUNDS WOMAN PASSES AWAY THURSDAY

Mrs. Mary Britton, wife of R. L. Britton, of Mounds, age 41 years, passed away Thursday night at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo following a prolonged illness.  Mrs. Britton had been a patient at St. Mary’s Infirmary about three weeks where she underwent an operation but up to the time that he was removed to the hospital she was able to be up and about her home.  The body was taken to the home in Mounds where funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock the Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the Methodist Church, officiating.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery, Hartwell and Ryan directing the funeral.

Mrs. Britton was before her marriage Miss Mary Thornton, and was born in Jonesboro, Illinois, January 19, 1889.  She was a sister to the first wife of Mr. Britton and for a time made her home with them.

She is survived by her husband, a daughter, Mrs. Alfred G. Hendrickson, of Los Angeles, Calif., two sons, Eugene, age 12 and Wiley, age 9.  She also leaves two stepdaughters, Mrs. Howell Byrd, of Los Angeles, and Mrs. Clinton C. Terrell, of Cairo, and a stepson Richmond Britton, of Mounds.  Her stepchildren were also her nieces and nephew, being her sister’s children.  Four sisters survive, Mrs. George Menees, of Phoenix, Ariz., Mrs. Ira Stringer, of Lakeland, Fla., Mrs. Charles Peck, of Peoria, and Mrs. E. C. Vanboorebeck, of Marseilles, the two latter sisters being with her at the time of her death.
Mrs. Britton’s death caused deep sorrow to all who knew her in this community.  She was a woman of lovable disposition and wonderful personality and had many friends in the community.  Her daughter in Los Angeles was unable to attend her funeral.

(According to her death certificate, Mary Britton was born 19 Jan 1889, in Jonesboro, Ill., the daughter of William Thornton, a native of England, and Mary Jane Chester, a native of Jonesboro, Ill., died 15 Oct 1931, in Cairo, Ill., wife of R. L. Britton.  William T. Thornton married Mary J. Chester on 25 Jan 1872, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FORMER MOUND CITY LADY PASSES AWAY IN ST. LOUIS

Mrs. Eva M. Bowling, for many years a resident of  Mound City, passed away at her home at 4536 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, Thursday, October 15, following an illness of several months.  Mrs. Bowling was 77 years of age and was the daughter of the late James and Rachael Rouse and sister of the late Thomas and James W. Rouse.  Mrs. Bowling and two brothers have all passed away within the year.  Thomas Rouse died in the East several months ago and about a month later, James W. Rouse passed away at his home in Memphis.

Several months ago Mrs. Bowling suffered a serious illness and for a time her life was despaired of.  At that time she was a patient in a hospital.  After a time she improved in health and it was thought she would regain her former health.

Mrs. Bowling left Mound City several years ago, going to St. Louis where she has since made her home.  She was well known in Mound City, where she had many friends who are grieved to learn of her passing.

Surviving Mrs. Bowling are three grandchildren, Mrs. Mary Bowling McCockle, and J. Lyles Bowling, of Washington, D.C., and Leo Whitney Bowling, of Norfolk, Va., and several nieces and nephews and other relatives.  Mrs. Harry Allen and brother, Hunter Rouse, of Memphis, Tenn., formerly of Mound City, are a niece and nephew of the deceased.

Funeral services were held in St. Louis from Ellis Chapel, 5240 Delmar Blvd., Friday, October 16, at 2:30 p.m. and interment was made in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Mrs. Bowling was a member of Occidental Chapter No. 185 O. E. S. and was a woman of fine Christian character.

The old Rouse homestead where Mrs. Bowling resided with her parents while residents of Mound City, formerly stood on Main Street opposite Bode’s Drug Store, but has since been removed to the back of the same lot facing Pearl Street.  The Rouse family was one of the oldest and most prominent families in this community.

(Jesse L. Bowling married Eva M. Rouse on 23 Apr 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Julliete Rouse, son, Hunter Rouse, and daughter, Mrs. Harry Allen, of Memphis, Tenn., passed through Mound City Saturday afternoon en route to their home from St. Louis where they had been being called there by the death of Mrs. Eva Bowling.

OBITUARY

John Sowers, son of Jesse and Sally Sowers, was born November 14, 1854, died October 14, 1931, age 76 years, 11 months.  The place of his death was the place of his birth.  He was born, grew up and has always lived on the same farm and in the same place from which God called him home.

He was united in marriage about the year 1874 to Mary Casper, who was called home December 5, 1891.  To this union were born 9 children, 5 boys and 4 girls, namely Ida Bell, deceased; John Calvin, of Cypress, Illinois; Arna, also deceased; Mrs. Effie Peeler, Oscar and Herman, of Dongola; Mrs. Mary Bevet, of Johnston City; Ira, of Perks; and Mrs. Sada Karraker, of Dongola.  He was married a second time to Ella Patterson June 30, 1898, to this union 8 children were born, seven of which survive.  Emery, of Harvey, Illinois, Emma Hartline, of Johnston City, Floyd, of Raymondville, Texas, Lonnie, of Dunning, Illinois, Katy Bough, of Mound City, Illinois, Ulmont and Walter living at home, Vermont deceased.

He professed a faith in Christ about the year 1893 and united with Mt. Olive Baptist Church and of which he was a faithful and consecrated member when God called him to his reward.

He became afflicted with little more than year ago with that dreaded disease known as cancer which caused him much suffering and intense pain, but he bore his suffering with much patience and Christian fortitude and often expressed his willingness to go.  He leaves to mourn his going his faithful companion, the children before names, 24 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren, and a host of other relatives and friends.  The companion has lost a good husband, the children a faithful father, the community a good citizen and the church one of its most loyal members.  Truly a great has fallen, but our loss is Heaven’s gain for this it is written, “Blessed are dead which die in the Lord from henceforth yea saith the Spirit they shall rest from their labors and their words do follow them.”

The funeral was conducted by H. W. Karraker assisted by A. M. Troutman and Lowell Arnhart at Mt. Olive Church and buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

(John Sowers, son of Sarah Mize, married Mary E. Casper on 29 Apr 1875, in Union Co., Ill.  John Sowers, 43, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Jesse Sowers and Sarah Peeler, married on 30 Jun 1898, in Union Co., Ill., Sarah E. R. Patterson, 19, born in Shelby, Ill., daughter of James A. Patterson and Cathren Show. Jesse Sowers married Sarah Peeler on 29 Oct 1840, in Union Co., Ill.  Shepherd Mize married Mrs. Sally Sowers on 18 Sep 1873, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that John Sowers was born 14 Nov 1854, near Dongola, Ill., and died 14 Oct 1931.  His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  John Sowers 1854-1931 Mary Sowers 1851-1891.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 23 Oct 1931:
Young Colored Woman Dies at Home in Villa Ridge

Miss Mary Bowers died at the home of her parents in Villa Ridge, Saturday, October 17, 1931, following a lingering illness.  She was born February 7, 1906, and had reached the age of 25 years, 3 months and 10 days.

Miss Bowers is survived by her mother and father, three sisters and one brother, also a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. T. M. Brandon, of Villa Ridge.

(Her death certificate states Mary Bowers was born 7 Feb 1906, in Villa Ridge, Ill., the daughter of Warren Bowers, a native of Tennessee, and Ida Roy, a native of Selma, Tenn., black, died 17 Oct 1931, in Villa Ridge, Ill., and was buried in Villa Ridge Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Prominent Pulaski County Resident Dies Friday Night
J. H. Hendricks Seriously Ill only Short Time

The passing of J. H. Hendricks, prominent farmer whose home for many years was near Mounds, came as a shock to his many acquaintances and friends.  While it was known he was not in the best of health, few knew of his serious illness.

John Henry Hendricks, was born in Cypress, Ind., June 28, 1865, and died at his home near Mounds, Ill., October 16, 1931, at the age of 66 years, 3 months and 19 days.  In 1891 he was married to Miss Augusta Amelia Kopps.  For some years they made their home in Western Kentucky moving there to Pulaski County, Ill., where they have since made their home.  Mr. and Mrs. Hendricks had a beautiful home near Water Valley that was destroyed by a cyclone in 1917.  They then bought the spacious home of William Crain nearby and have since lived there.

Mr. Hendricks is survived by his widow, one son, Henry Hendricks, one daughter, Miss Mary Hendricks, and one grandson, John Henry Hendricks, all living near Mounds.  He also leaves two brothers, C. C. and G. W. Hendricks, both of Malden, Mo.

Funeral services were held at the residence Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock the Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Cairo Lutheran Church officiating.  Pall bearers were Forrest Nixon, H. C. Moore, J. M. Mahoney, Alex Parker, Fred L. Hoffmeier, and Robert Anglin.

Burial was made in Thistlewood Cemetery with Funeral Director G. A. James in charge.

(His death certificate states that John Henry Hendricks was the son of Henry Hendricks and Margaret Weiskopf.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. R. L. Britton Passes Away Thursday Night
Leaves Many Sorrowing Relatives and Friends

Mrs. R. L. Britton died Thursday night, October 16, at 9:15 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, following a surgical operation made some eight days before in a vain attempt to save her life.

Mrs. Britton was the wife of Richmond L. Britton, former assessor and treasurer of Pulaski County.  Her maiden name was Mary Thornton and her childhood home was in Jonesboro, Ill.  She was born January 19, 1889, and had reached the age of 41 years.  She was first married to Mr. Ecker.  Following his death and the death of her sister, the first Mrs. Britton, she and her brother-in-law married.

She is survived by her husband, a daughter, Mrs. Alfred G. Henricson, of Los Angeles, formerly Miss Mable Ecker, of Cairo; and two sons, Eugene, 12, and Wiley, 9.  She also leaves two stepdaughters, Mrs. Howell Byrd, of Los Angeles, and Mrs. Clinton C. Terrell, of Cairo, and a stepson, Richmond Britton, of Mounds.  Four sisters also survive, Mrs. George Menees, of Phoenix, Ariz., Mrs. Ira Stringer, of Lakeland, Fla., Mrs. Charles Peck, of Peoria, and Mrs. E. C. Van Hoorebeck, of Marseilles.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the residence with the Rev. W. D. Richardson, pastor of the Methodist Church, officiating.  Immediately after the services the funeral cortege left by automobiles for Villa Ridge, where interment was made.  Funeral Directors Hartwell and Ryan were in charge.
 
Mrs. A. West was called to Detroit, Mich., Monday by the death of a relative, Coy Wilson, who was killed in an automobile accident at that place.
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the kind friends and neighbors who assisted us in any way during the illness and following the death of our beloved husband and father, John Henry Hendricks.  We extend our special thanks to those who sent floral tributes and to those who furnished cars.  We assure you that your kindness will ever be remembered.
The Family
  
Card of Thanks

We desire to express in this manner our sincere thanks to all our relatives and friends for the kindness and sympathy shown us during the illness and following the death of our beloved wife and mother.  Especially do we thank those who sent the beautiful flowers and those who offered the use of their cars.  Also we wish to thank the Rev. Mr. Richardson for his consoling words.  Your kindness will be held in grateful appreciation.
R. L. Britton and Family
 
Mrs. C. B. Sharp daughter Mariles, Mrs. Ralph Sharp and the former’s father, Mr. Lackey returned Saturday evening from Farina where they were called by the death of a relative (Pulaski)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Oct 1931:
NUMBER FROM CITY ATTEND FUNERAL OF HON. JOHN MOORE

Those from this city who attended the funeral of Hon. John M. Moore, who passed away Sunday evening at 6:30 o’clock at his home in Wickliffe, Ky., were C. E. Richey, William Bestgen, George Muscovalley, Mrs. E. B. Ewers, Peter Duncan, and Mrs. W. S. Deering, of Morganfield, Ky.

Funeral services for Judge Moore were held at the Methodist Church at LaCenter, Ky., his body being removed to the home of his brother at LaCenter Monday.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Barlow, Ky.

Judge Moore had a number of friends in Mound City who are grieved to learn of his death.

JOHN JONES, FORMERLY OF THIS CITY, KILLED SATURDAY

News has been received in this city of the death of John H. Jones, of Memphis, Tenn., a former resident of this city.  Mr. and Mrs. Jones had been visiting with relatives at Dyersburg, Tenn., and on Saturday afternoon in company with a grandson, was returning to their home in Memphis, when near the city their automobile turned over when rounding a sharp curve.  Mr. Jones suffered a broken neck and other injuries which resulted in his death.  The other occupants of the car escaped with minor injuries.

Mr. Jones and his family were former residents of this city.  For a number of years he was connected with the old McDowel Saw Mill, later being employed with the National Pump Company, leaving here with Mr. A. P. Smith, when he returned to the south to take charge of another manufacturing concern.
Funeral services were heled Tuesday afternoon with interment in Memphis cemetery.

Mr. Jones is survived by his widow, his stepfather and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Starks, several children and grandchildren.

MRS. MATILDA B. HICKS PASSES AWAY TUESDAY NIGHT

Mrs. Matilda B. Hicks, age 45 years, passed away at her home in this city Tuesday night at 8 o’clock.
Mrs. Hicks is survived by her husband, two sons and two daughters, a number of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at 1 o’clock at the residence, Rev. Humphrey, pastor of the First M. E. Church of this city officiating.  Immediately following the services the cortege left for Kentucky where interment was made in the Hazelwood Cemetery near Barlow. G. A. James was the funeral director.

(According to her death certificate, Matilda B. Hicks was born 4 Sep 1886, in Lawrenceville, Ill., the daughter of John Baledge, a native of Germany, and Rosa Cochran, a native of Illinois, died 27 Oct 1931, in Mound City, Ill., the wife of Morgan S. Hicks, and was buried Hazlewood Cemetery in Barlow, Ky.  John L. Ballage married Rose Ella Frances Cochran on 31 Dec 1876, in Lawrence Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

THOMAS CAMPBELL DIES AT HOME IN THIS CITY

Thomas Campbell, age 63 years, passed away at his home on North Main Street Sunday afternoon at 1 o’clock following a lingering illness.

Mr. Campbell is survived by his widow, Mrs. Laura Campbell, besides a number of close friends.
Funeral services were heled Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Pentecostal Church, the Rev. Atkinson officiating.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James, funeral director.

(Thomas Campbell was born 29 Jan 1868, in Missouri, died 25 Oct 1931, in Mound City, Ill., husband of Laura Campbell, and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

GEORGE MILLER OF KARNAK FOUND DEAD IN HIS BED

George Miller, age 65, was found dead in bed early Saturday morning.  Mr. Miller had made his home in and around Karnak for the past 16 years and had made many friends there.  He was discovered dead when he failed to respond to a call for breakfast.  He had been staying at the home of Mel Carpenter and as he did not answer when called the family went to his room where he was found dead.

Dr. Vineyard was immediately summoned and found that death had occurred several hours before. 

Mr. Miller had no relatives in this section so far as known.  He had been in the restaurant business in Karnak until recently, but had not been engaged in any other recently.  He apparently was in his usual health Friday, except that he complained of a slight pain in his breast when he retired Friday night.
Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR H. J. NEIBAUER

Funeral services for Henry J. Neibauer, prominent banker and land owner of Dongola, whose death occurred suddenly Monday afternoon following a cerebral hemorrhage, were held Wednesday afternoon at the residence with Rev. F. L. Crane and the Rev. C. F. Kiest officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola undertaker E. J. Ford directing the funeral.

Scores of friends of Mr. Neibauer attended the services, many being from points other than Dongola.  The floral offerings were abundant and beautiful which was a silent testimony of the high esteem in which Mr. Neibauer was held by his many friends.

Active casket bearers were Ray C. Keller, R. A. Anderson, C. C. Baggott, W. P. Rial, R. S. Dillow, John St. Ledger and Clyde Schluter.  There were also a number of honorary casket bearers who were also intimate friends of the deceased and his family and are as follows:  Joe E. Johnston, W. A. Elliott, Guy L. Penrod, Alex McCowen, P. C. Douglas, Dr. C. A. C. Parker, T. W. Jones, John B. Jackson, Charles Goodman, W. A. Albright, N. T. Lawrence, H. A. Plott, E. L. Goodman, D. L. Boyd, Wallace Karraker, F. M. Karraker, and Ray Karraker.

He is survived by his widow, a brother, William Neibauer, of Anna, and a nephew, Frank Neibauer, of Cairo.  He also leaves a sister, Mrs. George Worley, of Colorado Springs, Colo., and an aunt, Mrs. Julia Boettner, of Jonesboro.

(Henry J. Neibauer married on 27 Nov 1890, in Union Co., Ill., Nora B. Mason, 23, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of W. A. Mason and Sophronia Andrews.  George Worley married Lucinda Neibauer on 25 Oct 1891, in Union Co., Ill.  His death certificate states that Henry Julius Neibauer was born 21 Feb 1865, in Dongola, Ill., the son of Frank Neibauer, a native of Germany, and Rachel Keller, a native of Illinois, and died 26 Oct 1931, in Dongola, Ill.  His marker in the I. O. O. F. at Dongola reads:  Henry J. Neibauer Born Feb. 21, 1865 Died Oct 26, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 30 Oct 1931:

Gus W. Swoboda, of Cairo, Dies Suddenly Saturday

             Gus W. Swoboda, of Cairo, Alexander County Commissioner, died Saturday afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he had been taken only two days before.  Poison in the blood from an infection in the throat was the cause of his sudden death. Mr. Swoboda, aged 49, is survived by his widow, Mrs. Lilly McElligott Swoboda, his mother, Mrs. Selma C. Swoboda; four brothers, Albert, Robert, Gilbert, and Carl; and a sister, Mrs. Harry Hughes, all of Cairo.  He was born and reared in Cairo and had always made Cairo his home. The funeral, which was largely attended, was held Monday afternoon at the Swoboda home.

             (His death certificate states that Gustave William Swoboda was born 7 Sep 1882, in Cairo, Ill., the son of Adolph Swoboda, a native of Germany, and Selma C. Kobler, a native of Pennsylvania, died 24 Oct 1931, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Elizabeth Swoboda, and was buried at Villa Ridge.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Gustave W. Swoboda Oct. 24, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)

 

George Miller of Karnak, Found Dead in Bed

George Miller, of Karnak, aged 65, was found dead in bed Saturday morning, October 24, when he failed to appear for breakfast on being called. Mr. Miller, who had lived in Karnak for 16 years, was staying at the home of Mel Carpenter and was found dead by members of the Carpenter family. Dr. Vinyard, of Karnak, was called and stated that death had occurred some hours before.  Coroner O. T. Hudson, of this city, was notified and gave a verdict of death from heart seizure. Dr. Miller, who had been in the restaurant business in Karnak until recently, had no known relatives in the community.

(According to his death certificate, George Miller, an orphan, was born 6 May 1864, died 24 Oct 1931, in Karnak, Ill., and was buried in Grand Chain, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friends in Ullin were grieved to hear of the death of Henry Neibauer, of Dongola.

            
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 6 Nov 1931:
INFANT PASSES AWAY

Kenneth Leroy infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Haley, age 6 months, passed away at the home of his parents at 1:30 o’clock Monday evening following a brief illness of pneumonia.

Funeral services were held Monday after noon at the family residence at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. G. W. Humphrey, pastor of the M. E. Church.  Interment was in Thistlewood Cemetery by James, undertaker in charge.

(His death certificate states that Kenneth Leroy Haley was born 1 May 1931, in Madora, Illinois, the son of Robert D. Haley, a native of Mt. Carmel, Ill., and Hager Bolen, a native of New Madrid, Mo., died 2 Nov 1931, in Mound City, Ill., and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

DRINKING BOUT ENDS IN GIRL LOSING LIFE

Halloween party, in which liquor seems to have figured, proved fatal when Dorothy Vick, 19 years of age, of Tamms, was picked up Sunday night under a C. & E. I. train at Tamms with both legs cut off below the knee.  She died later in the hospital at Cairo.

The coroner’s jury gave a verdict yesterday saying that her death was accidental.  She had gotten out or been put out near her home in Tamms Sunday night after a party, which started Saturday night, and had lain down upon the tracks.  Some thought that she had been beaten and thrown out, but the jury found no evidence to this effect.

Those in the party included Thomas Clinard, of Cairo; Roy Crozier, of Miller City; Raymond Bledsoe, of Tamms; R. L. Jacobs, of Columbus, Mo.; Ruby Smith, of Mound City; and Erlene Heater, of Unity.

(Her death certificate states that Dortha J. Vick was born 29 Aug 1912, in Tamms, Ill., the daughter of Guy A. Vick and Leona M. McCrite, natives of Tamms, Ill., died 2 Nov 1931, in Cairo, Ill., and was buried in Olive Branch, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FORMER MOUND CITY RESIDENT DIES AT HOME IN PEORIA

News has been received by relatives in Mound City of the death of Sam Williams, which occurred at his home in Joliet, Illinois, Tuesday.

Mr. Williams is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Anna Bailey and Miss Myrtle Williams, of Joliet, one brother, Hugh Williams, of Mound City, besides a number of nieces and nephews and a large circle of friends.

For a number of years Mr. Williams made his home in Mound City.  His wife preceded him in death several years ago.  A brother Andrew Williams also passed away in this city several years ago.

Mr. Williams had many friends in this community who are sorry to learn of his death.

Mounds Independent, Friday, 6 Nov 1931:
Former Mounds Man Drops Dead in Bluford

Fred P. Ingram, for many years a conductor on the Illinois Central Railroad, with headquarters in Mounds, dropped dead in Bluford, Ill., Monday, November 2.  When the cut-off was opened, Mr. Ingram went from Mounds to Bluford to work and to reside.

(According to his death certificate, Fred P. Ingram, of Fulton, Ky., was born 4 Sep 1881, in Richview, Ill., the son of Henry P. Ingram and Maggie Clark, natives of Richview, Ill., died 2 Nov 1931, in Weber, Jefferson Co., Ill., the husband of Lela Hobbs, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery at Centralia, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Samuel Carney, of Ullin, Dies Tuesday Night

Samuel E. Carney, for twenty years a resident of Ullin, died at his home there Tuesday night following an illness of a month’s duration.  His age was 63 years.

Mr. Carney is survived by his widow, Mrs. Lola Carney, and two sons, Louis E. Carney, of Houston, Texas, and George Revis Carney, of Ullin.  Another son, Steven Carney, died in France during the World War.  Mrs. Hugh Caudle, a stepdaughter, also preceded him in death.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church of Ullin, the Rev. Mr. Loar officiating.  W. H. Aldred of Pulaski directed the funeral.

(Mannon F. Hooppaw married Lola Ellison on 14 Oct 1888, in Fayette Co., Ill.  Samuel Carney married Lola A. Hoopa on 25 Nov 1894, in Fayette Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Samuel E. Carney, a tile mason, was born 29 Dec 1867, in Acton, Ind., the son of Eli and Amanda Carney, died 4 Nov 1931, in Ullin, Ill., husband of Lola A. Carney.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Samuel E. Carney 1867-1931 Lola Carney Crippen 1867-1941.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Prominent Tamms Girl Fatally Injured Sunday Evening
Sad End of Prolonged Halloween Celebration

Dorothy Vick, 18, of Tamms, was fatally injured Sunday evening about 6:45 o’clock when run over by a C. & E. I. passenger train at Tamms crossing.  One of her legs was cut off and the other ground to pieces beneath the wheels of the train.  She was given emergency aid and then taken to the Cairo Hospital where she died at 4 o’clock Monday morning.

The accident was the culmination of a Halloween celebration begun Saturday night with the girl in company with other young people, attended a dance at Hodges Park.  When the dance closed at 1:30 Sunday morning, Dorothy left with an automobile party composed of four young men, R. L. Jacobs, of Columbia, Mo., Raymond Bledsoe, of Tamms, Ray Crozier, of Miller City and Thomas Clinard, employed by the Badger Construction Co., and two other girls, Ruby Smith, 16, of Mounds City, and Erlene Heater, 17, of Unity.  The girls were dressed in Halloween costume and during their traveling Sunday each one was taken at some time to her home where she changed her clothing and rejoined the party.

Sunday afternoon some of the boys purchased a jar of white mule liquor at Sandusky.

After the accident to Dorothy Vick, an Alexander County deputy sheriff learned with whom she had been all day and the two other girls and four boys were arrested at Irene Heater’s home in Unity and taken to the county jail in Cairo.  To the sheriff they told the story of their celebration and said that Dorothy had been drinking and had insisted on being let out of the car near the railroad crossing, giving as her reason that her grandmother, Mrs. Amanda McCrite, with whom she made her home, would be angry because she had been drinking.

(William J. McCrite married Amanda J. Helms on 7 Jan 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARBONDALE—The funeral of Mrs. Charles Hughey, who died at a camp on the highway south of Carbondale Sunday night, was held at the Carbondale Funeral Home at 10:00 o’clock Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Hughey, with Mr. and Mrs. John Oldfield, were en route to Texas and camped south of town a few days.  When Mr. Hughey awoke Monday morning he found his wife dead.  Heart disease was assigned as the cause of death.—Herald.

(Her death certificate states that Mandrandy Hughey was born 28 Aug 1869, in Peoria, Ill., died 26 Oct 1931, in Carbondale Township, Jackson Co., Ill., wife of Charles Hughey, of S. Washington, Peoria, Ill., and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Carbondale.—Darrel Dexter)
 
GOLCONDA—The double murder, which was committed over a week ago of Hedvig Samuelson and Mrs. Agnes Le Roi, of Phoenix, Ariz., by Mrs. Winnie Ruth Judd, was taken on a local hue.

Mrs. Judd, at one time, lived in Calhoun, Illinois.  That was before she was married.

One day the parents of Mrs. Judd missed her. She didn’t appear for some time and they began to see visions of their daughter being manhandled by kidnappers and sight of her lifeless body lying along a lonely road.  A search was instigated at once and after many hours of search, Rev. Lawler reported that he found her in his barn loft.

When he discovered the girl, she was clad in her natal clothing and when she was returned to her parents, she had weird tales to tell.  After tracing all of her stories down, they found that she had manufactured them.—Herald Enterprise.

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Nov 1931:
MRS. MARY EUNICE CHAPMAN DIES AT HOME NEAR PULASKI

Mrs. Mary Eunice Chapman, wife of James Chapman, who has been a resident of Pulaski County for over 16 years, passed away at her home near Pulaski Thursday.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Christian church in Pulaski, the Rev. Holloman officiating.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.  W. H. Aldred directed the funeral.

Surviving Mrs. Chapman, besides her husband, are three daughters, Mrs. Letha Goins, Mrs. Minnie Sullivan and Miss Dorothy Chapman, all of Pulaski.

(According to her death certificate, Mary Eunise Chapman was born 30 Jan 1873, in Union Co., Ky., the daughter of Charley Shanks, a native of Kentucky, died 5 Nov 1931, in Pulaski, Ill., the wife of James Allen Chapman, and was buried in Pulaski, Ill.  Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Mary E. Chapman 1873-1931 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Two Prominent Citizens Pass on Within Week

Mark L. Kennedy, age 73 years, prominent resident of Mounds, passed away at his home Sunday morning at 9:50 o’clock following an illness of long duration.  Mr. Kennedy had only been confined to his bed a few days when the end came.  His condition was not thought to be serious until within a few days prior to his death.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence in Mounds, Rev. D. W. Richardson, pastor of the M. E. Church, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery by the side of his daughter, Hazel, who passed away at the age of 21 several years ago.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

Active casket bearers were George Piper, I. Koonce, A. Kupfer, J. F. Lentz, J. V. DeCrow, and S. Clanton.  Honorary casket bearers were George Scruggs, W. T. Jaccard, M. McBride, W. J. Biggerstaff, F. Parker and W. L Oliver, all members of the I. O. O. F. lodge of long standing. Out of sympathy for Mrs. Kennedy, who is junior past president of District 31 of the Rebekah State Assembly, all officers of the district were present as well as many other Rebekahs of Southern Illinois.  The Odd Fellows, of which Mr. Kennedy was a prominent member, had charge of the services at the cemetery.

Mr. Kennedy is survived by his widow, one son, Mark L. Kennedy, Jr., and a granddaughter, Anna Laura Kennedy, all of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Nannie Stone, of Hollywood, Miss.; and a brother, John Kennedy, of Tunica, Miss., both of whom were in Mounds to attend the funeral of their brother.

Mr. Kennedy and family have resided in Mounds since 1901, moving there from Anna, Illinois.  He was born and reared in Pulaski County and was very prominent in business circles until ill health forced him to retire from active business.  For several years he was in the mercantile business and for eight years served as postmaster at Mounds.  The entire community is saddened by the passing of Mr. Kennedy.

(His death certificate states that Mark Lindsey Kennedy was born 28 Apr 1858, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the son of Samuel Kennedy and Caroline Carlew, died 8 Nov 1931, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Cora B. Kennedy, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  Marcus Kennedy married Cora Morrow on 14 Jun 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mark L. Kennedy, Sr., 1858-1931 Cora B. Kennedy 1866-1949.—Darrel Dexter)
 
HARRY LACKEY DIED AT HOME IN ROBERTSVILLE, MISSOURI

Harry Lackey, a member of the Lackey family of this county and a resident here for years, died at his home in Robertsville , Mo., a short distance from St. Louis on Thursday of last week, after an illness extending over a period of a year.  His critical illness was of short duration.

Mr. Lackey was the son of Thomas and Jane Lackey and was born at the Lackey homestead south of Pulaski on August 22, 1868, being 63 years, 2 months and 12 days of age at the time of death.  He spent his early life on the farm, attending public schools and was married to Miss Emma Bagby in the fall of 1892.  He lived on the farm for a time and later went to work for the C. I. P. S. Co. and helped in construction of the big power plant at Grand Tower.  Later still he went to work for the government on a dredge boat.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church in Pulaski and interment was in the Lackey Cemetery.  Many gathered to pay their respect it their former friend and neighbor.

The survivors besides his wife, three children, Clarence and Forest and Mrs. Althea Bradley, all living in St. Louis, one brother, E. J. Lackey, of Pulaski and one sister, Mrs. A. J. Lilly, of Pulaski and two grandchildren and many relatives both near and distant.

(H. W. Lackey married Emma Bagby on 1 Feb 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Lackey Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Harry Lackey 1868-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Word has been received in Mound City by friends that Dr. Hall Whiteaker, formerly of Mound City, but now located in Anna, is very ill in his apartment at the state hospital where he holds a position.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 13 Nov 1931:
M. L. Kennedy Sr., Dies Suddenly Sunday Morning
Prominent in Business Life of Mounds for Many Years

The community was shocked Sunday morning when news of the death of M. L. Kennedy, Sr., was passed from one to another. He had been in failing health for a number of years, but had been able to be around and downtown during the week.

Mark Lindsey Kennedy was born near Villa Ridge April 28, 1858, and died at his home in Mounds, November 8, 1931, age 73 years, 6 months and 10 days.  He was the son of Samuel Kennedy and Caroline Carlew Kennedy.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Cora B. Morrow Kennedy, a son, Mark L. Kennedy, Jr., a granddaughter, Anna Laura Kennedy, all of Mounds; a sister, Mrs. Nannie Stone, of Hollywood, Miss., and a brother, John Kennedy, of Tunica, Miss.  A daughter, Hazel Maude, died in young womanhood.
In 1901 Mr. Kennedy and his family came to Mounds to reside.  For eight years he served as postmaster of Mounds and for a number of years he and Mrs. Kennedy conducted a dry goods store.  He was a member of the M. E. Church and of the Odd Fellows Lodge.

Funeral services were held at the family residence on McKinley Ave., Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by the Rev. Mr. W. D. Richardson, of the M. E. Church.  The services at Beechwood Cemetery were in charge of the Odd Fellows of Mounds, Mound City, and Cairo.  Through sympathy for his widow, Mrs. Cora B. Kennedy, who is immediate past president of the District No. 31 of the Rebekah State Assembly, all of the officers were present, also many other Rebekahs and Odd Fellows from Southern Illinois lodges.

The active pallbearers were I. E. Koonce, J. F. Lentz, A. Kupfer, S. Clanton, J. DeCrow, and George Piper.  Honorary pallbearers were W. J. Biggerstaff, George M. Scruggs, W. T. Jaccard, M. J. McBride, F. Parker and W. R. Oliver.

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral were Mrs. L. L. Pace, Dyersburg, Tenn., Mrs. O. O. Rogers, Memphis, Tenn., Mr. and Mrs. T. O. Scott, East St. Louis, J. W. Kennedy, Tunica, Miss., Mr. and Mrs. Frank Badgley, Grand Chain, Mrs. Pearl Davidge, and Mrs. Elsie Bloss, Cairo, Mrs. Aurilla Spiller, Cobden, Mrs. T. Keese and Mrs. Campbell, of Jonesboro.
 
Grandson of Mrs. Lottie Hosler Dies in Arkansas

Mrs. Lottie Hosler has received word of the death of her grandson, William Arthur Hosler, age six, which occurred October 16 at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Archie B. Hosler, in Cotton Plant, Ark.

Mr. Hosler is a former resident of Pulaski County.  He is a contractor and is doing well in Cotton Plant.

Concerning his son’s death, he wrote thus to his aged mother:

“Our little Buddie, as we called him, died with tonsillitis.  He was sick only three days.  He was surely dear to us and to everyone who knew him.  We miss the dear little fellow so much.”

(Ernest Hosler, 21, born in Villa Ridge, son of Thomas S. Hosler and Lottie L. Pirdy, married on 5 Feb 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Leota Williams, 20, born in Montezuma, Ind., daughter of John L. Williams and Fannie Johnson.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. James Chapman Dies at Home in Pulaski

Mrs. Mary Eunice Chapman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Shanks, was born January 30th, 1873, in Union County, Ky., and passed away at her home in Pulaski, Nov. 5th, 1931, age fifty-eight years, nine months, and five days.

She was united in marriage to James Chapman in 1896.  To this union five children were born, two having died in infancy.  The three surviving are Mrs. Leatha Goins, Mrs. Minnie Sullivan, and Miss Dorothy Chapman, all of Pulaski.

She united with the Catholic Church at Fancy Farm, Ky., when quite young and continued in this faith until 1926, when she united with the Pulaski Christian Church.  She was a faithful member of this church until the time of her death.

Surviving her are also three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Carico and Mrs. Maggie Riley, of Fancy Farm, Ky., and Mrs. Anna Bennett, of Carlisle, Ky.

Funeral services were held at the Christian Church in Pulaski, Saturday, Nov. 7th, at 3 p.m., the Rev. T. J. Holloman, of Anna, pastor of the church officiating.  Interment was made in the Lackey Cemetery, W. H. Aldred funeral director was in charge.
 
Former Pulaski Resident Brought to Old Home for Burial

Harry Walter Lackey, son of Thomas M. Lackey and Jane Lackey, was born Aug. 22, 1868, at Pulaski, Ill., and died Nov. 4th, 1931, at his home at Robertsville, Mo., age 63 years, 2 months and 12 days.

He was married to Miss Emma Bagby in 1892.  To this union were born three children, Clarence, Forest and Mrs. Altha Bradley, all of St. Louis, Mo.

Surviving Mr. Lackey are his wife and three children, three grandchildren, one brother, E. J. Lackey, a sister, Mrs. A. J. Lilley, both of Pulaski, and many other relatives.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. E. Vick at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church in Pulaski, Saturday, Nov. 7th, at 1 p.m. with interment in the Lackey Cemetery.

Undertaker W. H. Aldred was in charge of the funeral.
 
Mr. Lawrence Pace, of Dyersburg, Tenn., was called here Sunday by the death of her brother-in-law, M. L. Kennedy, Sr.
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Nov 1931:
MRS. SARAH O’SULLIVAN SERIOUSLY ILL AT MEMPHIS

Word has been received in Mound City of the serious illness of Mrs. Sarah O’Sullivan, who left about two weeks ago for Memphis to spend the winter with her daughter, Mrs. Earnest McKinney, and family.  Another daughter, Mrs. Wayne Elder, of Louisville, Ky., and her son, Dan O’Sullivan, of Chicago, are at her bedside.  Her brother, John Bray, and wife of Kansas City, Mo., have also been summoned to her bedside.  There is very little hope for her recovery.

 
INFANT SON DIES

The infant son who was born to Mr. and Mrs. Everett Jones on North Main Street a few days ago, passed away Tuesday and on Wednesday morning short services were held at the residence by Rev. Van Meter, pastor of the Pentecostal Church of this city.  Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery by G. A. James undertaker in charge.  The little one had been ill since its birth.

(The infant’s death certificate states he was born 14 Nov 1931, in Mound City, Ill., the son of Everett Jones and Anna Barth, natives of Illinois, died 17 Nov 1931,in Mound City, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DR. HALL WHITEAKER CRITICALLY ILL AT ANNA

Dr. Hall Whiteaker, a member of the medical staff at the state hospital at Anna, Illinois, who has been confined to his apartment at the hospital for the past months, is in a critical condition and there is very little hope for his recovery.

Dr. Whitaker was a practicing physician in this city a number of years ago and has many friends in this community who are sorry to learn of his illness.
 
OBITUARY

Celia Kathyrn Fletcher was born February 19, 1878, to John W. and Susan Fletcher near Pomona, Illinois, died at her home near Alto Pass, November 11, 1931, age 52 years, 9 months and 22 days.

In the year 1901 she was united in marriage to Sherman Rodgers.  To this union were born seven children, three dying in infancy.  Those who with the father survive to mourn her loss are Wilson, Herbert and Monroe Rodgers, of Alto Pass; Mrs. Harnie Penrod, of Murphysboro; also one stepson, Henry Rodgers, Alto Pass, Mrs. Lloyd Howell, Buncombe; and Mrs. Charles Jones, of St. Louis; one sister, Mrs. P. G. Wendtland, of East St. Louis; Jesse Fletcher, East St. Louis; and George Fletcher, of Alto Pass, also many other relatives and loving friends who will miss that meek spirit that has returned to God who gave it.  She was a kind and loving Christian mother striving with all the power God gave her to live for Jesus.  Mrs. Rodgers has been in ill health for some time.  Her death was attributed to heart trouble brought on by obesity.  She professed faith in Christ early in life and remained a true Christian till her death.

Funeral services were conducted from the Pentecostal church with Rev. Kent of Marion officiating, assisted by Rev. Will Jackson, of Pomona.  She was laid to rest in Alto Pass Cemetery.

The out-of-town folks to attend the funeral were Jesse Fletcher and Mrs. P. G. Wendtland and son Billy E., of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lacy and daughter Gladys and Clarence Fletcher, Jonesboro, Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Penrod, Murphysboro.

(John William Fletcher married Susan Malinda Simpson on 7 Oct 1866, in Jackson Co., Ill.  The death certificate states that Celia Catherine Rodgers was born 19 Feb 1878, in Pomona, Ill., died 11 Nov 1931, in District No. 7, Union Co., Ill., and was buried in Alto Pass Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Word has been received by friends in this city that Mrs. Sarah O’Sullivan who suffered a paralytic stroke at the home of her daughter Mrs. Ernest McKinney at Memphis, Tenn., several days ago is slightly improved.  Her many friends in this city hope for a complete recovery for her.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 20 Nov 1931:
Called to Carbondale by Death of Father

J. B. Hester and family and Ray Scott and family were called to Carbondale Saturday by the illness and death of J. M. Scott, father of Mrs. Hester and Mr. Scott.  Funeral services were held at Simpson Sunday afternoon.
 
Aged Baptist Minister Dies

Elder B. T. Rodman, age 82, dean of Baptist ministers in Southern Illinois and former executive secretary of the Illinois Baptist State Association, died on Monday of this week at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Oscar Schultz, in Pinckneyville, Ill.  He was influential in the organization of the First Baptist Church of Mounds, having held a meeting here in a brush arbor before the organization of the church.  Funeral services were conducted on Thursday afternoon at the First Baptist Church in DuQuoin of which the deceased was a member.
 
Prominent Cairo Citizen Dies in New York

William Magner, chief engineer of the Cairo Water Company, died suddenly Saturday afternoon in New Rochelle, N.Y., where he had gone on business for the company.  With him in Rochelle was William C. Shoemaker, also an employee of the Cairo Company.

Mr. Magner was a native of Cairo and his entire life had been spent there.  For 42 years he had been chief engineer of the Water Company.  He had been an alderman from his ward and for the last 14 years he had been a member of the city board of elections. He was a member of St. Joseph’s Church.

Surviving him are two sons, Michael and William Magner, Jr., of Denver, Colo.; and two daughters, Miss Mary J. Magner, of El Paso, Texas, and Mrs. Walter Neff, o Cairo.  He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Margaret Moore, of Ft. Smith, Ark.; and a brother, in-law, Thomas Meehan of Cairo.

(William M. Magner married Mary A. Meehan on 13 Nov 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.  A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  William M. Magner  1866-1931 Mary Magner His Wife 1870-1928.—Darrel Dexter)
 
ANNA—Ralph F. Bradford, Jr., the only son of Ralph F. Bradford, director of the Department of Conservation in Illinois, was killed in an explosion on a Navy vessel off the California coast.  The mechanism of an anti-aircraft gun is believed to have caused the explosion which killed five.  Bradford was a lieutenant assigned to duty on the battleship Colorado.  He was 32 years old and had been on duty in the Navy several years.  His father has many friend here about who will learn of the sad misfortune with profound sorrow.—Talk

(Lieut. Ralph F. Bradford of the U. S. S. Colorado died in the line of duty on 5 Nov 1931, in Los Angeles, Calif., and was buried in Southside Cemetery in Pontiac, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Nov 1931:
MOTHER OF MOUND CITY WOMAN PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Sarah Brown, of Miller City, passed away at her home Thursday and funeral services were held at her home Saturday afternoon.

Mrs. Brown was the mother of Mrs. Henry Fisher, of Mound City.  Mrs. Fisher was at her mother’s bedside when she passed away.

Those from this city who attended the funeral were Henry Fisher, Mrs. and Mrs. Otis Apple and family, Thomas Smithey, William Smithey, and Mrs. Otho Morehead and family.

(The death certificate states that Sarah Miller Brown was born 1 Jan 1845, in Union Co., Ill., died 20 Nov 1931, at Miller City, Ill., and was buried in Olive Branch Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS WOMAN DIES MONDAY MORNING

Mrs. Effie McRoy, wife of Monroe McRoy, of Mounds, passed away Monday morning at 3:18 o’clock at her home.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock at the First Baptist Church in Carbondale, where the body was taken Tuesday morning.  Interment was made in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Hartwell and Ryan of Mounds directing the funeral.

Surviving Mrs. McRoy besides her husband are her father, Daniel Goodman, of Michigan, and two sisters, Mrs. J. R. Parker, of Michigan, and Mrs. Jessie Donaldson, of Creal Springs, besides a number of other relatives.

(Her death certificate states that Nora Effie McRoy was born 14 Jan 1887, in Makanda, Ill., the daughter of Daniel H. Goodman and Mary E. Waloni, natives of Illinois, died 23 Nov 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., wife of James M. McRoy, and was buried at Carterville, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS INFANT DIES

Funeral services for the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hines, of Mounds, were held Monday afternoon followed by interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

(The death certificate states that the infant was stillborn 22 Nov 1931, the daughter of Frank Hines and Madeline Easton, natives of Junction, Ill., and was buried in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds.—Darrel Dexter)

DONGOLA MAN DIES

Joseph E. Davis, aged 67, a farmer living near Dongola, passed away at his home Wednesday evening following an illness of about two weeks.

Funeral services were held at the Mt. Zion Church near Dongola at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  Rev. J. A. Hill, of Marion, officiated.  Interment was made in the Mt. Zion Cemetery, E. J. Ford, of Dongola, directing the funeral.

Mr. Davis is survived by his wife, Mrs. Clara Davis; and two sons, Montie E. Davis and A. Ray Davis, both of whom are in business in Dongola.

(His death certificate states that Joseph Edward Davis was born 22 Jan 1864, in Elco, Ill., the son of Dow Davis, a native of Tennessee, and Eliza McCrite, a native of Illinois, died 18 Nov 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., husband of Clara Davis, and was buried in Union Co., Ill.  Lorenzo D. Davis married Eliza Jane McCrite on 30 May 1854, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Joseph E. Davis, 25, born in Alexander Co., Ill., married on 24 Jun 1890, in Union Co., Ill., Clara Hargis, 17, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Morgan Hargis and Sallie Albright.  His marker in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Joseph E. Davis Born Jan. 22, 1864 Died Nov. 18, 1931 Clara L. Davis Born Aug. 11, 1872 Died May 9, 1936.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BROTHER OF LATE W. R. RODMAN DIES

Word has been received in Mound City of the death of Rev. B. F. Rodman, brother of the late W. R. Rodman, former druggist of Mound City.  Rev. Rodman passed away November 16, at 3:30 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Oscar Schulz, in Pinckneyville, following an illness of several months.
Rev. Rodman was an uncle of Mrs. E. T. Snyder, of Mound City and about three weeks prior to his death he visited his relatives in Mound City.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, November 19, at the First Baptist Church of DuQuoin, the Rev. C. W. Culp officiating.  Rev. Culp was assisted by Rev. Iver E. Miller, pastor of the Pinckneyville church.  Interment was made in the Pinckneyville cemetery.

(According to his death certificate, Benjamin F. Rodman was born 3 Aug 1850, in Madison Co., Ky., the son of John Rodman and Elizabeth Cook, died 16 Nov 1931, in Pinckneyville, Ill., husband of Isabel Halley, and was buried in Pinckneyville, Ill.  Benjamin F. Rodman married Belle Halley on 7 Nov 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DR. HALL WHITEAKER DIED AT ANNA TUESDAY

Dr. Hall Whiteaker, age 62, passed away at 11:10 o’clock Tuesday morning in his apartment at the Anna State Hospital following an illness of six weeks duration.

Dr. Whiteaker was one of the most prominent physicians in Pulaski County, having started his practice a number of years ago at Olmstead, later entering the medical profession in Cairo.  He then came to Mound City, where he practiced a number of years until he left for California.  While in California he enlisted in the U. S. Army and served overseas later returning to Mound City, where he practiced for a short time.

He was united in marriage to Miss Cina West, who preceded him in death in 1917.  He later remarried after returning to California and to this union two children were born.

For the past seven years Dr. Whiteaker has been a member of the medical staff at the state hospital at Anna, where he and his family had since resided.  He formed many true and lasting friendships in Pulaski County during his residence here and his many friends are sincerely grieved to learn of his death.

Much could be said of the life of Dr. Whiteaker and of his capability as a physician.  His jovial disposition among his fellowmen will be greatly missed.  As a physician and surgeon he has been unusually successful.

Dr. Whiteaker was a member of Trinity Lodge No. 562 A. F. and A. M., Mound City, also the Commandery at Cairo and the Modern Woodmen Lodge No. 5151 of Mound city.  During his residence in Mound City he was a member of the Pilgrim Congregational Church.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Grace Whiteaker, two little daughters, Ellen and Wanda; his aged mother, who is past 90 years; one brother, Dr. William Whiteaker, of Dongola; four sisters, Mrs. Rista McElroy, of Harrisburg, Mrs. Lizzie Mathis, of Vienna, Mrs. Neva Brown, of Harrisburg, and Mrs. Amos Compton, of Marion; besides a number of nieces, nephews, and other relatives and a large circle of friends.  He was a son of the late Mark Whiteaker, of Vienna.

The body remained at Anna until two o’clock Wednesday afternoon, when it was removed to Vienna and taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mathis.  Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First Methodist Church and interment was made in the Vienna Cemetery.

Music was furnished by the choir of the Pilgrim Congregational Church of Mound City who sang several beautiful hymns.  Miss Cora Fullerton very sweetly and impressively sang, “Face to Face.”

At the cemetery the beautiful and impressive rites of the Masonic order were given by members of Trinity Lodge of Mound City.

A number of friends from Mound City attended the funeral.

(His death certificate states that Hall Whiteaker was born 17 Oct 1869, in New Burnside, Ill., the son of Mark Whiteaker and Elizabeth Deaton, died 24 Nov 1931, in Union Co., Ill., husband of Florence Grace Whiteaker, and was buried in Vienna, Ill.  Hall Whiteaker married Mary J. B. Cook on 15 Aug 1873, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dr. W. R. Wesenberg and Dr. J. F. Hargan were in Anna Wednesday where they paid their last respects to the departed Dr. Hall Whiteaker.
 
Olmstead was very sorry to learn of Dr. Hall Whitaker’s illness. He was well liked by all who know him.
 
Mrs. Violet Millar had her sister, Mrs. Leona Walker’s body taken up from the Concord Cemetery and removed to the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead.  Undertaker Hartwell of Mounds did the work.
 
MOUNDS CONDUCTOR PASSES AWAY

W. A. Goodfellow, of Mounds, age 54 years, for many years a conductor for the I. C. R. R. Co. passed away at the Illinois Central Hospital in Chicago Sunday.  Mrs. Goodfellow was en route to Rochester, Minn., where he expected to enter the Mayo Brothers Clinic when he was compelled to go to the Chicago hospital.  Mrs. Goodfellow was with him when he passed away.

The body arrived in Mounds Tuesday morning an on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock funeral services were held at the Congregational church, the Rev. Benninger, pastor of the church, officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery, by Hartwell and Ryan, funeral directors.

Mr. Goodfellow is survived by his widow, three sisters, Mrs. D. M. Tanksley, Jacksonville, Fla., Mrs. Him Moore, Laudy, Fla., Mrs. W. H. Edwards, Pollard, Ala., and one brother, James Goodfellow.

Mr. Goodfellow was quite well known in the community and his death has been a shock to his many friends.  He was a member of the Moose Lodge and also a member of the O. R. C.

(His death certificate states that William A. Goodfellow was born 14 Aug 1877, in Pulaski, Tenn., the son of Dave Goodfellow and Adaline Pittman, died 23 Nov 1931, in Chicago, Ill., the husband of Nellie Goodfellow, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
  
   
Mounds Independent, Friday, 27 Nov 1931:
W. A. Goodfellow Dies in Chicago Hospital
Succumbs After Long and Painful Illness

W. A. Goodfellow, conductor on the Illinois Central Railroad died Sunday night, November __, in the Illinois Central Hospital in Chicago, while en route to the Mayo Brothers Clinic in Rochester, Minn.  Mrs. Goodfellow was at his bedside, also his sister, a resident of Florida, who has since had to return to her home on account of the illness of her husband.

“All that was mortal” was brought to Mounds Tuesday morning and taken to the Hartwell & Ryan Funeral Home on First Street.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational Church at 2:00 o’clock, the Rev. S. C. Benninger, pastor of the church, officiating.
 
Dr. Hall Whitaker Dies Tuesday in Anna
Member of Medical Staff of State Hospital

Dr. Hall Whitaker, for years a practicing physician in Mound City, died Tuesday, November 24, at the Anna State Hospital, where he was a member of the medical staff.  He had been ill for more than a month.

Dr. Whiteaker was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Whitaker, of Vienna.  His brother, Will Whiteaker, is a practicing physician located in Dongola.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Dec 1931:
MRS. IDA MAY CRIPPEN PASSES AWAY NEAR ULLIN

Mrs. Ida May Crippen, wife of Henry Crippen, who resides near Ullin, died at the Holden Hospital in Carbondale Sunday morning at 10 o’clock.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church at Ullin, followed by interment in New Hope Cemetery.  W. J. Rhymer directed the funeral.

Besides her husband, Mrs. Crippen is survived by several children and other relatives.

(According to her death certificate, Ida Jane Crippen was born 12 Feb 1876, in Makanda, Ill., the daughter of Daniel C. Hurst and Melvina Dillow, died 29 Nov 1931, in Carbondale, Ill., the wife of Henry Crippen, and was buried in Ullin Cemetery.  Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Father William H. Crippen 1867-1942 Mother Ida J. Crippen 1876-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BROTHER OF MRS. W. T. PARKER DIES AT HOME IN MISSOURI

Rev. John Hesselrode, age 66 years, brother of Mrs. W. T. Parker, of this city, passed away at his home at Poplar Bluff, Mo., Monday, November 30.

Rev. Hesselrode was a retired Methodist minister, having served the church for 27 years.  The Christian life he had lived made his passing a thing of beauty.  Just a day before he passed away he remarked that it was the happiest day of his life.  His death was caused from blood poison, being brought on by trimming a corn.  The latter years of his life were spent on a farm, having just recently moved with his family near Poplar Bluff.

Mr. and Mrs. Parker were called to his bedside several days ago and they have just returned to their home here Saturday afternoon.

Surviving Rev. Hesselrode are his widow, seven children, a number of grandchildren, his sister, Mrs. Parker of Mound City, and many other relatives and a large circle of friends.

(John Hesselrode married Alice Croner on 8 Apr 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ash Hill Cemetery in Fisk, Mo., reads:  John Hesselrode Aug. 14, 1865 Nov. 30, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
H. M. GOLDSMITH DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS

Harry M. Goldsmith, age 72, for many years a postal clerk on the Cotton Belt Railroad, passed away at his home in Mounds Tuesday morning at 4 o’clock following an illness of but two days.

Mr. Goldsmith retired from the postal service a few years ago and had been making his home in Mounds since then.

Mr. Goldsmith is survived by his widow and four children, Mrs. Alice Myrtle Lane, of Muncie, Ind., Mrs. Green, of Memphis, Tenn., Mrs. Ethel Elliott, of Kellogg, Ia., and Fred Goldsmith, of Gainesville, Fla.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church at Mounds, Rev. D. W. Richardson officiating.  Interment was made in the Thistlewood Cemetery. Hartwell and Ryan directed the funeral.

(His death certificate states Harry M. Goldsmith was born 15 May 1859, in Pella, Iowa, the son of Jacob Goldsmith, died 1 Dec 1931, in Mounds, Ill., the husband of Ida Goldsmith, and was buried at Mounds, Ill.  Harry M. Goldsmith married Nelia Howard on 1 May 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A. T. MORGAN, FORMERLY OF MOUNDS, PASSES AWAY

A. T. Morgan, age 70 years, a former resident of Mounds, passed away at his home in Bonegap, Illinois, Sunday.  Mr. Morgan’s death was not unexpected as he had been suffering from a long illness following a stroke of apoplexy some time ago.  He was well and favorably known in this community.  Mr. Morgan was a devout member of the Methodist Church and was active in church and community affairs.  Funeral services were held in Bonegap, at the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon.  Interment was made in the Bonegap cemetery.

Surviving Mr. Morgan are his widow, three sons, E. A. Morgan, of Mounds, and two others, and an adopted son who resides in Detroit, Mich.  Mrs. E. G. Britton, of Mounds, is a cousin of Mr. Morgan.
 
PROMINENT UNION COUNTY MAN DIES

L. V. Snider, age 69, passed away at his home in Dongola Saturday evening at 6 o’clock following a paralytic stroke about ten days ago.  Mr. Snider had been a resident of Dongola forty years, having come to Dongola to reside when a young man.  Since he has been a resident here, he has been connected with the business world. He conducted a grocery and meat market for a number of years.  He retired from active business a few years ago and for the past few years had devoted his time to office work.  He was at the time of his death the police magistrate of Dongola, was also justice of the peace, notary public and was the local correspondent for both county papers, the Talk and The Democrat.  He also was president of the Jonesboro Mutual Life Insurance Co. and a director in the Anna Mutual Life Insurance Co.  He had also served as village clerk, and village trustee at different times.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church of which he was a member at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. J. Ward, assisted by Rev. F. L. Cross, pastor of the Lutheran Church.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.  E. J. Ford directing the funeral.

Mr. Snider is survived by his widow, Mrs. Josephine Snider; two brothers, Willis and Frank Snider, of Centralia; one sister, Edna Gaddis, of Decatur; and the following children:  Mrs. Fay Felker and Mrs. Dorothy Schinderdorf both of St. Louis, Mrs. Vera Vaughn, of Centralia, Van Snider, of Mounds, Helene and Kent, both at home; and six grandchildren.

(Louis V. Snider, 30, born in Centralia, Ill., son of James Snider and Jane Maddox, married on 22 Mar 1893, in Union Co., Ill., Josie E. Ridenhour, 16, born in Dongola, Ill., daughter of William H. Ridenhour and Sarah A. Carter.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Josie E. Snider Born July 11, 1876 Died Oct. 30, 1958 Louis V. Sider Born Dec. 31, 1865 Died Nov. 28, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
EVERETT C. LEONARD TAKES HIS LIFE SATURDAY EVE

Everett C. Leonard, known to many in Mound City as “Buck” Leonard, age 37 years, committed suicide Saturday evening in his home on Poplar Street at 6:30 o’clock by drinking nearly an ounce of carbolic acid.  Leonard died an hour after drinking the poison, never regaining consciousness.

The body was taken to Metropolis Sunday, where funeral services were held.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Metropolis with undertaker G. A. James of Mound City in charge.

Mr. Leonard is survived by his widow, a three-week old baby and three children by a former marriage.

Despondency on account of ill health and his inability to work was given as the cause for taking his life.  His act was not unexpected as he has been heard to say several times that he intended to take his life.
Prior to his death he was in the home with his family.  He went into the kitchen and when once of the small children became fretful, he asked his wife to take it into the other room and try to pacify it.  This she did and shortly after leaving the kitchen her husband came staggering through the door and mumbled, “I have taken it,” then he muttered, “I’m going to lay down” and slumped to the floor.  His wife in her excitement was unable to aid him and after putting a coat under his head for a pillow, ran out of the house and called for aid at the home of Earl Karraker, who gave first aid directions then rushed to the Leonard home where he found Leonard unconscious and beyond all aid.

Coroner O. T. Hudson empanelled a jury which returned a verdict at the inquest to the effect that Leonard came to his death by drinking carbolic acid with suicidal intent.  The coroner’s jury was composed of A.J. Ridings, Mike Winkler, Earl Watson, Earl Karraker, John Royce, and W. F. Caldwell.

(The death certificate of Everett C. Leonard states he was born 2 Jun 1894, in Illinois, son of George Leonard and Josephine Carson, died 28 Nov 1931, in Mound City, Ill., husband of Lottie Leonard, and was buried at Metropolis, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER DONGOLA CHILD DIES OF DIPHTHERIA

James Graham McBride, nine years of age, passed away at Desloge, Mo., Tuesday morning, November 24, of diphtheria, having been ill only since Sunday.

His body was brought back to Dongola, his former home and a private funeral service was conducted at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. McBride, Thursday afternoon, November 26, at 2 o’clock, Rev. W. J. Ward, pastor of the Baptist Church in Dongola, officiating.  Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.

His father, Mark McBride, preceded him in death several years ago and since his death the family have made their home in Desloge, with Mrs. McBride’s parents.

He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Selma McBride, a younger brother, and his paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. McBride, of Dongola, and his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Graham, of Desloge, Mo., and a number of other relatives.

(His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  James Graham McBride Born Aug. 19, 1922 Died Nov. 24, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. ELIZABETH CORZINE DIES AT HOME IN ANNA WEDNESDAY

Mrs. Elizabeth Corzine passed away at her home in Anna, Illinois Wednesday morning at 11:30 o’clock following an illness of two months.  While her condition was considered serious, yet her death has been a great shock and has brought much sadness to her family and friends.

The body was removed to Mounds and funeral services were held Friday afternoon, November 27, at the First M. E. Church at 2 o’clock, the Rev. Dever, formerly pastor of the Mounds church, but now of Pinckneyville, conducted the funeral.  Interment as made in the cemetery at Mounds by Hartwell and Ryan, undertakers in charge.

Mrs. Corzine is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Amos Burris, of Mounds, Mrs. James M. Johnson, of Carbondale, Mrs. W. P. Lewis, of Anna, and Miss Ethyl Corzine, of St. Louis.  She also leaves two sons, Ward Corzine, of Mounds, and Lloyd Corzine, of Centralia, and four grandchildren, a sister, Mrs. George Resch, of Dongola, and two brothers, Thomas Knupp, of Illmo,. Mo., and Daniel Knupp, of Olmsted, a number of other relatives and friends.

Mrs. Corzine formerly resided in Mounds and a large number of friends in this community are sincerely grieved at her passing.

(Columbus H. Corzine, 25, born in Union Co., Ill., son of Jacob Corzine and Caroline Murphy, married on 28 Dec 1890, in Union Co., Ill., Undine Knupp, 27, born in Wetaug, Ill., daughter of Eli Knupp and Nancy Smoot.  George H. Resh, 23, born in Mississippi son of Georg Resh and Rachel Eubanks, married on 19 Dec 1886, in Union Co., Ill., Melinda Knupp, 18, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Eli Knupp and Nancy Smoot.  According to her death certificate, Elizabeth Undine Corzine was born 7 Mar 1861, in Dongola, Ill., the daughter of Eli Knupp, died 25 Nov 1931, in Anna, Ill., ex-wife of C. H. Corzine, and was buried in Thistlewood Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.  Her marker in Beechwood Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Elizabeth Corzine Born March 7, 1861 Died Nov. 25, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUNDS MAN PASSES AWAY AT ST. MARY’S INFIRMARY

Charles W. Wheeler, age 49 years, of Mounds, passed away Tuesday at St. Mary’s Infirmary, in Cairo.  Mr. Wheeler was the son of the late C. W. and Amanda Wheeler.

Funeral services were held Thursday morning at 10 o’clock at the funeral home of Hartwell and Ryan in Mounds, Rev. Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Mr. Wheeler is survived by his stepmother, Mrs. Agnes Wheeler; two sisters, Mrs. Ella Strauss, of East St. Louis and Mrs. Sarah Dean, of Atlanta, Ga.  He also is survived by four half-brothers, Eugene Wheeler, of Springfield, Illinois, John Wheeler, of San Francisco, Calif., Albert Wheeler, of San Pedro, Calif., and Matthew Wheeler, of Mounds; besides three half-sisters, Mrs. Martha Gannon, and Miss Abbie Wheeler, of Mounds, and Miss Elizabeth Wheeler, of Columbus, Ohio.

(Charles W. Wheeler, 57, born in Stratford, Fairfield Co., Conn., son of Levi Wheeler and Elvira Booth, married 2nd on 18 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Agnes C. Glynn, 26, born in Cairo, Ill., daughter of Michael Glynn and Bridget Fox.—Darrel Dexter)
  
DEATH CLAIMS HENRY S. SALMON AT AGE OF 67

Henry S. Salmon, age 67 years, passed away at the home of his son, Paul Salmon, at Miller City, Wednesday morning, November 25, following a brief illness.

The body was removed to the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Lentz, of Cairo, Thursday and on Friday morning at ten o’clock November 27, the body was taken to Hickman Ky., where funeral services were held at the grave and interment was made in the Hickman cemetery.  A Pentecostal minister of Cairo officiated.

Mr. Salmon was born in Hickman, Ky., in 1864 and spent his boyhood there.  He later moved with his family to Mound City where he spent many years.  About seven years ago he moved to Cairo, later going to Miller City where he has since made his home.

The surviving members of his family are his widow, Mrs. Lucy Salmon, four daughters, Mrs. Frederick Edmond, of Portland, Ore., Mrs. C. E. Barney, of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Hugh Lusk, of Aurora, and Mrs. John Lentz, of Cairo, four sons, Paul, of Miller City, Sam, of Chicago, Harry and William, both of Mound City, besides 22 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.  Treva Salmon, daughter of Mrs. Pearl Salmon, and Paul Salmon, son of Mrs. Hazel Salmon, of this city, are grandchildren of Mr. Salmon.

             (According to his death certificate, Henry S. Salmon was born 8 Feb 1864, in Kentucky, the son of Quint Salmon and Fanny Johnson, natives of Kentucky, died 25 Nov 1931, in Alexander Co., Ill., husband of Lou Salmon—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 4 Dec 1931:
Father of Earl A. Morgan Dies Sunday

A. T. Morgan, of Bone Gap, Ill., father of Earl A. Morgan, died Sunday morning at his home following an illness of about two months, having suffered a stroke of paralysis.  Surviving him are his widow, three sons and a foster son.  Earl, who is now a guard at the Joliet penitentiary, has been at his father’s bedside whenever it was possible.  Mrs. Morgan left Tuesday for Bone Gap to attend the funeral.
 
Mound City Man Commits Suicide Saturday

Everett C. Leonard, 37, ended his life Saturday evening at his home in Mound City by drinking carbolic acid.  He lived only one hour after drinking the poison and never regained consciousness.  He leaves his wife, a baby only a few weeks old, and three children by a former marriage.

Leonard “Buck” as he was familiarly known, was despondent over ill health and unemployment, according to his wife, who stated that he was suffering from tuberculosis and had been told by physicians he would not recover.

Coroner O. T. Hudson was called.  The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of “death by drinking carbolic acid with suicidal intent.”

The body was taken to Metropolis Sunday, where funeral services were held and where burial was made.  Undertaker G. A. James was in charge.
 
Charles W. Wheeler Dies Tuesday Afternoon

Charles W. Wheeler, a prominent farmer living just west of Mounds, died Tuesday afternoon, December 1, at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, following a short illness.

Mr. Wheeler was the son of the late C. W. and Amanda Wheeler.  Surviving him are his stepmother Mrs. Agnes Wheeler; two sisters, Mrs. Ella Strauss, of East St. Louis, Mo., and Mrs. Sarah Dean of Atlanta, Ga.; four half-brothers, Eugene Wheeler, of Springfield, Ill., John Wheeler, of San Francisco, Calif., Albert Wheeler, of San Pedro, Calif., and Mathew Wheeler of Mounds; also three half-sisters, Mrs. Martha Gannon, and Miss Abbie Wheeler, of Mounds, and Miss Elizabeth Wheeler, of Columbus, Ohio.

Funeral services were held Thursday morning at 10 o’clock at the funeral home of Hartwell and Ryan, the Rev. Father Gilmartin officiating.  Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery.  Flowers were omitted by request of the family.
 
Mrs. W. H. Crippen Dies Sunday at Holden Hospital

Mrs. Ida J. Hurst Crippen, wife of W. H. Crippen, of Ullin, died Sunday morning, November 29, 1931, at the Holden Hospital Carbondale.

Mrs. Crippen was a daughter of the late Rev. D. C. and Melvina Hurst, born February 12, 1876, at Makanda, Illinois.  At the age of 12 she received her baptism by her father, joining the Lutheran Church, then after her marriage, she removed her membership to the M. E. Church at Ullin. She was united in marriage to W. H. Crippen, October 23, 1892.  To this union were born fourteen children, seven of whom preceded her in death.  She is survived by her husband, five daughters, Mrs. Ruth McClellan, Reola, Lena, and Wilmont, all of Ullin, and Mrs. Ina Sowers, of Mounds, two sons, Vernon and Curtis, both of Ullin, one sister, Mrs. Mary Morton, of Daisy, Mo., one brother, John Hurst, of Oak Ridge, Mo., and twenty-one grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Ullin, with the Rev. Loar, pastor of the church, in the pulpit.  Interment was made in the Ullin cemetery.
 
Mrs. Elizabeth Corzine Dies Following Long Illness

Mrs. Elizabeth Corzine, for many years a resident of Mounds, died Wednesday, November 25, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Walker T. Lewis, in Anna.  She had been ill for some time.  Following an operation at St. Mary’s hospital, Cairo, she was brought to the home of her son, Ward, where she remained until some three weeks ago, when she was taken to Anna where she had made her home the last two years.

Elizabeth Knupp Corzine was born in Union County March 7, 1861, and died in the same county, November 25, 1931, at the age of 70 years, 3 months and 18 days.

Surviving her are two sons, Lloyd H. Corzine, of Centralia, Ward Corzine, of Mounds, and four daughters, Mrs. Amos B. Burris, of Mounds, Mrs. James M. Johnson, of Carbondale, Mrs. Walker T. Lewis, of Anna, and Miss Ethyl Corzine of St. Louis.  A son, Clyde Corzine, died in 1913 at the age of 21.  She leaves four grandchildren, Carl, Lloyd Jr., and Edward Dee, children of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Corzine, and Kathyrn Burris; a sister, Mrs. George Resch, of Dongola, and two brothers, Thomas Knupp, of Illmo, Mo., and Daniel Knupp, of Olmstead.

Funeral services were conducted at the M. E. Church of Mounds Friday afternoon November 27, at 2 o’clock, the Rev. J. S. Dever, of Pinckneyville officiating. Interment was made in Beechwood Cemetery in charge of Hartwell and Ryan.
 
H. M. Goldsmith Dies Early Tuesday Morning

Harry M. Goldsmith died at his home on South Delaware Avenue early Tuesday morning, December 1, at the age of 72 years.  A former resident of Cairo, he was for many years a postal clerk on the Cotton Belt Railroad.  He had been living in Mounds only a few months.

Surviving are his widow and four children, Mrs. Alice Green, of Memphis, Tenn., Mrs. Myrtle Lane, of Muncie, Ind., Mrs. Ethel Elliott, of Kellogg, Iowa, and Fred Goldsmith, of Gainesville, Fla.
 
Thomas Knupp and son Ralph of Illmo., Mo., were called here by the death of Mr. Knupp’s sister, Mrs. E. Corzine, have returned home.
 
HARRISBURG—Two-year-old Romal Teal, curious about the steam coming from a kettle of boiling water on the kitchen stove, lifted his tiny hand up and grabbed the handle. The kettle fell, splashing boiling water on the child.  He died from burns last night.

Romal lived with his mother, Zola Teal, and his grandfather, W. C. Wilson, who was boiling the water to scald slaughtered hogs with.  Wilson’s farm is 12 miles from here.

(According to his death certificate, Romel Teal was born 19 Apr 1930, in Gordon, Mo., the son of Asco Teal and Zola Wilson, natives of Illinois, died 26 Nov 1931, in Carrier Mills, Ill., and was buried in South Aminson Cemetery at Carrier Mills, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WEST SALEM—An injury received while playing during school caused the death of Bess McConnell, at West Salem Wednesday of last week.

The little girl, a pupil in the fifth grade, of the West Salem schools collided with Deloris Hall, bumping her head.  She went home before school was dismissed, was later taken to a hospital, where it was found she was suffering from a fractured skull.—Grayville Mercury-Ind.

(According to her death certificate, Bessie Lucille McConnell was born 9 Apr 1921, in Parkersburg, Ill., the daughter of Clarence McConnell and Effie Davis, natives of Wayne Co., Ill., died 18 Nov 1931, in Olney, Ill., and was buried in Richland Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. J. L. Coleman was called to Sparta, Ill., on account of the death of her son, Dave Murphy.  (Ullin)
 
Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson, of Carbondale, were called here Friday by the death of Mrs. Johnson’s mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Corzine.
 
Rev. J. S. Dever, of Pinckneyville, was a Mounds visitor Friday, having been called here to conduct the funeral services of Mrs. Elizabeth Corzine.
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Dec 1931:
DEATH CLAIMS MOTHER OF FORMER MOUNDS RESIDENTS

Mrs. Susan Anderson Parham, age 73 years, mother of T. A. and R. J. Parham, who formerly resided in Mounds, passed away at the home of he daughter, Mrs. M. T. McLean, in Jackson, Tenn., Monday night at 10:30 o’clock.

Besides the mentioned she is survived by four other daughters, Mrs. W. J. Coonrey, of Jackson, Mrs. J. F. Greathouse, of Ft. Smith, Ark., Mrs. C. T. Keenan, of Memphis, Tenn., and Mrs. W. E. Carel, of Greenville, Miss.  Also three other sons, J. L. and W. B. Parham, of Jackson, Tenn., and J. D. Parham, of Fulton, Ky., T. A. and R.J., who formerly resided in Mounds now resided in Jackson.  A brother, Neal Anderson, and two sisters, Miss Doon Anderson, of Jackson, and Mrs. C. B. Stout, of Texas, also survive.  Funeral services were held Wednesday, December 2, in the Methodist church at Jackson.
Mrs. Parham was quite well known in Mounds, having visited with her sons several times during their residence in Mounds.
 
DEATH CLAIMS GRAND CHAIN RESIDENT

Mrs. Katherine Mellein, age 73, one of the oldest and most highly respected residents of Grand Chain passed away at her home there at 1 o’clock Saturday morning following a paralytic stoke late Friday.  Mrs. Mellein had been blind since 1904, but in spite of this handicap, she lived alone, did her own work cared for a large flock of chickens and performed other work about her home.  Her husband preceded her in death several years ago.

Mrs. Mellein is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Kate Moore, Mrs. Louise Beshers, Mrs. Mae Evers, of Grand Chain; three sons, Will and Frank Mellein, of Grand Chain, and John Mellein, of Okawville, Illinois.  All the children, with the exception of John, were at the bedside of their mother when the end came.  Three sisters, Mrs. Mary Von Der Ahe, of St. Louis, Mrs. Louise Bennett, of East St. Louis, and Mrs. Atolonia Fresler, of Mounds and one brother, John Maured, Highland, Illinois, also survives.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at 10 o’clock at the Catholic Church, Rev. Father Orlett officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery by Undertaker G. A. James of Mound City.

(Andreas Mellein married Catharina Maurer on 13 Jan 1874, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  According to his death certificate, Katherine Mellein was born 8 May 1853, in Belleville, Ill., the daughter of Sebastian Maruier and Katherine Phillips, natives of France, died 5 Dec 1931, in Grand Chain, Ill.  John Melline 57, of New Madrid, Mo., born in Belleville, Ill., the son of Jacob Mellein and Maria Kuhn, married 2nd on 29 Oct 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mrs. Katie Melline, 42, born in Millstadt, Ill., daughter of Sebastian Maurer and Katharina Philip.  John Andrew Melline, 23, born in Belleville, Ill., son of Andrew Melline and Cath. Maurer, married on 20 Apr 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Tillie Diehl, 18, born in Belleville, Ill., daughter of William Diehl and Charlotte Vogt.  J. B. Eves, 24, of Grand Chain, Ill., married on 1 Feb 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Mary Melline, 17, of Grand Chain Ill.  Benjamin Evers, 22, of Grand Chain, Ill., married on 13 Jan 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill., Katie Melline, 18, of Grand Chain, Ill.  William Vonderae married Mary Maurer on 24 Jan 1880, in St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DEATH CLAIMS AGED MOUND CITY RESIDENT SATURDAY

Samuel Wright, age 83 years, passed away at his home on South First Street in this city Saturday morning at 3:20 o’clock following a lingering illness.

Mr. Wright was born in Creal Springs, Illinois, and moved to Grand Chain when a young man.  He resided in Grand Chain for several years and about fifteen years ago moved to Mound City, where he has since resided.

Surviving Mr. Wright are his widow, Mrs. Ann Starks Wright; a son, Rew Wright, of Mound City; a daughter, Mrs. Fred Weaver, of Evansville, Ind.; a brother, Francis Wright, of Marion, Illinois; four grandchildren, Mrs. Grace Robinson, of Mound City, Mrs. Ethel Barnett, of Villa Ridge, Miss Ella Weaver, and John Weaver, of Evansville, Ind.; and a great-grandson, Max Robinson, of Mound City.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence, Rev. G. S. Humphrey, pastor of the First M. E. Church officiating.  Rev. Humphrey’s remarks were very appropriate and impressive.  The church choir sang two beautiful hymns, “Rock of Ages” and “In the Hour of Trial.”  The floral offerings were abundant and beautiful.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Grand Chain under the direction of G. A. James, undertaker of Mound City. Casket bearers were Harry Darragh, Rohan Lutz, James Hayden, Joe Lutz, Carl McIntire, and S. F. McIntire.

The funeral party was met at the cemetery at Grand Chain by Mr. Wright’s brother, Francis Wright, and daughter, of Marion.

The funeral was largely attended in Mound City by friends of Mr. Wright and his family. At Grand Chain the funeral party was met at the cemetery by a large number of old friends of the Wright family.  Mr. Wright was highly respected in the communities in which he spent his life and the bereaved family have the sympathy of all.

(According to his death certificate, Samuel Wright, a livestock dealer, was born 13 Nov 1849, in Illinois, the son of John Wright, a native of Ireland, and Mary Arnel, a native of Illinois, and died 5 Dec 1931, in Mound City, Ill., the husband of Ann Wright.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads Samuel Wright 1849-1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. VILMA MELTON, MOUNDS PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Vilma V. Melton, age 46 years, prominent resident of Mounds, passed away at her home Saturday following a brief illness. Her sudden death came as a great shock to her family and friend as she had always enjoyed perfect health.  Acute indigestion was the cause of her death.

Mrs. Melton, who before her marriage was Miss Vilma V. Dacus, was born January 20, 1885, near New Albany, Miss.  She was united in marriage to Herbert A. Melton, of Mounds, February 24, 1909, and to this union four children were born, Holloway, Harold, Mildred, and Juanita, all of who reside in Mounds.

Mrs. Melton was a member of the First M. E. Church of Mounds and had been active in church work since girlhood.

Besides her husband and children, Mrs. Melton is survived by her mother, Mrs. W. L. Dacus, of Drew, Miss., and B. B. Dacus, of Inverness, Miss.  She also leaves a number of nieces and nephews.  Her father and six brothers preceded her in death several years ago.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the First Methodist Church, with the Rev. D. W. Richardson officiating.  Interment was made in the cemetery at Mounds.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(According to her death certificate, Velma V. Melton was born 20 Jan 1885, in Fayette Co., Miss., the daughter of Tempie Holloway, and died 5 Dec 1931, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of H. A. Melton.  Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Herbert A. Melton 1875-1954 Velma D. Melton 1885-193.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Those from this city who attended the funeral of Harry M. Goldsmith, which was held at Mounds Thursday afternoon, were Rev. G. W. Humphrey, William Smithie, Jesse Cunningham, Arthur Henning, and Oscar Atherton.
 
Mrs. Lottie Ashworth and grandson, Paul Salmon, were in Cairo Friday morning, where they attended the funeral of the latter’s grandfather, Henry Salmon.

 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 11 Dec 1931:
Infant Dies Thursday

The six-month-old infant of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Lindsey died Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Lindsey’s brother, Henry Powell, on the Thistlewood place.  Arrangements for the funeral have not been completed.
 
Josephine Huddleston Passes to Beyond Dec. 3

Mrs. Josephine Huddleston, colored, died Thursday, December 3, 1931, after an illness of more than a year.  She was born in Mounds, Ill., February 27, 1904.

Surviving her are her husband, John Huddleston, of La Porte, Ind., her father, Wren Harris; mother, Georgia Harris; four brothers, Frank, Charlie, Sam and Roy; two sisters, Blanche Davis, of St. Louis, and Hazel Hill, of Philadelphia, Pa.; two daughters, Hazel and Ilene Huddleston.

Funeral services were held at the home of her father on Monday, December 7.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery with Donaldson and Ingram in charge.

(According to her death certificate, Josephine Huddleston was born 26 Feb 1904, in Mounds Ill., the daughter of Wren Harris, a native of Essaquina Co., Miss., and Georgia Brass, a native of Hopkinsville, Ky., black, died 3 Dec 1931, in Mounds, Ill., the wife of John Huddleston, and was buried at Villa Ridge, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Former Mounds Man Dies at Age of Eighty-three

Samuel Wright, a former resident of Mounds, died Saturday, December 5, at his home in Mound City, at the ripe old age of 83.  He had been ill for some months.

Mr. Wright a native of Pulaski County was born in Grand Chain, where he lived for many years.  Since leaving there he has lived in Mounds and Mound City.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Annie Wright; a son, Rew Wright, of Mound City; a daughter, Mrs. Fred Weaver, of Evansville, Ind.; a brother, Francis Wright, of Marion; four grandchildren, Mrs. Grace Robinson, of Mound City, Mrs. John Barnett, of Villa Ridge, Miss Ella Weaver, and John Weaver, of Evansville, and a great-grandson, Max Robinson of Mound City.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the family residence in Mound city with interment in the Grand Chain cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.
 
Untimely Death of Mrs. H. A. Melton Grieves Entire Community

Mrs. Velma Dacus Melton, ill only one day, died Saturday evening near 9 o’clock at her home on Blanche Avenue.  She had suffered an attack of acute indigestion and, seemingly, had rallied.  Without warning, her heart failed and mortal became immortal.  The shock to her family and friends was almost too great to bear.  Mrs. Melton had never known serious illness, and death seemed something far removed from her in the thought of those accustomed to her presence.

Velma Dacus, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Dacus, was born January 20, 1885, near New Albany, Miss., and died Dec. 5, 1931, at Mounds, Ill.  She was united in marriage to Herbert A. Melton, of Mounds, February 24, 1909. Since that time they had made their home in Mounds.  Four children blessed this union, Holloway, Harold, Mildred, and Juanita.  Besides caring for her family and her home, Mrs. Melton gave much time and thought to the work of the church of her choice, the Methodist Episcopal.
Surviving her are her husband and children, her mother, who lived with A. H. Dacus, of Drew, Miss., and B. B. Dacus, of Inverness, Miss.  Her father and six brothers preceded her in death.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. Church which was filled long before the hour set.  The brief obituary was read by the Rev. Paul Galloway, of Joiner, Ark., the prayer was offered by the Rev. H. B. Shoaff, of DuQuoin, a former pastor of the Mounds church, and the sermon was delivered by the Rev. W. D. Richardson, the present pastor.  Interment was made in the Spencer Heights Cemetery directed by W. D. Gates, for G. A. James, who had charge of three funerals that day.

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral were A. H. Dacus, Drew, Miss.; R. B. Dacus, Inverness, Miss.; H. C. Melton, Joiner, Ark; Leonard and Gilbert Melton, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Russell Terrell, Chicago; Grover Chandler, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Chandler, Mr. and Mrs. Jess Taylor, Mrs. Bertha Brooks, Raymond Rudd, Mr. and Mrs. Homer Rudd, Mrs. M. A. Melton, all of Martin, Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. John Rich, Carbondale, Mr. and Mrs. T. Olson, Centralia; Rev. and Mrs. H. B. Shoaff, and sons, Carl and Ray Shoaff, DuQuoin Rev. Paul Galloway, Joiner, Ark., and Elizabeth Wash, Martin, Tenn.
 
Sister of Mounds Resident Dies in Grand Chain

Mrs. Katherine Mellein, 78, Grand Chain, sister of Mrs. Apolonia Trexler, of this city, died at her home Friday, December 4, 1931, following a paralytic stroke of a week before.

She was a pioneer resident of her community and had the high regard of all who knew her.  Although she had been blind for 27 years, she lived alone, doing all her work and caring for a large flock of chickens.  She had been a widow for a number of years.

Surviving Mrs. Mellein are three daughters, Mrs. Kate Moore, Mrs. Louise Beshers, and Mrs. Mark Evers, all of Grand Chain; three sons, Will and Frank Mellein, of Grand Chain, and John Mellein of Okawville, Ill.,   She also leaves three sisters, Mrs. Apolonia Trexler, of Mounds, Mrs. Mary Von Der Abe, of St. Louis and Mrs. Louise Bennett, East St. Louis, and one brother, John Maured, of Highland, Ill.  She was an aunt of Mrs. H. C. Moore, of this city.

Funeral services were held in Grand Chain Monday morning at 10 o’clock, the Rev. Father Orlett officiating.  Interment was made in the Grand Chain cemetery.
 
Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Brelsford, of America, attended the funeral of Mrs. H. A. Melton held at the M. E. Church Monday afternoon.
 
Rev. and Mrs. H. B. Shoaff, of DuQuoin, were called to Mounds Monday by the death of Mrs. H. A.  Melton.
 
Appreciation

We wish to express our sincere thanks to the citizens of Mounds and surrounding communities for their sympathy following the death of our loving wife and mother.

Realizing that you did not expect this to entirely heal a wound of this kind, we would like for you to know that it makes us feel grateful that we have had the companion and mother that received the respect from a community that our loved one did.

We went the community in and about which we are living to know that we appreciate this to the extent that we will hold this a grateful remembrance in connection with the loss of our loved one.
H. A. Melton and Family
Mrs. W. L. Dacus
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Dec 1931:
___ BLAND, COLORED CONTRACTOR, PASSES AWAY

___ Bland, well known and highly respected colored man of ____, passed away at Gary, Ind., ____y and his remains were brought to Mound City Tuesday and ___ Thursday afternoon at 12:30.  Funeral services were held at Missionary Baptist Church, ___fe officiating.  Interment was made in the cemetery at ____.

Deceased is survived by his wife, one son, one sister and an aged mother, besides several other relatives.

He was 48 years of age and was a ___own cemetery contractor of ___y for many years.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(This may be the same person as John Bland, 50, born in Tennessee, plasterer, negro, who is in the 1930 census of Mound City, Ill., with his wife, Dollie, 35, born in Illinois.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JESSE A. ELLER DIES AT HOME IN PERKS

Jesse A. Eller, age 27, passed away at the home of his parents, in Perks, Illinois, Sunday morning, December 13.  He had been ill for about eight months following an operation for appendicitis.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at 11 o’clock at the Pentecostal church in Perks, the Rev. Langston, officiating.  Interment was made in the Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola.  E. J. Ford of Dongola directed the funeral.

Mr. Eller is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Eller, of Perks, one brother and one sister and a number of other relatives and friends.

(According to his death certificate, Jessie Adams Eller was born 31 May 1904, in Dongola, Ill., the son of David Eller and Mary A. Dry, natives of Illinois, died 13 Dec 1931, in Pulaski Co., Ill., the husband of Jessie May Neely, and was buried in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Jessie A. Eller Born May 31, 1904 Died Dec. 13, 1931.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Mounds Independent, Friday, 18 Dec 1931: